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A blog about books and other things speculative

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Interview with Rod Duncan


Please welcome Rod Duncan to The Qwillery. Rod's most recent novel is The Custodian Marvels, the 3rd book in The Fall of the Gas-Lit Empire series, from Angry Robot Books.



Interview with Rod Duncan




TQWelcome back to The Qwillery. What is the most challenging thing for you about writing? Are you a plotter, a pantser or a hybrid?

Rod:  The most challenging thing is keeping the outline of a whole series of novels in my head.

Yes, I create plans of each novel. Lots of them. And each of them turns out different. When it comes down to it, a plan of a novel is only good for helping me to write the next chapter. Once the chapter is written, I have usually made discoveries that will change my ideas about where the book going.



TQDescribe The Custodian of Marvels in 140 characters or less.

Rod:  A heist & a date with destiny. It’s where the small adventures of Elizabeth Barnabus meet the big story of the fall of the Gas-Lit Empire.



TQTell us something about The Custodian of Marvels that is not found in the book description.

It is a story of circus folk and high politics.

It is also a story of horrifying secrets and terrifying locks. One secret is hidden in the Bullet Catcher’s Handbook. Another is hidden in a vault below the International Patent Court. One lock is the hammer that fires a gun, another is the mechanism that holds a mighty door closed.

I could tell you more, but it’s a secret.



TQThe Custodian of Marvels is the third novel of The Fall of the Gas-Lit Empire. What are your feelings on concluding the series?

Rod:  It is the end. But it’s not the end. Like so many things in the life of Elizabeth Barnabus, this is a paradox.

I can tell you that I have started to write the next book in this alternate history. But I don’t want to say more than that, because it might spoil things for readers of the series. When you get to the end of the Custodian of Marvels, I hope these vague comments will make more sense to you!



TQThe Fall of the Gas-Lit Empire series is Alternate History with a late Victorian setting. What appeals to you about writing Alternate History and AH set in the Victorian era?

Rod:  Alternate history has always appealed to me because it gives us the chance to ask “what if”? What if the Luddites had overthrown the government? What if technology had developed in a different way?

I own a small mechanical calculator. It is a marvellous piece of engineering and design, containing many hundreds of moving parts. It would have cost a huge amount of money when new. But this one was thrown away because it had been superseded by the newly invented four-function electronic calculator.

I doubt that anyone could make such a mechanical calculator today. It was the pinnacle of the technology. But what might have been developed in the world of mechanical calculation if the electronic calculator had not been invented quite so soon? Alternate history explores questions like that.

As for the Victorianesque setting – I’m not sure why I like it so much. I certainly wouldn’t like to be living in that era. But there is something about the aesthetic that appeals.



TQIn The Fall of the Gas-Lit Empire series who was the easiest character to write and why? The hardest and why?

Rod:  I’m not sure which was the easiest character to write. But I will say that I particularly enjoyed writing Fabulo. I had a very clear understanding of who he was when I wrote the Bullet Catcher’s Daughter. But in that story he was always overshadowed by Harry Timpson. In the Custodian of Marvels he has a bigger part to play. Readers will get to understand him far better. It is a great pleasure to be able to share him in this way.

As for the hardest character to write – that was Elizabeth Barnabus. Of course, I know her best of all. I had no difficulty in knowing what she would feel or think or how she would behave. But for a couple of chapters in this story she is “not herself”. That is to say, she goes to a very dark place. My problem was working out how to convey that journey through her own voice.



TQWhy have you chosen to include social issues in The Fall of the Gas-Lit Empire series?

Rod:  Drama comes from conflict. Conflict often comes from inequality. And inequality lies at the heart of most social issues. Or, to put it another way, comfortable people aren’t so interesting to write about.

Most of the characters in these books are marginalised in one way or another. Fabulo is a dwarf. Tinker is a runaway from an abusive father. Elizabeth was born in a travelling show. It is because of these differences, and others that I can’t reveal here, that they go on to do extraordinary things.



TQWhich question about The Custodian of Marvels or The Fall of the Gas-Lit Empire series do you wish someone would ask? Ask it and answer it!

Rod:  I think you’re asking me to do your job for you!

Q: “Can we make it into a series of movies?”

A: “Perhaps.”



TQWhat's next?

