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Interview with Scott Meyer, author of Off to Be the Wizard - March 22, 2014


Please welcome Scott Meyer to The Qwillery as part of the 2014 Debut Author Challenge Interviews. Off to Be the Wizard, Scott's debut, was published by 47North on March 18th.



Interview with Scott Meyer, author of Off to Be the Wizard - March 22, 2014




TQ:  Welcome to The Qwillery. When and why did you start writing?

Scott:  Like many people, I first started writing creatively in high school. I knew early on that I wanted to try writing a novel someday, but for many years I channeled my energy into writing projects that were helping me pay the bills – stand-up comedy material and comic strips, mostly.



TQ:  Are you a plotter or a pantser?

Scott:  I’m very much a plotter. Off to Be the Wizard is the first novel I’ve completed, but it’s the third I’ve attempted. The first two times I tried to write via the pantser method and I found it impossible. I can’t go for a long drive unless I know the general route in advance, and it seems I can’t manage a large writing project without a good plan. That said, I do allow myself to deviate from that plan if the need arises. It just means I have to reformulate the plan before moving forward again.



TQ:  What is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

Scott:  Finding the balancing point between not explaining things enough and over-explaining them. The fact that my books so far have involved computer hacking and time travel has not made this any easier.



TQ:  Who are some of your literary influences? Favorite authors?

Scott:  First, I’ll say Patrick F. McManus. He’s a humorist who specializes in hunting and fishing stories. There weren’t a lot of books in my household growing up, but my dad had a subscription to Outdoor Life. The back page always featured a humor piece by Patrick F. McManus, which I would read ASAP. I never picked up any real appreciation for hunting or fishing, but he taught me that writing could be funny.

As for novelists, I’ve read more than my share of Neal Stephenson, Terry Pratchett, Douglas Adams, and Hunter S. Thompson.



TQ:  Describe Off to Be the Wizard in 140 characters or less.

Scott:  A hacker proves reality is a computer program which he can control. He gets in trouble and flees to Medieval England to pose as a wizard.



TQ:  Tell us something about Off to Be the Wizard that is not in the book description.

Scott:  This is the long-awaited book in which the Pontiac Fiero finally gets the respect it deserves.



TQ:  What inspired you to write Off to Be the Wizard? How has the novel changed from when it was self-published until this new edition published by 47North?

Scott:  I had the general plot in mind for a while, but I hadn’t really gotten serious about trying to write a novel again. The two earlier failed attempts left me fairly demoralized. Then I got an idea involving time travel where for one character a logical series of events would be spread out over many days but to another character the events would all take place within a space of about five minutes and would be totally inexplicable. It was the challenge of trying to execute that idea that got me excited about trying again.

The 47North edition has many fewer typos. The single biggest mistake I made when I self-published was not hiring a professional editor. That is not a mistake I will make again. Beyond that, a few things are explained better, and I’ve added an action sequence to a part of the book that I felt was dragging slightly.



TQ:  You write an ongoing comic titled Basic Instructions. How does comic writing influence your novel writing or vice versa?

Scott:  I like to think that producing the comic has given me some good practice at writing humorous dialog. Aside from that, working on the comic makes me appreciate the freedom to stretch out that a novel allows. I can’t tell you how much of my time as a cartoonist is spent trying to cut unnecessary words out of a sentence because it’s taking up too much space.

Making the comic also taught me the importance of producing material on a regular basis. For years I thought I was the kind of person who couldn’t create on a set schedule. Turns out I was wrong about that.



TQ:  What sort of research did you do for Off to Be the Wizard?

Scott:  I read up on Medieval England and decided to deliberately not make my book a realistic depiction of life in that time. I figured I was writing a humorous book about time travel, I didn’t want to get bogged down explaining what a trencher was. I’m pretty happy with that decision, but I should have researched my technical computer details better, and my Esperanto grammar. The self-published edition of the book had some embarrassing errors.



