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What About Us? More Merseybeat Nuggets


What About Us? More Merseybeat Nuggets




What About Us? More Merseybeat Nuggets


What About Us? More Merseybeat Nuggets


Tracklist

1 –Tommy Quickly Tip Of My Tongue
2 –The Searchers Goodbye My Love
3 –Tony Jackson & The Vibrations This Little Girl Of Mine
4 –Johnny Sandon & The Remo Four On The Horizon
5 –The Chants (2) I Don't Care
6 –Jeannie & The Big Guys Don't Lie To Me
7 –Tommy Quickly With The Remo Four Humpty Dumpty
8 –Johnny Sandon Donna Means Heartbreak
9 –The Searchers Ain't That Just Like Me
10 –The Chants (2) A Thousand Stars
11 –The Trends (2) Sweet Little Miss Love
12 –The Undertakers (2) Money
13 –Johnny Sandon & The Remo Four Magic Potion
14 –The Searchers Twist & Shout
15 –The Chants (2) One Star
16 –Tony Jackson & The Vibrations That's What I Want
17 –Jeannie & The Big Guys I Want You
18 –The Chants (2) Sweet Was The Wine
19 –The Undertakers (2) What About Us
20 –The Koobas Take Me For A Little While
21 –Mark Peters* Don't Cry For Me
22 –The Chants (2) Then I'll Be Home
23 –Tommy Quickly You Might As Well Forget Him
24 –The 'Takers* Think
25 –Mark Peters* I Told You So
26 –The Koobas You'd Better Make Up Your Mind


Enjoy

Ty To Original Sharer

"I hope for nothing, I fear nothing, I am free"

She Came From Liverpool! (Merseyside Girl Pop 1962-68)


She Came From Liverpool! (Merseyside Girl Pop 1962-68)



She Came From Liverpool! (Merseyside Girl Pop 1962-68)


In July 1961, the first issue of the Liverpool music paper Mersey Beat put three items on its front page. One was a surreal article by John Lennon titled Being a Short Diversion on the Dubious Origins of The Beatles. Another was a photo of Gene Vincent “at the Rialto Ballroom earlier this year, [signing] autographs for two young Liverpool beauties, Mary Larkin and Terry Shorrock.” The third was a piece on “Swinging Cilla,” “a Liverpool girl who is starting on the road to fame.” She has, readers were told, sung with The Big Three and the Hurricanes.

Exactly two years after she became front page news for the first time, Cilla Black auditioned at EMI’s Abbey Road studios and was signed – like The Beatles – to Parlophone. One of the tracks from the July 1963 audition features on She Came From Liverpool! - Merseyside Girl-Pop 1962-1968, a 25-track collection with a self-explanatory title. Alongside Cilla are fellow Liverpudlians Beryl Marsden, The Vernons Girls and their various spin-offs, and lesser-knowns like Tiffany and Nola York.
That beat-era Liverpool wasn’t all about male combos is attested to by a flick through subsequent copies of Mersey Beat. Cilla crops up a lot. But there were also The Pacemakers with their singer Rita – who, when Gerry and co caught on, became Four Hits & A Miss and then Jeannie and the Big Guys, as whom they are heard on She Came From Liverpool! In the 24 October 1963 issue, The Beatles are pictured with the trio version of The Vernons Girls perched on their besuited knees.

But really, the Liverpool scene was male dominated. Even so, She Came From Liverpool! is a bold, hugely enjoyable and informative attempt to shift the emphasis towards the female. In so doing, some gentle tweaking has been undertaken. Jeannie and the Big Guys were from Chester. Although they formed in Liverpool, The Liverbirds – the only all-female beat group as such spawned by the city – moved to Hamburg and made all their records in Germany. Sandy Edmonds was born in Liverpool but moved to New Zealand with her family when she was 15. She recorded there. Glenda Collins, a totemic name for Joe Meek fans, was born in London and spent a few childhood years in Liverpool before heading back south.
In this wonky world, once Cilla is set aside – her brash, Fabs-penned debut single “Love of the Loved” opens proceedings – the big stars are The Vernons Girls and what they begat. Originally a 70-piece choir formed from members of staff of the Vernons football pools company in 1953, they slimmed down to a 16-piece and debuted on vinyl in 1957 as the Voices of Vernons, as back-up on an Eamonn Andrews single. A sap-filled album as The Vernons Girls arrived in 1958. Change came with Jack Good picking them up for TV and a concomitant rocking makeover. Eventually, a trio became the most recognisable on-screen faces and, when the pools company folded them in 1961, three of the group continued in music with the name as session singers and recording artists. Another trio from the ranks called themselves The Breakaways (later, they sang on Hendrix’s “Hey Joe”).

