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Barry McGuire - The Eve Of Destruction Man (1965)

Barry McGuire - The Eve Of Destruction Man (1965)


Barry McGuire - 'The Eve Of Destruction Man' (Ember Records EMB 3362)

Barry McGuire - The Eve Of Destruction Man (1965)


01 - Greenback Dollar
02 - Doo Dah
03 - Little Boy
04 - Town And Country
05 - So Long, Stay Well
06 - The Banjo Song
07 - The Way You Are
08 - Good Times Is All Done Now
09 - Another Country
10 - Oh, Miss Mary
11 - Far Side Of The Hill
12 - Old Paint

Along with Bob Dylan's emergence came countless other folk-based "protest singers" in the early to mid-'60s, including Barry McGuire. Born in Oklahoma City during 1935, McGuire had relocated to New York City and joined up with folk revivalists the New Christy Minstrels by the early '60s. He was anointed the band's lead singer and appeared on several albums and their first hit single, "Green, Green" (which was co-penned by McGuire). Soon after, however, McGuire caught the attention of both record producer Lou Adler and singer/songwriter P.F. Sloan, resulting in the guitarist/singer leaving the New Christy Minstrels and launching a solo career, signing on with Adler's Dunhill Records. McGuire's solo debut, The Barry McGuire Album, was released in 1963, but it wasn't until two years later that McGuire scored a massive hit with the Sloan-penned track "Eve of Destruction," which topped the U.S. charts (peaking at number three in the U.K.) and was taken from his sophomore full-length, Barry McGuire Featuring Eve of Destruction. McGuire became good friends with another Adler-guided outfit, the Mamas & the Papas (who mentioned him in some of their song lyrics), while further solo albums were issued, including This Precious Time and The World's Last Private Citizen, but none spawned any singles as successful as "Eve." By the early '70s, McGuire had turned his back on folk music and he re-appeared as a Christian/gospel artist, signing on with the Myrrh label and issuing such standout albums as 1973's Seeds, 1975's Lighten Up, and a live recording, 1982's To the Bride, among countless others. McGuire put his music career on hold and moved to New Zealand in the mid-'80s with his wife, where they remained until 1990, working with the poverty organization World Vision. Upon his return, McGuire began issuing albums once more, including such titles as El Dorado, Let's Tend God's Earth, Adventures on Son Mountain, and Journey to Bible Times, before teaming up with another gospel singer/guitarist, Terry Talbot, to form an outfit called Talbot McGuire.


The Cowsills - On My Side (1971)

The Cowsills - On My Side (1971)


 Cowsills - On My Side (London Records SHA-U 124)

The Cowsills - On My Side (1971)


01 - On My Side
02 - Once There Was A Time
03 - If You Can't Have It - Knock It
04 - Contact Mae
05 - Can You Love?
06 - The Mystery Of Life
07 - Heather Says
08 - There Is A Child
09 - Dover Mine
10 - Cheatin' On Me
11 - Down On The Farm
12 - Good Ole Rock And Roll Song


The Cowsills are an American singing group from Newport, Rhode Island who were the inspiration for the television series, The Partridge Family. The band was formed in the spring of 1965 by brothers Bill Cowsill, Bob Cowsill and Barry Cowsill, then shortly after, added John Cowsill. After their initial success, the brothers were later joined by their siblings Susan Cowsill and Paul Cowsill and their mother, Barbara. Bob's twin brother Richard (who died on 08-Jul-2014) was the road manager.


The Crickets - A Collection (1965)

The Crickets - A Collection (1965)


The Crickets - A Collection (Liberty LBY 1258)

The Crickets - A Collection (1965)


01 - La Bamba
02 - All Over You
03 - Everybody's Got A Little Problem
04 - I Think I've Caught The Blues
05 - We Gotta Get Together
06 - Playboy
07 - Lonely Avenue
08 - My Little Girl
09 - Teardrops Fall Like Rain
10 - Right Or Wrong
11 - You Can't Be In Between
12 - Don't Try To Change Me
13 - Lost And Alone
14 - I'm Not A Bad Guy

US American band, which started in the 1950s with members: Buddy Holly (real name: Charles Hardin Holley) (vocals/guitar), Jerry Allison (drums), Niki Sullivan (guitar) and Joe Mauldin (bass). Member Niki Sullivan left in 1958 and Buddy Holly died in 1959. Afterwards the band was kept alive by Jerry Allison, who still recorded and toured with various line-ups, including some with the early sixties personnel.



