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Wonderland - The Best Of

Wonderland - The Best Of


Wonderland - The Best Of


This was a beat band formed at the beginning of 1968. Reichel and Tarrach had previously been members of the most famous German beat band: The Rattles. Wonderland recorded three singles before Humphries and Franke quit at the end of 1969, to be replaced by Kalle Trapp and Claus-Robert Kruse. One year and a single later the band ceased its activities, with Reichel and Dostal teaming up for the Wonderland Band album, to which Franke, Tarrach, Trapp and Kruse all contributed. All Wonderland singles and four tracks for a projected album were collected in 1973 on a Karusell sampler.WONDERLAND BAND - One of Achim Reichel's strangest projects occurred in l97l, after the demise of Wonderland. His long time collaborator Frank Dostal followed him from this band. Together they recorded as Frankie Dymon .as well as the very different Wonderland Band, whose album was an ambitious production featuring 25 guest musicians, among them Clauk-Robert Kruse (guitar, organ, vocals, arrangements), Helmut Franke (guitar), Ladi Geissler (guitar), Hans-Uwe Remers (piano, arrangements), Benny Bendorf (bass), Hans Hartmann (bass), Kalle Trapp (bass), Joe Nay (drums), Barry Reeves (drums) and Dicky Tarrach (drums, chimes, trumpets and trombones). The results sounded close to the eclectic solo album Die Grune Reise, but Reichel's echo guitars were in this case replaced by solid doses of brass! Wonderland Band's No. 1 was equally weird with boogie rock, vintage glitter rock and folky ballads spiced with incredibly strange brass arrangements. It was hardly a great success (however, there are highlights!) and proved to be a one-off, although a 1972 single featured two unreleased tracks: "Rock'n'Roll People" coupled with "King Of America". 

Wonderland - The Best Of


The Feminine Complex - Livin' Love

The Feminine Complex - Livin' Love

The Feminine Complex - Livin' Love


Bass, Vocals – Jean Williams (2)
Drums, Vocals – Lana Napier
Engineer – Lee Hazen
Liner Notes, Reissue Producer – Jonathan Marx
Organ, Vocals – Pame Stephens
Producer – Rick Powell
Tambourine, Vocals – Judi Griffith
Vocals, Guitar – Mindy Dalton



Biography by Jason Ankeny

An obscure all-girl '60ss garage band from Nashville, Tennessee, the Feminine Complex comprised singer/guitarist Mindy Dalton, bassist Jean Williams, vocalist/tambourine player Judi Griffith, organist Pame Stephens, and drummer Lana Napier. The group was formed by Williams and Napier in 1966 while both were sophomores at Nashville's Maplewood High School. Originally named the Pivots, a moniker suggested by the girls' basketball coach, they made their debut at a school talent show -- after recruiting teammates Dalton and Griffith -- dressed in matching pantsuits and performing covers of contemporary hits. After adding Stephens, the quintet rechristened themselves the Feminine Complex and began making regular appearances at Skateland, then Nashville's hottest summer teen hangout.

In a local scene otherwise dominated by male combos like the Anglo Saxons, the Feminine Complex quickly earned a cult following, and soon they were touring throughout Tennessee. They caught the attention of A&R vet Dee Kilpatrick, who'd just formed the Athena Records label. The Feminine Complex was the label's first signing, and in 1969, the band's debut LP Livin' Love was released. However, by the time the album appeared the group had already disintegrated -- Stephens, who'd graduated high school, ultimately chose college over rock & roll, and both Williams and Napier quit soon after. Dalton and Griffith briefly forged on as a duo, but by late 1969, the Feminine Complex was no more. In 1996, the hip indie label TeenBeat reissued Livin' Love, followed a year later by the rarities collection To Be in Love.


