close

The Qwillery | category: 2012 DAC Interview | (page 2 of 9)

home

The Qwillery

A blog about books and other things speculative

qwillery.blogspot.com

Interview with Melissa F. Olson, author of Dead Spots - October 23, 2012

Please welcome Melissa F. Olson to The Qwillery as part of the 2012 Debut Author Challenge Interviews. Dead Spots (Scarlett Bernard 1) will be published on October 30, 2012.



Interview with Melissa F. Olson, author of Dead Spots - October 23, 2012



TQ:  What would you say is your most interesting writing quirk?

Melissa:  This is true - I often wear hats when I write. It’s not a writerly affectation, I promise, but I’m prone to migraines, and the lighting in my house, combined with the screen glow from my laptop, can start giving me headaches when I work for a few hours straight. So I’ll put on a hat to cut the glare from the room lights. Of course, it’s always my most ridiculous or hideous hats, because then I won’t accidentally wear them out of the house and lose them.


TQ:   Who are some of your favorite writers? Who do you feel has influenced your writing?

Melissa:  Rob Thurman was the first Urban Fantasy author I ever read, so in a way you can blame everything on her. Then there’s Jim Butcher and Charlaine Harris for worldbuilding, Carrie Vaughn and Patricia Briggs for how to craft a long series, early Laurel K. Hamilton for attitude and girl power. And, of course, Joss Whedon, who despite being a man is sort of the patron saint of strong female characters.


TQ:  Are you a plotter or a pantser?

Melissa:  In order to truly enjoy the writing, I’ve found I have to be about 30%-70%. I start with a premise, the main characters, a first chapter, a very vague idea of the main arc, and maybe an idea of what the ending looks like. Then I think of it as writing into a fog.


TQ:  What is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

Melissa:  Honest answer? Being a mom at the same time. I have a 3 ½ year old at home who’s just the perfect age to prevent me from getting anything done while she’s awake. And I really can’t recommend being 35 weeks into a tough pregnancy when your book comes out. It’ll all settle down in a few years, but for now, balancing being a full-time parent and a professional writer is the hardest thing I do.


TQ:  Describe Dead Spots (Scarlett Bernard 1) in 140 characters or less.

Melissa:  “A rare human who can nullify supernatural powers, Scarlett Bernard must help a young cop solve a series of supernatural murders in LA.” With five to spare!


TQ:  What inspired you to write Dead Spots?

Melissa:  It was actually a scene from the movie Hellboy 2. The characters put on these goggles that help them see through magic spells. I started with the premise of someone who can see through spells, but I couldn’t make it work the way I wanted. Then I came up with someone who can neutralize spells, and as soon as I had that, Scarlett was born.


TQ:  Why did you set the novel in Los Angeles?

Melissa:  At first, LA sort of won by default – it’s the biggest place I’ve ever lived in, and the only major city I know well. Later I realized that it’s also a great fit for Scarlett: LA is a city without a center. Some would even say it lacks a heart and soul. I love LA, and I know it’s full of good things – but it’s also full of lost people. At the beginning of Dead Spots, Scarlett has no drive, no center – and she is definitely lost.


TQ:  What sort of research did you do for Dead Spots?

Melissa:  I did a lot of research in magical folklore – the various myths about werewolves, vampires, witches – so I could decide how I wanted my mythology to work. I found myself researching evolution, because in my world magic is a natural offshoot of science. I also have a big LA city map hanging in my office with pushpins in it to represent the various locations in the novel. When people write about LA they often stick to the well-known areas – Hollywood, downtown, the beach. I try to visit a lot more of the city.


TQ:  Who was the easiest character to write and why? Hardest and why?

Melissa:  Once I understood her backstory and her attitude, Scarlett came naturally to me, which I suppose is what you want from your main character. Dashiell the vampire was probably the hardest, because there are so many vampire stories out there that it’s important to me to try not to just fall into existing stereotypes. It would be easy to say “Okay, Dashiell is Lestat from Interview With the Vampire, dropped into this other story.” That’s the last thing in the world I want to do. On the other hand, it isn’t easy to imagine what it’s like to be nearly 200 years old, rich out of your mind, and immortal.


TQ:  Without giving anything away, what is/are your favorite scene(s) in Dead Spots?

Melissa:  Nobody’s ever asked me that! I loved writing the scene where Jesse and Scarlett first meet – these two people are just shoved into this completely messed up situation, and immediately everything they’ve been working for is turned on its head.


TQ:  What's next?

Melissa:  The sequel to Dead Spots, Trail of Dead, will be published sometime this spring or early summer – I don’t have an exact date yet. I just finished editing it, and I’m really excited about where Scarlett’s story takes her. I’m also looking into doing some stories for Scarlett’s world for Christmas.


TQ:  Thank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

Melissa:  Thank you!




About Dead Spots

Dead Spots
Scarlett Bernard 1
47North, October 30, 2012
Trade Paperback and Kindle eBook, 293 pages

Interview with Melissa F. Olson, author of Dead Spots - October 23, 2012
Scarlett Bernard knows about personal space: step within ten feet of her, and any supernatural spells or demonic forces are instantly defused—vampires and werewolves become human again, and witches can’t get out so much as a “hocus pocus.” This special skill makes her a null and very valuable to Los Angeles’s three most powerful magical communities, who utilize her ability to scrub crime scenes clean of all traces of the paranormal to keep humanity, and the LAPD, in the dark.

But one night Scarlett’s late arrival to a grisly murder scene reveals her agenda and ends with LAPD’s Jesse Cruz tracking her down to strike a deal: he’ll keep quiet about the undead underworld if she helps solve the case. Their pact doesn’t sit well with Dash, the city’s chief bloodsucker, who fears his whole vampire empire is at stake. And when clues start to point to Scarlett, it’ll take more than her unique powers to catch the real killer and clear her name.





About Melissa

Interview with Melissa F. Olson, author of Dead Spots - October 23, 2012
Melissa Olson was born and raised in Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, and studied film and literature at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. So…culture shock. Never one for beer or cheese, anyway, Melissa came to love her new city, especially the climate, the movie-watching opportunities, and the food, pretty much in that order. After graduation, and a brief stint bouncing around the Hollywood Studio System, Melissa proved too broke for LA and moved to glorious Madison, WI, where she eventually acquired a master’s degree from UW-Milwaukee, a husband, a mortgage, two kids, and two comically oversized dogs, not at all in that order. She loves Madison and it’s proximity to her family, but still dreams of the food in LA. Literally. There are dreams.

Her work has been published in the Daily Trojan, the Chippewa Falls Herald Telegram, The International Journal of Comic Art, The La Crosse Tribune, U-Wire, Women on Writing.com, and the upcoming compilation The Universal Vampire. She has also presented or been on panels at the Midwest Popular Culture/American Culture Conference, the International Association of the Fantastic in the Arts Conference, and OdysseyCon 2012.

Website : Blog : Facebook : Twitter

Interview with Rob DeBorde, author of Portlandtown - October 18, 2012

Please welcome Rob DeBorde to The Qwillery as part of the 2012 Debut Author Challenge Interviews.  Portlandtown (A Tale of the Oregon Wyldes 1), Rob's fiction debut, was published on October 16, 2012.


Interview with Rob DeBorde, author of Portlandtown - October 18, 2012


TQ:  Welcome to The Qwillery.

Rob:  Thanks. Nice place. I like the moon.


TQ:  What would you say is your most interesting writing quirk?

Rob:  That’s an odd question. Let’s see . . . I do have a dead man hanging in my office. Does that count? He watches over me while I write. Doesn’t say much. I do seem to include quite a few dead/undead things in my writing, so perhaps he does have an influence. Is that quirky or just creepy? I think I’ll stop answering this question now.


TQ:  Who are some of your favorite writers? Who do you feel has influenced your writing?

Rob:  Favorites? Jim Butcher, Warren Ellis, Sarah Vowell, Christopher Moore, J. K. Rowling, Matt Taibbi, David Simon, Matthew Weiner, and a bunch of other peoples. I like writers. I like books. Comics and TV, too. Where there are words there’s story and I’m all for that.

As for influences, everything I know about putting pen to paper I learned from reading Stephen King novels. Where else can a body find four decades of entertainment and education in one bibliography? Plus—dead things! Man, I love that guy.


TQ:  Are you a plotter or a pantser?

Rob:  A plotter, definitely. I wrote an 80 page treatment for Portlandtown. That doesn’t mean I won’t revise on the fly, but I like to have a pretty good idea where I’m going. I can’t imagine writing a novel any other way. (I tried once. Didn’t go well.)

Oddly enough, the opposite is true when I write a short story. I usually have an idea or some ridiculous situation, maybe a character or two, but that’s it. I sit down and start writing until it’s done or I hit the wall. More often than not I hit the wall. This is why I have two dozen unfinished short stories floating around my computer at the moment. Plotter, definitely.


TQ:   What is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

Rob:  Page 7. I can usually get through first half dozen or so pages of any story on enthusiasm alone, but around page 7 things start to get real. I start to ask questions. What am I doing? Am I really going to write this? Will anyone want to read a story about a half-blind vegan ventriloquist and his tofu dummy? It’s at this point that I either shrug and go back to writing or start playing Plants Vs. Zombies.


TQ:   Describe Portlandtown (A Tale of the Oregon Wyldes 1) in 140 characters or less.

Rob:  If you like supernatural adventures about 19th century booksellers, undead outlaws, & zombies in the rain, Portlandtown is the book for you.


TQ:  What inspired you to write Portlandtown?

Rob:  The inspiration for Portlandtown was a love of zombies and a photograph of downtown Portland during the Flood of 1894. When I combined the two in my head it all came together: wet zombies. Awesome.


TQ:   What sorts of research did you do for Portlandtown?