Lee Hazlewood - Friday's Child (1966)

Lee Hazlewood - Friday's Child (1966)


Lee Hazlewood - Friday's Child  (Reprise RS 6163)

Lee Hazlewood - Friday's Child (1966)


01 - Friday's Child
02 - Hutchinson Jail
03 - By The Way
04 - Four Kinds Of Lonely
05 - Houston
06 - Sally Was A Good Old Girl
07 - Since You're Gone
08 - A Real Live Fool
09 - I'm Blue
10 - The Fool
11 - That Old Freight Train
12 - Me And Charlie


Country and pop iconoclast Lee Hazlewood was one of the music world's most irascible geniuses during a long, fruitful career. An Oklahoma Dust Bowl refugee who grew up to become a dedicated Europhile; a production heavyweight who authored success stories for Duane Eddy and Nancy Sinatra, but also a recording eccentric who refused to acknowledge mainstream tastes; a songwriter capable of crippling fatalism ("My Autumn's Done Come") and playful country corn ("Dolly Parton's Guitar"), and songs that use elements of both ("Dark in My Heart"); it's all part of the highly contradictory legend of Hazlewood.

Hazlewood was born Barton Lee Hazlewood in 1929 in Mannford, Oklahoma. (A 1968 recording even took his birthplace as its title.) His father, an oil man, moved the family around continually during the 1930s and '40s while looking for work -- with stops in Arkansas, Kansas, and Louisiana -- before landing on the Gulf Coast in Port Neches, Texas. Hazlewood enrolled at Southern Methodist planning to study medicine but was conscripted soon after; he married his high-school sweetheart, Naomi Shackleford, and spent several years overseas, spinning records in Japan for Armed Services Radio but also on active duty in Korea.

Returning from the war, the Hazlewoods moved to California and then Coolidge, Arizona, where Lee used a short stint in broadcasting school to land a job with a local radio station. His playlists eventually gravitated toward rock & roll, and following a move to Phoenix several years later, he began producing tracks for his own label, Viv, in 1955. One year later, he wrote a song called "The Fool" and hired local country singer Sanford Clark to record it. Hazlewood's innovative recording techniques -- heavily echoed, in similar fashion to Sam Phillips' work at Sun -- turned the single into an unlikely Midwestern regional favorite and a national hit after it was reissued by Dot. It eventually peaked inside the Top Ten. Clark failed to repeat its success, however, and a Dot production deal for Hazlewood also fizzled, even after he moved back to California. He then hooked up with entrepreneur Lester Sill, who had previously been partners with Leiber & Stoller and was still managing the Coasters. Hazlewood cut some tracks back in Phoenix, including a few bizarre guitar-effects records by local sensation Duane Eddy. Eddy, an unlikely signee to Jamie Records (co-owned by Dick Clark), hit the big time with "Rebel Rouser" and went on to notch 15 singles in the Top 40. (Hazlewood's influence extended to an associate of Sill's named Phil Spector: Spector visited the studio in Phoenix to study Hazlewood's taping techniques, and his first productions appeared on the Trey label owned by Hazlewood and Sill.)

With success came a series of complications, however, beginning with Eddy's decision to produce himself, after an argument concerning royalties. Then, Sill began focusing his patronage on Spector in the wake of his increasing production acumen during the early '60s. While the duo formed their own Philles label, Hazlewood was having little success with his productions, which included another brief stint with Eddy, longtime friend Al Casey (who had a moderate hit with "Surfin' Hootenanny"), and his own folk-pop group, the Shacklefords.

