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VA - Mod - The Early Years 3

VA - Mod - The Early Years 3

VA - Mod - The Early Years 3

01 - Gene Chandler - Duke Of Earl
02 - Marvin Gaye - Let Your Conscience Be Your Guide
03 - Tiny Topsy - Miss You So
04 - Charles Sheffield - It's Your Voodoo Working
05 - Eric Morris - Humpty Dumpty Mod
06 - Sugar Pie Desanto - I Want To Know
07 - The Supremes - Buttered Popcorn
08 - The Contours - Whole Lotta Woman
09 - The Fabulous Playboys - Honky Tonk Women
10 - Huey Piano Smith - Don't You Just Know It
11 - The Isley Brothers - Respectable
12 - Etta James - I Just Want To Make Love To You
13 - Marv Johnson - Come To Me
14 - The Mar Keys - Last Night
15 - The Marathons - Peanut Butter
16 - Popcorn & The Mohawks - Shimmy Gully
17 - The Shirelles - Baby It's You
18 - Ann Cole - Plain As The Nose On Your Face
19 - Lavern Baker - Voodoo Voodoo
20 - Prince Conley - I'm Going Home

beatman said:

VA - Mod - The Early Years 2

VA - Mod - The Early Years 2

VA - Mod - The Early Years 2


01 - Barrett Strong - Money (That's What I Want)
02 - Ernie K-Doe - A Certain Girl
03 - Willie Cobbs - You Don't Love Me
04 - The Isley Brothers - Shout (Part 1 & 2)
05 - James Brown - Please, Please, Please
06 - Little Willie John - Fever
07 - Slim Harpo - Don't Start Cryin' Now
08 - Bill Doggett - Honky Tonk (Part 2)
09 - Mary Wells - Bye Bye Baby
10 - Nat Kendrick - Mashed Potatoes
11 - The Shirelles - Mama Said
12 - Bobby Bland - I Pity The Fool
13 - Bobby Peterson Quintet - Mama Get Your Hammer
14 - Eddie Holland - Take A Chance On Me
15 - The Jarmels - Keep Your Mind On Me
16 - Ed Townsend - Cherrigale
17 - Freddie King - Hide Away
18 - Maurice Williams & The Zodiacs - Come And Get It
19 - Roscoe Gordon - Just A Little Bit
20 - Dave Cortez - Hurricane

beatman said:



VA - Mod - The Early Years 1

VA - Mod - The Early Years 1

VA - Mod - The Early Years 1


01 - Bobby Bland - Turn On Your Love Light
02 - Bobby Parker - Watch Your Step
03 - Carla Thomas - Gee Whiz
04 - Chris Kenner - I Like It Like That - Part 1
05 - Ben E. King - Stand By Me
06 - James Ray - If You Gotta Make A Fool
07 - Pete Bennett & The Embers - Fever
08 - The Triumphs - Burnt Biscuits
09 - Barbie Gaye - My Boy Lollipop
10 - Carl Lester - When You See Me Hurt
11 - Paul Gayten - The Hunch
12 - Bobby Freeman - (Do The) Shimmy Shimmy
13 - Gene & Al's Spacemen - Mercy
14 - Jessie Hill - Ooh Poo Pah Doo
15 - The Olympics - (Baby) Hully Gully
16 - Bobby Freeman - The Mess Around
17 - Chuck Jackson - I Don't Want To Cry
18 - Little Papa Joe - Looking For My Baby
19 - Willie Harper - But I Couldn't
20 - Barbara George - I Know (You Don't Love Me No More)

beatman said:



The Birds - The Collector's Guide To Rare British Birds

The Birds - The Collector's Guide To Rare British Birds



The Birds - The Collector's Guide To Rare British Birds

The Birds - The Collector's Guide To Rare British Birds

The Birds - The Collector's Guide To Rare British Birds

The Birds - The Collector's Guide To Rare British Birds

The Birds - The Collector's Guide To Rare British Birds

Members: Ali McKenzie: vocals - Ron Wood: lead guitar, vocals - Tony Munroe: rhythm guitar, vocals - Kim Gardner: bass, vocals - Pete McDaniels: drums.