TQ:  Who was the easiest character to write and why? The hardest and why? Who is your favorite character?

Scott:  The easiest character was Phillip, because his thought process is most like mine, which is not necessarily a good thing. The hardest and my favorite are the same character: My villain (who I’m not going to name here). I found it both fun and challenging to try to think like someone who thinks they are doing the right thing, but are actually doing something awful.



TQ:  Give us one of your favorite lines from Off to Be the Wizard.

Scott:  “I’m delighted at the prospect of all the marvelous things you’re not going to say in the future! You know, the less you talk, the more people assume that what you're not saying is important.”



TQ:  What's next?

Scott:  I have already completed a second book and am currently working on the third in the trilogy of books that started with Off to Be the Wizard.



TQ:  Thank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

Scott:  Thanks for having me!





Off to Be the Wizard

Off to Be the Wizard
Magic 2.0
47North, March 18, 2014
Trade Paperback and Kindle eBook, 386 pages

Interview with Scott Meyer, author of Off to Be the Wizard - March 22, 2014
Martin Banks is just a normal guy who has made an abnormal discovery: he can manipulate reality, thanks to reality being nothing more than a computer program. With every use of this ability, though, Martin finds his little “tweaks” have not escaped notice. Rather than face prosecution, he decides instead to travel back in time to the Middle Ages and pose as a wizard.

What could possibly go wrong?

An American hacker in King Arthur’s court, Martin must now train to become a full-fledged master of his powers, discover the truth behind the ancient wizard Merlin…and not, y’know, die or anything.





About Scott

Scott Meyer grew up in the small town of Sunnyside, Washington. He began his career in humor by working as a stand-up comedian and radio personality, a highlight of which was participating as the opening act in Weird Al Yankovic’s Running with Scissors tour. Following a long stint touring the United States and Canada, Scott settled down in Orlando, Florida, where he works on his ongoing comic strip, Basic Instructions. Off to Be the Wizard is his first novel.

Basic Instructions  ~  Google+  ~  Twitter @binstructions



2014 Debut Author Challenge Update - Off to Be the Wizard by Scott Meyer



2014 Debut Author Challenge Update - Off to Be the Wizard by Scott Meyer


The Qwillery is pleased to announce the newest featured author for the 2014 Debut Author Challenge.



Scott Meyer

Off to Be the Wizard
Magic 2.0
47North, March 18, 2014
Trade Paperback and Kindle eBook, 386 pages

2014 Debut Author Challenge Update - Off to Be the Wizard by Scott Meyer
Martin Banks is just a normal guy who has made an abnormal discovery: he can manipulate reality, thanks to reality being nothing more than a computer program. With every use of this ability, though, Martin finds his little “tweaks” have not escaped notice. Rather than face prosecution, he decides instead to travel back in time to the Middle Ages and pose as a wizard.

What could possibly go wrong?

An American hacker in King Arthur’s court, Martin must now train to become a full-fledged master of his powers, discover the truth behind the ancient wizard Merlin…and not, y’know, die or anything.

2014 Debut Author Challenge Update: Terms of Enlistment by Marko Kloos



2014 Debut Author Challenge Update: Terms of Enlistment by Marko Kloos


The Qwillery is pleased to announce the newest featured author for the 2014 Debut Author Challenge.



Marko Kloos

Terms of Enlistment
47North, January 28, 2014
Trade Paperback, 346 pages
Previously published in Kindle eBook format, May 8, 2013

2014 Debut Author Challenge Update: Terms of Enlistment by Marko Kloos
The year is 2108, and the North American Commonwealth is bursting at the seams. For welfare rats like Andrew Grayson, there are only two ways out of the crime-ridden and filthy welfare tenements, where you're restricted to two thousand calories of badly flavored soy every day:

You can hope to win the lottery and draw a ticket on a colony ship settling off-world, or you can join the service.