The Feminine Complex - Livin' Love

The Feminine Complex - To Be in Love (A Collection of Live Performances and Rare Demolition Recordings)

 

The Feminine Complex - To Be in Love (A Collection of Live Performances and Rare Demolition Recordings)


The mid- to late '60s were an exciting time for music in Nashville. Never mind countryГ‘all manner of music was being made here. WLAC radio deejays Hoss Allen and John Richbourg were working with some of the South's finest soul singers, the former producing Earl Gaines for Hollywood and Deluxe Records, the latter producing Roscoe Shelton and countless others for Monument's Sound Stage 7 imprint. Robert Knight took Mac Gayden and Buzz Cason's "Everlasting Love" to the national charts, while local kid Bucky Wilkin had a few hits of his own with his group Ronny and the Daytonas. Meanwhile, the city's combo scene was hopping: Charlie McCoy and the Escorts, the Kapers, the Lemonade Charade, the Anglo-Saxons, and the Fairlanes all worked the local circuit, playing dances, frat parties, army bases, skating rinks, and teen hangouts like the Hullabaloo Club.

So it shouldn't be such a surprise that Nashville would be home to the Feminine Complex, one of the greatest coulda-been stories in the history of '60s pop. Locals who remember the group will tell you that the Feminine Complex were one of the most unforgettable combos around Г‘ and not just 'cause they happened to be all-female. Granted, such a phenomenon was a true rarity a tthe time, but once local kids got over the initial surprise, they were won over by the music of these five talented teams.

And well they should have been. Mindy Dalton, Judi Griffith, Lana Napier, Pame Stephens, and Jean Williams spent countless hours in practice; as they remember it, if they weren't in school, chances are they were in Mindy's or Jean's basement, instruments in hand. In retrospect, the Feminine Complex weren't notable just for their live show, which featured choreographed routines and stylish matching outfits. At a time when many bands simply worked up their own sound-alike versions of hits of the day, the Feminine Complex generated dynamite material of their own.

Teen-Beat's previous reissue of the Feminine Complex features all original compositions and provides two glimpses of the band: the slick, production-heavy sound of the group's sole LP, Livin' Love, released in 1969 on Athena Records; and the stripped-down, more immediate sound captured by engineer Lee Hazen in a demo session the previous summer. This collection provides, in some ways, a more honest portrait of the band, tracing their development from the basement to the recording studio to serveral live appearances, including one on national TV. In the process, we can hear a band developing not just confidence and skill, but their own distinctive approach to the music. While early tunes like "Stepping Stone" are rough and a little primitive, "Jaguar Jimmy" (the group's take on "Mustang Sally") show a group clearly coming into its own. And the sequnce taken from a 1968 show in Knoxville reveals a group that could put its own personal stamp on just about any song, be it one by the Supremes or one by the Association.

Three decades later, the members of the Feminine Complex speak of the recordings on this CD far too modestly and self-effacingly. And yet it's clear these songs also bring back a rush of memories-not of specific dates and facts, for the circumstances surrounding many of the recordings are shadowy at best. Rather, these songs remind these now grown-up women of the pure fun and excitement they had playing rock'n'roll.

DEMO SESSION (The Pivots):
1. (I'm Not Your) Stepping Stone
2. You Can't Do That

Two of the earliest existing recordings of the group, taken froma March 15, 1967, demo session at Capitol Recording Studios. Several music-industry types were in attendance, among them Ronny and the Daytonas' Bucky Wilkin, who took an interest in the band, Like the follwoing two tracks, these songs predate the addition of organist Pame Stpehens; to the best of anyone's recollection, the group was still going by its original moniker, The Pivots.

DEMO SESSION:
3. Leslie
4. Without You

These songs were recorded by the group at, of all places, Owen Bradley's Barn, where country stars such as Patsy Cline and Loretta Lynn made their hit recordings for the Decca label. In attendance a thte March 30, 1967, session were Wilkin and the group's manager, Scott Burton. Sadly, the only remaining source for these songs is a quarter-inch-tape recording of an acetate-made, no doubt, by placing a mic in front of a record player.

At least a couple of members of the group cite "Without You" as the best song the Feminine Complex ever recorded. It's also one of the few songs to feature the lyrics and vocals of tambourinist Judi Griffith, whose role as a songwriter and vocalist diminished as the group developed. "Leslie," meanwhile, is the group's interpretation of "Gloria"; Jean, who sings the tune, named it after a childhood friend who grew up across the street from her.

