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Betty MacDonald Fan Club

Betty MacDonald Fan Club. Join fans of the beloved writer Betty MacDonald (1907-58). The original Betty MacDonald Fan Club and literary Society. Welcome to Betty MacDonald Fan Club and Betty MacDonald Society - the official Betty MacDonald Fan Club Website with members in 40 countries. Betty MacDonald, the author of The Egg and I and the Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle Series is beloved all over the world. Don't miss Wolfgang Hampel's Betty MacDonald biography and his very witty interviews on CD and DVD!

bettymacdonaldfanclub.blogspot.com

Betty MacDonald, Monica Sone and Dorita Hess

Bildergebnis für Happy Wednesday with Fall



same colour, isn't it.........................

Bildergebnis für Trump they don't know how to write good
Bildergebnis für Donald Trump and catsBildergebnis für Happy Sunday with TrumpBildergebnis für Vita Magica
Bildergebnis für Betty MacDonald farm in SeptemberBildergebnis für upside down house

Anne MacDonald Canham

Bildergebnis für Happy Wednesday with Typewriter


  





















Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle author Betty MacDonald on Vashon Island
http://seattletimes.com/ABPub/2011/06/16/2015337656.jpg




Betty MacDonald fan club fans,

Betty MacDonald fan club newsletter November does not only include the story of Betty MacDonald's and Monica Sone's friendship but also more info on Betty MacDonald's mysterious lady Dorita Hess and other persons described in Betty MacDonald's books.
 
New info regarding Betty MacDonald's filmed interview will come soon.

Betty MacDonald fan club voting for International Betty MacDonald fan club event 2018 will be very exciting.

Which city will be the winner?

My favourite is this city.



http://static01.nyt.com/images/2012/11/18/travel/18PRAGUE_SPAN/18PRAGUE-superJumbo.jpg



Do you have any idea which city this might be?

Send us a mail, please and you can win the the new Betty MacDonald documentary with several interviews by Wolfgang Hampel never published before. 


We are going to publish new Betty MacDonald essays on Betty MacDonald's gardens and nature in Washington State.

Lisa and Betty MacDonald fan club cooking research team are working on a new item 'Betty MacDonald and her favourite recipes'.
 
Betty MacDonald fans asked their favourite writer many questions regarding her cooking and recipes.

There had been many excellent cooks in the Bard family, for example Betty MacDonald's mother Sydney Bard. 

Betty MacDonald's husband Donald Chauncey MacDonald tried to be a good cook too.

Can you remember his favourite recipe?

If so send us mail and you can win the new Betty MacDonald fan club item 'Betty MacDonald and her favourite recipes'.

              Deadline: November 30, 2017
 
Good luck! 

Betty MacDonald fan club founder Wolfgang Hampel interviewed Betty MacDonald's daughter Joan MacDonald Keil and her husband Jerry Keil.

This interview will be published for the first time ever.


Happy Wednesday,

Peter 

Bildergebnis für Happy Wednesday with beautiful Fall flowers



Many ESC fans from all over the world are so very sad because we lost Joy Fleming - one of the best singers ever. 


Betty MacDonald fan club founder Wolfgang Hampel sings  'Try to remember' especially for Betty MacDonald fan club organizer Linde Lund at Vita Magica September


you can join 


Betty MacDonald fan club


Betty MacDonald Society  


Vita Magica  


Eurovision Song Contest Fan Club 




on Facebook



Vita Magica Betty MacDonald event with Wolfgang Hampel, Thomas Bödigheimer and Friedrich von Hoheneichen


Vita Magica 


Betty MacDonald 

Betty MacDonald fan club 


Betty MacDonald fan club on Facebook


Betty MacDonald forum  

Wolfgang Hampel - Wikipedia ( English ) 

Wolfgang Hampel - Wikipedia ( English ) - The Egg and I 


Wolfgang Hampel - Wikipedia ( Polski)   

Wolfgang Hampel - Wikipedia ( German )

Wolfgang Hampel - LinkFang ( German ) 

Wolfgang Hampel - Academic ( German )

Wolfgang Hampel -   

Wolfgang Hampel - DBpedia  ( English / German )

Wolfgang Hampel - people check ( English ) 

Wolfgang Hampel - Memim ( English )

Vashon Island - Wikipedia ( German )

Wolfgang Hampel - Monica Sone - Wikipedia ( English )

Wolfgang Hampel - Ma and Pa Kettle - Wikipedia ( English )

Wolfgang Hampel - Ma and Pa Kettle - Wikipedia ( French ) 


Wolfgang Hampel - Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle - Wikipedia ( English)

Wolfgang Hampel in Florida State University 

Betty MacDonald fan club founder Wolfgang Hampel 

Betty MacDonald fan club interviews on CD/DVD

Betty MacDonald fan club items 

Betty MacDonald fan club items  - comments

Betty MacDonald fan club - The Stove and I  
 

Betty MacDonald fan club groups 

Betty MacDonald fan club organizer Linde Lund 


Germany and Europe





Talk of Merkel’s political demise has been going on since the 2015 refugee crisis, and yet she is still around.’ Photograph: Michele Tantussi/Getty Images
The collapse of Germany’s coalition talks is the latest shock to hit Europe. No one saw it coming. Of course the blow is of a different nature from the banking crisis, the war in Ukraine, the refugee crisis, Brexit, Trump, Poland and Hungary’s democratic backsliding, or Catalan secessionism. Germany’s politics look upended but the fundamentals are still in place: the postwar democratic set-up is hardly under threat. Still, this is rattling stuff. Europe’s powerhouse is in unknown political territory at a time when so much remains unresolved across the continent. And Germany’s political uncertainty means yet more uncertainty for the EU. Yet doomsayers shouldn’t assume that this crisis has to be fatal.
Nowhere outside Germany is the political breakdown being watched more closely than in France. Emmanuel Macron had set his sights on the German election as the starting point of his plan for a European “renaissance” alongside Merkel. On Monday, Macron did not hide his concern, saying it was not in France’s interest that “things become tense” in Germany. “We must move forward,” he added. But the worries go deeper than Germany’s internal problems. If Merkel was supposed to be the leader of the free world in the era of Trump and Brexit then what might the future look like without her? Far-right websites have been humming with glee at the news that Merkel has now run into deep difficulty.