The Birds were one of the hard-luck outfits in the annals of '60s British rock. By reputation, they were one of the top R&B-based outfits in England during the mid-'60s, with a sound as hard and appealing as the Who, the Yardbirds, or the Small Faces. In contrast to a lot of other acts that never charted a hit, the Birds are remembered slightly by some serious fans, and are mentioned in several history books -- but for entirely the wrong reasons. the Birds are remembered for the fact that Ron Wood got his start in the band before moving on to bigger things with the Faces and the Rolling Stones; and that they shared a name, albeit spelled differently, with an American band of considerable prominence. Nobody knows a lot about their music, however, which, on record, consisted of fewer than a dozen songs. Ron Wood (guitar, harmonica, vocals), Tony Munroe (guitar, vocals), and Kim Gardner (bass) grew up within a block of each other, along with original drummer Bob Langham (succeeded by Pete Hocking, aka Pete McDaniels), and had gotten together with lead singer Ali McKenzie to form a band in 1964, while all were in their teens. They were based in Yiewsley in West London, and played the local community center regularly, building up a serious following, which led to their turning professional. The name the Birds came about when they were forced to change their original name, the Thunderbirds, owing to the name of Chris Farlowe's backing band of the period. Their music was hard R&B with a real edge to to it, and was good enough to get them into in a battle-of-the-bands contest held under the aegis of Ready, Steady, Go, the weekly music showcase series. They didn't win, but got a television appearance out of it, on which they were spotted by executives from Decca -- a contract followed, resulting in the recording of their first single, "You Don't Love Me," in November of 1964. Early the following spring, they tried again with a second single, "Leaving Here," which they got to perform on television.
The group seemed poised for success. Their bookings placed them ahead of the Pretty Things and the early Jeff Beck group the Tridents, and they were billed with the Who on some of the same gigs. In that company, there seemed to be no way that they could fail, especially with their sound, a loud, crunchy brand of British rhythm & blues-based rock, roughly akin to early Who, the Yardbirds, and the Kinks.
Disaster struck the band from a completely unexpected quarter -- across the Atlantic -- at in the spring of 1965, however. Fresh off of their first U.S. hit came a Los Angeles-based quintet called the Byrds. Their debut single, "Mr. Tambourine Man," released on the newly established British CBS Records label, was burning up the British charts, and "Leaving Here" by the Birds was left there, on record store shelves (when it was ordered at all). That summer the rival group toured England for the first time, and although the Birds' manager tried to take legal action, it was to no avail -- the spellings were different, and both groups' claim to the name were about equally good. A third Decca single in late 1965 brought their relationship with that label to an end. The group then moved to Reaction Records, at first under the name Birds Birds, but their debut single for the label, "Say Those Magic Words," was delayed in release for almost a year due to a contractual dispute. They also cut a version of Pete Townshend's "Run Run Run" highlighted by Wood's crunchy guitar and McKenzie's punked-out vocals, that could've given the Who a run for their money in a chase up the charts by rival singles. And they got one delightfully bizarre film appearance under their belt, performing a Ron Wood/Tony Munroe song, "That's All I Need," in the horror chiller The Deadly Bees, in 1966. Munroe was out of the band not long after, and Wood left in 1967, passing through the lineup of the Jeff Beck Group before joining the reconfigured (Small) Faces with Rod Stewart in 1969.
the Birds were one of the better bands of their era, as evidenced by the large following they built up from their live performances, playing a hard, loud brand of R&B, with polished vocals and a forceful, crunchy guitar sound. They weren't far removed from the Small Faces or the Who in sound, and perhaps they might've fared better, or had a longer run at success, if they hadn't been signed to a label that already had the Small Faces and the Rolling Stones under contract. The name confusion probably killed whatever chance they had of cracking the English charts, as well as eclipsing their musical virtues for posterity.


The Birds - The Collector's Guide To Rare British Birds


This is an astonishingly lively and exciting collection, coming from a band that scarcely sold any records in their own time and are known today for their name and their lineup, but not their music. The stuff here is as crunchy and grinding as the early Who material, and if the band's own songwriting isn't as distinctive, the style of the performing is more appealing. The songs range from some hot Ron Wood originals ("You're on My Mind," "Next in Line," "That's All I Need") to covers of obscure Motown songs and Pete Townshend material. Think of the Kinks from "Long Tall Sally," the Yardbirds from "A Certain Girl," or the Who from "The Good's Gone" and that's the dominant sound here -- curiously, their cover of Townshend's "Run Run Run" starts out as though it's going to turn into "My Generation." Ali MacKenzie sounded like a punkier Roger Daltrey, and Ron Wood's playing was a delightful compendium of rhythm fills and angular blues licks that must've been devastating on-stage. There's also an unlisted bonus track on the CD -- at the risk of spoiling the surprise, it's their number from the 1966 horror film The Deadly Bees, which seems not to have survived as a formal, free-standing studio master.