DEMO SESSION:
5. Jaguar Jimmy
6. Now I Care
7. To Be In Love

The circumstances of the recording session are foggy, but this much we know: The songs were cut on November 21, 1967, in a recording studio in downtown Nashville. The Group had been together for more than a year at this point, and their poise and confidence are fully in evidence. Take "Jaguar Jimmy," which is more than just a lyrical rewrite of "Mustang Sally." Here the group dispenses with the macho vibe of Wilson Pickett's original, opting instead for a version that manages to be both tough and girlish. "Now I Care" is an earlier version of a song that the group would later record in a demo session for Athena Records. And "To Be in Love" is a torrid summer-of-love number that, for all its datedness, still sounds pretty compellling. Singer-guitarist Mindy Dalton wasn't too happy with her vocal here; apparently, the session had gotten so loud that she wasn't able to hear herself sing. Given the circumstances, we say she acquitted herself admirably.

ON SHOWCASE '68:
8. Here Comes the Judge
9. I've Been Workin' on You

Two songs taken from what had to be both a terrifying and exhilarating moment for the band; an appearance on national TV, taped in the Waldorf-Astoria ballroom in the summer of 1968. Accompanied by several parents, and producer Rick Powell, the Feminine Complex traveled to New York City to appear on Showcase '68, a talent search featuring four unknown musical acts (and "special guest star Carlos Montoya!" according to the show's announcer). Before the show began taping, the group took the stage to warm up the crowd with their flabbergasting rendition of Pegmeat Markham's "Here Comes the Judge" routine. Pame Stephens can be heard in the role of the judge, using her organ to simulate a judge's bench. Judi, meanwhile, filled the role of the bailiff, responsible for bringing the apparently guilty parties before the court. The group sounds like they're having a good time here, although it's hard to judge, from the polite applause, just what people in the audience thought of it.

Once the show's theme kicked in, it clearly hit these five teens from Tennessee that they were on national TV! "We were shakin' all over," remembers Jean Williams. "We were just tore all to pieces." But for all their nervousness, the Feminine Complex turned in a manic performance of "I've Been Workin' on You," which Athena Records would release as a single later that year. Even if the band isn't together at the outset, the skittering guitar and the racing drums convey just how exciting - and utterly frightening - the experience must have been for them.

As it turns out, the winner of the evening's show was a young vocalist named Julie Budd. Even before the show, recalls Jean, the group felt like they didn't have a chance against this belter, who was just barely in her teens. "When we heard her practice, we were pretty concerned at that point."

Even if the group didn't win, the trip to New York had plenty of highlights. Macy's, Radio City Music Hall, the subway, and, for Pame, a date with the organist from the 1910 Fruitgum Co., who were in the Waldorf-Astoria taping another segment of the show. For her part, Judi remembers Mindy's mother "going off and getting a massage; I thought it was pretty cool at the time."

LIVE IN KNOXVILLE:
10. Never My Love
11. Hold On! I'm Comin'
12. You Keep Me Hangin' On
13. Come on Up
14. Forgetting
15. Spooky
16. Theme

More than anything else on this collection, these songs convey what the Feminine Complex were truly about: live performance. Every weekend, the group hit the road, playing teen gigs and military bases all around Tennessee. Come Friday night, a parent would rent a U-Haul trailer, and the girls would load their equipment and head out for the night's show. In fact, there were always a couple of parents around to lend a helping hand and to make sure the shows went off smoothly. And on at least one occasion, the parents were also there to make sure the crowd didn't get out of hand-at on Vanderbilt University frat party, the crowd got so drunk that the band had to pull the plug, for the fear that the fraternity brothers would trash their equipment.

Included here are just the highlights fo a lengthy 1968 set at the University of Tennessee that included "I Heard it Through the Grapevine," The Parliaments' "(I Wanna) Testify," The Box Tops' "The Letter," Brenton Wood's "Gimme Little Sign," and countless other radio hits. Of the several live tapes of the band, this one by far sounds the best: Pame's organ is perhaps the most audible instrument, while Mindy's guitar goes into fuzzed-out overdrive on the Rascals' "Come on Up." Jean's bass sounds especially muscular, particularly on the theme that the group used to open and close their sets.