There is little doubt about which forces might seek to capitalise on these events. Merkel has been a favourite punch bag for populists and extremists, left and right alike. Germany’s clout in Europe under her tenure has been much disparaged, not least by Putin and Trump. And the EU was meant to be “catching the winds in its sails” this year, as Jean-Claude Juncker said. But now what? The German crisis may or may not be solved through new elections, but to assess what it means for Europe, how Macron plays his cards will be a key factor.Macron’s France is on a bit of a high these days, and pulling Europe out of a difficult decade is one of the president’s biggest ambitions. He has built up a close relationship with Merkel, and together they had announced a “plan” for Europe to be implemented once Merkel had overcome her election hurdle. The trouble now is the clock is ticking. After the summer of 2018 campaigning for the 2019 European parliament elections gets under way. That’s a key political moment for Macron, who wants his République En Marche party to somehow be replicated across Europe through transnational lists which would then fill the departing UK’s 73 seats. Add to this Italy’s elections – due early 2018 – with the populist, anti-migrant Five Star Movement worryingly strong, and it becomes obvious that Europe does not need this German impasse.
Another German election could delay everything for months on end: fixing the eurozone, resolving the future relationship with Britain, dealing with the Balkans, delivering on trade deals, regulating globalisation, saving the Paris climate accord, building up European defence, solving Ukraine and the rest of it. As Britain pulls out of Europe, the dynamics of the Franco-German alliance have become absolutely paramount. Macron needs Germany if he is to succeed in at least creating the impression that he can transform France into a trailblazing European power. Germany needs France to allay continental perceptions that it has become too domineering and is acting selfishly.
But let’s keep things in perspective. Germany remains a strong democracy. Its economy is thriving. The country’s anchoring in the EU is not in doubt. Its main political parties all agree on the need to preserve the European project which, as Konrad Adenauer said in the 1950s, would be the road to Germany’s rehabilitation and its wellbeing. Merkel has repeatedly said this year: “Germany can do well only if Europe does well.” No serious politician contradicted her.


To a degree, the current trouble says more about German provincialism than it does about German might or hubris, or indeed any debate in Germany on a grand design for the country’s future or for Europe as a whole. Frank-Walter Steinmeier, the German president, wasn’t wrong when he warned on Monday that concern would only grow among his neighbours if the leaders of Europe’s largest nation did not rise to their responsibilities.Against that backdrop, Macron projects self-confidence while Merkel looks jaded. Yet Macron depends on the outcome in Germany more than anything else. At home, he has contained domestic opposition to his labour market reforms and his ratings are up. It is not good news for him that Merkel is now weakened. At the same time, talk of Merkel’s political demise has been going on since the 2015 refugee crisis, and yet she is still around.
Macron is now waiting to see how he can secure the benefits of a relationship he’s so keenly invested in. These questions aren’t just central to two political careers – one just starting, the other of almost record duration. They are central to a whole continent
.
Natalie Nougayrède is a Guardian columnist



Many ESC fans from all over the world are so very sad because we lost Joy Fleming - one of the best singers ever. 


Betty MacDonald fan club founder Wolfgang Hampel sings  'Try to remember' especially for Betty MacDonald fan club organizer Linde Lund at Vita Magica September


you can join 


Betty MacDonald fan club


Betty MacDonald Society  


Vita Magica  


Eurovision Song Contest Fan Club 




on Facebook



Vita Magica Betty MacDonald event with Wolfgang Hampel, Thomas Bödigheimer and Friedrich von Hoheneichen


Vita Magica 


Betty MacDonald 

Betty MacDonald fan club 


Betty MacDonald fan club on Facebook


Betty MacDonald forum  

Wolfgang Hampel - Wikipedia ( English ) 

Wolfgang Hampel - Wikipedia ( English ) - The Egg and I 


Wolfgang Hampel - Wikipedia ( Polski)   

Wolfgang Hampel - Wikipedia ( German )

Wolfgang Hampel - LinkFang ( German ) 

Wolfgang Hampel - Academic ( German )

Wolfgang Hampel -   

Wolfgang Hampel - DBpedia  ( English / German )

Wolfgang Hampel - people check ( English ) 

Wolfgang Hampel - Memim ( English )

Vashon Island - Wikipedia ( German )

Wolfgang Hampel - Monica Sone - Wikipedia ( English )

Wolfgang Hampel - Ma and Pa Kettle - Wikipedia ( English )

Wolfgang Hampel - Ma and Pa Kettle - Wikipedia ( French ) 


Wolfgang Hampel - Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle - Wikipedia ( English)

Wolfgang Hampel in Florida State University 

Betty MacDonald fan club founder Wolfgang Hampel 

Betty MacDonald fan club interviews on CD/DVD

Betty MacDonald fan club items 

Betty MacDonald fan club items  - comments

Betty MacDonald fan club - The Stove and I  
 

Betty MacDonald fan club groups 

Betty MacDonald fan club organizer Linde Lund 

Trump and Putin about Syria



Trump, Putin discuss Syria, NKorea, more in hour-plus call


Trump's phone call with the Russian president came a day after Putin met with Syrian President Bashar Assad. Putin hosted Assad at a Black Sea resort ahead of a summit later this week with Russia, Turkey and Iran. Assad was called to Russia to get him to agree to potential peace initiatives drafted by the other three countries, the Kremlin said.


The Kremlin said Putin briefed Trump in the phone call about his talks with Assad and plans for a political settlement in Syria. Putin also called for coordination of anti-terror efforts with the U.S., the Kremlin said, adding that Afghanistan was also discussed.

Trump and Putin spoke informally several times earlier this month when they attended a summit in Vietnam. They agreed on a number of principles for the future of Syria.


Many ESC fans from all over the world are so very sad because we lost Joy Fleming - one of the best singers ever. 


Betty MacDonald fan club founder Wolfgang Hampel sings  'Try to remember' especially for Betty MacDonald fan club organizer Linde Lund at Vita Magica September


you can join 


Betty MacDonald fan club


Betty MacDonald Society  


Vita Magica  


Eurovision Song Contest Fan Club 




on Facebook



Vita Magica Betty MacDonald event with Wolfgang Hampel, Thomas Bödigheimer and Friedrich von Hoheneichen


Vita Magica 


Betty MacDonald 

Betty MacDonald fan club 


Betty MacDonald fan club on Facebook


Betty MacDonald forum  

Wolfgang Hampel - Wikipedia ( English ) 

Wolfgang Hampel - Wikipedia ( English ) - The Egg and I 


Wolfgang Hampel - Wikipedia ( Polski)   

Wolfgang Hampel - Wikipedia ( German )

Wolfgang Hampel - LinkFang ( German ) 

Wolfgang Hampel - Academic ( German )

Wolfgang Hampel -   

Wolfgang Hampel - DBpedia  ( English / German )