Rob:  Not having grown up in the 1880s I had to do quite a bit of period-specific research on the city of Portland, revolvers, bullets, clothing, architecture, floods, Astoria, traveling circuses, language, steamboats, Native Americans, totem poles, the Oregon coast, horses, roads, rivers, and bridges. Trust me, I have extensive notes. This did not stop me from occasionally inventing details or adjusting the facts if it suited the story. Stupid writers . . . always makin’ stuff up.


TQ:   Who was the easiest character to write and why? Hardest and why?

Rob:  The marshal was the easiest. Grumpy old man—how hard could that be? Actually, he’s a little more nuanced than that, but still a natural voice that came readily (steer clear of me when I’m retired, obviously). Much more difficult was Andre Labeau, the African American Shaman/cowboy who never uses contractions and always speaks truth even when he’s telling a lie. Tricky.


TQ:  Without giving anything away, what is/are your favorite scene(s) in Portlandtown?

Rob:  Without giving anything away, huh? Okay. If I had to pick a favorite I’d say the Hanged Man’s return (think corpse on display, circus freaks, and a shootout). Takes a few pages to get there, but it’s worth it. I’m also quite fond of Andre’s memory of his mother and the twins first encounter with a living-challenged local.


TQ:  What's next?

Rob:  Next will either be the sequel to Portlandtown or an unrelated novel called Pumpkin Eater. The later is about ghosts, skeletons, and Halloween. Yeah, I know, more dead things.


TQ:  Thank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

Rob:  My pleasure.




About Portlandtown
Portlandtown
A Tale of the Oregon Wyldes 1
St. Martin's Griffin, October 16, 2012
Trade Paperback and eBook, 384 pages

Interview with Rob DeBorde, author of Portlandtown - October 18, 2012
Welcome to Portlandtown, where no secret is safe---not even those buried beneath six feet of Oregon mud.

Joseph Wylde isn’t afraid of the past, but he knows some truths are better left unspoken. When his father-in-law’s grave-digging awakens more than just ghosts, Joseph invites him into their home hoping that a booming metropolis and two curious grandtwins will be enough to keep the former marshal out of trouble. Unfortunately, the old man’s past soon follows, unleashing a terrible storm on a city already knee deep in floodwaters. As the dead mysteriously begin to rise, the Wyldes must find the truth before an unspeakable evil can spread across the West and beyond.





About Rob
Interview with Rob DeBorde, author of Portlandtown - October 18, 2012

Rob DeBorde is the author of Portlandtown: A Tale of the Oregon Wyldes, a story of supernatural suspense, adventure, and zombies in the rain due October 16 from St. Martin’s Griffin. He also wrote a fish cookbook and a cartoon about an accident-prone octopus chef. Seriously. He lives upriver from Portland, Oregon and can be found online at www.robdeborde.com.

WebsiteFacebook : Twitter

Interview with D.J. McIntosh, author of The Witch of Babylon, and Giveaway - October 17, 2012

Please welcome D.J. McIntosh to The Qwillery as part of the 2012 Debut Author Challenge Interviews. The Witch of Babylon, D.J.'s US debut, was published on October 16, 2012.


Interview with D.J. McIntosh, author of The Witch of Babylon, and Giveaway - October 17, 2012


TQ:  Welcome to The Qwillery!

D.J.:  Thanks very much Sally – glad to come aboard and love your questions.


TQ:  What would you say is your most interesting writing quirk?

D.J.:  I’ll often write late in the day, sometimes until midnight. The witching hour I guess!


TQ:  Who are some of your favorite writers? Who do you feel has influenced your writing?

D.J.:   J.R.R. Tolkien and Frank Herbert rate really, really high. I’ve gone back to their books again and again. Some of their perspectives may have rubbed off because although not strictly supernatural, fantastical elements slip into my work more and more often. It’s not just the worlds that Tolkien and Herbert created which are so absorbing but the central human truths at the heart of their stories.


TQ:  Are you a plotter or a pantser?

D.J.:  Plotter first and foremost. Satisfying genre fiction depends heavily on a good plot.


TQ:  What is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

D.J.:  The first draft. Once that’s done, making all the revisions feels like pure bliss.


TQ:  Describe The Witch of Babylon (Mesopotamian Trilogy 1) in 140 characters or less.

D.J.:  A deadly game reveals the truth about a famous story the world believes is just a myth.


TQ:  Tell us something about The Witch of Babylon that is not in the book description.

D.J.:  “The Witch” belongs to the genre of antiquity or historical thrillers and these books are often an Indiana Jones-like romp through many countries in search of an elusive and priceless relic. My novel, although like that, has a much darker side because it’s partially set against the backdrop of the Iraq war and even though it’s fictional, it highlights some of the fearsome events that that took place in the early days of the war.


TQ:  What sort of research did you do for The Witch of Babylon?

D.J.:  When I began writing “The Witch” I knew little about Mesopotamian history or alchemy. I actually began with the Book of Genesis and quickly learned that a number of stories in Genesis are based on much older Mesopotamian myths. It took years to bring myself up to speed on both the origins of alchemy and Assyrian literature and history. My primary sources were books and the internet. All that time spent though, turned out to be a labor of love because the research was so fascinating.


TQ:  What is one of the oddest things you found during your research?

D.J.:  That a mistress of a French king died from poisoning after taking a drink saturated with gold particles.


TQ:  Who was the easiest character to write and why? Hardest and why?

D.J.:  The easiest to write was John Madison, an art dealer and the central character, maybe because I like him and was drawn to his persona as I began writing the book. I wanted a character who seemed like a real person, not a hero figure who would use military or police skills to get him out of difficult situations. The hardest to write was the lead woman – Laurel – because of her complex nature.


TQ:  Without giving anything away, what is/are your favorite scene(s) in The Witch of Babylon?

D.J.:  When they find the treasure and it’s revealed what it is.


TQ:  What's next?

D.J.:  Hard at work on Book 2 in the trilogy, The Book of Stolen Tales. It features John Madison on the hunt for a rare 17th century Italian anthology of fairy tales. As his quest deepens, the dark origins of these tales appear to come to life. I’m especially excited about this because 2012-2013 is the 200th anniversary of the Grimm brothers first book!


TQ:  Thank you for joining us at The Qwillery!




The Witch of Babylon

The Witch of Babylon
Mesopotamian Trilogy 1
Forge Books, October 16,2012
Hardcover and eBook, 416 pages

Interview with D.J. McIntosh, author of The Witch of Babylon, and Giveaway - October 17, 2012
Out of the searing heat and sandstorms of the infamous summer of 2003 in Baghdad comes The Witch of Babylon, a gripping story rooted in ancient Assyrian lore and its little-known but profound significance for the world.

John Madison is a Turkish-American art dealer raised by his much older brother, Samuel, a mover and shaker in New York's art world. Caught between his brother's obsession with saving a priceless relic looted from Iraq's National Museum and a deadly game of revenge staged by his childhood friend, John must solve a puzzle to find the link between a modern-day witch and an ancient one.

Aided by Tomas, an archaeologist, and Ari, an Iraqi photojournalist—two men with their own secrets to hide—John races against time to decipher a biblical prophecy that leads to the dark history behind the science of alchemy. Kidnapped by villainous fortune hunters, John is returned to Iraq, where a fabulous treasure trove awaits discovery—if he can stay alive long enough to find it.

International thriller-writing sensation D. J. McIntosh makes her American debut with The Witch of Babylon.





About D.J. McIntosh


Interview with D.J. McIntosh, author of The Witch of Babylon, and Giveaway - October 17, 2012
D.J. (Dorothy) McINTOSH is the former co-editor of the Crime Writers of Canada's newsletter, Fingerprints, and is a Toronto-based writer of novels and short mystery fiction. Her short story "The Hounds of Winter", published in Blood on the Holly by Baskerville Books (Toronto, 2007), was nominated for the 2008 Arthur Ellis Award for Best Short Story. "A View to Die For" appeared in Bloody Words: The Anthology, also published by Baskerville Books (Toronto, 2003). McIntosh graduated with a B.A. in English from the University of Toronto.



Website : Facebook : Twitter : The Witch of Babylon








The Giveaway

THE RULES

What:  One commenter will win a copy of The Witch of Babylon from Forge Books! US ONLY

How:   Answer the following question: 

Do you believe that myths have some truth to them?

Please remember - if you don't answer the question your entry will not be counted.

You may receive additional entries by:

1)   Being a Follower of The Qwillery.

2)   Mentioning the giveaway on Facebook and/or Twitter. Even if you mention the giveaway on both, you will get only one additional entry. You get only one additional entry even if you mention the giveaway on Facebook and/or Twitter multiple times.

There are a total of 3 entries you may receive: Comment (1 entry), Follower (+1 entry) and Facebook and/or Twitter (+ 1 entry).  This is subject to change again in the future for future giveaways.

Please leave links for Facebook or Twitter mentions. You MUST leave a way to contact you.

Who and When:  The contest is open to all humans on the planet earth with a US mailing address. Contest ends at 11:59pm US Eastern Time on Wednesday, October 24, 2012. Void where prohibited by law. No purchase necessary. You must be 18 years old or older to enter.

*Giveaway rules are subject to change.*

Interview with Max Gladstone, author of Three Parts Dead - October 5, 2012

Please welcome Max Gladstone to The Qwillery as part of the 2012 Debut Author Challenge Interviews. Three Parts Dead was published on October 2, 2012.  You may read Max's Guest Blog - The Agony and Ecstasy of Send - here.



Interview with Max Gladstone, author of Three Parts Dead - October 5, 2012


TQ:  Welcome to The Qwillery!

Max:  Thanks! Happy to be here.


TQ:  What would you say is your most interesting writing quirk?