VA -Beat Us If You Can: 36 Sixties Mod - R&B - Beat Winners ! From The UK!

VA -Beat Us If You Can: 36 Sixties Mod - R&B - Beat Winners ! From The UK!

Beat Us If You Can, Vol. 1

VA -Beat Us If You Can: 36 Sixties Mod - R&B - Beat Winners ! From The UK!


Eighteen rare mod/R&B/beat cuts from the 1960s are on this LP, most from the U.K. and a little more than half previously unavailable on any reissue compilation, though (despite what the title says) a couple are actually from Australia. Not a single one of these artists is well known with the exception of Heinz, though the Liverpool Five and the Beatstalkers might be reasonably familiar to hardcore British Invasion collectors. While this stuff is undeniably off the beaten track, truthfully most of it's on the forgettable and formulaic side. At least there's some variety within the framework, the selections ranging from innocuous Merseybeat to power-chording mod and borderline heavy psychedelia. And there are a few standouts here and there, the best by far being Force West's "Talkin' About Our Love," which could be the best early Hollies imitation bar none. the Liverpool Five's "Piccadilly Line" is fairly solid British Invasion soul-R&B; John Bryant's "Tell Me What You See" (from Australia) is reasonable, earnest, gritty folk-rock; Tony Ritchie's "Anyone at the Party Seen Jenny" is oddball bossa nova rock; the Beatstalkers' "You Better Get a Hold On" is fair Scottish soul-rock; and Heinz's "Movin' In" is actually superbly raunchy with phenomenal fiery guitar, though it's been reissued on numerous other Heinz-only anthologies. All this would make for a decent EP, but as a whole the LP's only for British Invasion specialists.
~ by Richie Unterberger

. 1 - Wishful Thinking - V.I.P (02:43)
. 2 - Lyons & Malone - She's Alright (02:50)
. 3 - The Groove - Play The Song (02:17)
. 4 -  Don Charles - She's Mine (02:11)
. 5 -  The New Breed - Friends & Lovers Forever (02:31)
. 6 -  The Monotones - Something's Hurting Me (02:30)
. 7 -  The Liverpool 5 - Piccadilly Line (This Jumps Sorry) (02:46)
. 8 -  John Bryant - Tell Me What You See (02:17)
. 9 - The Force Five - Gto Tiger (02:25)
. 10 -  Tony Richie - Anybody At The Party Seen Jenny (02:50)
. 11 - The Executives - Sensations (03:07)
. 12 -  Pattersons People - Deadly Nightshade (02:10)
. 13 -  The Cherokees - Everybody Needs (02:32)
. 14 -  One Hit Wonders - Hey Hey Jump Now (02:47)
. 15 - The Beatstalkers - You'd Better Get A Hold On (02:06)
. 16 -  Force West - Talkin' About Our Love (02:18)
. 17 - The Kingpins - Thats The Way It Should Be (02:29)
. 18 -  Heinz - Movin' In (02:27)

Beat Us If You Can, Vol. 2

VA -Beat Us If You Can: 36 Sixties Mod - R&B - Beat Winners ! From The UK!

Like the first volume of this series, this has rare non-hits of the 1960s British Invasion that aren't even easily found on other compilations dedicated to that theme. Not all rarities are lost gems, though, and while the 18 tracks on this LP are generally OK, they're more amiable than they are remarkable. There are quite a few fairly nondescript mod rock-ish items here, most by groups that are unknown even to many major British Invasion fans, though the Downliners Sect, Zephyrs, Beatstalkers, and Dave Davani Four will ring some bells with serious collectors. The Zephyrs' "There's Something About You" and the Nothings' "At Times Like This" are reasonably catchy items (though the Nothings must qualify as one of the least-likely-to-succeed band names in all of '60s rock), but neither are exactly lost classics. In fact, the standout track is the Dave Davani Four's "Top of the Pops," a super-cool slice of instrumental jazzy organ R&B, even if it's not too typical of the British Invasion sound. All credit to the compilers for selecting material that's not apt to duplicate other items in the collections of the fans likely to buy something like this, but even for such fans, it's more likely to be something to be filed away for safekeeping rather than played repeatedly for pleasure.
~ by Richie Unterberger