In 1963, Hazlewood booked some time at Western Studios (the site of a few Brian Wilson/Beach Boys classics) and recorded the tracks for his first solo LP, Trouble Is a Lonesome Town. A concept record centered on the eccentric residents of a small Western burg, it introduced Hazlewood's distinctive performing talents. A keen observer of human behavior with a talent for storytelling, he dryly told despairing tales of hard-bitten small-town characters and prefaced each song with a few knowing words about its subject. It wasn't a formula for pop success, but Mercury A&R man Jack Tracy believed in the record and released it with little interference.
After a year-long break from recording of any kind, he returned to the studio in 1965 when he was asked by Jimmy Bowen from Reprise to produce Dino, Desi & Billy -- a trio of Hollywood teens with royal blood (the first two were the sons of Dean Martin and Desi Arnaz, respectively). Hazlewood recorded a pair of Top 40 hits, "I'm a Fool" and "Our Time's Coming," and one of his compositions, "Houston," was recorded for a hit by Martin himself. Reprise showed their gratitude by allowing him to record his second LP, The N.S.V.I.P.'s ("The Not-So-Very-Important People"), in 1965. Also, Hazlewood was duly apportioned the career of Nancy Sinatra, another blue-blooded child who had been at Reprise for four years without earning a hit. By the end of 1965, she reached the pop charts with "So Long Babe." One year later, Sinatra became an international superstar thanks to the cultural milestone "These Boots Are Made for Walkin'." Hazlewood's other production chart-topper was "Somethin' Stupid," featuring a duet with Nancy and father Frank.
After another record for Reprise (Friday's Child), his publisher found him a contract with MGM, and he released two LPs in two years: 1966's The Very Special World of Lee Hazlewood and 1967's Lee Hazlewood-ism: Its Cause and Cure. (A planned third record, 1968's Something Special, wasn't actually heard until decades later.) These two comprised the best work of his (solo) career, a collection of desert-dry ballads of the dust boasting a healthy dose of Western fatalism and wanderlust and given impeccable productions that ranged from cowboy minimalism to overblown brassy pop. They were also a place to flesh out material he would later produce for Sinatra, like "Sand" and "Summer Wine." When the latter, a Nancy & Lee duet tacked onto the B-side of a 1966 Sinatra single, became a hit one year later, it sparked a full-fledged duet album. Nancy & Lee sold a million copies during 1968 and earned its place as one of the most influential records associated with either Sinatra or Hazlewood; "Some Velvet Morning," a haunting hymn to the twilight, became an alternative classic thanks to airings, not as much by contemporaries (Vanilla Fudge, Gabor Szabo) as by second- and third-generation inheritors (Lydia Lunch, Thin White Rope, Slowdive, Primal Scream).
Also in 1968, Hazlewood the solo artist returned (briefly) to Reprise to issue Love and Other Crimes, another vaguely conceptual record featuring some solid material (though little compared to his MGM work). He also formed his own imprint, LHI (Lee Hazlewood Industries), which most famously signed the International Submarine Band featuring Gram Parsons but later refused to release Parsons' contract so his work with the Byrds could appear on the country-rock classic Sweetheart of the Rodeo. His own LHI debut was 1969's The Cowboy & the Lady, recorded with another female foil, Ann-Margret. (The album, which developed something of a cult following, was reissued in 2017, as was 1969's Forty.)
Increasingly, though, Hazlewood appeared restless in Southern California, recording a few sessions for country stars (including Eddy Arnold and Waylon Jennings) but gradually spending more time in Europe -- especially Sweden. During 1970, he recorded Cowboy in Sweden, the first of several collaborations with Swedish director Torbjörn Axelman. (Hazlewood even earned a Golden Rose at the Montreux Festival in 1973.) The same year, Requiem for an Almost Lady etched onto wax his breakup with Suzi Jane Hokom, who had duetted on several of his MGM singles. More and more, his records weren't even being released in America, though he continued to do solid work -- 1973's Poet, Fool or Bum was one of the best of his career.
After his recording career began drifting during the late '70s, Hazlewood retired briefly but resurfaced in 1995, touring America with Sinatra after her comeback album, One More Time. He also contributed two vocal tracks to the Casey album Sidewinder, recorded in Phoenix and released in 1995 by the German label Bear Family. After his peak in the late '60s, however, Hazlewood had been revered by figures in the alternative scene ranging from Nick Cave to Tindersticks to Lambchop. In 1999, Smells Like Records (founded by Steve Shelley of Sonic Youth) began reissuing several of Hazlewood's classic LPs, and also released his first new album in 20 years, Farmisht, Flatulence, Origami, ARF!!! and Me...
In the mid-2000s, Hazlewood was diagnosed with terminal renal cancer; nevertheless, he released a new record, Cake or Death, in late 2006. The end finally came on August 4, 2007. After his death, there was a steady stream of archival releases. Rhino released Strung Out on Something New: The Reprise Recordings in 2008, but Light in the Attic wound up diving deep into the vaults, starting with 2012's The LHI Years: Singles, Nudes & Backsides (1968-71). The following year brought the lavish box set There's a Dream I've Been Saving: 1966-1971, a comprehensive anthology of his record label, LHI. In 2018, Light in the Attic released 400 Miles from L.A.: 1955-56, which chronicled his earliest songwriting demos.

Badfinger (The Tragic Story of)


Badfinger (The Tragic Story of)



Badfinger (The Tragic Story of)


Badfinger were a Welsh/English rock band formed in Swansea that were active from the 1960s to the 1980s. Their best-known lineup consisted of Pete Ham, Mike Gibbins, Tom Evans, and Joey Molland. They are recognised for their influence on the 1970s power pop genre.

The band evolved from an earlier group called the Iveys, formed in 1961, which became the first group signed by the Beatles' Apple label in 1968. The band renamed themselves Badfinger, after the working title for the Beatles' 1967 song "With a Little Help from My Friends" ("Bad Finger Boogie"). From 1968 to 1973, Badfinger recorded five albums for Apple and toured extensively, before they became embroiled in the chaos of Apple Records' dissolution.

Badfinger had four consecutive worldwide hits from 1970 to 1972: "Come and Get It" (written and produced by Paul McCartney, 1970), "No Matter What" (produced by Mal Evans, 1970), "Day After Day" (produced by George Harrison, 1971), and "Baby Blue" (produced by Todd Rundgren, 1972). Their song "Without You" (1970) has been recorded many times, and became a US number-one hit for Harry Nilsson and, decades later, a UK number-one for Mariah Carey.