Max:  My lawyer friends encourage me not to mention the human sacrifice, so I'll go with "writing on the move." I'm busy—day job, fencing, travel, active social life—so I had to get used to writing whenever and wherever I could find time. I wrote Three Parts Dead on an AlphaSmart Neo (sort of like a graphing calculator with a keyboard attached, 800 hours of battery life), on subways, during coffee breaks, in bars, early morning at cheap hotels—wherever I could scrape a few minutes together.


TQ:  Who are some of your favorite writers? Who do you feel has influenced your writing?

Max:  Roger Zelazny is a huge influence. Lord of Light was one of the first sci-fi books I fell in love with. I must have read it 14 times as I was growing up. I snatch up every Zelazny book I can find, and by now I have a long bookshelf full of his work, including the excellent NESFA 6-volume set of short stories. Robin McKinley's Hero and the Crown was another pivot around which my young reading life revolved. I read that book so many times in fifth and sixth grade that when I left for middle school, the librarian gave me her copy. I also love and regularly return to Ursula K LeGuin's Earthsea books. (Haven't re-read those in a few years, though—time to dive back in!) I can't praise Dorothy Dunnett's Lymond Chronicles enough, either. Vivid, crystalline writing, page-turner plots, complex characters who reveal themselves layer by layer as the series progresses, and enough research to make a team of Cambridge grad students go blind. Her books were the first I ever read that demanded I slow down enough to appreciate the writing. I owe her an immense debt for that.

I've already gone on for a while, but the full list would have to include Dan Simmons, John Crowley, Frank Herbert, and John Steinbeck, who I've been reading a lot of recently.


TQ:   Are you a plotter or a pantser?

Max:  I'm more pantser than a plotter, but I don't feel wedded to either camp. I start working with a few images fresh in my mind: scraps of character, setting, line, dramatic moments and turning points that the rest of the story drives toward. Is that a plot? Not really. More like the spine of one. Then I write desperately & expansively for about 30,000 words or so—or the first third of the target length, if I'm working on a short story. Then I step back, examine what I've done so far, and determine how various threads connect. The rest of the book is the weaving, knotting, and tying. At key stages, I'll reconsider, maybe scrap elements of the outline I'm working on, change terms, figure out what needs to happen next.

I can't believe I'm saying this, but it's sort of like Agile development methodology applied to a one-person project: you know your goals, you work toward them, and you keep checking back in with yourself to see how the project's developed and changed since the last meeting. Allows for more flexibility and creativity. But, then, everyone's different.


TQ:  What is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

Max:  I love writing, but every book I write, about 2/3 of the way through, like clockwork I have that hour of the wolf, when I'm convinced nothing I've written works. I'm wrong, but that doesn't help. So, that's a challenge. The other big challenge is changing from writing mode to editing mode: the shift from development to obsessive detail-mongering.


TQ:  Describe Three Parts Dead in 140 characters or less.

Max:  A god has died, and Tara, first year associate in an international necromancy firm, must bring Him back to life before His city falls apart. (A three-word longer version of this pitch actually got me my agent.)


TQ:  What inspired you to write Three Parts Dead?

Max:  In 2008, after two years teaching in rural China, I moved back to the States just as the economy stumbled into a meat grinder. My girlfriend (now my wife) was in law school, and I was looking for work; the collapse was a cold welcome back to urban American society, and I watched it evolve as I handed out resumes.

The sun shone, birds flew, the breeze smelled sweet, but you could see fear in the news anchors’ eyes. AIG failed. My wife’s professors started taking leaves of absence to help stem the crisis. An invisible war was being fought on a realm most of us could barely comprehend, fought by ostensibly immortal ‘persons’ without physical form, in whom hundreds of thousands of human beings had invested their lives and dreams.

These are gods, I thought, after a fashion. Pagan gods. And they’re dying.

So I decided to write a book about that.


TQ:  What sort of research did you do for Three Parts Dead?

Max:  I was lucky enough to be living with law students, and close to some of the great centers of legal learning in America. I talked with people about their lives and work; I attended lectures on the crisis, and about possible remedies. I paid more attention to what my friends who worked in Manhattan said about their jobs. I read broadly about the economy and its last hundred years or so of development. And once I had a pretty good picture of how everything worked, I threw most of it out and wrote a book.


TQ:   What is the oddest bit of information that you came across in your research?

Max:  The more I came to learn about bankruptcy, the more I realized it worked like necromancy: you take a dead thing, protect it with magic circles, chop it up, rewire it according to your dread purpose, and then, when your work is done, you hook up the lightning rods and tell Igor to get cranking. That image was the seed around which the rest of the book crystallized.


TQ:  Tell us something about Three Parts Dead that is not in the book description.

Max:  Tara's boss, Ms. Kevarian is one of my favorite characters. Tara's taking the first steps of her journey to become a master Craftswoman; Ms. Kevarian has walked that road, and been transformed in the process. She's a window into the power, and the loss, that comes from a career of working with Powers Humankind Was Not Meant To Comprehend.


TQ:  Who was the easiest character to write and why? Hardest and why?

Max:  Tara was probably the easiest character to write. I know a ton of people in that stage of their life: ambitious folks starting the careers for which they've spent years preparing, and wondering whether they've chosen the right path. No character was particularly difficult to write, though I had a harder time getting into the heads of characters who were older, and those who were convinced of their position's rightness.


TQ:  Without giving anything away, what is/are your favorite scene(s) in Three Parts Dead?

Max:   There's one scene early in the book, where Tara encounters an obstacle, and she almost shrugs, leaves, and goes on with her work and life—a decision that would have drastically changed the direction of the story. I like that scene because it's such a character moment. There's no need for her to press on. She does because she wants to, because someone's tried to stop her and she won't let them, and for a host of other internal reasons.


TQ:  What's next?

Max:   I've already written another book in the Craft sequence—Two Serpents Rise is due out next summer. That book expands the world, introduces new characters, and develops a number of the themes of Three Parts Dead. I'm about to start another book in the sequence, which will connect characters from the first two books; in my spare time, I'm working with a good friend on a webcomic project I hope will debut sometime around the new year, and writing a short story for an anthology. Life's the kind of busy I love: lots of creative projects, and freedom to pursue them all.


TQ:  Thank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

Max:  My pleasure!




Three Parts Dead

Three Parts Dead
Craft 1
Tom Doherty Associates / Tor Books, October 2, 2012
Hardcover and eBook, 336 pages

Interview with Max Gladstone, author of Three Parts Dead - October 5, 2012
A god has died, and it’s up to Tara, first-year associate in the international necromantic firm of Kelethres, Albrecht, and Ao, to bring Him back to life before His city falls apart.

Her client is Kos, recently deceased fire god of the city of Alt Coulumb. Without Him, the metropolis’s steam generators will shut down, its trains will cease running, and its four million citizens will riot.

Tara’s job: resurrect Kos before chaos sets in. Her only help: Abelard, a chain-smoking priest of the dead god, who’s having an understandable crisis of faith.

When Tara and Abelard discover that Kos was murdered, they have to make a case in Alt Coulumb’s courts—and their quest for the truth endangers their partnership, their lives, and Alt Coulumb’s slim hope of survival.

Set in a phenomenally built world in which justice is a collective force bestowed on a few, craftsmen fly on lightning bolts, and gargoyles can rule cities, Three Parts Dead introduces readers to an ethical landscape in which the line between right and wrong blurs.




About Max

Max’s novel Three Parts Dead will be published by Tor Books in October.

Max has taught in southern Anhui, wrecked a bicycle in Angkor Wat, and been thrown from a horse in Mongolia. Max graduated from Yale University, where he studied Chinese.

Website : Twitter : Goodreads

Interview with Sharon Lynn Fisher, author of Ghost Planet - October 4, 2012

Please welcome Sharon Lynn Fisher to The Qwillery as part of the 2012 Debut Author Challenge Interviews. This is also the first stop on the Great Fall 2012 GHOST PLANET Book Launch Blog Tour ExtravapaloozaGhost Planet, Sharon's debut, will be published on October 30, 2012.


Interview with Sharon Lynn Fisher, author of Ghost Planet - October 4, 2012


TQ:  Welcome to The Qwillery.

Sharon:  Thanks very much for having me. This is stop #1 on my blog tour and I’m really excited to be here!


TQ:  What would you say is your most interesting writing quirk?



Sharon:  I think writers can be a mess of contradictions. (Or maybe that’s just me.) I rarely outline before starting a new project -- I’m really inspired by discovering my story and characters as I go. Yet if you were the gargoyle that sits on my desk, you would frequently hear me muttering about how much easier this would be if I knew where the bleep I was going.

Perhaps the truth is that writers just like to mutter. A couple of years ago I had this idea for a spinoff of Twitter called Mutter. I think that would be awesome.


TQ:  Who are some of your favorite writers? Who do you feel has influenced your writing?

Sharon:  My most beloved books from childhood and adolescence were A WRINKLE IN TIME (Madeleine L’Engle), WATERSHIP DOWN (Richard Adams), and the Tolkien books. As an adult I’ve particularly loved English classics, my favorites being JANE EYRE and everything by Anthony Trollope. Another of my all-time favorites is OUTLANDER (Diana Gabaldon).

With regard to GHOST PLANET -- SOLARIS, by Stanislaw Lem, and the grim tales of Margaret Atwood, both of whom I paid tribute to in the novel. I also draw a lot of inspiration from science books.

My newest favorite is the WOOL series, by Hugh Howey -- one of those self-publishing success stories. For good reason. Dude can WRITE.

I suppose if you mash all these genres together you can see how I ended up writing science fiction romance!


TQ:  Are you a plotter or a pantser?