Wolfgang Hampel - people check ( English ) 

Wolfgang Hampel - Memim ( English )

Vashon Island - Wikipedia ( German )

Wolfgang Hampel - Monica Sone - Wikipedia ( English )

Wolfgang Hampel - Ma and Pa Kettle - Wikipedia ( English )

Wolfgang Hampel - Ma and Pa Kettle - Wikipedia ( French ) 


Wolfgang Hampel - Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle - Wikipedia ( English)

Wolfgang Hampel in Florida State University 

Betty MacDonald fan club founder Wolfgang Hampel 

Betty MacDonald fan club interviews on CD/DVD

Betty MacDonald fan club items 

Betty MacDonald fan club items  - comments

Betty MacDonald fan club - The Stove and I  
 

Betty MacDonald fan club groups 

Betty MacDonald fan club organizer Linde Lund 


The end of Angela Merkel



For all her Teflon-like invulnerability, the talks’ collapse leaves the chancellor gravely wounded. 

By

Updated

The end of Angela Merkel

German Chancellor Angela Merkel attends a parliamentary group meeting in Berin after the failure of exploratory talks between her CDU, the CSU, the Greens and the FDP | Clemens Bilan/EPA



Germany without a government? That’s like Britain without pints and pounds — unimaginable. While Italy has seen its 65th government since World War II, Germany, this rock of the ages, has had only eight chancellors in almost seven decades. It usually takes four to six weeks from election day to work out a coalition deal. Not this year.
After seven weeks of “exploratory talks,” it was suddenly curtains — a first in the history of the Bonn-Berlin Republic. On Sunday, the leader of one of Chancellor Angela Merkel’s presumptive junior coalition partner, Christian Lindner of the Free Democrats (FDP), went in front of the microphones to stun the nation: “It is better not to govern at all than to govern badly.” In other words, “Auf Wiedersehen, Frau Merkel.”
Thus, stalwart, placid Germany is in for interesting times, ushered in by more fundamental forces than the usual wrangling over cabinet posts and doctrinal points enshrined in the coalition contract. In decades past, German politics has been so ultra-stable because it was dominated by three parties only: the centrist Christian Democrats (CDU), the left-of-center Social Democrats (SPD) and the ever-so-flexible FDP as kingmakers, shifting opportunistically to one side or the other.
In spite of all her vaunted skills at fudging issues and bribing antagonists, Merkel failed this time — a debacle that is a first in German electoral history.
Now, the party system has splintered, making majority-building more complicated than ever before. The FDP take their roughly 10 percent, which has typically been enough to tip the scales in the past. But the two major parties are being devoured from the fringes.
On the far-left, the Linke (Left Party) is good for about 10 percent of the vote. Pushing ecology and peace, the Greens take another roughly 10 percent. This explains why the SPD fell to a historic low of slightly more than 20 percent. On the right struts the Alternative for Germany (AfD), a populist party hawking anti-immigrant slogans and “Germany first.” Making hay on Merkel’s open-door refugee policy, the AfD scored a stunning 12.6 percent in September’s election. Its victory is a sign Germany has joined the European populist trend, with a far-right party in the Bundestag for the first time in decades.



Christian Lindner, leader of the FDP, addresses the media following preliminary coalition talks | Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Gone are the happy days where only three parties divvied up the pie among themselves. To form a government, Merkel had to try to corral the Greens and the FDP, two parties that despise each other. Hence the interminable “exploratory talks” that ended in disaster Sunday. The FDP insisted on deregulation and tax cuts, while the Greens had their hearts set on gender and minority politics, renewable energy and a generous intake of refugees.
In spite of all her vaunted skills at fudging issues and bribing antagonists, Merkel failed this time — a debacle that is a first in German electoral history. There is no precedent on which instant punditry could fall back. Nor has there ever been a minority government that rules by ad-hoc majorities in the parliament.
Of course, the sky is not falling, at least not yet. A well-run country like Germany, where the trains mostly run on time, can get by with a caretaker government led, as in the past 12 years, by Merkel. But for how long?

In Berlin, the bet is on a snap election, say, in February, March or April — but that is unlikely to break the logjam. According to a poll published Monday, the three parties that failed to sign on the dotted line will haul in roughly the same number of votes as they did on September 24, give or take half a percentage point. The trio would have to take another stab at a ménage à trois.
Merkel may not think so, but in the end it is always No. 1 who owns the fiasco, not some lesser player.
And if they fail again? Then Merkel has only one other coalition option: the SPD, with whom she has ruled Germany for two of her three terms. There is just one problem: The SPD has had it with Merkel. This proud party that captured the chancellorship with Willy Brandt, Helmut Schmidt and Gerhard Schröder has seen its strength ebb in Merkel’s Python-like grip. After eight years with “Angie,” the SPD is now down to a bit more than 20 percent, and it is dead-set against another grand killer coalition. “Beware the Merkel Curse” is the party’s near-unanimous battle cry.
As the country absorbs the shock, the parlor game in Berlin centers on the question: “Who did this to us?” The search for culprits is on. Was it Lindner’s fault? He might fit the part because he torpedoed the coalition talks. Or shall we blame the Social Democrats, who are shirking their responsibility by refusing to rejoin Merkel yet again?



Merkel may not think so, but in the end it is always No. 1 who owns the fiasco | Michael Kappeler/AFP via Getty Images

It is a safe bet that eventually the fingers will start to point at the Chancellor, who insists on leading her party in the snap elections. Merkel may not think so, but in the end it is always No. 1 who owns the fiasco, not some lesser player. Maybe she will succeed, against all odds, to lure the SPD into a grand coalition by invoking their duty to the nation. But for all her Teflon-like invulnerability, she is now gravely wounded. And to those lacerations, we can add the worst threat to seemingly everlasting rulers: boredom after 12 years in power.
Given Germany’s wondrous stability, this crisis will pass. Indeed, it is quite likely that Merkel will get another term, especially since she has eliminated potential rivals in her own party during her long run. But don’t bet on the full four years. “Black Sunday,” when the coalition talks collapsed, may go down in history as the beginning of the end of Angela, the Eternal.
Josef Joffe is co-editor of Die Zeit in Hamburg and a fellow of the Hoover Institution at Stanford, where he has been teaching international politics.

Many ESC fans from all over the world are so very sad because we lost Joy Fleming - one of the best singers ever. 