With the colony lottery a pipe dream, Andrew chooses to enlist in the armed forces for a shot at real food, a retirement bonus, and maybe a ticket off Earth. But as he starts a career of supposed privilege, he soon learns that the good food and decent health care come at a steep price…and that the settled galaxy holds far greater dangers than military bureaucrats or the gangs that rule the slums.

The debut novel from Marko Kloos, Terms of Enlistment is a new addition to the great military sci-fi tradition of Robert Heinlein, Joe Haldeman, and John Scalzi.

Review: Romulus Buckle & the Engines of War by Richard Ellis Preston, Jr.


Romulus Buckle & the Engines of War
Author:  Richard Ellis Preston, Jr.
Series: The Chronicles of the Pneumatic Zeppelin 2
Publisher:  47 North, November 19, 2013
Format:  Trade Paperback and Kindle eBook, 486 pages
List Price:  $14.95 (print)
ISBN:  9781477807682 (print)
Review Copy:  Provided by the Publisher

Review: Romulus Buckle & the Engines of War by Richard Ellis Preston, Jr.
The frozen wasteland of Snow World—known as Southern California before an alien invasion decimated civilization—is home to warring steampunk clans. Crankshafts, Imperials, Tinskins, Brineboilers, and many more all battle one another for precious supplies, against ravenous mutant beasts for basic survival, and with the mysterious Founders for their very freedom.

Through this ruined world soars the Pneumatic Zeppelin, captained by the daring Romulus Buckle. In the wake of a nearly suicidal assault on the Founders’ prison city to rescue key military leaders, both the steam-powered airship and its crew are bruised and battered. Yet there’s little time for rest or repairs: Founders raids threaten to shatter the fragile alliance Buckle has risked everything to forge among the clans.

Even as he musters what seems a futile defense in the face of inevitable war, Buckle learns that the most mysterious clan of all is holding his long-lost sister in a secret base—and that she holds the ultimate key to victory over the Founders. But rescuing her means abandoning his allies and praying they survive long enough for there to be an alliance to return to.



Trinitytwo’s Point of View

Romulus Buckle & the Engines of War picks up right where The City of the Founders left off. (Note: if you have not read Romulus Buckle & the City of the Founders go back and read it now.) Romulus Buckle and his crew are pretty beat up after their encounter with the City of the Founders. Their airship, the Pneumatic Zeppelin, was almost destroyed and many of the crew were injured or killed. Thankfully, their daring rescue attempt succeeded and their leader, Admiral Balthazar Crankshaft, along with two other clan’s leaders are safe. Among the recovered clan leaders is Admiral Katzenjammer Smelt who swears that his Imperial clan is innocent of waging the devastating assault on the Crankshaft’s Tehachapi outpost over a year ago. This blitz resulted in the stronghold’s obliteration and the tragic loss of Buckle’s adoptive mother and his biological sister, Elizabeth. Smelt’s denial forces Buckle to reconsider his hatred of the Imperial clan. Buckle is so obsessed in discovering the truth that he is willing to risk his life by heading into the treacherous mountains where an enemy zeppelin was shot down during the attack.

Engines of War starts off at a rollicking fast pace. New mysteries, deadly alien beasts and unexplored romantic longings are introduced adding more depth to the story. Author Richard E. Preston, Jr. begins to layer personal history and insight into many of the main characters. I enthusiastically enjoyed the glimpse into Romulus and his adopted sister Sabrina’s respective childhoods. The momentum stalled somewhere midpoint when in the middle of war councils and military preparations, the story dallies at the Seasonal Ball. Here our characters primp, play matchmaker, and think inappropriate thoughts about one another. Once this is accomplished, however, the momentum is regained and the characters get back to the dire business of impending war onboard their zeppelin. Preston is at his best in the midst of battles and action and the author begins and finishes Engines of War with exciting exploits and a promise of more to come. Preston’s steampunk world has sparked my imagination and I am anticipating the next chapter of Romulus' adventure in his third book.