Sharon:  I’m a plontser. Or maybe a planter? Anyways you see where I’m going. I used to be 100 percent pantser. After gutting and finally rewriting my first manuscript, I now use a blended approach -- I usually start with a one-paragraph synopsis that’s written as if I'm pitching the story. That helps get me excited about the concept, and plugs in the creative crockpot. The paragraph usually grows to a page or two as I work out the story arc and plot. By that point I’ve usually written at least the opening chapter, and I take off from there. I WILL outline if I’m struggling with some aspect. But I WON’T enjoy it.


TQ:  What is the most challenging thing for you about writing?



Sharon:  Tuning out what a fellow SFR writer has referred to as the “I suck” fairies. I have never known a writer who did not have whole swarms of these locked in closets and sealed up in boxes under the bed. They’re tricksy and they get out. If anyone has found a pest spray that works, for the love of Pete, please share it with me. I’ll send chocolate.


TQ:  Describe Ghost Planet in 140 characters or less. /like a tweet/



Sharon:  Wow, that required some gymnastics. This is a bit of a spoiler with regard to the opening hook, but it’s all in the cover copy as well…

Psychologist takes a job on an alien world. On day 1, she learns she's: Dead. Reincarnated as an alien. Tethered to a man who must shun her.


TQ:  What inspired you to write Ghost Planet?



Sharon:  First came the title. It made me ask, “What would be the story behind a world called “ghost planet”?” For me it almost always begins that way.

Second came the idea of a symbiotic bond between two people -- a man and woman who had not chosen each other, yet could not get away from each other. As a writer drawn to speculative worlds, romance, and science, that idea was fascinating to me. One blogger pointed out that it’s sort of a new twist on the whole soul mate thing. I like that a lot.

Third came the film Sunshine. I loved the slow-building tension in that film, and the focus on the psychology of the characters’ motivations. Also the physicist hero, played by Irish actor Cillian Murphy, inspired GHOST PLANET’s hero, Dr. Grayson Murphy.


TQ:  What sorts of research did you do for Ghost Planet?



Sharon:  As with most sci-fi projects, I spent some time researching the geek aspects – what would their personal technology be like? How would they get to the planet? How would the colonies be constructed? I tried to keep all that to a minimum in the book. It has to be there, but it’s just part of the supporting structure.

The real meat of my research was on symbiosis – specifically, the work biologist Lynn Margulis did on symbiogenesis and Gaia theory. This research was critical to my world-building and character development. When I say “character,” I include the planet itself, because I feel it has a character-like presence in the story.


TQ:  Who was the easiest character to write and why? Hardest and why?



Sharon:  Elizabeth (my heroine) was the most difficult. The first version of her was…well, ME. I think a lot of writers probably start this way. But she didn’t work very well as me. It wasn’t the person she wanted or needed to be. Helping Elizabeth find her true self was a long process that unfolded over multiple versions of the manuscript. It was also very challenging writing from the point of view of a person experiencing something that no real person has ever experienced.

As for the easiest, I’d have to say the physicist-turned-transport-pilot, Garvey. I “got” him from the beginning, and I had a blast writing him. He and a character called Jake (from another of my manuscripts) are probably the only two characters that have ever sprung fully formed from my brain. They are both extreme smart-asses. I’m not sure what that says about me.


TQ:  Without giving anything away, what is/are your favorite scene(s) in Ghost Planet?



Sharon:  I think my favorite scenes occur in chapter 2. The chapter opens with Elizabeth engaged in the fight of her life – a fight to hold onto her identity as others try to strip it away. The chapter closes with her discovery of devastating (and irrefutable) evidence that she’s lost that fight. She’s tethered to a stranger, and yet more alone than she’s ever been.


TQ:  What's next?

Sharon:  First there’s my second book for Tor, working title THE OPHELIA PROPHECY, post-apocalyptic bio-punk romance. A twisty tale with lots of color and texture, science, politics, and adventure.

Hopefully a short or two in the interim -- a story set in the earliest days of colonization on Ardagh 1 (the “ghost planet”), and this unrelated zombie romance thing I’ve had simmering.


TQ:  Thank you for joining us at The Qwillery!

Sharon:  Thank you for the fun interview!



About Ghost Planet

Ghost Planet
Tor Books, October 30, 2012
Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 352 pages

Interview with Sharon Lynn Fisher, author of Ghost Planet - October 4, 2012
When psychologist Elizabeth Cole arrives on a recently colonized planet to start a new job, she doesn’t expect to find her supervisor, Murphy, so incredibly attractive. She doesn’t expect to see alien beings, native to the planet, materializing as ghosts and following the “colonist” humans around. Most of all, she doesn’t expect to learn that Elizabeth Cole in fact died in a crash en route to this planet, and that she herself a reincarnated ghost-alien, connected symbiotically to Murphy—who, bound by the “Ghost Protocol” that he himself created, is not allowed to interact with or acknowledge Elizabeth in any way.

Confused, alone, and discounted as less than human, Elizabeth works to unlock the secrets of her own existence and fight the blatant discrimination of the Ghost Protocol. But as she draws closer to the truth, she begins to realize that she is only a pawn in the struggle for control of the planet. Oppressed by her ghost status and tantalized by forbidden love, Elizabeth may just be the one to upset the planetary balance….




About Sharon Lynn Fisher

Interview with Sharon Lynn Fisher, author of Ghost Planet - October 4, 2012
SHARON LYNN FISHER is the author of GHOST PLANET, coming from Tor Books on Oct. 30. The book -- a two-time RWA Golden Heart finalist -- is a sci-fi/romance blend that offers a "fresh and fascinating take on the human-alien problem" (says author Linnea Sinclair). She lives in the Pacific Northwest, where she is hard at work on her next novel and battles writerly angst with baked goods, Irish tea, and champagne. You can visit her online at SharonLynnFisher.com.




Facebook : Twitter : Google+

Interview with Tina Connolly, author of Ironskin - October 3, 2012

Please welcome Tina Connolly to The Qwillery as part of the 2012 Debut Author Challenge Interviews. Ironskin, Tina's debut, was published on October 2, 2012!


Interview with Tina Connolly, author of Ironskin - October 3, 2012


TQ:  Welcome to The Qwillery.

Tina:  Thanks so much for having me!


TQ:  Writing quirks! What are some of yours?

Tina:  For novels, I like to write a sort of book pitchy thing before I write the book (or at least, before I've written most of the book.) It keeps me focused, and it also lets me see if there are major structure problems. I started doing this after I wrote my 3rd novel (a quirky MG) and then tried to write up a query letter for it. I had the hardest time making the pitch sound logical...because the character who drove the plot was not the main character. Whoops!


TQ:  Who are some of your favorite writers? Who do you feel has influenced your writing?

Tina:  Oh, this is a long list. My favorite all time fantasy writer is Diana Wynne Jones. In the kickass fantasy heroines department, I also love Robin McKinley and Kristin Cashore. I also recently read Rae Carson's first book and tore through that. On the adult fantasy side, I love Dave Duncan for his detailed worldbuilding and complex magic systems. And Sharon Shinn for worldbuilding plus a good romance. And then, classics - my favorite all time writer ever is Jane Austen. But I obviously also love Charlotte Bronte (my favorite is actually Villette, which is amazing), Edith Wharton... Margaret Atwood for her deeply feminist (if sometimes depressing) books. Saki for his incisively funny short stories.... Take bits of all that and stir, I guess!


TQ:  Are you a plotter or a pantser?

Tina:  I'm not sure if I'm really either! I come from short fiction, where I have a ridiculous process of jumping all around an idea, writing down random things and scenes I know. Eventually a story starts to emerge. This turned out to be fairly unworkable for novels (though I did, painfully, write one book this way (my possibly unfixable Great Experimental Lawrence Kansas Novel). So nowadays I'm more to the plotter side - I start with a very loose overarching idea, and then start going back and forth between writing and outlining.


TQ:  What is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

Tina:  Before Ironskin, I'd written, I dunno, 6 novels and 70 short stories? During those years I had a full-time job, or a part-time job, or multiple part-time jobs... And then, a month after I sold Ironskin, I had a baby. And it turns out that finding time around a baby is a whole different kettle of fish. An adorable kettle of fish, but still. Writing the sequel to Ironskin while having a baby around was...challenging. (Not to mention that I still work seasonally as a face painter!)


TQ:  Describe Ironskin in 140 characters or less.

Tina:  Steampunk Jane Eyre with fairies! Of course it's not exactly steampunk, doesn't precisely follow the JE plot, and the fey aren't particularly tinkerbelly. But it's a good jumping off point.


TQ:  What inspired you to write Ironskin?

TinaIronskin actually started in 2007 as a novella written for a gothic anthology call. They didn't take it, but it was a finalist at Writers of the Future, which encouraged me to go back to it and develop it into a novel. That's the genesis of the plot, but as far as the driving impetus behind actually writing it, I'd say I tend to write a lot about beauty and feminism and power and the intersection of all those. The story structure I had gave me a lot of room to explore those themes.


TQ:  What sort of research did you do for Ironskin?

TinaIronskin is not meant to be historical fantasy, but at the same time I wanted to give my world a good grounding. One of the more important worldbuilding points is that the book is set five years after a devasting human-fey war. So I ended up reading a lot of books about England post-WWI. My technology (among other things!) has gone at a different rate in Ironskin, but it was a good jumping-off point. One book I particularly liked was called "The Great War and Modern Memory", by Paul Fussell.


TQ:  Who was the easiest character to write and why? Hardest and why?

Tina:  Jane was tricky at the beginning, because in the original story, Jane's curse was closer to depression. I realized pretty quickly that was not going to give me a character who could drive an entire book. Once I got a handle on how rage would fit for Jane, she went much more smoothly. Easiest was perhaps Nina, who says the most awful things and is completely sure of herself. She was fun to write.


TQ:  Without giving anything away, what is/are your favorite scene(s) in Ironskin?