Betty MacDonald fan club founder Wolfgang Hampel sings  'Try to remember' especially for Betty MacDonald fan club organizer Linde Lund at Vita Magica September



you can join 


Betty MacDonald fan club


Betty MacDonald Society  


Vita Magica  


Eurovision Song Contest Fan Club 




on Facebook



Vita Magica Betty MacDonald event with Wolfgang Hampel, Thomas Bödigheimer and Friedrich von Hoheneichen


Vita Magica 


Betty MacDonald 

Betty MacDonald fan club 


Betty MacDonald fan club on Facebook


Betty MacDonald forum  

Wolfgang Hampel - Wikipedia ( English ) 

Wolfgang Hampel - Wikipedia ( English ) - The Egg and I 


Wolfgang Hampel - Wikipedia ( Polski)   

Wolfgang Hampel - Wikipedia ( German )

Wolfgang Hampel - LinkFang ( German ) 

Wolfgang Hampel - Academic ( German )

Wolfgang Hampel -   

Wolfgang Hampel - DBpedia  ( English / German )

Wolfgang Hampel - people check ( English ) 

Wolfgang Hampel - Memim ( English )

Vashon Island - Wikipedia ( German )

Wolfgang Hampel - Monica Sone - Wikipedia ( English )

Wolfgang Hampel - Ma and Pa Kettle - Wikipedia ( English )

Wolfgang Hampel - Ma and Pa Kettle - Wikipedia ( French ) 


Wolfgang Hampel - Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle - Wikipedia ( English)

Wolfgang Hampel in Florida State University 

Betty MacDonald fan club founder Wolfgang Hampel 

Betty MacDonald fan club interviews on CD/DVD

Betty MacDonald fan club items 

Betty MacDonald fan club items  - comments

Betty MacDonald fan club - The Stove and I  
 

Betty MacDonald fan club groups 

Betty MacDonald fan club organizer Linde Lund 

New details emerge in Lil Peep's death



New Details Emerge in Lil Peep's Death


New details have emerged in the death of Lil Peep. Peep, whose captivating debut studio album Come Over When You're Sober Pt. 1 was released back in August, died Nov. 15 in Tucson on one of the final dates of his 2017 North American tour. No official cause of death has been announced. The local Medical Examiner's Office, however, told the Associated Press last week that the suspected cause of death is a drug overdose. He was 21.
A new report from TMZ Monday, citing the police report, claims that someone on Peep's management team interacted with him on his tour bus earlier that Wednesday and he "appeared to be fine." This management member added that Peep took a nap around 5:45 p.m., and when she checked on him shortly after he was "snoring and breathing without issue." Another member of Peep's management team checked on him later that evening and found him unresponsive, at which point CPR was administered and the authorities were called.
Peep's brother, Karl Åhr, who goes by Oskar, pushed back against many of the rumors surrounding the death in an interview with People Friday. As many have speculated, Oskar said the family has been told that Peep had been given laced pills. "We [the family] have heard there was some sort of substance he did not expect to be involved in the substance he was taking," he said. "He thought he could take what he did, but he had been given something and he didn't realize what it was."
Oskar added that the death "really was an accident," and—despite Peep's public persona—he was happy. "My brother didn't take five Xanax pills every day, but he would take them and then post on Instagram about it," Oskar said. "I wish it would have paid for him to be a little safer, but the world needed him to have superlative problems that he dealt with in superlative ways. [Gustav Åhr] dealt with these problems much better than Lil Peep did, but people didn't know Gus, and there's a reason Gus doesn't sell."
Though several of the publications now ravenously reporting on his death ignored it, Peep's music struck a chord with thousands of listeners walking the line between rap's new wave and the raw melodies of early '00s pop punk and emo. In addition to his debut album Come Over When You're Sober Pt. 1, Peep will be remembered for the genre-hopping immediacy of his breakthrough mixtapes Hellboy and Crybaby.


Many ESC fans from all over the world are so very sad because we lost Joy Fleming - one of the best singers ever. 


Betty MacDonald fan club founder Wolfgang Hampel sings  'Try to remember' especially for Betty MacDonald fan club organizer Linde Lund at Vita Magica September



you can join 


Betty MacDonald fan club


Betty MacDonald Society  


Vita Magica  


Eurovision Song Contest Fan Club 




on Facebook



Vita Magica Betty MacDonald event with Wolfgang Hampel, Thomas Bödigheimer and Friedrich von Hoheneichen


Vita Magica 


Betty MacDonald 

Betty MacDonald fan club 


Betty MacDonald fan club on Facebook


Betty MacDonald forum  

Wolfgang Hampel - Wikipedia ( English ) 

Wolfgang Hampel - Wikipedia ( English ) - The Egg and I 


Wolfgang Hampel - Wikipedia ( Polski)   

Wolfgang Hampel - Wikipedia ( German )

Wolfgang Hampel - LinkFang ( German ) 

Wolfgang Hampel - Academic ( German )

Wolfgang Hampel -   

Wolfgang Hampel - DBpedia  ( English / German )

Wolfgang Hampel - people check ( English ) 

Wolfgang Hampel - Memim ( English )

Vashon Island - Wikipedia ( German )

Wolfgang Hampel - Monica Sone - Wikipedia ( English )

Wolfgang Hampel - Ma and Pa Kettle - Wikipedia ( English )

Wolfgang Hampel - Ma and Pa Kettle - Wikipedia ( French ) 


Wolfgang Hampel - Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle - Wikipedia ( English)

Wolfgang Hampel in Florida State University 

Betty MacDonald fan club founder Wolfgang Hampel 

Betty MacDonald fan club interviews on CD/DVD

Betty MacDonald fan club items 

Betty MacDonald fan club items  - comments

Betty MacDonald fan club - The Stove and I  
 

Betty MacDonald fan club groups 

Betty MacDonald fan club organizer Linde Lund 

David Cassidy dead at 67

David Cassidy dead at 67 – The Partridge Family star passes away surrounded by loved ones after suffering ‘organ failure’

Singer's family confirmed David had passed away after he was admitted to hospital following multiple organ failure


 David Cassidy has died at the age of 67


DAVID Cassidy has died at the age of 67, his family confirmed this morning.
The actor and musician, who shot to fame as Keith in 1970s TV sitcom The Partridge Family, was admitted to a hospital in Florida last week after he suffered multiple organ failure.

But David, who went on to have a successful music career with multiple Grammy nominations and 30million record sales worldwide, sadly lost his battle.

In a statement a representative said: “On behalf of the entire Cassidy family, it is with great sadness that we announce the passing of our father, our uncle, and our dear brother, David Cassidy.
“David died surrounded by those he loved, with joy in his heart and free from the pain that had gripped him for so long.
“Thank you for the abundance and support you have shown him these many years.”