After Apple Records folded in 1973, Badfinger struggled with a host of legal, managerial and financial issues, leading to Ham's taking his own life in 1975. Over the next three years, the surviving members struggled to rebuild their personal and professional lives against a backdrop of lawsuits, which tied up the songwriters' royalty payments for years. Their subsequent albums floundered, as Molland and Evans alternated between cooperation and conflict in their attempts to revive and capitalise on the Badfinger legacy. In 1983, Evans also died by suicide.
Former member Joey Molland continues to tour under the name Joey Molland's Badfinger in the United States. In 2015, former member Bob Jackson formed his own version of Badfinger with current members Andy Nixon, Michael Healey, and Ted Duggan to honour the memory of Pete Ham, Tom Evans, and Mike Gibbins and undertook a 23 date UK theatre tour, playing to over 20,000 people. In 2016 the band continued to play UK shows.

Tracklist

1 –Pete Ham Man Without A Heart
2 –The Iveys Taxi
3 –The Iveys Take Good Care Of My Baby
4 –The Iveys She Came Out Of The Cold
5 –Pete Ham Knocking Down Our Home
6 –The Iveys Clown Of The Party
7 –The Iveys Maybe Tomorrow
8 –The Iveys Midnight Sun
9 –Pete Ham Take It All
10 –Pete Ham Radio & Backstage Interviews With Pete Ham: June 25, 1972
11 –Tom Evans Blind Owl
12 –Pete Ham, Tom Evans Hotel Interview With Pete Ham, Tom Evans: March 29, 1974
13 –Pete Ham Steve Craiter Phone Call: October 27, 1974
14 –Badfinger Hey, Mr. Manager
15 –Pete Ham Ringside
16 –The Dodgers I Believe In Love
17 –Tom Evans Steve Craiter Phone Call, May 1983
18 –Tom Evans Steve Craiter Phone Call: August 19, 1983
19 –Tom Evans, Rod Roach Over You

Enjoy

"I hope for nothing, I fear nothing, I am free"

Ty To Original Sharer

VA - Beatles Lieder Auf Deutsch / Beatles Songs Auf Deutsch

VA - Beatles Lieder Auf Deutsch / Beatles Songs Auf Deutsch





Beatles Songs Auf Deutsch : Das War Ein HarterTag Vol. 1

VA - Beatles Lieder Auf Deutsch / Beatles Songs Auf Deutsch

VA - Beatles Lieder Auf Deutsch / Beatles Songs Auf Deutsch


Sure, to people outside Germany the concept of this 30-song compilation might seem daft: 1960s recordings by German artists, singing in German, covering Beatles songs. For someone looking for wacky and interesting Beatles-related ephemera, though, it's actually quite a fun listen, if nothing you would place among the best Beatles covers ever (let alone anything close to the original versions). You haven't heard of any of these singers unless you were living in Germany then (and maybe even if you were living in Germany then). For some reason, Didi & Die ABC Boys are heavily represented, with no less than nine songs. You won't get any help from the liner notes, which are brief, do not contain details on the artists, and (if you don't speak the language) are in German. Anyway, the pleasure, such as it is, in listening to this is in the unexpected weird variations. Sometimes, for instance, the verse-chorus structure will be messed with a little, or a little bit of the song (usually the chorus) will be sung in English and the rest translated into German. And even for those English fragments, considerable liberties are taken: the title phrase of "Love Me Do" is changed by Didi & Die ABC Boys to "I love you," for instance, and Howard Carpendale sings "life is cra-zee" instead of "life goes on, bra" in the chorus to "Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da." In at least one case, speaking and singing German turns out to be a definite advantage: in Bill Ramsey's "Yellow Submarine," the German U-boat dialogue in the instrumental break sounds, perhaps unsurprisingly, really convincing. All kidding aside, it's a true testament to the strength of the Beatles' melodies that even when sung in German, and by rather second- and third-rate acts, the tracks are still usually just plain enjoyable (and better than Bear Family's sequel compilation that also adheres to this concept, Sie Liebt Dich Jeah Jeah Jeah: Weitere Beatles Songs Auf Deutsch). It's also a credit to this compilation that it contains versions of some Beatles songs that were rarely covered by anyone in any language, like "I'll Get You," "It Won't Be Long," "There's a Place" (some really screechy female singers on this one, backing Hermann Van Keeken), and "Two of Us." To no one's reasonable objection, the concept is stretched a little bit to include four songs that, strictly speaking, aren't Beatles covers: versions of "Twist and Shout" (modeled on the Beatles' own cover), Claudia Gordon's "Goodbye" (a Lennon-McCartney number that had been a hit for Mary Hopkin, but was never recorded by the Beatles), and two 1963 Beatles "tribute" records, auf Deutsch of course.