Tina:  Oh, a bunch, of course! But a non-spoilery one is I had fun writing the first ball sequence at Helen's house, particularly the point where the three old women (Pince-Nez, Shoes, and Handkerchief, as Jane internally dubs them), reminisce about the old days. There are also some fantastical books that pop up in the story and I always love making up those.


TQ:  What's next? /this is where you share anything you'd like/

Tina:  I'm currently working on the sequel, which is due out in October 2013! I've also had a couple stories appear recently - the SF generation ship story "Flash Bang Remember" in Lightspeed (with Caroline M. Yoachim), and a loose retelling of the Icelandic folk tale Kisa the Cat, "One Ear Back", in Beneath Ceaseless Skies (also podcast there by me!)


TQ:  Thank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

Tina:  Thank you for having me!




About Ironskin

Ironskin
Tor, October 2, 2012
Hardcover and eBook, 304 pages

Interview with Tina Connolly, author of Ironskin - October 3, 2012
Jane Eliot wears an iron mask.

It's the only way to contain the fey curse that scars her cheek. The Great War is five years gone, but its scattered victims remain -- the ironskin.

When a carefully worded listing appears for a governess to assist with a "delicate situation" -- a child born during the Great War -- Jane is certain the child is fey-cursed, and that she can help.

Teaching the unruly Dorie suppress her curse is hard enough; she certainly didn't expect to fall for the girl's father, the enigmatic artist Edward Rochart. But her blossoming crush is stifled by her own scars, and by his parade of women. Ugly women, who enter his closed studio...and come out as beautiful as the fey.

Jane knows Rochart cannot love her, just as she knows that she must wear iron for the rest of her life. But what if neither of these things is true? Step by step Jane unlocks the secrets of her new life -- and discovers just how far she will go to become whole again.




About Tina

Interview with Tina Connolly, author of Ironskin - October 3, 2012
Tina Connolly lives in Portland, Oregon with her husband and young son, in a house that came with a dragon in the basement and blackberry vines in the attic. Her stories have appeared in Strange Horizons, Fantasy, Beneath Ceaseless Skies, and the anthology Unplugged: Year’s Best Online SF 2008. Her debut fantasy novel IRONSKIN is forthcoming from Tor in October 2012, with a sequel in 2013. She is a frequent reader for Podcastle, and is narrating a 2012 flash podcasting venture called Toasted Cake. In the summer she works as a face painter, which means a glitter-filled house is an occupational hazard. Her website is tinaconnolly.com.


Twitter : Google+ : Goodreads

Interview with Steve Bein, author of Daughter of the Sword - October 2, 2012

Please welcome Steve Bein to The Qwillery as part of the 2012 Debut Author Challenge Interviews. Daughter of the Sword (The Fated Blades 1) is published today, October 2, 2012. Happy Publication Day to Steve!

You may read Steve's Guest Blog - Why Swords - here.


Interview with Steve Bein, author of Daughter of the Sword - October 2, 2012


TQ:  Welcome to The Qwillery.

Steve:  Thanks so much for having me. And thanks so much for including me in your Debut Author Challenge. That was a big honor for me.


TQ:  Writing quirks! What are some of yours?

Steve:  Does swinging swords around in my house count as quirky? I choreograph fight scenes the same way you’d do it in a movie, physically acting it out, and with Daughter of the Sword that involved a bit of swordplay in my office, my bedroom, my kitchen, my basement….

What else? M&Ms are a must for writing. So are pen and paper; I’m still old tech. I used to stay up until 3:00 and 4:00 in the morning to write, but I’m trying to cut back on that little quirk these days.


TQ:  Who are some of your favorite writers? Who do you feel has influenced your writing?

Steve:  Most recently, China Mieville and Neal Stephenson. Larry David too, oddly enough; I don’t write comedy but he has a gift for weaving multiple plotlines together. I have unending admiration for Philip K. Dick and Ted Chiang, the philosopher-kings of SF. The day I can write like them is going to be a pretty great day.

Going to the favorites list, it’s got to start with Tolkien, Herbert, Vonnegut, Palahniuk. Add to that William Gibson, Dan Simmons, George Martin, Jeff Carlson, James Clavell. If I’m feeling a little more serious, I go to Nick Hornby, Richard Russo, Hemingway, guys like that.

This list is sounding a little macho, isn’t it? As much as I love all those guys, Helen Dewitt’s The Last Samurai still remains the best novel I’ve ever read.


TQ:  Are you a plotter or a pantser?

Steve:  Plotter all the way.


TQ:  What is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

Steve:  Plotting, actually. I’ve tried writing by the seat of my pants, but it doesn’t go anywhere, so the hardest road is the only one I can take.

The most difficult thing for me is turning story ideas into stories. I’ve been making a study of this, actually, trying to uncover some kind of trick that will make it easier. I read a lot of philosophy every week, and being a fan of Ted Chiang and Philip K. Dick, I’m always on the lookout for philosophically engaging story ideas. And I find them all the time, but then comes the alchemy: turning leaden ideas into golden stories.


TQ:  Describe Daughter of the Sword (The Fated Blades 1) in 140 characters or less.

Steve:  Three masterwork swords change history; cops, yakuzas, soldiers, and samurai do their best to change it back. Can they succeed? Read on.

Let me do one for Only a Shadow too, if you would:

An aging ninja master must enlist the man who wants to supplant him to infiltrate an impregnable castle and save their clan from extinction.


TQ:  What sort of research did you do for Daughter of the Sword?

Steve:  Loads! Most of Daughter of the Sword takes place in 21st century Tokyo, which I know pretty well, but I still had to do a lot of research on police work, especially on how different it is in Japan as compared to the States. Then there are the historical sections of the book: one with samurai in the 11th century, one with samurai in the 16th century, and another chunk set in WWII. Originally there was another storyline set in the 1400s, but that’s taken on a life of its own, and now it’s the stand-alone novella Only a Shadow. So that makes four different eras, all of them unique, all of them difficult to research because this is Japan and not, say, Germany or England. Studying up on medieval Europe is easy. Finding similar resources on Japan can be a real pain in the neck.


TQ:  What inspired you to write Daughter of the Sword?

Steve:  Lots of things. It started with a dream, actually, of a katana that leaves this haunting sound in the air whenever it cuts. Samurai movies were a big influence too. There’s a classic series of Lone Wolf and Cub films, which are hilarious and horrifying and badass all at once. The little boy in those movies is called Daigoro, and so is the boy samurai in Daughter of the Sword. There’s also a series starring Zatoichi, the Blind Swordsman. He’s sort of Zorro-meets-Robin-Hood-meets-Beatrix-Kiddo. I don’t have the same Tarantinoesque bloodfest going on, but I do have a blind swordsman, thanks to Zatoichi.

That explains the samurai stuff, but not the parts set in 1942 and 2010. I chose WWII because it was such an enormous event in Japanese history, so I felt it just had to get into the book somehow. The modern story, Mariko’s story, had to be invented ex nihilo. “Inspiration” isn’t the right word for how she came to be; the book just demanded her to be there.


TQ:  Who was the easiest character to write and why? Hardest and why?

Steve:  The easiest is Daigoro, a samurai boy struggling to live up to his father’s image. I just love picking on him. I don’t know why he’s so much fun, but I love making his life worse and worse. He’s constantly overshadowed by his brother, and his father’s shoes are just too big to fill, and then I make him and his brother butt heads over the possession of a sacred sword—the very symbol of their house. He’s got a really strong moral code, and I give him lots of opportunities to make his life easier by breaking it, but he just can’t do it. Poor guy.

The hardest is Mariko, without a doubt. She’s the only woman to make detective and sergeant in Tokyo’s most elite police unit, and so in some ways she’s like Daigoro: constantly under pressure, and the pressure just keeps mounting as the book goes on. But she’s the only female POV character, which is tough, and I’ve never been a cop, so I had to do ride-alongs and a lot of interviews to get into her head. Besides all that, her story is what holds the rest of the book together. All of the historical segments are self-contained and self-coherent. Mariko’s story has to do all of that and unite all the other stories too. Everyone else can be a brick, but she has to be both brick and mortar. For a guy who finds plotting to be a challenge, writing Mariko is as tough as it gets.


TQ:  Without giving anything away, what is/are your favorite scene(s) in Daughter of the Sword?

Steve:  Daigoro and Mariko both have terrific showdowns. Mariko ends up with a sensei who’s very much like my grandfather in many respects, and very much like my mentor when I lived in Japan. I don’t know how much of that will come across to people who don’t know my grandpa or Yuasa-sensei, but writing those scenes allowed me to reflect a lot on moments I spent with them, and that’s what I think of whenever I revisit those scenes.


TQ:  What's next?

Steve:  Drugs and ninjas. I just turned in the manuscript for Year of the Demon, the second book in the series. Daigoro gets a lot more attention in this one, and once again it’s Mariko who holds the whole book together. I’ve got some new protagonists coming in too, including Mariko’s new partner in the Narcotics division, plus a whole bunch of ninjas.


TQ:  Thank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

Steve:  It’s been such a pleasure. Thanks so much for inviting me here.




The Fated Blades

Daughter of the Sword
The Fated Blades 1
Roc, October 2. 2012
Trade Paperback and eBook, 480 pages

Interview with Steve Bein, author of Daughter of the Sword - October 2, 2012
Mariko Oshiro is not your average Tokyo cop. As the only female detective in the city’s most elite police unit, she has to fight for every ounce of respect, especially from her new boss. While she wants to track down a rumored cocaine shipment, he gives her the least promising case possible. But the case—the attempted theft of an old samurai sword—proves more dangerous than anyone on the force could have imagined.

The owner of the sword, Professor Yasuo Yamada, says it was crafted by the legendary Master Inazuma, a sword smith whose blades are rumored to have magical qualities. The man trying to steal it already owns another Inazuma—one whose deadly power eventually comes to control all who wield it. Or so says Yamada, and though he has studied swords and swordsmanship all his life, Mariko isn’t convinced.