 .01 - Lyons & Malone - Dr. Gentle (03:00)
. 02 -The Cresters - I Just Don't Understand (02:19)
. 03 - The League - Nothing On (02:15)
. 04 - The Downliners Sect - Lonely And Blue (02:46)
. 05 - The Peenuts - Trouble (02:08)
. 06 - Dick Watson Five - I'll Make It Up Some Other Way (01:44)
. 07 - Gates Of Eden - Hey Now (02:19)
. 08 - The Force Five - I Want You Baby (02:03)
. 09 - The Peeps - The Loser Wins (02:38)
. 10 - The Exceptions - The Eagle Flies On Friday (02:50)
. 11 - The Beatstalkers - Everybody's Talking About You (02:49)
. 12 - The Zephyrs - There's Somethimg About You (02:19)
. 13 - The Nothings - At Times Like This (02:34)
. 14 - The Interns - Just Like Me (02:13)
. 15 - The New Breed - Unto Us (02:31)
. 16 - The Pentad - Don't Throw It All Away (02:56)
. 17 - The Nerve - Satisfying Kind (02:19)
. 18 - The Dave Davani Four - Top Of The Pops (02:12)


Love Affair - The Best Of The Good Times

Love Affair - The Best Of The Good Times


Originally formed in 1966, this London, England-based quintet comprised Steve Ellis (vocals), Morgan Fisher (b. 1 January 1950, London, England; keyboards), Rex Brayley (guitar), Mick Jackson (bass) and Maurice Bacon (drums). Although Ellis was barely 16 years old, the band performed frequently in clubs on a semi-professional basis. Fisher was briefly replaced by Lynton Guest and the following year Ellis, backed by session musicians, recorded a sparkling cover version of Robert Knight’s ‘Everlasting Love’ for CBS Records. By January 1968, the single unexpectedly hit number 1 in the UK and Love Affair became instant pop stars with Ellis’ cherubic looks gracing teen magazines throughout the nation. With Bacon’s father Sid overseeing the management, the band resisted the solicitations of more powerful entrepreneurs, yet failed to exploit their potential. Four more Top 20 hits followed, ‘Rainbow Valley’, ‘A Day Without Love’, ‘One Road’ and ‘Bringing On Back The Good Times’, but by 1969 Ellis had left to start a solo career. He recorded a few singles and the soundtrack to Loot before collaborating with Zoot Money in Ellis, who released two albums for Epic Records (1972’s Riding On The Crest Of A Slump and 1973’s ... Why Not?). Ellis later sang with Widowmaker, and in 1978 recorded a solo album (The Last Angry Man) which was briefly made available on cassette before finally being given a full release in 2000.

The remaining quartet recruited new vocalist Gus Eadon (b. Auguste Eadon; ex-Elastic Band) and began to steer the band in a more progressive direction. The second Love Affair album, released at the beginning of 1971, was credited simply to LA in an attempt to attract a more mature audience. The record was a commercial failure and six months later the band was dropped by CBS. They resigned to Parlophone Records as Love Affair but were unable to revive their fortunes. Bacon and Fisher left to form Morgan, recording 1973’s Nova Solis for RCA Records. Fisher later reappeared in Mott The Hoople and the Third Ear Band before releasing some bizarre solo material for Cherry Red Records during the 80s and launching a career in Japan. Bacon moved into music publishing and management, while Jackson worked his way up to become an important figure in the Alfa Romeo car group. A line-up of the Love Affair featuring no original members went on to issue obscure singles for Pye Records and Creole, before successively plundering the band’s name for cabaret/revivalist bookings.

Love Affair - The Best Of The Good Times

Love Affair - The Best Of The Good Times

Love Affair - The Best Of The Good Times

Love Affair - The Best Of The Good Times

Love Affair - The Best Of The Good Times

Love Affair - The Best Of The Good Times


Love Affair - The Best Of The Good Times

The Artwoods - Jazz in Jeans (+14 bonus)

The Artwoods - Jazz in Jeans (+14 bonus)

The Artwoods - Jazz in Jeans (+14 bonus)



The Artwoods were every bit the rivals of such bands as the Animals and the Spencer Davis Group, but never saw the success as a recording act that either of them enjoyed. Rather, their following was confined to the clubs they played, despite releasing a half-dozen singles and an LP during their four years together.