ON LOCAL TV:
17. Summertime
18. I Aiin't Gonna Eat Out My Heart Anymore
19. Ferry Cross the Mersey
20. Look in My Eyes

For anyone who grew up in Nashville in the last three or so decades, Ralph Emery and Teddy Bart are household names. For years, Emery hosted a morning variety show on WSM, the local NBC affiliate. (He would, of course, eventually go on to greater fame as host of the Nashville Network's Nashville Now.) Bart was a lounge singer who hosted WSM's Noon Show: he's still around Nashville todaay, although he now makes his home on talk radio.

These recordings, taken straight from the TV-you can hear the sounds of drummer Lana Napier's family gathered together in the background-feature the Feminine Complex on both Bart's and Emery's programs. The first two songs are taken from a June 1967 appearance on The Noon Show, one month before organist Pame Stephens joined the group. It's clear from the after-performance dialogue that host Teddy Bart is a real square-he refers to the Rascals tune "I Ain't Gonna Eat Out My Heart Anymore" as "I Ain't Gonna Eat Out No More." Interestingly enough, the group's rendition of "Summertime" predates the release of Janis Joplin's by more than a year - is it possible that the singer just happened to be in Nashville one June day and tuned in to The Noon Show?

The following two tunes are taken from a later appearance on Emery's program: "Look in My Eyes" is noteworthy because it's the only existing recording of this Judi Griffith composition. For her part, Mindy remembers an especially embarrasing moment from the show: Emery had cut to a commercial break, so she turned around to adjust her amp. Unbeknownst to her, the show had gone back on the air while she was still hunched over, her backside to the camera - and when she turned around, local viewers got a glimpse of her best deer-caught-in-the-headlights expression.

21. The Feminine Complex (Instro) - (Untitled)

- Jonathan Marx, Nashville, Tennessee, 1997

The Feminine Complex - To Be in Love (A Collection of Live Performances and Rare Demolition Recordings)




Billie Davis - Billie Davis (1970)






Half-a-dozen of the 13 tracks on Billie Davis' sole LP were actually mostly taken from previously released singles, including her small 1968 U.K. hit "I Want You to Be My Baby" and big 1963 British smash cover of "Tell Him" (which, while not bad, is the only track here pre-dating 1967, and thus stylistically ill-fitting). While it was thus (in common with many albums of the period) kind of slapped together, it was still a pretty good representation of a worthwhile reedy singer with an affinity for both soul and pop, even if it was a little heavy on familiar cover versions. One of those covers, "Angel of the Morning," was actually released before the more famous Merrilee Rush version became a hit, and the same songwriting team responsible for that song (Chip Taylor and Al Gorgoni) also wrote one of the LP-only cuts here, the brassily upbeat "Billy Sunshine." Elsewhere, this has got to have the best (only?) pop-oriented cover of Jethro Tull's "Living in the Past" ever attempted. While the interpretations of the Turtles' "Me About You," Buffy Sainte-Marie's "Until It's Time for You to Go," the Moody Blues' "Nights in White Satin," and Nilsson's "Without Him" are only adequate, they're still pleasant, and her version of Neil Diamond's "Love to Love" swings along nicely. Nine of the tracks (including all of the best ones) appear on the 2005 CD compilation Tell Him: The Decca Years, and all 13 of the LP's songs are on the more obscure CD anthology Her Best: 1963-1970, which also adds 14 non-LP cuts from 1963-1970 singles.


The Teenmakers -‎The Danish Hollies - Complete Collection/Featuring Billie Davis

The Teenmakers -‎The Danish Hollies - Complete Collection/Featuring Billie Davis

Danish band was established in Ringsted, Denmark in 1963, and last performance on 26-12-1971. In 1972 the band shortly changed name to Hoodwink  for a more soul oriented sound but disbanded soon after.
Members was:
Frank Hansen: Lead Vocals
Flemming Rasmussen: Guitar & Vocals
Arne Rasmussen: Bass & Vocals
Carsten Gregersen: Guitar
John Roger: Drums


01 I'm So Happy Now
02 The Ernest Of Being George
03 You Need Love
04 Mo'ren
05 Hey Girl
06 Step Inside
07 Look Here Comes The Sun
08 You Better Run
09 Lullaby To Tim
10 Route 66
11 Angel Of The Morning
12 Come On Back
13 You Know He Did
14 Yes I Will
15 You'll Be Mine
16 It Won't Be Wrong
17 A Taste Of Honey
18 Baby Dont Cry
19 Angella
20 Runaway
21 Yellow Ballon
22 La La La (She Gives Me Love)
23 Games We Play
24 Dream World