Rod:  As I said, I’m writing the next book set in this alternate history. I don’t want to reveal too much of that, because it might count as a spoiler. But I will tell you that in the last month, I have been researching the Louisiana Purchase, the sound of wooden beams moving against each other and various effects of the Labrador Current. Make of that what you will.



TQThank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

Rod:  Thank you. I always enjoy Qwillery questions.





The Custodian of Marvels
The Fall of the Gas-Lit Empire 3
Angry Robot Books, February 2, 2016
     Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 368 pages
Angry Robot Books, February 11, 2016 (UK Print)
Cover Art by Will Staehle

Interview with Rod Duncan
You’d have to be mad to steal from the feared International Patent Office. But that’s what Elizabeth Barnabus is about to try. A one-time enemy from the circus has persuaded her to attempt a heist that will be the ultimate conjuring trick.

Hidden in the vaults of the Patent Court in London lie secrets that could shake the very pillars of the Gas-Lit Empire. All that stands in Elizabeth’s way are the agents of the Patent Office, a Duke’s private army and the mysterious Custodian of Marvels.

Rod Duncan returns with the climactic volume of The Fall of the Gas-Lit Empire, the breathtaking alternate history series that began with the Philip K. Dick Award-nominated The Bullet-Catcher’s Daughter.

File Under: Fantasy [ Time Runs Out | The Duke’s Enemy | Open the Vault | A Union ]


See Melanie's Review here.





Previously

The Bullet-Catcher's Daughter
The Fall of the Gas-Lit Empire 1
Angry Robot Books, August 26, 2014
    Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 384 pages
Angry Robot Books, September 4, 2014 (UK Print)
Cover Art by Will Staehle

Interview with Rod Duncan
Elizabeth Barnabus lives a double life – as herself and as her brother, the private detective. She is trying to solve the mystery of a disappearing aristocrat and a hoard of arcane machines. In her way stand the rogues, freaks and self-proclaimed alchemists of a travelling circus.

But when she comes up against an agent of the all-powerful Patent Office, her life and the course of history will begin to change. And not necessarily for the better…

File Under: Fantasy


See Melanie's Review here.




Unseemly Science
The Fall of the Gas-Lit Empire 2
Angry Robot Books, May 5, 2015
    Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 384 pages
May 7, 2015 (UK Print)
Cover Art by Will Staehle

Interview with Rod Duncan
In the divided land of England, Elizabeth Barnabus has been living a double life – as both herself and as her brother, the private detective. Witnessing the brutal hanging of someone very close to her, Elizabeth resolves to throw the Bullet Catcher’s Handbook into the fire, and forget her past. If only it were that easy!

There is a new charitable organisation in town, run by some highly respectable women. But something doesn’t feel right to Elizabeth. Perhaps it is time for her fictional brother to come out of retirement for one last case? Her unstoppable curiosity leads her to a dark world of body-snatching, unseemly experimentation, politics and scandal. Never was it harder for a woman in a man’s world…

File Under: Fantasy


See Melanie's Review here.




About Rod

Interview with Rod Duncan
Rod Duncan is a published crime writer. His first novel Backlash was shortlisted for the CWA John Creasey Dagger, and he has since written three other novels (all Simon & Schuster UK), and had his first screenplay produced.

His background is in scientific research and computing, and he lives in Leicester.



You can find Rod online at www.rodduncan.co.uk and follow him @RodDuncan on Twitter.


Interview with Matthew De Abaitua


Please welcome Matthew De Abaitua to The Qwillery. The Destructives, Matthew's most recent novel, was published on March 1st by Angry Robot Books.



Interview with Matthew De Abaitua




TQWelcome to The Qwillery. What is the most challenging thing for you about writing? Are you a plotter, a pantser or a hybrid?

Matthew:  I am a reformed pantser. In real life, people often fail to make the choices that would give shape to their lives and so they live shapelessly. So in art, we demand that a protagonist makes a choice, just so that we can explore how that might turn out. I wrote The Destructives at the same time as thinking seriously about choice and plot. How that choice should be almost impossible to make. Or made too late. Or just in time.



TQDescribe The Destructives in 140 characters or less.

Matthew:  AIs break humanity. They feel guilty, so repair humanity and leave to live next to the sun. One AI stays to study the life of our hero. Why?



TQTell us something about The Destructives that is not found in the book description.