Art Wood, the older brother of Ron Wood, had been involved with the London blues scene almost from the beginning, as an original member of Blues Incorporated, the pioneering blues/R&B outfit founded by Alexis Korner and Cyril Davies. He was the backup rhythm singer in the band's early lineup, before the split between Davies and Korner (and prior to their recording their one and only album); he also had a group of his own that he fronted on the side, called the Art Woods Combo. They later became the Artwoods in 1963 and Jon Lord later joined along with guitarist Derek Griffiths, after their own earlier band, Red Bludd's Bluesicians, split up. The group's decision to turn professional in 1964 required a new drummer and Keef Hartley was recruited by way of an ad in Melody Maker magazine. For their bassist, they raided Malcolm Pool from the Roadrunners lineup. In the booming London music scene, getting a recording contract was relatively easy -- labels were signing everything in sight that could make a noise that sounded like music -- and they joined Decca Records' roster in 1964.
The Artwoods - Jazz in Jeans (+14 bonus)

The Artwoods' early records are some of the most fondly remembered British R&B singles, rivals to the work of the Rolling Stones, the Yardbirds, or, ironically enough, the Birds, the outfit of which Art Wood's younger brother Ron Wood was a member. Their sound was as steeped in soul and funk as it was in blues, which set them apart from many of their rivals. What's more, they were good at it, with a natural feel for the music and even capable of writing decent originals, which graced the B-sides of their singles. And they had a virtuoso lineup: Jon Lord's piano and organ sound was a great complement to Wood's singing, Derek Griffiths' guitar work was tastefully flashy, and Keef Hartley was animated as well as powerful, with a bigger sound on the drums than, say, Jim McCarty of the Yardbirds. All of these attributes made the Artwoods a top stage attraction. Club audiences always knew they were good for a great show and the band loved playing live. Ultimately, in fact, the group's success in touring and their love of playing live may have hurt them. They had no problem playing hundreds of gigs a year at venues like Klooks Kleek in Hampstead and dozens of lesser clubs for the sheer enjoyment of it, but they earned relatively little money doing it.

At the same time, their singles never seemed to connect, despite appearances on programs like Ready, Steady, Go! and other television venues promoting them. Their failure as a recording outfit is inexplicable upon hearing the singles -- they weren't strong songwriters, to be sure, but when covering American-style R&B, their records were soulful, funky, and played not only well but inventively; close your eyes and it seems like they were the U.K. answer to Booker T. & the MG's. And the vocals -- if not as charismatic as what Eric Burdon, Mick Jagger, or Paul Jones were doing with their respective bands -- were attractive and memorable and sounded authentically American. And, in contrast to a lot of other British bands of that period, they did manage to capture something of their live sound on those records, which made them very potent. In fairness, Decca even allowed them to cut a complete LP despite their lack of chart success, but the quintet never broke through. Like the Action, another U.K. R&B outfit that made great records that never got heard, the Artwoods never did more than amaze audiences one club at a time and leave behind some great music to be found by pop culture archivists.
The Artwoods - Jazz in Jeans (+14 bonus)

A series of label switches in 1967 to Parlophone and then Fontana gave them some furtive success on the continent (in Denmark, of all places) and after four years of hard work, the Artwoods called it quits after a brief foray under the name the St. Valentine's Day Massacre. Keef Hartley was the first to go, heading to John Mayall's band (Macolm Pool followed his lead) and then into his own group, while Jon Lord, who had dabbled in studio outfits like Santa Barbara Machinehead, took up an offer from ex-Searcher Chris Curtis to join a group called Roundabout, which evolved into Deep Purple. Art Wood himself never left music, despite the disappointment inherent in the Artwoods. Like such older contemporaries as Alexis Korner, he made the occasional recording and was one of the members of the revived Downliners Sect during the 1980s and 1990s.