 The musician was surrounded by his family after being admitted to hospital in Florida last week

Splash News
The musician was surrounded by his family after being admitted to hospital in Florida last week
His nephew Jack told his Twitter followers: “My uncle David Cassidy has sadly passed away tonight... & in the process of mourning I can't help but thank God for the joy that he brought to countless millions of people!“I don't think I'm alone in saying that we will all miss him. God Speed!”
Earlier this year, David revealed he was battling dementia and planned to stop touring to concentrate on his health.
He confirmed he was fighting the disease after he was filmed slurring and falling off stage during a gig.





 It was reported he was suffering from organ failure and was waiting for a transplant

Getty - Contributor
It was reported he was suffering from organ failure and was waiting for a transplant
The veteran star told People magazine: “I was in denial, but a part of me always knew it was coming.“I want to focus on what I am, who I am and how I’ve been without any distractions. I want to love. I want to enjoy life.”
David, who had suffered from alcohol problems in the past, also said he had decided to step out of the limelight after struggling to remember lyrics to his classic songs.
Following the news of his death, tributes from those who worked with David poured in.
Beach Boys co-founder Brian Wilson tweeted: “There were times in the mid-1970s when he would come over to my house and we even started writing a song together.
“He was a very talented and nice person. Love & Mercy to David and his family.”





 David, pictured here at the start of his incredible career in 1970, on The Partridge Family

Getty - Contributor
David, pictured here at the start of his incredible career in 1970, on The Partridge Family
 The star was born into showbiz as the son of stage star Jack Cassidy and actress Evelyn Ward

Michael Ochs Archives - Getty
The star was born into showbiz as the son of stage star Jack Cassidy and actress Evelyn Ward
Harry Connick Jr. told his fans: “So sad to hear of the passing of David Cassidy...He was always so kind to me - such a pleasure to have had him on my show... Sending love and prayers to his family... R.I.P. friend.”Singer Gloria Gaynor also paid tribute to the star, writing online: “My thoughts and prayers are with the family and loved ones of David Cassidy ... part of a musical legacy via his role as Keith Partridge that brought music and laughter into the homes of millions.”

David Cassidy performs I Think I Love You with The Partridge Family
Musician Marie Osmond, member of showbiz family The Osmonds, shared a photo of old magazines featuring the teen idol.
She added: "Heartbroken over the passing of #DavidCassidy. He graced the covers of teen magazines w/ my Brothers in the '70s. My condolences to his Family."
Director Kevin Smith posted a video of Cassidy presenting an MTV award in 1990, and spoke of how the star had been a regular feature on his TV screen during his childhood.
He said: "I grew up in an era before even cable TV, when The Partridge Family was already in reruns.
"David Cassidy's Keith was one of my favorite TV characters. He was legit funny AND he could sing. The man entertained me during my childhood and even years later."
Singer Rick Springfield said: "So sorry to hear about David Cassidy's passing. Godspeed."





 He became a heartthrob and had a legion of fans

Michael Ochs Archives - Getty
He became a heartthrob and had a legion of fans
As well his battle with dementia, David also suffered a string of legal problems in recent years, including several arrests on suspicion of drink-driving, and a court-ordered rehab stint in 2014.David was born into showbiz as the son of singer and stage star Jack Cassidy and actress Evelyn Ward.
He made his stage debut in 1969 while still a teenager, before signing with Universal Studios and moving to Los Angeles.
David was cast as Keith Partridge in the musical TV show The Partridge Family in 1970.





 David released 12 studio albums, six compilations and 24 singles throughout his career

Splash News
David released 12 studio albums, six compilations and 24 singles throughout his career
 David, here in London in 1975, toured the world and wowed fans with his musical talents

Getty - Contributor
David, here in London in 1975, toured the world and wowed fans with his musical talents
 But his love of partying saw him ordered into rehab by a court in 2014

Getty - Contributor
But his love of partying saw him ordered into rehab by a court in 2014


David Cassidy wipes away tears as he talks to Dr Phil about his dementia
It  spawned the release of 12 studio albums, six compilations and 24 singles, with his biggest selling track I Think I Love You remaining as his best known hit.
His success continued into the 1980s, when he performed The Last Kiss alongside George Michael, who cited him as one of his major influences.
Cassidy has been married three times – to Kay Lenz from 1977 to 1983, Meyl Tanz from 1984 to 1985 and Sue Shifrin, who he married in 1991 and divorced from last year.
He has one son, Beau, born in 1991, and a daughter, Katie, who is an acclaimed actress who has starred in Arrow and Gossip Girl.





 David with his son Beau and third wife Sue Shifrin

David with his son Beau and third wife Sue Shifrin
 David also has a daughter, Katie, who he proudly posed with at the 9th annual Family Television Awards in 2007

Getty Images - Getty
David also has a daughter, Katie, who he proudly posed with at the 9th annual Family Television Awards in 2007
After his father fell ill, Beau thanked his fans for their kind messages.He said: “Unfortunately David is very sick. However he is getting the support he needs, surrounded by the people he loves most.
“Thank you very much for your love and concern that you have expressed in your messages to him.”
David, who received an Emmy nomination for his appearance on Police Story in 1978, was most recently seen on TV in a 2013 episode of CSI: Crime Scene Investigation.





 David and his first wife Kay Lenz at their wedding at The Little Church Of The West in Las Vegas

Getty - Contributor
David and his first wife Kay Lenz at their wedding at The Little Church Of The West in Las Vegas
 David here with George Michael and Mike Nolan, at the premiere of the film 'Number One', in 1985

Getty - Contributor
David here with George Michael and Mike Nolan, at the premiere of the film 'Number One', in 1985
 Earlier this year he revealed he was taking a step out of the limelight due to his ongoing battle with dementia

Splash News
Earlier this year he revealed he was taking a step out of the limelight due to his ongoing battle with dementia
 
 

Many ESC fans from all over the world are so very sad because we lost Joy Fleming - one of the best singers ever. 