On She Came From Liverpool!, nine tracks are Vernons related. “Only You Can Do It”, credited on 45 to The Vernons Girls in 1964, is one of the best British female singles of the Sixties and essential to any collection of the era’s pop. Samantha Jones, the lead voice on that track, is also heard solo with the spine-tingling and previously unissued “I Don't Want to be the One”, which was produced in 1965 by New York’s Teddy Randazzo. The full story of the Vernons dynasty is told in the booklet.
The Liverbirds are as interesting, and also responsible for one of Sixties pop’s greatest moments with their hard-edged, folk-rock-come-R&B 1965 B-side ”Why do You Hang Around me”. By the time it was released, they were a distant memory in the their home city where developments in pop moved at atom-fast speed. After members saw The Beatles in 1962 the band had formed as, initially, The Squaws. Curiously, but logically in the light of their preference for R&B, their closest allies in band-world were London-based outfits The Kinks and The Rolling Stones. In May 1964, they arrived in Hamburg and went on to make a ripping album and two singles. Before that and back at Liverpool’s Cavern, John Lennon had told them “girls don’t play guitars.”

Of the other wonders collected, both tracks by Tiffany – she passed through an early Liverbirds formulation – are fantastic. So is Jeannie & The Big Guys’s thumping “I Want You”, The Three Bells’s churning “Someone to Love” and Nola York’s dramatic, stirring John Barry-esque “I Don't Understand”.

Ultimately though, the thrilling She Came From Liverpool! - Merseyside Girl-Pop 1962-1968 is about telling a story which has not been told before. It was there, but it’s taken over 50 years to bring the pieces together. Pity it took so long.

Track listing

01 Love Of The Loved - Cilla Black
02 Long Tall Shorty - The Liverbirds
03 Everybody Loves A Lover - Beryl Marsden
04 I Want You - Jeannie & The Big Guys
05 Baby Don't Look Down - Tiffany with The Thoughts
06 Someone To Love - The Three Bells
07 What's She Got (That I Ain't Got) - Beryl Marsden
08 Only You Can Do It - The Vernons Girls
09 That Boy Of Mine - The Breakaways
10 Something I've Got To Tell You - Glenda Collins
11 Don't Understand - Nola York
12 ust For Him - Samantha Jones
13 Am I Dreaming? - Tiffany
14 ill He Tells Me - Jacki Martin
15 A Shot Of Rhythm And Blues - Cilla Black
16 Sticks And Stones - Jeannie & The Big Guys
17 Why Do You Hang Around Me - The Liverbirds
18 I Don't Want To Be The One - Samantha Jones
19 Sally Go Round The Roses - Lyn Cornell
20 Puppet On A String - The De Laine Sisters
21 Dumb Head - The Sharades
22 Lover Please - The Vernons Girls
23 Just Being Your Baby (Turns Me On) - Cindy Cole
24 Baby, You're So Right For Me - The Satin Bells
25 Come See Me - Sandy Edmonds

Enjoy

Ty To Original Sharer

"I hope for nothing, I fear nothing, I am free"

VA-All Time Greatest Hits The Mersey & The Beat

VA-All Time Greatest Hits The Mersey & The Beat

VA-All Time Greatest Hits The Mersey & The Beat

Side 1-2


A1.Gerry & The Pacemakers - You'll Never Walk Alone         
A2.The Swinging Blue Jeans - Hippy Hippy Shake              
A3..Herman's Hermits- Mrs. Brown you've got a lovely daughte
A4. Freddie & The Dreamers - If You Gotta Make A Fool Of Som
A5.Billy J. Kramer & The Dakotas- Do you want to know a secr
A6.Adam Faith & The Roulettes - It's Alright                
B1.Cliff Bennett - Got To Get You Into My Life              
B2. Billy J. Kramer & The Dakotas- Little Children          
B3. Freddie & The Dreamers - I'm Telling You Now            
B4Herman's Hermits- No milk today                           
B5.Swinging Blue Jeans - You're no good                     
B6.Gerry & The Pacemakers - How Do You Do It    
            
Side 3-4

C1.The Hollies- Bus stop                                    
C2. Gerry & The Pacemakers- Don't Let The Sun Catch You Cryi
C3.Billy J. Kramer & The Dakotas- Trains and boats and plane
C4.The Roulettes - Bad Time                                 
C5.Freddie & The Dreamers- You Were Made For Me             
C6.Swinging Blue Jeans - Good golly miss Molly              
D1.Gerry & The Pacemakers- Ferry across The Mersey          
D2.Billy J. Kramer With The Dakotas- Bad To Me              
D3.The Hollies - Yes I Will                                 
D4.The Roulettes-The Long Cigarette                         
D5.Freddie & The Dreamers - Do The Freddie                  
D6.Herman's Hermits - East West       