But Mariko’s skepticism hardly matters. Her investigation has put her on a collision course with a curse centuries old and as bloodthirsty as ever. She is only the latest in a long line of warriors and soldiers to confront this power, and even the sword she learns to wield could turn against her.


Only a Shadow
Fated Blades eNovella
Roc, September 4, 2012
ebook, 59 pages

Interview with Steve Bein, author of Daughter of the Sword - October 2, 2012
The author of Daughter of the Sword takes readers to feudal Japan, where men and empires rise and fall by the sword…

The Tiger on the Mountain is a legendary blade, crafted by the master sword smith Inazuma, and reputed to possess magical powers. In 1442 Japan, the sword dwells inside the impregnable fortress of Hirata Nobushige, the enemy of the Iga clan.

Venerable shinobi Jujiro has recruited the brave young ninja Tada to steal the sword and restore power to the Iga clan. If Tada is successful, he’ll go from being the clan’s orphaned ward to a legend for the ages—and he’ll be able to ask for Old Jujiro’s granddaughter’s hand in marriage. If he fails, the clan will be annihilated.

Getting inside the castle is next to impossible—getting out is inconceivable. But as Tada prepares himself for one of the boldest thefts in history, the greatest obstacle he faces may just prove to be himself…

Don’t miss Daughter of the Sword, the first Novel of the Fated Blades!



About Steve

Interview with Steve Bein, author of Daughter of the Sword - October 2, 2012
Steve Bein is a philosopher, martial artist, climber, photographer, diver, world traveler, and award-winning sci fi and fantasy author. His short fiction has appeared in Asimov’s, Interzone, as a winner in the Writers of the Future contest, and in international translation. Daughter of the Sword, his first novel, has already received critical acclaim.

Steve divides his time between Rochester, Minnesota, and Rochester, New York, where is a visiting professor of Asian philosophy and Asian history at SUNY-Geneseo. His other academic interests include bioethics, which led him to a brief stint as a visiting researcher at the Mayo Clinic, environmental philosophy, which led him to see polar bears in Canada and penguins in Antarctica, and philosophy and science fiction, which leads him everywhere else in the universe.

Please visit Steve at www.philosofiction.com. If you like Steve on Facebook, you can receive an autographed sampler from Ace and Roc featuring the first two chapters of Daughter of the Sword. You can also find a preview of Daughter of the Sword in the companion novella, Only a Shadow, which will bring lots of ninja action to your e-reader.

Interview with Jill Archer, author of Dark Light of Day, and Giveaway - September 28, 2012

Please welcome Jill Archer to The Qwillery as part of the 2012 Debut Author Challenge Interviews. Dark Light of Day (Noon Onyx 1) was published on September 25, 2012. You may read Jill's Guest Blog - A Post-Apocalyptic Novel without Zombies, Robots, Aliens, Dystopia, the Plague or Even a Recent War - here.


Interview with Jill Archer, author of Dark Light of Day, and Giveaway - September 28, 2012


TQ:  Welcome to The Qwillery.

Jill:  Thank you! I'm happy to be here.


TQ:  What would you say is your most interesting writing quirk?

Jill:  My editor pointed out that I was overly fond of using dog metaphors in my writing. Until she mentioned it, I hadn't realized! Sure enough, I ran a search. Clearly, I love comparing people to pooches and demons to dogs. (I've since reduced the number of dog metaphors in DLOD).


TQ:   Who are some of your favorite writers? Who do you feel has influenced your writing?

Jill:  Past and current favorites include Lois McMaster Bujold, S.M. Stirling, Ken Follett, Naomi Novik, Anne Rice, Stephen King, Colleen McCullough, Elizabeth George, Elizabeth Peters, Nora Roberts, and Lisa Kleypas. To some degree they've all influenced my writing (as have many others whose work I admire). Despite the disparate genres represented by this list, collectively they represent the best that storytellers have to offer: memorable characters, richly detailed worlds, and/or stories with emotional resonance.


TQ:  Are you a plotter or a pantser?

Jill:  I'm a plotter, although I always give myself permission to create new characters or explore different plot directions. Neither the ending of Dark Light of Day nor the second book in the series is the ending I originally planned. So far, my books have been too detailed for me to be a pantser, but I can't deny myself the thrill of discovery that comes with being open to story possibilities I didn't see at the start of a project.


TQ:  What is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

Jill:  All of it. That's not to say I don't enjoy it, but I wonder if I'll ever be able to say that attempting to produce a 100,000 word novel with characters readers can be passionate about, settings that are imaginative yet believable, and plots that are as surprising as they are satisfying isn't challenging every step of the way! :-D


TQ:   How did practicing law prepare you for writing novels? Or not!

Jill:  Most of my ten years in practice was spent doing transactional work, not litigation. That means when I wasn't in meetings or on the phone, I was drafting documents -- inch-thick, single-spaced documents. The kind that take forever to finish. The kind that take a team of people to get just right. The kind that go back and forth between the involved parties multiple times. The kind with looming deadlines, lots of stress, but immeasurable satisfaction once they are complete. So, in a way, those ten years were prepping me for novel writing! (But now I get to double space).


TQ:  Describe Dark Light of Day (Noon Onyx 1) in 140 characters or less.

Jill:  A 21 year old post-grad magic user must choose between death or training to become a demon peacekeeper.


TQ:  What inspired you to write Dark Light of Day?

Jill:  Noon Onyx is very loosely inspired by the librarian Evelyn "Evie" Carnahan from the movie, The Mummy. Some years ago, while I was still practicing law, I sat next to a librarian during a writer's event. We each commiserated with the other about how dull we felt our day jobs were, a feeling each of us couldn't believe the other had. It led to a discussion about Evie's character and I got the idea to see if I could somehow create a similarly bookish lawyer character who lived in some sort of "otherworld."


TQ:  What sort of research did you do for Dark Light of Day?

Jill:  All kinds. There was the legal research, of course. Although I didn't obsessively concern myself with legal accuracy (demons and due process don't always mix), I wanted to use enough legal terminology to establish the "school of demon law" milieu I was trying to create. That said, no one needs a law degree to read the book! Necessary meaning can be derived from context. (The real story is Noon's emotional journey). I researched antique apple varieties to create the ensorcelled Empyr wines. That was fun! And I researched all sorts of demons and deities from around the world, as well as various religious myths and holidays. I played fast and loose with most of it. I tend to use research as an inspirational springboard.


TQ:  Who was the easiest character to write and why? Hardest and why?

Jill:  Noon Onyx was the easiest character to write. Since the book's written in first person, I'd be worried if she wasn't my answer to this question! I think if your character's perspective is hard to write from, or you don't identify with them for whatever reason, writing in first person would be doubly hard. That said, writing in first person is challenging because your main character's not going to be present for every single story event. And you have to work extra hard at showing what the other characters might be thinking or feeling (something I enjoy knowing as a reader).

Noon's parents were difficult to write at first. I get them more now that I've spent more time with the story, but when I was first fleshing things out it was difficult for me to relate to parents that acted the way they did.


TQ:  Without giving anything away, what is/are your favorite scene(s) in Dark Light of Day?

Jill:  Hmm... that's a tough one. I think there's something different to love in each. But I will say I loved how the Barrister's Ball sequence turned out. There's also a small twist to the climax of the book that made me hoot out loud when I first thought of it. (I thought, "I can't write that--!" and then I knew I *had* to!) And the emotional note of the very last scene of the book, to me, is pitch perfect.


TQ:  What's next?

Jill:  Book #2 is currently scheduled for a spring release -- May 2013. My plan for each book is new assignments, new adventures, and new adversaries. In book #2, some characters will return, some new ones will be introduced, and Noon will get her first field assignment.


TQ:  Thank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

Jill:  Thanks for having me, Sally! I appreciated having a chance to share more about Noon Onyx and Dark Light of Day with your readers.



About Dark Light of Day

Dark Light of Day
A Noon Onyx Novel 1
Ace, September 25, 2012
Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 384 pages

Interview with Jill Archer, author of Dark Light of Day, and Giveaway - September 28, 2012
Armageddon is over. The demons won. And yet somehow…the world has continued. Survivors worship patron demons under a draconian system of tributes and rules. These laws keep the demons from warring among themselves, the world from slipping back into chaos.

Noon Onyx grew up on the banks of the river Lethe, daughter of a prominent politician, and a descendant of Lucifer’s warlords. Noon has a secret—she was born with waning magic, the dark, destructive, fiery power that is used to control demons and maintain the delicate peace among them. But a woman with waning magic is unheard of and some will consider her an abomination.

Noon is summoned to attend St. Lucifer’s, a school of demon law. She must decide whether to declare her powers there…or attempt to continue hiding them, knowing the price for doing so may be death. And once she meets the forbiddingly powerful Ari Carmine—who suspects Noon is harboring magic as deadly as his own—Noon realizes there may be more at stake than just her life.




About Jill

Interview with Jill Archer, author of Dark Light of Day, and Giveaway - September 28, 2012
Raised in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Jill earned a bachelor of science from Penn State University and later moved to Baltimore to attend the University of Baltimore School of Law, where she graduated magna cum laude. She went on to practice law as a “dirt lawyer” for ten years, specializing in real estate law, municipal development, commercial leasing, and anything involving exceedingly lengthy legalese-like contractual monstrosities.

Jill now lives in rural Maryland with her two children and husband, who is a recreational pilot. Weekends are often spent flying around in the family’s small Cessna, visiting tiny un-towered airfields and other local points of interest.


Website: www.jillarcher.com
Blog: http://jillarcherauthor.wordpress.com/
Twitter: @archer_jill
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jillarcherauthor
Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/13556956-dark-light-of-day




The Giveaway

THE RULES

What:  One commenter will win a copy of Dark Light of Day (Noon Onyx 1) from The Qwillery.