Betty MacDonald fan club founder Wolfgang Hampel sings  'Try to remember' especially for Betty MacDonald fan club organizer Linde Lund at Vita Magica September


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Wolfgang Hampel - Wikipedia ( English ) 

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Wolfgang Hampel in Florida State University 

Betty MacDonald fan club founder Wolfgang Hampel 

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Linde Lund and her cuties

Dear Aashish Alix Angélique Arno Bärbel Bodo Carsten Dawid Denise Eugenia Eva Ewa Friedrich Gabriele Gabriele Geli Hana Harald Harald Heidrun Heike Heinz Heinz Jörg Hiltrud Immo Inna Iris Janie Jeanine Jorge Joyce Julieta Julia Kain Lila Melitta NA NG Nancy Octavia Pascale Peter Pram Rebecca Scott Swiss Teo Tom Ursula Zaezilia and our other friends we wish you a ver nice evening, a good night with only sweet dreams and a great Wednesday with lots of joyful moments like this one. It's such a cutie. 

All the best and many greetings from Linde, Astrid, Greta and Lund family 

www.bettymacdonaldfanclub.blogspot.com/

Linde Lund and her cuties



Many ESC fans from all over the world are so very sad because we lost Joy Fleming - one of the best singers ever. 


Betty MacDonald fan club founder Wolfgang Hampel sings  'Try to remember' especially for Betty MacDonald fan club organizer Linde Lund at Vita Magica September


you can join 


Betty MacDonald fan club


Betty MacDonald Society  


Vita Magica  


Eurovision Song Contest Fan Club 




on Facebook



Vita Magica Betty MacDonald event with Wolfgang Hampel, Thomas Bödigheimer and Friedrich von Hoheneichen


Vita Magica 


Betty MacDonald 

Betty MacDonald fan club 


Betty MacDonald fan club on Facebook


Betty MacDonald forum  

Wolfgang Hampel - Wikipedia ( English ) 

Wolfgang Hampel - Wikipedia ( English ) - The Egg and I 


Wolfgang Hampel - Wikipedia ( Polski)   

Wolfgang Hampel - Wikipedia ( German )

Wolfgang Hampel - LinkFang ( German ) 

Wolfgang Hampel - Academic ( German )

Wolfgang Hampel -   

Wolfgang Hampel - DBpedia  ( English / German )

Wolfgang Hampel - people check ( English ) 

Wolfgang Hampel - Memim ( English )

Vashon Island - Wikipedia ( German )

Wolfgang Hampel - Monica Sone - Wikipedia ( English )

Wolfgang Hampel - Ma and Pa Kettle - Wikipedia ( English )

Wolfgang Hampel - Ma and Pa Kettle - Wikipedia ( French ) 


Wolfgang Hampel - Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle - Wikipedia ( English)

Wolfgang Hampel in Florida State University 

Betty MacDonald fan club founder Wolfgang Hampel 

Betty MacDonald fan club interviews on CD/DVD

Betty MacDonald fan club items 

Betty MacDonald fan club items  - comments

Betty MacDonald fan club - The Stove and I  
 

Betty MacDonald fan club groups 

Betty MacDonald fan club organizer Linde Lund  

Trump and the Russia investigation



Mueller interviews with senior White House officials coming up




Who is Hope Hicks?






Washington (CNN)Investigators working for special counsel Robert Mueller are scheduled to interview additional senior White House officials in the coming weeks, adding to their list of high-profile interviews and pushing the investigation closer to President Donald Trump and his family.
On the slate are White House communications director Hope Hicks, White House counsel Don McGahn and Josh Raffel, a communications aide to White House senior adviser Jared Kushner. Other staff are also expected to be interviewed.
These three staffers have spent considerable time around the highest echelon of the Trump administration and campaign. Given their involvement in some key events under scrutiny by the special counsel, Mueller's interest in talking to them signals continued focus on Trump and the White House. 
"It is my hope and expectation that shortly after Thanksgiving, all the White House interviews will be concluded," White House special counsel Ty Cobb told CNN on Thursday.
Mueller's team has already interviewed White House senior policy adviser Stephen Miller, Trump's former White House chief of staff Reince Priebus and former White House press secretary Sean Spicer. Spicer and Priebus left the White House over the summer, but they were still around when Trump fired FBI Director James Comey. Miller was also involved in the Trump campaign.
The special counsel is investigating Russian election meddling, potential collusion with Russians by the Trump campaign and potential obstruction of justice as it reacted to the probe.
Here is a breakdown of some of the interviews taking place soon, and how the White House officials facing questions might be of interest to Mueller's sweeping investigation.

Hope Hicks: The confidante

Hicks has long been seen as one of Trump's most trusted confidantes. She has served as a sounding board for the president -- which could give Mueller's team insights on his thinking.
Her work for Trump intersects with the Russia investigation in a few distinct ways.
She first worked for the Trump Organization and was one of the earliest members to join his campaign team in spring 2015. She was almost always at his side on the campaign trail, and she now works from a desk just outside the Oval Office. Her profile has continued rising inside the administration, and she was elevated to White House communications director in July.
Hope Hicks (AP/Andrew Harnik)
Donald Trump Jr. confirmed last week that he exchanged some private Twitter messages during the campaign with WikiLeaks, the anti-secrecy website that published damaging materials about the Democratic National Committee and Hillary Clinton's campaign during the heat of the election. After the first exchanges in September 2016, Trump Jr. informed a group of senior Trump campaign officials including Kushner over email. Kushner forwarded the email to Hicks, according to The Atlantic which first reported the story.
Trump, 71, does not use a computer, and Hicks would regularly print out articles and memos for him during the presidential campaign. Mueller's team will likely want to know if she shared Kushner's email with Trump and if there were any additional discussions about WikiLeaks.
On at least two occasions, then-Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort emailed Hicks asking her to dismiss questions from reporters about his international dealings and his relationship with Russian oligarch Oleg Deripaska, according to the Washington Post. Manafort was indicted last month on charges stemming from his lobbying work before he joined the campaign for Russia-friendly clients in Ukraine. He has pleaded not guilty to the charges.
In his testimony before the House Intelligence Committee, former Trump campaign adviser Carter Page said he emailed Hicks and two other campaign officials before embarking on a trip to Russia in July 2016. Page insists that the trip was unrelated to the campaign, though he admitted asking campaign officials for input on a speech he delivered at a Moscow university.
Days after the election, Hicks issued denials on behalf of the campaign that haven't held up. She told The New York Times that the campaign was "not aware of any campaign representatives that were in touch with any foreign entities" during the election. And she told The Associated Press that "there was no communication between the campaign and any foreign entity during the campaign."
It was later revealed -- through press reports and public acknowledgements -- that several campaign officials had contacts with Russians, including Kushner, Trump Jr., Manafort, and Page, as welll as Trump campaign foreign policy adviser George Papadopoulos and Michael Flynn, who advised the campaign and briefly served as national security adviser in the White House before resigning.
Earlier this year, Papadopoulos pleaded guilty to a charge of lying to the FBI about his interactions with foreign officials close to the Russian government.
Hicks was in the Oval Office as Trump discussed firing Comey in early May, The Washington Post reported. His firing is a key part of Mueller's investigation into obstruction of justice.
She was also there when the Trump White House scrambled to respond to a bombshell report that Trump Jr., Manafort and Kushner met with a Russian lawyer during the campaign. Trump Jr.'s first response, which the president was involved in crafting onboard Air Force One, was misleading and didn't mention that the rendezvous had been arranged after he was told that it could bring incriminating information about Clinton. As The New York Times published more stories, Trump Jr. later acknowledged the Clinton angle.
That series of events, which took place largely without lawyers, opened up those White House officials to legal scrutiny and in many ways led to their interviews with the Mueller team.
Hicks' attorney Robert Trout declined to comment for this story.