VA-All Time Greatest Hits The Mersey & The Beat
 

The Merseybeats-All Time Greatest Hits (Purple Pyramid 2008)

The Merseybeats-All Time Greatest Hits (Purple Pyramid 2008)


The Merseybeats were one of the better quartets to come out of the British Invasion without ever making a dent on the charts in the United States -- along with the Roulettes, the Chants, and the Undertakers, they represent an undeservedly lost chapter in early-'60s British rock & roll. Although they enjoyed a little less than a year of serious chart success, the Merseybeats were unable to pull together the various facets of their sound into a cohesive, coherent whole in the manner of the Beatles or the Hollies, and into something lasting, in part because of a lack of original songwriting ability in their ranks. The group's roots go back to the early '60s in Liverpool, and a band originally known as "the Mavericks," comprised of Tony Crane (lead guitar, vocals), Billy Kinsley (bass, vocals), David Elias (rhythm guitar, vocals), and Frank Sloane (drums). They were doing well but soon found the name to be a drag on their success, making people think that they were a country & western band. They briefly used the name "the Pacifics," and then became the Merseybeats -- evidently their timing was such that they grabbed the name, previously a local music reference, ahead of anyone else in a city boiling over with musical activity.

By the end of 1962, the Merseybeats lineup had solidified around Crane and Kinsley, with Aaron Williams joining on rhythm guitar in place of Elias and John Banks succeeding Sloane. The group made their recording debut around this time as part of the Oriole label's Liverpool showcase, This Is Merseybeat. With the help of the manager of the Cavern Club, they were formally signed to Fontana Records in mid-1963, and made their debut in August of that year with a single of "It's Love That Really Counts" b/w "Fortune Teller" -- the A-side, a Bacharach/David tune, was a solid piece of British Invasion pop/rock in the best Beatles/Hollies/Searchers mode, with memorable guitar hooks and a memorable chorus, and it reached number 24 on the U.K. charts. They were later signed up by the Beatles' legendary manager, Brian Epstein, but the fit was an awkward one, owing to differences in musical sensibility -- the group was a fairly hard rock & roll outfit, but their singles tended much more to the pop side of rock & roll, and the A-sides never represented their real sound very well. In early 1964, the Merseybeats released a second single, "I Think of You" backed with the pop/rock standard "Mister Moonlight," which reached number five in England. In both of these instances, the B-side was closer to the band's sound than the A-side and, in both instances, the band had latched onto the material first -- but was eclipsed by rival versions by the Rolling Stones and the Beatles.

Though it had come along a little late, "It's Love That Really Counts" turned the group into a major pop/rock act, and the future looked good for them. But there were problems on the horizon, starting with the fact that neither of those singles had made even the slightest impact in the United States, which was where the real fortunes were to be made; and, much more seriously, the decision by Billy Kinsley to leave the band in 1964 in order to form his own group, the Kinsleys. In his place, they got John Gustafson on bass and vocals. formerly of Liverpool's Big Three trio, who also contributed some songwriting. In April of 1963, they released "Don't Turn Around" b/w "Really Mystified," which -- despite a beautifully catchy, harmony-and-hook-laden A-side that was heavily influenced by the work of Roy Orbison, and an original B-side co-authored by Crane and Gustafson -- didn't do quite as well, peaking at number 13. A third single in July, "Wishin' and Hopin'" b/w "Milkman" (the latter another Crane/Gustafson original), also reached number 13. The band released a pair of extended-play singles, including "I Think of You" and "Merseybeats on Stage," the latter capturing their real sound in concert and included "Long Tall Sally" and "You Can't Judge a Book by Its Cover" in early 1964. They also worked their way into two rock & roll featurettes, Swinging UK and UK Swings Again -- one of their clips, "Don't Turn Around," was nicely staged, the band miming to the single on a platform that, on the chorus of the title, starts to rotate.

The Merseybeats were successful enough to get an LP release, and the resulting self-titled album showcased their limitations as well as their virtues. Amid a few inspired moments, mostly on the single-sides (such as "Milkman") picked up for the LP, there were some "originals" that were highly derivative of Bo Diddley and Little Richard, interspersed with some decent Liverpool-style adaptations of American R&B ("Bring It on Home to Me," "He Will Break Your Heart,") and a strange choice of show tunes, one ("Hello Young Lovers") partly successful and the other not. Apart from a lack of originality in their sound, the album pointed to the group's very thin in-house songwriting -- they were almost wholly dependent on Peter Lee Stirling, who had written their three biggest, single A-sides, for success. And to judge from the weak diversity on their album, one couldn't tell if the Merseybeats wanted to sound like the Beatles, the Fortunes, or the Pretty Things, and as a consequence gained very few fans from the release.