How:   Answer the following question: 

What is one of your favorite stories featuring demons? 
 
Please remember - if you don't answer the question your entry will not be counted.

You may receive additional entries by:

1)   Being a Follower of The Qwillery.

2)   Mentioning the giveaway on Facebook and/or Twitter. Even if you mention the giveaway on both, you will get only one additional entry. You get only one additional entry even if you mention the giveaway on Facebook and/or Twitter multiple times.

There are a total of 3 entries you may receive: Comment (1 entry), Follower (+1 entry) and Facebook and/or Twitter (+ 1 entry).  This is subject to change again in the future for future giveaways.

Please leave links for Facebook or Twitter mentions. You MUST leave a way to contact you.

Who and When:  The contest is open to all humans on the planet earth with a mailing address. Contest ends at 11:59pm US Eastern Time on Friday, October 5, 2012. Void where prohibited by law. No purchase necessary. You must be 18 years old or older to enter.

*Giveaway rules are subject to change.*

Interview with Richard E. Gropp, author of Bad Glass, and Giveaway

Please welcome Richard E. Gropp to The Qwillery as part of 2012 Debut Author Challenge Interviews. Bad Glass was published on September 25, 2012.


Interview with Richard E. Gropp, author of Bad Glass, and Giveaway


Richard:  Thanks for welcoming me to your site! I really appreciate it.

TQ:  My pleasure!



TQ:  Writing quirks! What are some of yours?

Richard:  Hmmmm … I’m constantly reading aloud. Is that odd? I’ll read a sentence over and over again, listening to the rhythm of the syllables. I’ll change a word and read it again; I’ll read it in context, and then read through the whole chapter. Then again. Sometimes I’ll read it into a recorder and play it back. And if I’m being productive, I won’t call it a day until my voice is hoarse and my throat is raw. (Luckily, I seldom work at the local coffee shop.)


TQ:   Who are some of your favorite writers? Who do you feel has influenced your writing?

Richard:  That’s a pretty long and constantly-shifting list. Raymond Chandler, Samuel R. Delany, Caitlín R. Kiernan, Stephen King, and William Gibson are all major influences. But the most recent writer I went all “fan boy” over would have to be Gail Carriger. I absolutely adore her Parasol Protectorate series, and I’ve been recommending it to everyone – it’s so much fun, and a type of writing I don’t think I could ever manage!


TQ:  Are you a plotter or a pantser?

Richard:  I guess I’m a mixture of the two. I can generally see the big things on the horizon – the action climax, the way a relationship is probably going to work out – but I usually don’t know how I’m going to get there. Most of the time, I’ll be able to see about two chapters into the future, and that’s it.

That can be scary at times – not knowing where you’re going – but I think it’s fun to dig yourself into a deep, dark hole and then try to dig your way back out. That’s when you stumble upon all of the most awesome and unexpected things.


TQ:  What is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

Richard:  Probably working at a reasonable speed. I tend to obsess over sentences and words, rewriting and rewriting and rewriting until I’m absolutely happy. That means it can take me weeks or months to finish a single chapter. I’m hoping that my pace will pick up as I get more experience and confidence.


TQ:  Describe Bad Glass in 140 characters or less.

Richard:  An aspiring photographer sets out to document the unexplained horrors in a quarantined city. He faces the inexplicable & fights to survive.


TQ:  What inspired you to write Bad Glass?

Richard:  I’ve always been a fan of apocalyptic and “weird city” fiction (books like The Stand, or Swan Song, or Viriconium, or Gormenghast), but those things always seemed like such a huge undertaking to me – the world-building, the large cast of characters, the delicate mood. I think, when I sat down to write Bad Glass, I just felt like it was time for me to stop fooling around and start working on something I’d genuinely love. Even if it was big and scary and intimidating.


TQ:  What sort of research did you do for Bad Glass?

Richard:  Most of my research involved traveling to Spokane, WA (where the novel takes place) and walking the streets on a quiet October afternoon. The weather was gray and the streets were empty, and that’s when I came up with much of the mood and setting of Bad Glass. And really, mood and setting are a huge part of this novel. I also took a lot of photographs, and descriptions of some of those photos actually made it into the book.

I also boned up on computer networks, photography, psychology, and a little bit of physics.


TQ:  Who was the easiest character to write and why? Hardest and why?

Richard:  My main character, Dean, was pretty easy for me to write. He’s an aspiring, unpublished photographer looking desperately for his big break, and when I was writing Bad Glass I was an aspiring, unpublished writer looking desperately for my big break. So getting into his head and expressing his hopes and dreams and fears was a fairly easy task. I hope that those parts come across as truthful and deeply-felt, because I really think that that’s a snapshot of where I was just a couple of years ago.

The hardest character for me to write was probably Floyd. And not because he was difficult for me to relate to, but because I really liked him a great deal, and I felt like absolute crap for all of the horrible things I put him through. Really, he’s a nice, likable guy, and I do not treat him well.


TQ:  Without giving anything away, what is/are your favorite scene(s) in Bad Glass?

Richard:  Probably Dean’s meeting with Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Cob Gilles. It’s an interesting (and at times incoherent) exchange, and I think, in this venerable elder, Dean sees his dreams reflected and laid bare. And it gives him a lot to think about.


TQ:  What's next?

Richard:  I’m working on a new, unrelated novel. It’s still pretty early in the process, though, so I don’t want to reveal too much. I’m also hoping to work on some more short fiction soon.


TQ:  Thank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

Richard:  Thanks for having me! And thanks for including Bad Glass in your Debut Author Challenge!



About Bad Glass

Bad Glass
Del Rey, September 25, 2012
Trade Paperback and eBook, 432 pages


Interview with Richard E. Gropp, author of Bad Glass, and Giveaway
One of the most hauntingly original dark fantasy debuts in years—perfect for fans of Lost and Mark Danielewski’s cult classic, House of Leaves.

Something has happened in Spokane. The military has evacuated the city and locked it down. Even so, disturbing rumors and images seep out, finding their way onto the Internet, spreading curiosity, skepticism, and panic. For what they show is—or should be—impossible: strange creatures that cannot exist, sudden disappearances that violate the laws of physics, human bodies fused with inanimate objects, trapped yet still half alive. . . .

Dean Walker, an aspiring photographer, sneaks into the quarantined city in search of fame. What he finds will change him in unimaginable ways. Hooking up with a group of outcasts led by a beautiful young woman named Taylor, Dean embarks on a journey into the heart of a mystery whose philosophical implications are as terrifying as its physical manifestations. Even as he falls in love with Taylor—a woman as damaged and seductive as the city itself—his already tenuous hold on reality starts to come loose. Or perhaps it is Spokane’s grip on the world that is coming undone.

Now, caught up in a web of interlacing secrets and betrayals, Dean, Taylor, and their friends must make their way through this ever-shifting maze of a city, a city that is actively hunting them down, herding them toward a shocking destiny.




About Richard

Interview with Richard E. Gropp, author of Bad Glass, and Giveaway
Richard E. Gropp lives on a mountain outside of Seattle with his partner of fifteen years. It is a small mountain. He studied literature and psychology at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and has worked as a bookstore clerk, a forklift driver, and an accountant. He has a hard time spelling the word broccoli, and in his spare time he dabbles in photography and cooking.




Website : Twitter @rgropp : Facebook









The Giveaway

THE RULES

What:  Three commenters will each win a copy of Bad Glass from Random House! US/Canada ONLY

How:   Answer the following question: 

What is one of your favorite apocalyptic or "weird city" stories?
(stories = novels, comics, short stories, movies, etc.)

Please remember - if you don't answer the question your entry will not be counted.

You may receive additional entries by:

1)   Being a Follower of The Qwillery.

2)   Mentioning the giveaway on Facebook and/or Twitter. Even if you mention the giveaway on both, you will get only one additional entry. You get only one additional entry even if you mention the giveaway on Facebook and/or Twitter multiple times.

There are a total of 3 entries you may receive: Comment (1 entry), Follower (+1 entry) and Facebook and/or Twitter (+ 1 entry).  This is subject to change again in the future for future giveaways.

Please leave links for Facebook or Twitter mentions. You MUST leave a way to contact you.

Who and When:  The contest is open to all humans on the planet earth with a US or Canadian mailing address. Contest ends at 11:59pm US Eastern Time on Thursday, October 4, 2012. Void where prohibited by law. No purchase necessary. You must be 18 years old or older to enter.


*Giveaway rules are subject to change.*

Interview with Douglas Nicholas, author of Something Red - September 21, 2012

Please welcome Douglas Nicholas to The Qwillery as part of the 2012 Debut Author Challenge Interviews. Something Red was published on September 18, 2012. You may read Douglas' Guest Blog - The Page and the Palantir - here.


Interview with Douglas Nicholas, author of Something Red - September 21, 2012


TQ:  What would you say is your most interesting writing quirk?

Douglas:  I think perhaps it’s a slightly antique quality to the prose.


TQ:  Who are some of your favorite writers? Who do you feel has influenced your writing?

Douglas:  It’s nearly impossible to single out authors from a lifetime of constant reading without doing injustice to a lot of people, but I’d have to start with Jack Vance, and mention Conan Doyle—particularly his medieval books, which he considered his masterpieces: The White Company and Sir Nigel; Ursula K. LeGuin, Cecelia Holland, Tanith Lee; Patrick O’Brian’s Aubrey/Maturin novels and C.S. Forester’s Hornblower novels, both set in the British Navy in the Napoleonic era, Michael Chabon, a consistently inventive writer; for modern tough-guy escapism, John Sandford’s Lucas Davenport novels are very good, especially for such an extended series, and Thomas Perry. I especially recommend two of Perry’s earlier works: Metzger’s Dog, and Island, for exuberant quirky fun. Fritz Leiber’s Fafhrd and Gray Mouser stories. When I was young I read a lot of Robert E. Howard who, despite his egregious racism—a product of his time—was a vivid, if simplistic, writer. Tolkien, of course.