Weitere Beatles Songs Auf Deutsch: Sie Liebt Dich  
Jeah, Jeah, Jeah   Vol.3

VA - Beatles Lieder Auf Deutsch / Beatles Songs Auf Deutsch

VA - Beatles Lieder Auf Deutsch / Beatles Songs Auf Deutsch

If you're looking for a gift for the Beatles-maniac who has everything, you could do worse than choose this 25-song compilation of German Beatles covers from the 1960s and early '70s. These were both made in Germany and sung in German; even American Peggy March qualifies, with her 1972 Deutsch-sung cover of "Eleanor Rigby." We're not talking any feats of brilliance here; it's just weird and fun to hear tunes like "I Call Your Name," "You're Going to Lose That Girl," "Things We Said Today," and even Lennon-McCartney songs that the Beatles didn't do ("World Without Love," "Bad to Me") performed earnestly (and sometimes stiff as a board) in an unfamiliar tongue. There are even some rare examples of East German beat from the Electra Combo and the notorious Theo Schumann; the lugubrious '70s covers by the dreaded German schlagers (as MOR vocalists were called over there) even have some campy charm, as on Mary Roos' easy listening cover of "And I Love Her." How often, after all, do you get to hear "Carry That Weight" or "Maxwell's Silver Hammer" in German? The compilers stretch the format a bit with some Beatles tribute records, as well as a cover of "Money" that was probably inspired by the Beatles' rendition rather than the original. With 25 songs and nearly 70 minutes, it certainly doesn't lack value for money. This is, by the way, a sequel to a similar Bear Family compilation, Das War Ein Harter Tag.

Noch Mehr Beatles Songs Auf Deutsch:Eleanor Rigby Vol.3

VA - Beatles Lieder Auf Deutsch / Beatles Songs Auf Deutsch

VA - Beatles Lieder Auf Deutsch / Beatles Songs Auf Deutsch

A faint sense of desperation leaks into the third volume of Bear Family's series of German-language covers (principally though not exclusively from the 1960s) of Beatles songs, following 1995's Das War Ein Harter Tag: Beatles Lieder Auf Deutsch and 1997's Sie Liebt Dich: Weitere Beatles Songs Auf Deutsch. You get the feeling the compilers were really scrambling to fill out the 26-track program this time around, including more songs from the 1970s (one from as late as 1978) and padding out the set with a higher quotient of Beatles tributes/novelties. There are, too, a few other songs that are not exactly Beatles covers, those being some early-'70s interpretations of early John Lennon, Paul McCartney, and George Harrison solo efforts. And finally, some of the selections are not so much Beatles covers as they are covers of songs the Beatles also covered, and not necessarily based on the Beatles' versions. Jan and Kjeld's "Ein Kuss Zum Abschied," for instance, is clearly modeled on Herb Alpert's "A Taste of Honey," not the 1963 interpretation of that same tune by the Beatles. A German-language 1969 cover of "Twist & Shout" by the very British Cliff Richard stretches the concept almost to its breaking point. It's silly to apply schoolmaster-like rules to anthologies like this, of course, which by their very nature are only out for a bit of silly fun. More problematically, however, there's not much fun to be had from the music, either on artistic or novelty/kitsch grounds. The covers are usually middle-of-the-road pop arrangements or unmemorably crude early Beatles-styled pseudo-British beat. There are also a couple of really inept ones to supply a few cheap yuks, those being Die Beat-Oma's Mrs. Miller-like warble through "Ich Bin Die Beat-Oma" (to the tune of "A Hard Day's Night") and Die 3 Spitzbuben's "Michelle," played in the manner of a lounge accordion trio, apparently with liberal comedic translation judging from the uproarious audience laughter, though the humor will be entirely lost on non-German speakers. Speaking of getting lost in the translation, even the titles let you know that much liberties were taken for many of these German recordings, with, for instance, "My Sweet Lord" translated as "Wo Ist Er" (where is he), "What Is Life" as "Nimm Die Welt Wie Sie Ist" (take the world as it is), "Penny Lane" as "Reeperbahn" (!), and "Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey" as "Von Calais nach Dover" (double !). Winding the CD down are a half-dozen Beatle tribute discs, some of them early Beatles cash-ins along the lines of "Baby Beatle Song" and "Crazy Beatle Boots," and other drearier 1970s homages include Marianne Rosenberg's "Mr. Paul McCartney." This will fill out the collection of fans obsessed with Beatles ephemera, but even more than its two predecessors, it's more something to collect than to enjoy.



The Dave Clark Five - Complete collection (Vol.1 - Vol.9)

The Dave Clark Five -  Complete collection (Vol.1 - Vol.9)

The Dave Clark Five -  Complete collection (Vol.1 - Vol.9)



For a very brief time in 1964, it seemed that the biggest challenger to the Beatles' phenomenon was the Dave Clark Five. From the Tottenham area of London, the quintet had the fortune to knock "I Want to Hold Your Hand" off the top of the British charts with "Glad All Over," and were championed (for about 15 minutes) by the British press as the Beatles' most serious threat. They were the first British Invasion band to break in a big way in the States after the Beatles, though the Rolling Stones and others quickly supplanted the DC5 as the Fab Four's most serious rivals. the Dave Clark Five reached the Top 40 17 times between 1964 and 1967 with memorable hits like "Glad All Over," "Bits and Pieces," "Because," and a remake of Bobby Day's "Over and Over," as well as making more appearances on The Ed Sullivan Show than any other English act. the DC5 were distinguished from their British contemporaries by their larger-than-life production, Clark's loud stomping drum sound, and Mike Smith's leathery vocals. Though accused by detractors of lacking finesse and hipness, they had a solid ear for melodies and harmonies and wrote much of their early material, the best of which endured quite well. Interestingly, and unusually for that era, bandleader Dave Clark managed and produced the band himself, negotiating a much higher royalty rate than artists of that period usually received. After a couple years of superstardom, the group proved unable to either keep up with the changing times or maintain a high standard of original compositions, and called it quits in 1970.