See Trinitytwo's thoughts on Romulus Buckle & the City of the Founders here.

2013 Debut Author Challenge COVER OF THE YEAR Winner!


2013 Debut Author Challenge COVER OF THE YEAR Winner!


The votes are in and the winner of the 2013 Debut Author Challenge COVER OF THE YEAR is Romulus Buckle and the City of the Founders. The cover is by Eamon O'Donoghue. The author is Richard Ellis Preston, Jr. and the novel was published by 47North.


2013 Debut Author Challenge COVER OF THE YEAR Winner!
In a post-apocalyptic world of endless snow, Captain Romulus Buckle and the stalwart crew of the Pneumatic Zeppelin must embark on a perilous mission to rescue their kidnapped leader, Balthazar Crankshaft, from the impenetrable City of the Founders. Steaming over a territory once known as Southern California – before it was devastated in the alien war – Buckle navigates his massive airship through skies infested with enemy war zeppelins and ravenous alien beasties in this swashbuckling and high-octane steampunk adventure. Life is desperate in the Snow World – and death is quick – Buckle and his ship’s company must brave poisoned wastelands of noxious mustard and do battle with forgewalkers, steampipers and armored locomotives as they plunge from the skies into the underground prison warrens of the fortress-city.

Captain Romulus Buckle must lead the Pneumatic Zeppelin and its crew of never-do-wells on a desperate mission where he must risk everything to save Balthazar and attempt to prevent a catastrophic war which could wipe out all that is left of civilization and the entire human race.



The results:

2013 Debut Author Challenge COVER OF THE YEAR Winner!




Cover Wars started as a way to recognize and celebrate the talented individuals who bring books to life with their eye-catching covers. While I may not judge a book by its cover, a terrific cover will certainly make me want to know what is on the inside.

Guest Blog by Jodi McIsaac - Into the Fire Blog Tour - November 11, 2013


Please welcome Jodi McIsaac to The Qwillery as part of the Into the Fire Tour! The second novel in Jodi's Thin Veil series, Into the Fire, will be published tomorrow.



Guest Blog by Jodi McIsaac - Into the Fire Blog Tour - November 11, 2013




“Do you have any quirky writing habits? If so, what are they?”

I don’t know if my writing habits count as “quirky,” but they seem to work for me! I have two small children and run my own copywriting business, so the majority of my writing gets done between 5 and 7 in the morning, before my kids get up. This, of course, means that I’m usually in bed by 9 and have very little social life. (But if you ask me if I’d rather have a social life or be a published writer, I’ll choose the latter every time!) I also book into a hotel one weekend a month and spend 8-10 hours each day writing—I find that it helps to get away from my house and all the distractions like kids, laundry, and dinner. Fortunately, my husband is very supportive and doesn’t mind when I jump ship once a month. I can usually get between 10,000 and 15,000 words done on these weekends away, so they certainly help move the story along.

Another writing habit I’ve developed is standing while I write. I found that when I was sitting for several hours a day I would experience horrible back pain, even though I tried to make my desk as ergonomic as possible. I’m currently writing this on a wireless keyboard on an old bookshelf, while my laptop is stacked on top of seven big hardcover books so that the screen is at eye-level. I have a good mat under my feet, and my back has never been happier. Besides, they say that if you work at a standing desk you’ll develop really shapely legs (among other health benefits), so here’s hoping!

I’m also a big fan of sticky notes. My office walls are covered with them – some are future story ideas, some are reminders about edits I need to make, others are for tricky spellings (like Toirdhealbhach MacDail re Deachai). I usually start a novel with three columns on the wall – Act I, Act II, and Act III. As I come up with ideas for the plot, I write them down on a sticky note and put it in the appropriate column, then move them around as necessary. It’s like the old index card outlining system, but on my walls.

Other quirky writing habits? I try to exercise and meditate every day, so that my mind is calm and clear and ready to focus. And other than that, I just stick with the old adage: butt in chair, hands on keyboard! Except for me, it’s “feet on mat, hands on keyboard!”