Don McGahn: The lawyer

An attorney who specialized in campaign finance for many years, McGahn was the top lawyer for the Trump campaign. He was appointed White House counsel and has since had a front-row seat for a handful of issues that are now under intense scrutiny by Mueller's team.
Flynn personally informed McGahn during the transition that he was under investigation for his undisclosed lobbying for Turkey, according to The New York Times. That conversation took place in early January, and Flynn was still allowed to become national security adviser.
Things got worse after Trump's inauguration. Then-acting Attorney General Sally Yates privately met with McGahn twice, where she warned him that Flynn was subject to blackmail by the Russians because he was lying about his calls with then-Russian ambassador, Sergey Kislyak. Those White House officials repeated his lies in public, creating the compromising situation.
McGahn briefed Trump about her warnings, but Flynn stayed on as national security adviser. He only resigned after it was publicly reported that he misled senior White House officials, including Vice President Mike Pence, about his conversations with Kislyak.
Mueller's team will likely ask McGahn about the series of events that led to Flynn's resignation.
As the top White House lawyer, McGahn also played a key role in Comey's firing, and Mueller's investigators will surely pepper him with questions about the process and Trump's thinking.
In early May, Trump and Miller, the senior policy aide, had drafted a memo that detailed reasons to fire Comey, but McGahn was concerned about the letter and it was never released, according to The New York Times. Instead, McGahn edited the memo and sent it back to Trump and Miller with revisions. Mueller's team has a copy of the original draft, the newspaper reported.
After that back-and-forth, McGahn arranged for an Oval Office meeting to discuss the firing with Trump, Attorney General Jeff Sessions and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein. Sessions and Rosenstein left the meeting with a directive to prepare the legal framework necessary to terminate Comey, according to the Washington Post. Comey was fired the next day.

Josh Raffel: The PR specialist

After working with Kushner in the private sector, doing public relations for Kushner Companies, Raffel joined the White House as as a communications aide for the White House Office of American Innovation, which Kushner runs. He also handles Kushner-related press inquiries.
Raffel was involved in discussions about how to respond to the inquiries about the Trump Tower meeting. He was also aboard Air Force One when the president took part in crafting the response that was ultimately released by the Trump Organization under Trump Jr.'s name.
These discussions will likely be of interest to Mueller's team -- at the very least, they could shed light on how much Trump and others knew about the meetings before learning about them in the press reports. The White House says it didn't learn about the meeting until the press reports.
This article has been updated.

Merkel: No minority government

Merkel: New elections a 'better path' than minority government

Updated 2030 GMT (0430 HKT) November 20, 2017

Merkel fails to form coalition government

CNN) Fresh elections in Germany appeared increasingly likely Monday evening after Chancellor Angela Merkel announced that she preferred a new vote over governing without a parliamentary majority.

The country has been plunged into its worst political crisis in years after negotiations to form the next government collapsed overnight, dealing a serious blow to Merkel and raising questions about the future of the longtime Chancellor.
Merkel's party, which lacks a majority in the Bundestag, had spent weeks trying to cobble together a ruling coalition with three other parties. But the plan fell apart when the liberal Free Democratic Party (FDP) walked out of talks shortly before midnight on Sunday over disagreements on issues ranging from energy policy to migration.


Speaking to state broadcaster ARD Monday evening, Merkel said that the "path of minority government" should be considered "very very closely".
"I am very skeptical and I believe that new elections would be the better path," she said. Merkel also confirmed that she would be ready to lead her party into any new vote.
She did not rule out further talks with other parties, however, and acknowledged that the country's next steps were in the hands of German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier. 
German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier said Monday that the country's parties had a responsibility to try to form a government.
Merkel met with Steinmeier earlier in the day to discuss the country's options. Speaking after their meeting, Steinmeier described the situation as unprecedented in postwar Germany and urged the country's parties to work together to try to form a government.
But Merkel is not the only party leader who has voiced doubt about whether further talks could lead to a resolution. Martin Schulz, the leader of the Social Democrats -- the second largest party in parliament after Merkel's Christian Democratic Union (CDU) -- described new elections as "the right path" earlier Monday.
Either way, the setback has raised concerns about the political stability of Europe's largest economy. The euro weakened against major currencies on Monday and Germany's DAX dropped 0.4% in early trade before recovering its losses.

Why the "Jamaica coalition" fell apart

Merkel had hoped to build a coalition consisting of her conservative CDU, its sister party the Christian Social Union, the pro-business FDP, and the Green Party.
The FDP's walkout came after the four parties had already missed several self-imposed deadline to resolve their differences. 
"The four discussion partners have no common vision for modernization of the country or common basis of trust," said Christian Lindner, leader of the FDP. "It is better not to govern than to govern badly."
Speaking Monday, he expressed regret that the talks had failed but said that his party would have had to compromise on its core principles.
The parties failed to make progress on a number of policy areas -- including the right for family members of refugees in Germany to join them there -- and tensions had risen.
While the FDP blamed the CDU/CSU alliance for the breakdown, the Green Party thanked Merkel and the leader of the CSU, Horst Seehofer, for negotiating "hard" but "fair," and accused the FDP of quitting the talks without good reason.
The so-called "Jamaica coalition" -- named after the parties' colors -- would have been unprecedented at federal level.

How did we get here?