Dave Clark Five - Complete vol. 1 


The Dave Clark Five -  Complete collection (Vol.1 - Vol.9)

The Dave Clark Five -  Complete collection (Vol.1 - Vol.9)


 1  -  Chaquita
  2  -  In Your Heart
  3  -  First Love
  4  -  I Walk The Line
  5  -  That´s What I Said
  6  -  I Knew It All The Time
  7  -  Glad All Over
  8  -  All Of The Time
  9  -  Stay
10  -  Chaquita
11  -  Do You Love Me
12  -  Bits And Pieces
13  -  I Know You
14  -  No Time To Lose
15  -  Doo Dah
16  -  Time
17  -  She´s All Mine
18  -  Mulberry Bush
19  -  Poison Ivy
20  -  Because
21  -  Thinking Of You Baby
22  -  Ol´  Sol

  1 -   6  Lp Ember
  7 - 17  Lp Glad All Over
18 - 22  Sgs



Dave Clark Five - Complete vol. 2

The Dave Clark Five -  Complete collection (Vol.1 - Vol.9)

The Dave Clark Five -  Complete collection (Vol.1 - Vol.9)


01  -  I Need You I Love You
02  -  Can´t You See That She´s Mine
03  -  I Love You No More
04  -  Rumble
05  -  Funny
06  -  On Broadway
07  -  Zip A Dee Doo Dah
08  -  Can I Trust You
09  -  Forever And A Day
10  -  Theme Without A Name
11  -  Who Does He Think He Is
12  -  Move On
13  -  Whenever You´re Around
14  -  I Want You Still
15  -  Come On Over
16  -  Blue Monday
17  -  Sometimes
18  -  Anytime You Want Love
19  -  I Cried Over You
20  -  Long Ago

01 - 10  Lp Session With
11 - 20  Lp American Tour 

Dave Clark Five - Complete vol. 3

The Dave Clark Five -  Complete collection (Vol.1 - Vol.9)

The Dave Clark Five -  Complete collection (Vol.1 - Vol.9)


01  -  Anyway You Want It
02  -  I Can´t Stop Loving You
03  -  I Can´t Stand It
04  -  What Is There To Say
05  -  Everbody Knows ( i still love you)
06  -  Crying Over You
07  -  Say You Want Me
08  -  When
09  -  Don´t You Know
10  -  To Me
11  -  It´s Not True
12  -  Wild Weekend
13  -  New Kind Of Love
14  -  Dum Dee Dee Dum
15  -  I Said I Was Sorry
16  -  No Stopping
17  -  Don´t Be Taken In
18  -  When I´m Alone 
19  -  If You Come Back
20  -  Sweet Memories
21  -  Don´t You Realise
22  -  On The Move
23  -  Catch Us If You Can

Dave Clark Five - Complete vol. 4

The Dave Clark Five -  Complete collection (Vol.1 - Vol.9)

The Dave Clark Five -  Complete collection (Vol.1 - Vol.9)

01 - I Like It Like That
02 - Over And Over
03 - Reelin´ And Rockin´
04 - I´ll Be Yours My Love
05 - I'm On My Own
06 - I Need Love
07 - Come Home
08 - We´ll Be Running
09 - Blue Suede Shoes
10 - Hurting Inside
11 - I´ll Never Know
12 - Til The Right One Comes Along
13 - I´m Thinking
14 - Your Turn To Cry
15 - Little Bitty Pretty One
16 - Remember It´s Me
17 - Mighty Good Loving
18 - At The Scene
19 - Nineteen Days
20 - I´ve Got To Have A Reason
21 - I Miss You
22 - Don´t Let Me Down
23 - Good Time Woman
24 - All Night Long

1, 4 - 6  Lp  I Like It Like That
7 - 17  Lp  Weekend In London
2 - 3, 18 - 24  Sg

Dave Clark Five - Complete vol. 5



The Dave Clark Five -  Complete collection (Vol.1 - Vol.9)

The Dave Clark Five -  Complete collection (Vol.1 - Vol.9)


01 -Try Too Hard
02 - Look Before You Leap
03 - Please Tell Me Why
04 - Somebody Find A New Love
05 - Satisfied With You
06 - Do You Still Love Me
07 - I Meant You
08 - Today
09 - I Never Will
10 - Looking In
11 - Ever Since You´ve Been Away
12 - I Really Love You
13 - It Don´t Feel Good
14 - Scared Of Falling In Love
15 - I Know
16 - Go On
17 - You Never Listen
18 - I Still Need You
19 - It´s Only Hurt You For A Little While
20 - Good Lovin´
21 - Something I´ve Always Wanted
22 - How Can I Tell You
23 - Picture Of You
24 - Pick Up Your Phone