01 Let It Be Me
02 Don't Take It So Hard
03 Dear Mr. Jones
04 On A Saturday
05 It's Not Fair
06 Southern Man
07 Sorry Susanne
08 Hello World
09 Never Say Never
10 Sueno
11 On A Saturday
12 If I Needed Someone
13 Mo'ren
14 In My Own Time
15 Mo'ren
16 Angel Of The Morning
17 Games We Play 
18 Lullaby To Tim
19 It's Take Two *
20 Bang, Bang *

The Teenmakers -‎The Danish Hollies - Complete Collection/Featuring Billie Davis

*Tracks 19-20 With Billie Davis







 

Les Baroques ‎– Such A Cad

Les Baroques ‎– Such A Cad


One of the strangest and best Dutch bands of the mid-'60s, Les Baroques always seemed out of synch with the real world. They had a French name, a lead singer with an obviously anglicized pseudonym (Gary O'Shannon, real name Gerard Schoenaker), and played R&B-tinged pop-rock with odd streaks of European folk tunes and corny orchestral arrangements. Their reputation hinges chiefly upon their first four singles and self-titled 1966 LP, all recorded with O'Shannon before the singer left the group at the end of 1966. At his best, O'Shannon could sound like a less polished, neurotic version of Van Morrison, delivering songs that, like much Dutch beat of the mid-'60s, were sullen and minor-keyed. Les Baroques took this moodiness to extremes, however, in cuts like "Silky" and "Summer Beach," which had a dreamlike sheen and forlorn, doomed atmosphere. At other times, they espoused an earthier, R&B-based sound more in line with some British groups of the time, especially in the sharp organ riffs; "She's Mine" closely approximates Them's ballads, while "O, O, Baby Give Me That Show" is a good Animals clone. "Such a Cad," a weird punky number that was, like several of their 45s, embellished with bassoon (!) fills, was a big Dutch hit in 1966. But after one more fine single, the typically inscrutable "I'll Send You to the Moon," O'Shannon had to leave the band for military service. Les Baroques did continue for five more singles and a second LP with Michel van Dijk as lead singer, but it wasn't the same, although the first two singles with this lineup, "Working on a Tsing Tsang" and "Bottle Party," were acceptably twisted pop numbers.

Les Baroques ‎– Such A Cad (2015)

Les Baroques ‎– Such A Cad

Thanks Lora !




Billie Davis - Her Best 1963-1970

Billie Davis - Her Best 1963-1970



Billie Davis - Her Best 1963-1970

Biography by Bruce Eder

Carol Hedges was a 16-year-old aspiring singer when she was discovered as the result of a talent contest in 1962. Backed up in the competition by Cliff Bennett's support group, the Rebel Rousers, she won the contest and Bennett got her together with producer Joe Meek. Hedges was recorded by Meek with his resident group, the Tornados, without achieving success. Luckily, a neophyte music talent manager named Robert Stigwood had also seen her and liked what he heard, and he ultimately took her away from Meek. He was impressed with Hedges' singing, a white soul sound similar to (though not as powerful as) Beryl Marsden's work, and also with the fact that her two musical inspirations were Billie Holiday and Sammy Davis Jr.. Stigwood renamed her Billie Davis and teamed her with Mike Sarne, another singer he had under contract, and the two scored a novelty hit in 1962 with "Will I What." For her solo debut, he gave her a song that he had heard on a visit to America. "Tell Him" had been recorded by the Exciters, but Davis' cover, released on English Decca, made the Top Ten in England in early 1963 despite the fact that the American original actually topped the U.K. charts at the same time. Davis recorded for both English Decca and Pye Records during the early and mid-'60s without ever duplicating "Tell Him"'s success -- the closest she came to another hit was in 1968, with "I Want You to Be My Baby." Some of her work was reissued on compilation CDs, including her cover of Burt Bacharach's "The Last One to Be Loved," which appears on Sequel Records' Trains & Boats & Covers. Billie Davis is fondly remembered in England by her early pop/rock success in the pre-Beatles era.