Influences: Jack Vance; Lord Dunsany; Robert E. Howard (and, oddly enough, T.E. Shaw’s (Lawrence of Arabia’s) vivid translation of The Odyssey, which reminds me of Howard’s writing); E. R. Eddison (but only The Worm Ouroboros—couldn’t get through A Fish Dinner in Memison and subsequent works); and probably a thousand others who don’t come to mind at the moment.


TQ:  Are you a plotter or a pantser?

Douglas:  Definitely a plotter. I need to know the story I want to tell, and usually the main events—the most dramatic scenes, which I often, but not always, write first—and then I fill in the narrative.


TQ:  What is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

Douglas:  Because I write slowly, and spend a lot of time polishing the sound of the sentences, and the exact sequence of expression (which I think is the influence of my poetry on my prose), it’s difficult for me to turn out a high volume of writing.


TQ:  Describe Something Red in 140 characters or less.

Douglas:  Evil stalks 1200s English winter woods; Irish grandma and family flee in vain to monastery, inn, castle; finally must turn and face threat.


TQ:  What inspired you to write Something Red?

Douglas:  Here’s how I came to write this book:

The Cambridge don M. R. James wrote ghost/horror stories to be read at Christmastime to his friends. They usually featured a mild-mannered antiquarian like himself, and would begin slowly with bits of scholarly detail, very dry. This would go on for about two pages—the stories are quite short—and then, ten or fifteen pages later, you realize that you are never going to sleep again for the rest of your life.

So I thought I would write a story to read to my wife, Theresa, over the holidays. I don’t know where the exact idea for the story came from, but I knew the general arc almost at once, and that I wanted to make a strong woman the hero. Soon I found that I had to explain this or that; I had to get my people from here to there; etc. I wanted to make the story historically accurate and vivid, which involved a lot of research. I finally realized that this was going to have to be a novel.

Then I got very busy with other things and put the story away. Some years later, when things were less hectic, I returned to Something Red and got it done.


TQ:  What sort of research did you do for Something Red?

Douglas:  I’ve been an avid reader all my life, and I studied medieval literature in college and in some grad school courses. So, between reading and formal study, I realized that I had a feel for the period, and I wanted the architectural isolation of a snowed-in castle: nowhere to go, just you and the monster. The movie Alien functions this way, as does John W. Campbell’s 1938 novella, Who Goes There? (which was the basis for the 1951 movie The Thing from Outer Space).

I thought I knew a lot about medieval life, but I’d come to something and think, “Wait, I need to know a lot more about this, just to write one paragraph.” So I knew a fair amount, and probably learned an equal amount, about the thirteenth century while writing SR.


TQ:  Who was the easiest character to write and why? Hardest and why?

Douglas:  The boy Hob was perhaps the easiest because I have been a teenage boy myself. Nemain was in some ways difficult, because she is also coming of age, a young girl with a bit of a ferocious older soul; someone coming into power but a little young to temper it with wisdom; someone unsure of whether she’s jealous of Hob or not. Another character who required some work: Sir Jehan. It was a challenge to convey adequately a sense of his peculiar restless energy.


TQ:  Without giving anything away, what is/are your favorite scene(s) in Something Red?

Douglas:  The big action scenes, of course, but also, just after the major conflict, there are the reactions of the characters to the aftermath—I was pleased with the way that turned out. And I did enjoy writing the ten murderous mastiffs.

There’s a scene, a little more than a page long, where two servants at the inn are drawing water from a well, and the older man is telling his nephew what happened a long time ago. It’s essentially a one-page murder ballad, a miniature drama told in heavy dialect. Later this episode will bring Hob to a kind of epiphany about adult life, but by itself it’s a tiny story within the main story that was interesting to write.

Other things I enjoyed are small stylistic touches. There’s a scene from “The Exile of the Sons of Uisliu” in Irish literature, where Derdriu (Deirdre) sees a raven drinking drops of blood that have fallen on the snow from a dead calf her father is flaying, and she says, “I could love a man with those three colors: hair like a raven, cheeks like blood and a body like snow.” I was thinking of that when I began describing Nemain obsessively in terms of three colors: the white of her skin, the red of her hair and the green of her eyes, which vary from being plain and everyday: “blotchy . . . green as spring grass . . . red as apples”; to goddess-like “white as . . . drifts of snow”, “ruddy . . . as embers”, ”green . . . as smaragds [emeralds]”; to sinister “white as a cleaned skull . . . red . . . as spilled blood . . . green and cold as an old serpent's”; to romantically beautiful “green [as a] fern-shaded pool”, red as roses, white as lilies.


TQ:  What's next?

Douglas:  I’m working on a sequel, which will also be published by Simon and Schuster. It follows directly from Something Red, takes place a year and a fraction later, and follows the same major characters, with the addition of several others who are very, very scary.


TQ:  Thank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

Douglas:  It’s been my pleasure entirely.



About Something Red

Something Red
Emily Bestler Books / Atria Books, September 18, 2012
Hardcover and eBook, 336 pages

Interview with Douglas Nicholas, author of Something Red - September 21, 2012
From debut author Douglas Nicholas comes a haunting story of love, murder, and sorcery.

During the thirteenth century in northwest England, in one of the coldest winters in living memory, a formidable yet charming Irish healer, Molly, and the troupe she leads are driving their three wagons, hoping to cross the Pennine Mountains before the heavy snows set in. Molly, her lover Jack, granddaughter Nemain, and young apprentice Hob become aware that they are being stalked by something terrible. The refuge they seek in a monastery, then an inn, and finally a Norman castle proves to be an illusion. As danger continues to rise, it becomes clear that the creature must be faced and defeated—or else they will all surely die. It is then that Hob discovers how much more there is to his adopted family than he had realized.

An intoxicating blend of fantasy and mythology, Something Red presents an enchanting world full of mysterious and fascinating characters— shapeshifters, sorceresses, warrior monks, and knights—where no one is safe from the terrible being that lurks in the darkness. In this extraordinary, fantastical world, nothing is as it seems, and the journey for survival is as magical as it is perilous. 



About Douglas

Interview with Douglas Nicholas, author of Something Red - September 21, 2012
DOUGLAS NICHOLAS is an award-winning poet whose work has appeared in numerous publications, among them Atlanta Review, Southern Poetry Review, Sonora Review, Circumference, A Different Drummer, and Cumberland Review, as well as the South Coast Poetry Journal, where he won a prize in that publication's Fifth Annual Poetry Contest. Other awards include Honorable Mention in the Robinson Jeffers Tor House Foundation 2003 Prize For Poetry Awards, second place in the 2002 Allen Ginsberg Poetry Awards from PCCC, International Merit Award in Atlanta Review's Poetry 2002 competition, finalist in the 1996 Emily Dickinson Award in Poetry competition, honorable mention in the 1992 Scottish International Open Poetry Competition, first prize in the journal Lake Effect's Sixth Annual Poetry Contest, first prize in poetry in the 1990 Roberts Writing Awards, and finalist in the Roberts short fiction division. He was also recipient of an award in the 1990 International Poetry Contest sponsored by the Arvon Foundation in Lancashire, England, and a Cecil B. Hackney Literary Award for poetry from Birmingham-Southern College. He is the author of Something Red, a fantasy novel set in the thirteenth century, as well as Iron Rose, a collection of poems inspired by and set in New York City; The Old Language, reflections on the company of animals; The Rescue Artist, poems about his wife and their long marriage; and In the Long-Cold Forges of the Earth, a wide-ranging collection of poems. He lives in the Hudson Valley with his wife, Theresa, and Yorkshire terrier, Tristan.

Douglas Nicholas on Facebook and Goodreads and on Twitter (@DouglasScribes)


The Giveaway

THE RULES

What:  One commenter will win an ARC of  Something Red from The Qwillery.

How:   Answer the following questions:

What is one of your favorite novels that is not set in the present day?

Please remember - if you don't answer the question your entry will not be counted.

You may receive additional entries by:

1)   Being a Follower of The Qwillery.

2)   Mentioning the giveaway on Facebook and/or Twitter. Even if you mention the giveaway on both, you will get only one additional entry. You get only one additional entry even if you mention the giveaway on Facebook and/or Twitter multiple times.

There are a total of 3 entries you may receive: Comment (1 entry), Follower (+1 entry) and Facebook and/or Twitter (+ 1 entry).  This is subject to change again in the future for future giveaways.

Please leave links for Facebook or Twitter mentions. You MUST leave a way to contact you.

Who and When:  The contest is open to all humans on the planet earth with a mailing address. Contest ends at 11:59pm US Eastern Time on Friday, September 28, 2012. Void where prohibited by law. No purchase necessary. You must be 18 years old or older to enter.

*Giveaway rules are subject to change.*
Interview with Melissa F. Olson, author of Dead Spots - October 23, 2012Interview with Rob DeBorde, author of Portlandtown - October 18, 2012Interview with D.J. McIntosh, author of The Witch of Babylon, and Giveaway - October 17, 2012Interview with Max Gladstone, author of Three Parts Dead - October 5, 2012Interview with Sharon Lynn Fisher, author of Ghost Planet - October 4, 2012Interview with Tina Connolly, author of Ironskin - October 3, 2012Interview with Steve Bein, author of Daughter of the Sword - October 2, 2012Interview with Jill Archer, author of Dark Light of Day, and Giveaway - September 28, 2012Interview with Richard E. Gropp, author of Bad Glass, and GiveawayInterview with Douglas Nicholas, author of Something Red - September 21, 2012

Report "The Qwillery"

Are you sure you want to report this post for ?

Cancel
×