1, 4, 8 - 15  Lp  Try Too Hard
2, 3, 6  Sg
5, 7, 16 - 20  Lp  Satisyfied With You
21 - 24  Lp  5 By 5

Dave Clark Five - Complete vol. 6

The Dave Clark Five -  Complete collection (Vol.1 - Vol.9)

The Dave Clark Five -  Complete collection (Vol.1 - Vol.9)

The Dave Clark Five -  Complete collection (Vol.1 - Vol.9)

The Dave Clark Five -  Complete collection (Vol.1 - Vol.9)

The Dave Clark Five -  Complete collection (Vol.1 - Vol.9)


01 - Pumping
02 - Maybe It´s You
03 - That´s How Long Our Love Will Last
04 - A Little Bit Of Love
05 - Please Love Me
06 - Goodbye My Friends
07 - She´s A Loving Girl
08 - You Know You´re Lying
09 - Everybody Knows
10 - A Little Bit Now
11 - At The Place
12 - Inside And Out
13 - Red And Blue
14 - You Must Have Been A Beautiful Baby
15 - Good Love Is Hard To Find
16 - Lost In His Dreams
17 - Concentration Baby
18 - Hold On Tight
19 - I´ll Do The Best I Can
20 - You Got What It Takes
21 - A Little Bit Strong
22 - Blueberry Hill
23 - Tabatha Twitchi
24 - Sitting Here Baby

1 - 8  Lp  I Like It Like That
9 - 24 Lp  Everybody Knows

Dave Clark Five - Complete vol. 7

The Dave Clark Five -  Complete collection (Vol.1 - Vol.9)

The Dave Clark Five -  Complete collection (Vol.1 - Vol.9)

The Dave Clark Five -  Complete collection (Vol.1 - Vol.9)

The Dave Clark Five -  Complete collection (Vol.1 - Vol.9)


01 - Bernadette
02 - You Don't Play Me Around
03 - Man In A Pin-Stripped Suit
04 - Doctor Rhythm
05 - Let Me Be
06 - Lovin' So Good
07 - Play With Me
08 - Just A Little Bit Now
09 - Maze Of Love
10 - Return My Love
11 - Best Day´s Work
12 - Who Do You Think You´re Talking To
13 - Got Love If You Want It
14 - Red Balloon
15 - Please Stay
16 - Devoted To Me
17 - 34 - 06
18 - Away From The Noises
19 - No One Break A Heart Like You
20 - You Don´t Want My Lovin´
21 - Mulberry Tree
22 - Small Talk
23 - Children
24 - Forget

1 - 2  Lp  Everybody Knows
4 - 7  Lp  You´ve Got What It Takes
8 - 19  Lp 5 By 5
3, 20 - 24  Sg

Dave Clark Five - Complete vol. 8

The Dave Clark Five -  Complete collection (Vol.1 - Vol.9)

The Dave Clark Five -  Complete collection (Vol.1 - Vol.9)

The Dave Clark Five -  Complete collection (Vol.1 - Vol.9)


01 - If Somebody Loves You
02 - It Ain´t What You Do
03 - Live In The Sky
04 - Five By Five
05 - Here Comes Summer
06 - How Do You Get To Heaven
07 - Everybody Get Together
08 - Julia
09 - Break Down And Cry
10 - Darling I Love You
11 - If You Wanna See Me Cry
12 - Worried Times
13 - Southern Man
14 - Bring It On Home To Me
15 - Signs
16 - Won´t You Be My Lady
17 - The Time Hase Come
18 - Officer Mc Kirk
19 - If You´ve Got A Little Love To Give
20 - Paradise Is Half As Nice

1 - 12  Lp  If Somebody Loves You
13 - 20  Lp  Dave Clark and Friends

Dave Clark Five - Complete vol. 9

The Dave Clark Five -  Complete collection (Vol.1 - Vol.9)

The Dave Clark Five -  Complete collection (Vol.1 - Vol.9)


01 - Signs
02 - Won´t You Be My Lady
03 - The Time Hase Come
04 - Officer Mc Kirk
05 - If You´ve Got A Little Love To Give
06 - Paradise Is Half As Nice
07 - Draggin´ The Line
08 - Think Of Me
09 - One-Eyed, Blue-Suited, Gun-Totin´ Man
10 - Right Or Wrong
11 - I Don´t Know
12 - Put A Little Love In Your Heart
13 - Into Your Life
14 - Rub It In
15 - I´m Sorry Baby
16 - Sha Na Na Na, Hey Goodbye
17 - Always Me
18 - Sweet City Woman
19 - Love Comes But Once

1 - 12  Lp Dave Clark and Friends
13 - 19  Sg

The Dave Clark Five - Satisfied With You (1966)