Billie Davis - Her Best 1963-1970 (1995)

Review by Richie Unterberger 

This 27-track CD of rather mysterious origin is the most comprehensive Billie Davis anthology, but not without its imperfections. In its favor, it does include nine tracks from her 1963-1964 girl group-influenced singles, whereas the most commonly available Davis anthology (Tell Him: The Decca Years has just four of those. In all, it has ten songs not on Tell Him: The Decca Years, but is also missing three songs that are not that release, whose sound quality is better (though not seriously flawed). And the liner notes on Her Best: 1963-1970 are perfunctory, though it does contain a complete 1962-1970 Davis discography. So what most people would pick this up for are the ten songs not on Tell Him, which are useful for Davis fans, but not (with one exception) among her most outstanding recordings. That one exception is the moody, sassy 1964 single "Whatcha' Gonna Do," perhaps her best girl group-styled effort; the Mersey-influenced chirpy warble of its B-side "Everybody Knows" is pretty enjoyable too. However, the other tracks not found on Tell Him are either fairly undistinguished 1963-1964 sides, or competent but unremarkable covers (including the Turtles' "Me About You," Buffy Sainte-Marie's "Until It's Time for You to Go," the Moody Blues' "Nights in White Satin," and Nilsson's "Without Him") from her 1967-1970 recordings. The rare 1970 Spanish-language single "Venid con Mego" is also here, though it too is only a fair pop-soul production. Tell Him: The Decca Years still gets the nod for the best Billie Davis comp, but this lengthier anthology still does a good job of presenting highlights of the career from this decent if second-division British singer, from both her perky 1963-1964 output and her more mature, soul-influenced 1967-1970 work. Neither this nor Tell Him, incidentally, include anything from her seven 1965-1966 Piccadilly singles, three of which she did as half of the duo Keith & Billie. While there might be a limited demand for such a thing, someone should do a two-disc set that finally assembles all of the sides she cut for Decca, Columbia, and Piccadilly into one place.

Billie Davis - Her Best 1963-1970





 

VA - Marylebone Beat Girls 1964-1967

VA - Marylebone Beat Girls 1964-1967

1. Liza & The Jet Set - Dancing Yet (2:37)
2. Billie Davis & The Leroys - Whatcha' Gonna Do (2:41)
3. The McKinleys - Sweet And Tender Romance (2:08)
4. Julie Driscoll - Don't Do It No More (2:34)
5. Alma Cogan - Love Is A Word (2:12)
6. Helen Shapiro - Stop And You Will Become Aware (2:37)
7. Beryl Marsden - Music Talk (2:55)
8. Toni Daly - Like The Big Man Said (2:49)
9. The Chantelles - I Want That Boy (1:59)
10. Andee Silver - The Boy I Used To Know (2:42)
11. Jean & The Statesides - Mama Didn't Lie (2:11)
12. The Three Bells - He Doesn't Want You (2:21)
13. Beverley Jones with The Prestons - Hear You Talking (2:46)
14. She Trinity - He Fought The Law (2:22)
15. Tiffany with The Thoughts - Find Out What's Happening (2:43)
16. Helen Shapiro - Forget About The Bad Things (2:25)
17. Julie Driscoll - I Know You Love Me Not (3:25)
18. Peanut - I'm Waiting For The Day (2:23)
19. Cindy Cole - Lonely City Blue Boy (2:27)
20. The Three Quarters - The Pleasure Girls (2:28)
21. Linda Laine with The Sinners - Ain't That Fun (2:31)
22. Cilla Black - Suffer Now I Must (1:43)
23. Barbara Ruskin - Euston Station (2:27)
24. Valerie Avon - He Knows I Love Him Too Much (2:43)
25. Judi Johnson - Make The Most Of It (3:50)

VA - Marylebone Beat Girls 1964-1967

***




 

Wonderland - The Best OfThe Lipsticks ‎– Let's Have A Bonnie & Clyde PartyThe Feminine Complex - Livin' Love Billie Davis - Billie Davis (1970)Les Baroques ‎– Such A CadVA - Girls With Guitars

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