The Artwoods - Jazz in Jeans 1966

The Artwoods - Jazz in Jeans (+14 bonus)


This four-song British EP was a coveted '60s British rock collectible, not so much for the music (which is just OK) as for its rarity. Although the title might lead one to expect a jazzier bent than was evident on the Artwoods' other recordings (which sometimes did have a jazzy tinge, particularly in the keyboards), it's just an assortment of four covers, none particularly good except for "Our Man Flint," which is a sizzling jazz-blues organ instrumental. Aside from that, there's a pretty meaningless version of "These Boots Are Made for Walkin'," a fair jazzy instrumental treatment of "A Taste of Honey," and a dull Jon Lord R&B/rock original with the unfortunately accurate title "Routine."

The Artwoods - Jazz in Jeans (+14 bonus) 
Recordsmen Communications ‎– RCM 00113 2
2010

The Artwoods - Jazz in Jeans (+14 bonus)

01. Sweet Mary   [1964]    [0:02:55.09]
02. If I Ever Get My Hands On You   [1964]    [0:02:03.46]
03. Oh My Love   [1965]    [0:02:52.37]
04. Big City   [1965]    [0:02:09.11]
05. Goodbye Sisters   [1965]    [0:02:53.61]
06. She Knows What To Do   [1965]    [0:02:30.36]
07. I Take What I Want   [1966]    [0:02:54.54]
08. I'm Looking For A Saxophonist Doubling French Horn Wearing Size 37 Boots   [1966]    [0:02:48.12]
09. I Feel Good   [1966]    [0:02:46.15]
10. Molly Anderson's Cookery Book   [1966]    [0:03:30.10]
11. What Shall I Do   [1967]    [0:02:52.47]
12. In The Deep End   [1967]    [0:03:07.12]
13. Brother Can You Spare A Dime   [1967]    [0:02:57.09]
14. Al's Party   [1967]    [0:02:44.38]
15. These Boots Are Made For Walking   [1966]    [0:02:47.14]
16. A Taste Of Honey   [1966]    [0:03:11.44]
17. Our Man Flint   [1966]    [0:03:00.37]
18. Routine   [1966]    [0:03:05.43]



The Sorrows - Old Songs, New Songs

The Sorrows - Old Songs, New Songs


The first-ever official reissue of this legendary Italian-only late Sixties album! British freakbeat/garage R&B giants the Sorrows relocated to Italy in 1966, recording the album Old Songs New Songs a couple of years later for a small independent label based in Milan. Now extremely rare as an original pressing, this new, band-approved reissue features the album in sparkling sound quality and adds an extra 100 minutes of music, nearly all of which is previously unreleased. Among the highlights are the magnificent heavy psychedelia of the band's aborted early 1968 Pye single 'Which Way'/'My Way Of Thinking', the theme song to the cult Italian spy caper Ypotron, a couple of movie collaborations with soundtrack maestro Ennio Morricone, and even an entire late 1968 demo album that, following the departure of two group members, was eventually scrapped and replaced by Old Songs New Songs! Completed by a previously unheard live gig from 1980 that proved the Sorrows' savage garage band instincts were fully intact a decade later, this package features new, extremely detailed sleevenotes concerning their time in Italy, with fresh band quotes and some superb, previously unpublished photos. This incredible 2CD package is the final word on the band's lengthy but previously little-documented Italian sojourn!

"This is the final word on the Sorrows, dating from their later Italian period. Disc one is the real keeper here, coupling the rare Cream/Hendrix inspired '69 LP Old Songs New Songs in great sound with the addition of nine rare and unreleased tracks from the same period. The spy film theme 'Ypotron' is a freakbeat jewel and 'Which Way' and 'My Way Of Thinking' from a '68 acetate are sublime psych gems, up there with the greatest of the genre. Disc two is not essential but adds interest as wider documentation. There's a nine track demo album, featuring some great band originals and alternate takes as well as rather less thrilling extemporisations of Bee Gees, Animals, Beatles and Traffic songs. A 1980 live reunion reflects the band's mid-60s stage repertoire but other than spirited renditions of 'Let Me In' and 'Take A Heart', this is mainly a rock 'n' roll revival show. The booklet and David Wells' liners are immaculate and make clear sense of the convoluted story of this undervalued band." (Shindig!)