Jodi McIsaac is the author of the Thin Veil contemporary fantasy series, where Celtic mythology and the modern world collide. INTO THE FIRE, the second book in the series, is being released on November 12. You can pre-order it here.







Thin Veil

Into the Fire
Thin Veil 2
47North, November 12, 2013
Trade Paperback and Kindle eBook, 260 pages

Guest Blog by Jodi McIsaac - Into the Fire Blog Tour - November 11, 2013
Cedar McLeod would like nothing more than to return to Tír na nÓg, help rebuild the mythical kingdom, and start a new life for herself and her daughter, Eden. But peace isn’t what Cedar finds after being reunited with her little girl.

Nuala—who kidnapped and terrorized Eden in her previous bid for power—has returned and is making a persuasive claim for the vacant throne. The devastation such a ruler would bring upon both the kingdom and the human world is unthinkable. With no one else to stake a convincing counter-claim, Cedar steps forward...but first she must prove her worth beyond a doubt.

Her opportunity comes when she is charged with finding an ancient treasure, the Stone of Destiny, and returning it to its rightful home. It is a quest that will lead her to question her beliefs, and push her loyalties to their limits. If she succeeds, Cedar could grant her new world and her new family a chance to flourish again. If not...destruction may be the only path ahead.

Into the Fire, the second book in the Thin Veil series, is a captivating blend of Celtic myth, mystery, and adventure that delves deeper into the ancient world first explored in Through the Door.



Through the Door
Thin Veil 1
47North, April 23, 2013
Trade Paperback and Kindle eBook, 294 pages

Guest Blog by Jodi McIsaac - Into the Fire Blog Tour - November 11, 2013
It’s been seven years since the love of Cedar McLeod’s life left with no forwarding address. All she has left of him are heart-wrenching memories of happier times and a beautiful six-year-old daughter, Eden. Then, one day, Eden opens her bedroom door and unwittingly creates a portal that leads to anywhere she imagines.

But they’re not the only ones who know of Eden’s gift, and soon the child mysteriously vanishes.

Desperate for answers, Cedar digs into the past and finds herself thrust into a magical world of Celtic myths, fantastical creatures, and bloody rivalries. Teaming up with the unlikeliest of allies, Cedar must bridge the gap between two worlds and hold tight to the love in her heart…or lose everything to an ancient evil.

The first in the Thin Veil series, Through the Door is a pulse-pounding adventure that takes readers across the globe and deep into the hidden realms of Celtic lore.





About Jodi

Guest Blog by Jodi McIsaac - Into the Fire Blog Tour - November 11, 2013
I grew up in New Brunswick, Canada. After stints as a short-track speed skater, a speechwriter, and fundraising and marketing executive in the nonprofit sector, I started a boutique copywriting agency and began writing novels in the wee hours of the morning. I currently live with my husband and two feisty daughters in Calgary, Alberta. 


Website  ~  Facebook  ~  Twitter  ~  Goodreads

Check out the entire Into the Fire Blog Tour on Jodi's website here.  There is a giveaway there too!

Review: Romulus Buckle & the City of the Founders by Richard Ellis Preston, Jr.


Romulus Buckle & the City of the Founders
Author:  Richard Ellis Preston, Jr.
Series:  The Chronicles of the Pneumatic Zeppelin 1
Publisher:  47North, July 2, 2013
Format:  Trade Paperback and Kindle eBook, 456 pages
List Price:  $14.95 (print)
ISBN:  9781611099188 (print)
Review Copy:  Provided by the Publisher

Review: Romulus Buckle & the City of the Founders by Richard Ellis Preston, Jr.
In a post-apocalyptic world of endless snow, Captain Romulus Buckle and the stalwart crew of the Pneumatic Zeppelin must embark on a perilous mission to rescue their kidnapped leader, Balthazar Crankshaft, from the impenetrable City of the Founders. Steaming over a territory once known as Southern California – before it was devastated in the alien war – Buckle navigates his massive airship through skies infested with enemy war zeppelins and ravenous alien beasties in this swashbuckling and high-octane steampunk adventure. Life is desperate in the Snow World – and death is quick – Buckle and his ship’s company must brave poisoned wastelands of noxious mustard and do battle with forgewalkers, steampipers and armored locomotives as they plunge from the skies into the underground prison warrens of the fortress-city.