Merkel's position was widely seen as unassailable in the run-up to September's elections, with many commentators suggesting the outcome was so predictable as to be boring.
But the country's two mainstream parties -- Merkel's CDU/CSU alliance and the center-left Social Democratic Party (SDP) -- suffered big losses on the night.
Smaller parties, including the FDP and the far-right Alternative for Germany (AfD) -- who won 12.6% of the vote and entered parliament for the first time -- were the beneficiaries.
Unable to form a coalition with one other party (as is the norm in Germany), Merkel emerged from the election substantially weakened.
On Monday, the AfD hailed the collapse of coalition talks. "We are glad that Jamaica isn't happening," said AfD co-leader Alexander Gauland. "Merkel has failed." His co-leader, Alice Weidel, welcomed the prospect of fresh elections and called on Merkel to resign.
The Chancellor told state broadcaster ZDF Monday evening that she has not considered resigning. "There was no question that I should face personal consequences," she said.

What options does Merkel have?

Short of resolving the impasse with the FDP, Merkel's options are limited.
The SPD, Merkel's junior governing partner for the last four years, ruled out a renewal of their so-called "Grand Coalition" on the night of the election and reiterated that position on Monday. 
The SPD is also reluctant to renew the coalition as it would leave the AfD as the largest opposition party, granting it a set of privileges including the right to respond first to the Chancellor and a boost in resources -- an outcome none of the other parties want.
Merkel's CDU/CSU alliance could still attempt to form a minority government with either the FDP or the Green Party separately, but this has happened rarely -- and never successfully -- at the federal level in Germany.
If all other options fail, Steinmeier, the German President, has the power to set in motion a complex process that could lead to a new vote next year.
But recent polling puts all parties roughly where they were on election night, meaning a new election could result in similar deadlock.

Doube your money, Theresa May












Boris Johnson and Michael Gove promised Brexit would release an extra £350m a week for the NHS. Now they’ve given the green light to Theresa May to double her offer to settle our obligations to the EU, to a rumoured £40bn. Meanwhile, tomorrow’s budget is likely to confirm that the health service is being starved of funds.
But that’s not the end of the story. When the final Brexit bill comes in, it is likely to reach about £80bn – double the prime minister’s latest offer.




Not that the government will come clean on this, as it is trying to head off a backlash by Tory backbenchers unhappy that even the £40bn agreed at yesterday’s Brexit cabinet subcommittee is too much. If they realised how much we are going to end up paying, they really would go “bananas” as one MP put it.
The government is hoping to defuse opposition from within its own ranks by suggesting the money will come with strings attached: it will be conditional on the EU agreeing a good trade deal or, more realistically, at least agreeing to talk about a future trade deal.
May’s new offer could be enough to break the deadlock in the talks at next month’s crucial summit – provided she doesn’t say it’s a “final offer” or add unrealistic conditions to it. After all, the other EU countries have said they will be prepared to move on to talking about our future relationship once “sufficient progress” has been made on the three key divorce issues: money, citizens’ rights and Ireland.
Our government’s failure to come up with any practical solutions to the Irish question may yet keep the talks frozen. But, looking at the money issue alone, the EU could well decide that a £40bn offer amounts to sufficient progress, without accepting that that is the end of the matter.

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And that means the final bill is likely to rise. After all, the EU would come back to the money issue towards the end of the talks. Once we had sketched out the broad framework of our future relationship, and the transitional period to get there, it would push hard to get the extra £10-20bn it says we owe. Given that May would by then be desperate to clinch a deal, she would probably fold.
But even that wouldn’t be the final bill, because the prime minister hasn’t been realistic about something else: the two-year transitional period she is asking for won’t be enough to nail down the details of a future free trade deal.
All we will have by the time we quit the EU is a fairly flimsy document. Filling in the details, getting it ratified by all the other 27 countries and then implementing it could take up to five years, according to the Irish foreign minister.
Even Gove and Johnson admitted that two years may not be long enough, in the letter they wrote to the prime minister last month calling on her to back a hard Brexit. They wrote: “We may still have a ‘no deal’ outcome at the end of the transition period.”



The snag is that for each extra year of transition we will have to pay membership fees to the EU of about £8bn. So a realistic transitional period could cost us a further £20-30bn. Add it all together, and you get £80bn.
Of course, we could avoid paying this last sum by not extending the transition beyond two years. But then the economy would fall off a cliff in March 2021, just before the next election. That would be like rolling out the red carpet to Downing Street for Jeremy Corbyn. When push comes to shove, the Tories would probably blink.
It would, though, be much better if May fessed up to this all now so that the public could have an honest debate. If voters were told how much Brexit is really going to cost – and how much the loss of access to the EU’s vast single market is going to clobber the public finances, so we will struggle even harder to get cash for the NHS, schools, homes and vital infrastructure – they might decide they don’t want Brexit at all.
Hugo Dixon is chairman and editor-in-chief of InFacts



Many ESC fans from all over the world are so very sad because we lost Joy Fleming - one of the best singers ever. 


Betty MacDonald fan club founder Wolfgang Hampel sings  'Try to remember' especially for Betty MacDonald fan club organizer Linde Lund at Vita Magica September

you can join 


Betty MacDonald fan club


Betty MacDonald Society  


Vita Magica  


Eurovision Song Contest Fan Club 




on Facebook



Vita Magica Betty MacDonald event with Wolfgang Hampel, Thomas Bödigheimer and Friedrich von Hoheneichen


Vita Magica 


Betty MacDonald 

Betty MacDonald fan club 


Betty MacDonald fan club on Facebook


Betty MacDonald forum  

Wolfgang Hampel - Wikipedia ( English ) 

Wolfgang Hampel - Wikipedia ( English ) - The Egg and I 


Wolfgang Hampel - Wikipedia ( Polski)   

Wolfgang Hampel - Wikipedia ( German )

Wolfgang Hampel - LinkFang ( German ) 

Wolfgang Hampel - Academic ( German )

Wolfgang Hampel -   

Wolfgang Hampel - DBpedia  ( English / German )

Wolfgang Hampel - people check ( English ) 

Wolfgang Hampel - Memim ( English )

Vashon Island - Wikipedia ( German )

Wolfgang Hampel - Monica Sone - Wikipedia ( English )

Wolfgang Hampel - Ma and Pa Kettle - Wikipedia ( English )

Wolfgang Hampel - Ma and Pa Kettle - Wikipedia ( French ) 


Wolfgang Hampel - Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle - Wikipedia ( English)

Wolfgang Hampel in Florida State University 

Betty MacDonald fan club founder Wolfgang Hampel 

Betty MacDonald fan club interviews on CD/DVD

Betty MacDonald fan club items 

Betty MacDonald fan club items  - comments

Betty MacDonald fan club - The Stove and I  
 

Betty MacDonald fan club groups 

Betty MacDonald fan club organizer Linde Lund  
Betty MacDonald, Monica Sone and Dorita Hess

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