The Dave Clark Five -  Complete collection (Vol.1 - Vol.9)

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pt.1  ****       pt.2 ****









The Dave Clark Five - Instrumental Album 1966

The Dave Clark Five -  Complete collection (Vol.1 - Vol.9)

The Dave Clark Five -  Complete collection (Vol.1 - Vol.9)

****

The Dave Clark Five - The Complete History (Volume 7)
Rarities,Hits & Single Tracks

The Dave Clark Five -  Complete collection (Vol.1 - Vol.9)

The Dave Clark Five -  Complete collection (Vol.1 - Vol.9)


****

Sandy Nelson - Golden Hits & The Best Of The Beats


Sandy Nelson was the biggest -- and one of the few -- star drummers of the late '50s and early '60s era in which instrumental rock was at its peak. He landed two Top Ten hits, "Teen Beat" (1959) and "Let There Be Drums" (1961), which surrounded his Gene Krupa-inspired solos with cool, mean guitar licks that were forerunners of the surf sound. Nelson had only one other Top 40 hit, "Drums Are My Beat" (1962). He ground out a quick series of instrumental albums in the early '60s -- eight within 18 months, as a matter of fact -- with several other top Hollywood rock and pop session musicians. Nelson was not that great a drummer, although he was good. His principal importance is that he found a place for drum rock solos in hit instrumental singles, and the more reckless elements of his style no doubt influenced other musicians, such as surf drummers and, later, Keith Moon.

Nelson started to play rock & roll as a teenager in Los Angeles in the 1950s, forming a group that included Jan Berry, Dean Torrence, and Bruce Johnston, all of whom would be important to the surf and hot rod scenes a few years down the line. By the late '50s he was playing sessions, including drums on the Teddy Bears' chart-topper "To Know Him Is to Love Him." After his "Teen Beat" became a hit for Original Sound in 1959, he signed with Imperial as a solo artist, and continued to work as a session musician. For instance, he's heard on Gene Vincent records of the time, as well as the Hollywood Argyles' big hit "Alley Oop," on which he also did some screams. Nelson's numerous solo albums, despite the assistance of top fellow sessioneers like Steve Douglas (sax), Ernie Freeman (piano), and Rene Hall (guitar), had a lot of basic and unimaginative instrumental rock, whether original material or covers of well-known hits of the day. As with Duane Eddy's recordings, however, these simple albums might have helped inspire aspiring musicians as things to play along and learn with, if nothing else.

Near the end of 1963, Nelson was involved in a serious motorcycle accident that necessitated amputation of his right foot and part of his leg. Nonetheless, he managed to resume his drumming career and continued to churn out albums, as well as some singles, of which "Casbah" (1965) is the highlight, with its wild splashing drums and frenetic Middle Eastern/surf guita

Sandy Nelson - Golden Hits & The Best Of The Beats

Sandy Nelson - Golden Hits & The Best Of The Beats

Sandy Nelson - Golden Hits & The Best Of The Beats
  
Golden Hits & The Best Of The Beats (1997)

Although their titles seem to suggest best-of compilations, both Golden Hits and Best of the Beats are simply two more entries in a long line of Sandy Nelson records cut in response to the chart blockbusters of the moment. These LPs live or die on their relative compatibility with Nelson's strengths and sensibilities, and each of these 12-song efforts is a significant cut above average thanks to the inclusion of several R&B classics that afford the drummer the chance to cut loose. (Their similarities also make them more compatible than many of the pairings on See for Miles' other Sandy Nelson two-fers.) Nelson clearly savors the verve and creativity of Golden Hits covers like Wilbert Harrison's "Kansas City," Bill Doggett's "Honky Tonk," and Fats Domino's "Walking to New Orleans," and his drum solos exhibit an unusual finesse, complementing the melodies instead of overpowering them. The Best of the Beats is even better. The loosey-goosey energy of the New Orleans party classics "Ooh Poo Pah Doo" and "Mother-in-Law" proves particularly well matched to the chaotic abandon of Nelson's rhythms, and he also captures the Latin-flavored verve of the Ritchie Valens hits "Let's Go" and "La Bamba." Best of all are the back-to-back Elvis Presley covers "All Shook Up" and "Don't Be Cruel," which pay implicit homage to D.J. Fontana, the King's longtime sideman and arguably the first truly great rock & roll drummer. 

Sandy Nelson - Golden Hits & The Best Of The Beats

Hi-Fi Complete Works (Featuring David Surkamp And Ian Mathews)Barry McGuire - The Eve Of Destruction Man (1965)The Cowsills - On My Side (1971)The Crickets - A Collection (1965)Lee Hazlewood - Friday's Child (1966)Badfinger (The Tragic Story of) VA - Beatles Lieder Auf Deutsch / Beatles Songs Auf DeutschThe Dave Clark Five -  Complete collection (Vol.1 - Vol.9)Sandy Nelson - Golden Hits & The Best Of The BeatsSandy Nelson - Let There Be Drums (1961)

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