Their fall 1964 single "Last Night I Made a Little Girl Cry" b/w "Send Me Back," barely made the British Top 40, peaking at number 40, and it wasn't long after this that Gustafson left the band and was replaced by Kinsley, whose return to the lineup coincided with their last round of success as the Merseybeats. By 1965, the Liverpool sound synonymous with the term "Merseybeat" was considered old-hat, and the name that had helped gain the group some vital recognition was now weighing them down. Following "I Love You, Yes I Do" b/w "Good, Good Lovin'," and "I Stand Accused" (later covered by Elvis Costello) backed with "All My Life," which peaked at numbers 22 and 38, respectively, the group seemed to have run its course for commercial success by early 1966. They were rescued by the interest of the members of the Who, whose members knew Crane and Kinsley, and got them under the management of Chris Stamp and Kit Lambert.

Pin Ups In mid-1966, Crane and Kinsley became the Merseys and scored a huge hit with "Sorrow" later that year, reaching number four in England. They'd still never charted a record in America, however, and their next single, a fine rendition of the Who song "So Sad About Us," never charted. The duo called it quits after the release of their single "Lovely" b/w "Loretta Drifting." Kinsley went on to form Rockin' Horse, while Crane later re-fomed the old band -- after a fashion -- as Tony Crane & the Merseybeats during the '70s and '80s, with Bob Packham on bass and vocals, Alan Cosgrove on drums and vocals, and Colin Drummond on keyboards and vocals. The original group was fondly remembered and the band did well embracing its own past; in the meantime, David Bowie covered "Sorrow" on Pin Ups in 1973, an acknowledgment of the lingering appeal of their best work. By the '90s, Kinsley was working with them again as the Merseybeats, built around that same core lineup except for Dave Goldberg on keyboards. In 2000, Crane's son Adrian joined on keyboards and guitar, and Lou Rosenthal took over on drums.


01. The Merseybeats-Don’t Turn Around                       
02. The Merseybeats-Fortune Teller                          
03. The Merseybeats-I Love You Baby  I Love You Yes I Do    
04. The Merseybeats-I Think Of You                          
05. The Merseybeats-It’s Love That Really Counts            
06. The Merseybeats-Mr. Moonlight                           
07. The Merseybeats-Sorrow                                  
08. The Merseybeats-Wishin’ And Hopin’                      
09. The Merseybeats-You Can’t Judge A Book By Its Cover     

VA - Merseybeat - The Story Of The Liverpool 60s Sound (2CD)

VA - Merseybeat - The Story Of The Liverpool 60s Sound (2CD)

The musical influence in Liverpool in the late 1950’s was British recording artist Lonnie Donegan who started the skiffle boom. It didn’t last very long as many newly formed skiffle groups turned to rock ‘n’ roll, the most well known being The Beatles who where just one of 100’s of groups performing at dance halls and ‘Jive Hives’ in and around Merseyside, the most famous being ‘The Cavern Club’ which started out as a jazz club but, after some resistance, changed over to rock ‘n’ roll. Not all clubs changed to playing this type of music, some groups played Country and Western, others went into Folk music therefore various music styles made up the ‘Mersey Sound’. Some of these groups recordings have been included on the site. There was also versatility within the groups the line-up wasn’t just a singer and backing musicians, listen to the recordings on the site different group members singing to vary the sounds produced, The Dennisons - Ray Scragge with his husky voice singing ‘Walkin’ The Dog’ is a good example of a different group members taking lead vocals.


VA - Merseybeat - The Story Of The Liverpool 60s Sound (2CD)



Mersey Beats - Liverpool A Go Go (1965) and Canadian Beatles....

Mersey Beats - Liverpool A Go Go (1965) and Canadian Beatles....






LIVERPOOL A GO GO-mersey beats-ARC-1965 A850
Real nice and raw early cover version
on this Canadian only Comp. Unknown studio band with a gritty sound. 

Mersey Beats - Liverpool A Go Go (1965) and Canadian Beatles....


Wanted full LP
Canadian Beadles - Three Faces North (1964)

Mersey Beats - Liverpool A Go Go (1965) and Canadian Beatles....

Mersey Beats - Liverpool A Go Go (1965) and Canadian Beatles....


What About Us? More Merseybeat NuggetsVA - The Story Of The MerseybeatShe Came From Liverpool! (Merseyside Girl Pop 1962-68)The Swinging Blue Jeans - Rarities&Live TracksVA-All Time Greatest Hits The Mersey & The BeatThe Merseybeats-All Time Greatest Hits (Purple Pyramid 2008)The Merseybeats - I Think Of You (1963-196VA - Merseybeat - The Story Of The Liverpool 60s Sound (2CD)Mersey Beats - Liverpool A Go Go (1965) and Canadian Beatles....

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