"To most 60s pop fans, the Sorrows are known as one-hit wonders with a rough sound and a surly attitude, featuring the soon-solo talents of Don Fardon - himself a one-hit wonder with 'Indian Reservation', but perhaps best known for being six foot, seven-and-a-half inches tall. And that's it. Long after Fardon split, however, some of the band grabbed a last chance (for an extended holiday, at least) and relocated to Italy in 1966 to try and cash in on an Anglophilic scene. During this footnote era, they did achieve some squealing success as a placebo live draw, and hung around for years playing Family and Traffic songs, plus numbers by the ex-pat rockers who made up a bewildering, revolving cast list (two relatively major players are remembered only as "Kit" and "Rod"). They recorded singles for a tiny Italian indie label and, eventually, an LP. Old Songs New Songs is rare, inevitably hailed as a legendary cult classic. This two-disc set contains a complete bonus demo album and various 45 sides, including the sole outstanding track 'Ypotron' - feed-backing freakbeat recorded in '66 for an Italian spy caper movie." (Record Collector)

The Sorrows hardly require introduction - their 1965 chart single ‘Take a Heart’ virtually defines freakbeat, after all. As most readers will know, the group began shedding members when they failed to match that record’s modest commercial success in the following months, but did carry on, eventually decamping to Italy where, for a time, they were regarded as genuine pop stars. Their collectible, sometimes bootlegged 1969 LP for the tiny Milan-based Miura label here receives its first authorized reissue, together with a wealth of related singles, film soundtrack numbers, demos, and the previously unissued live recording of a 1980 band reunion gig. With an informative and photo-packed booklet, this set sheds considerable light on the Sorrows’ previously somewhat murky Italian period. If a bit of a hodge-podge, considering that it was cobbled together from bits and pieces by at least three different band configurations, Old Songs New Songs actually hangs together pretty well as an album. Basically, it reflects their live sets of the period, which featured covers of numbers by Traffic, the Small Faces and Family along with band originals like guitarist Chuck Fryers’ ‘Hey Hey’, ‘Same Old Road’ and the decidedly heavy ‘Io Amo Te Per Lei’ (heard elsewhere here in an earlier UK-recorded demo of its original English language incarnation, ‘Which Way’). By far the strangest track - and possibly the most interesting - is ‘The Maker’, six minutes of loopy British psychedelia that rocks like mad before fading on a coda of sitar and Spanish guitar. It’s a holdover from the short-lived line-up that included two fellows named Kit and Rod (their surnames have faded from memory). Based on this and two other Kit and Rod-penned numbers from the same demo sessions (the catchy ‘Dogs And Cats’ and the Ogden’s-flavoured ‘Answer My Questions’), they were a clever pair of songwriters, and one wonders what became of them. Also of interest are the very cool ’66-vintage film soundtrack recordings ‘Pioggia Sul Tuo Viso #1’ and ‘Viso #2’ (both Ennio Morricone co-writes and both sung by former member Pip Whitcher) and the spy flick theme song ‘Ypotron’, a freakbeat winner with plenty of feedback and crunch. In 1980, the mid-‘60s Sorrows line-up, minus Don Fardon, reconvened for a series of pub gigs in their old Coventry stomping grounds. The set captured here concludes with (what else?) ‘Take A Heart’. “We had a hit record with this in 1965,” says the member announcing the number. “Three pounds each out of it!” (Ugly Things)

Initial line-up
Philip (Pip) Whitcher - (born 1943, Coventry) - lead guitar and vocals.
Don Fardon - (born Donald Arthur Maughn, 19 August 1940, Coventry) - vocals
Philip (Phil) Packham - (born 13 June 1945, Bidford-on-Avon, near Stratford, Warwickshire) - bass guitar
Terry Juckes - (born 27 August 1943, Broadway, Worcestershire ) - rhythm guitar - vocals
Bruce Finlay - (born 20 September 1944, Huntly, Aberdeenshire, Scotland) - drums

After 1966
Philip (Pip) Whitcher - rhythm guitar and vocals
Wesley 'Wez' Price - bass - (born 19 July 1945, Coventry, Warwickshire)
Roger (Rog) Lomas - lead Guitar (born Roger David Lomas, 8 October 1948, Keresley Hospital, Coventry, Warwickshire). 1966 - 1967
Bruce Finlay - drums
Chuck Fryers - Guitar, vocals. (born Alan Paul Fryers, 24 May 1945, Bognor Regis, West Sussex). 1967 -1969
Geoff Prior - Bass. 1967 -
Chris Smith - lead vocals Hammond organ

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sorrows

The Sorrows - Old Songs, New Songs (1966-1980)

The Sorrows - Old Songs, New Songs

The Sorrows - Old Songs, New Songs

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