Captain Romulus Buckle must lead the Pneumatic Zeppelin and its crew of never-do-wells on a desperate mission where he must risk everything to save Balthazar and attempt to prevent a catastrophic war which could wipe out all that is left of civilization and the entire human race.




Trinitytwo's Point of View:

Dashing and daring, Romulus Buckle is the adopted son of Admiral Balthazar Crankshaft, the chief of the Crankshaft clan. He is also the young captain of the Pneumatic Zeppelin, a prize dirigible that he stole from the Imperial Clan. Buckle soars over what was once California, in a post-apocalyptic Earth which was forever changed by an alien assault. This attack polluted Earth’s surface with a noxious gas and caused a climate of endless snow. The many clans of Snow World engage in small skirmishes but are not openly at war. Balthazar, along with the leaders of several other important clans, have been kidnapped during a recent attempt at peace talks. The Crankshaft clan has received intelligence that the clan leaders are being held in the mysterious fortress known as the City of the Founders. A rescue mission has been sanctioned but little is known about the Founders' defenses and much is rumored. Romulus and his loyal crew immediately volunteer even though the odds are slim that they will succeed, let alone survive.

I ABSOLUTELY LOVED THIS BOOK. Yes, I am aware I am emphasizing my point with the dreaded caplock, but I will not offer an apology. This swashbuckling quest set mainly aboard the Pneumatic Zeppelin was so fast paced and exciting, I finished it in one day. Romulus Buckle knows his steam powered airship like the back of his hand and, along with his assorted crew members, made the daring rescue attempt a pleasure. Richard Ellis Preston Jr.’s steampunk adventure is just like riding a great rollercoaster, a little slow going in the beginning, as the author acquainted the reader with the setting, but early on he hit the apex and once the car (or zeppelin in this case) began to accelerate it was pure adrenaline, exhilaration, wind in your face, no holds barred excitement. I was also impressed with the engineering details of the zeppelin. Preston managed to allow me to visualize the complicated workings that seemed mechanically sound without boring me in the slightest. The characters were well written and diverse. I am intrigued to learn more about their mysterious backgrounds as the series unfolds. The tone is jaunty and the novel is not intended for those looking for brooding introspection. Preston is an enthusiastic storyteller, spinning a tale of derring-do. I can’t wait to hop aboard the Pneumatic Zeppelin and take another wild ride in its upcoming adventure: Romulus Buckle & the Engines of War.


Interview with Kate Maruyama, author of Harrowgate - October 24, 2013


Please welcome Kate Maruyama to The Qwillery as part of the 2013 Debut Author Challenge Interviews.  Harrowgate was published on September 24th by 47North.



Interview with Kate Maruyama, author of Harrowgate - October 24, 2013




TQ:  Welcome to The Qwillery.

Kate:  Thanks! Nice to be here.



TQ:  When and why did you start writing?

Kate:  I’ve been writing in one form or another since I was quite small. I visited home recently and I found a mortifying page of prose I had written while studying abroad in England—I could tell it was done there because it was done with red typewriter ribbon. My black had run out, so it was a red year.



TQ:  What would you say is your most interesting writing quirk?

Kate:  I have an especially ugly sweater I like to wear when I write. I won’t even let my family see me in it.



TQ:  Are you a plotter or a pantser?

Kate:  Both. I pants my way through a draft, the plot starts taking shape and then I work on solidifying the structure in further drafts.



TQ:  What is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

Kate:  Composing. I’m always so happy revising because the clay is already there on the table—I love to move things around for character, tension. I cut mercilessly. But not knowing where I’m going or what I’m doing—having the story just out of reach-- is a terrifying daily leap of faith.


TQ:  Describe Harrowgate in 140 characters or less. /like a tweet/

Kate:  A guy’s wife and kid are dead but living with him in his apartment. He tries to make it work.



TQ:  What inspired you to write Harrowgate?

Kate:  It actually came from the last five pages of a screenplay I wrote years ago—I couldn’t get it to work. Probably because the ending was, guess what? They’re dead! Big surprise. But I really loved those five pages and they nagged me. I started to ask, “They’re dead. Now what?” and the book started growing from there.



TQ:  What sort of research did you do for Harrowgate?

Kate:  Thanks to Google, I could go to New York City, a neighborhood I know, an apartment I know, and figure out the rest. The Cathedral of St. John the Divine was rather snippy on the phone, but they answered my questions. As my story doesn’t travel much, the research was pretty mellow compared to other things I’ve written.



TQ:  Who was the easiest character to write and why? The hardest and why?

Kate:  They got easy and complicated in turns. The villain, Greta, had about three drafts just about her—motivation, rules, power—these were all questions that needed answering. Sarah came after Michael, and she was shadowy at first and needed filling in. Michael was easy, but then there were subtle layers left to add later which made it complicated. His reactions to all of the strangeness in his life had to be measured carefully.



TQ:  Without giving anything away, what is/are your favorite scene(s) in Harrowgate?

Kate:  There’s a scene with rotten vegetables that actually started this whole thing. I have some nostalgia for that one. But my favorite space to write was really the relationship between Michael and Sarah, the things they can’t say to each other; the things they do say.



TQ:  What's next?

Kate:  I have a very different novel at market now, which I’m smitten with. It takes place in early 1940s Hollywood, 1990s Hollywood and Baltimore of all places. More soon, I hope.



TQ:  Thank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

Kate:  Thanks for having me!




Harrowgate

Harrowgate
47North, September 24, 2013
Trade Paperback and Kindle eBook, 286 pages

Interview with Kate Maruyama, author of Harrowgate - October 24, 2013
Michael should be overjoyed by the birth of his son, but his wife, Sarah, won?t let him touch the baby or allow anyone to visit.

Greta, an intrusive, sinister doula has wormed her way into their lives, driving a wedge between Michael and his family. Every time he leaves the Harrowgate, he returns to find his beloved wife and baby altered. He feels his family slipping away, and as a malevolent force begins to creep in, Michael does what any new father would do?he fights to keep his family together.

Kate Maruyama?s debut novel, Harrowgate, is a chilling, richly detailed story of love, loss, and the haunted place that lies between.





About Kate

Interview with Kate Maruyama, author of Harrowgate - October 24, 2013
Kate Maruyama's work has appeared in Controlled Burn, Arcadia Magazine and Stoneboat, as well as on The Rumpus, Salon.com and The Citron Review among others. She writes, teaches, cooks, and eats in Los Angeles, where she lives with her husband and two children. Harrowgate is her first novel and she'd love to hear your haunted stories on http://harrowgatebook.tumblr.com





Website  ~  Twitter @KateMaruyama  ~  Harrowgate Tumblr
Interview with Scott Meyer, author of Off to Be the Wizard - March 22, 20142014 Debut Author Challenge Update - Off to Be the Wizard by Scott Meyer2014 Debut Author Challenge Update: Terms of Enlistment by Marko KloosReview: Romulus Buckle & the Engines of War by Richard Ellis Preston, Jr.2013 Debut Author Challenge COVER OF THE YEAR Winner! Guest Blog by Jodi McIsaac - Into the Fire Blog Tour - November 11, 2013Review: Romulus Buckle & the City of the Founders by Richard Ellis Preston, Jr.Interview with Kate Maruyama, author of Harrowgate - October 24, 2013

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