Matthew:  There is an artificial intelligence in it called Totally Damaged Mom.



TQWhat inspired you to write The Destructives?

Matthew:  I was watching Mad Men, and I thought: Mad Men in Space! In advertising, people are called creatives. But capitalism functions on a cycle of creativity and destruction, so I thought, saying that you’re a creative limits you to only half of the available business. You could be a destructive as well.



TQYour prior standalone novel for Angry Robot is If Then. Do If Then and The Destructives share anything thematically?

Matthew:  Both novels explore the quantification of humanity, the quest to render our selves as data, and the consequences of that translation. They share a secondary character, Alex Drown, who is a high-level fixer and consultant to Big Tech.



TQIn The Destructives who was the easiest character to write and why? The hardest and why?

Matthew:  The AI or emergence Dr Easy is the easiest to write. It’s a sardonic, knowing, and faintly patronising voice - as a lecturer, that comes naturally to me. The final third of the novel is from the point of view of Reckon, who is an angry, young, black female scientist. I am only one of those four adjectives.



TQWhy have you chosen to include or not chosen to include social issues in The Destructives?

Matthew:  A novel is a long thought. That is, only by writing a novel about something can I discover what I think about it, and I cannot summarise that thought in any way other than to point at the novel and say, there, that is what I think. It is a thought with its own contradictions baked in. It’s an evolving question. Some of the characters care about social issues, some of them don’t care. Their conflict is how I think about anything.



TQWhich question about The Destructives do you wish someone would ask? Ask it and answer it!

Matthew:  There is a recurring image of a black box in The Destructives. What does it mean?

The black box is a place we cannot see inside.

I came across the phrase when reading about the flash crash of 2010, when high frequency trading algorithms crashed the American stock market. The work of these algorithms takes place within a black box: we don’t really know what is going on in their interactions. In the Destructives, when one of the characters is dying, their mouth takes on the shape of a dark rectangle. Death is a black box. Space is too. We know its outline but we don’t know what is inside.



TQWhat's next?

Matthew:  I am quietly plotting and dreaming something new but is too early to share.



TQThank you for joining us at The Qwillery.





The Destructives
Angry Robot Books, March 1, 2016
    North American Print and eBook
    Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 416 pages
Angry Robot Books, March 3, 2016
    UK Print
Cover Art: Raid71

Interview with Matthew De Abaitua
Theodore Drown is a destructive. A recovering addict to weirdcore, he’s keeping his head down lecturing at the university of the Moon. Twenty years after the appearance of the first artificial intelligence, and humanity is stuck. The AIs or, as they preferred to be called, emergences have left Earth and reside beyond the orbit of Mercury in a Stapledon Sphere known as the university of the sun. The emergences were our future but they chose exile. All except one. Dr Easy remains, researching a single human life from beginning to end. Theodore’s life.

One day, Theodore is approached by freelance executive Patricia to investigate an archive of data retrieved from just before the appearance of the first emergence. The secret living in that archive will take him on an adventure through a stunted future of asylum malls, corporate bloodrooms and a secret off-world colony where Theodore must choose between creating a new future for humanity or staying true to his nature, and destroying it.

File Under: Science Fiction [ Fatal Loop / Emergent See / Lunar Lunatics / Dr Easy ]




Also from Angry Robot Books

If Then
Angry Robot Books, September 1, 2015
    North American Print and eBook
    Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 416 pages
Angry Robot Books, September 3, 2015
    UK Print
Cover Art: Raid71

Interview with Matthew De Abaitua
In the near future, after the collapse of society as we know it, one English town survives under the protection of the computer algorithms of the Process, which governs every aspect of their lives. The Process gives and it takes. It allocates jobs and resources, giving each person exactly what it has calculated they will need. But it also decides who stays under its protection, and who must be banished to the wilderness beyond. Human life has become totally algorithm-driven, and James, the town bailiff, is charged with making sure the Process’s suggestions are implemented.

But now the Process is making soldiers. It is readying for war — the First World War. Mysteriously, the Process is slowly recreating events that took place over a hundred years ago, and is recruiting the town’s men to fight in an artificial reconstruction of the Dardanelles campaign. James, too, must go fight. And he will discover that the Process has become vastly more sophisticated and terrifying than anyone had believed possible.

File Under: Science Fiction [ Trust the Process | A Debate With Bullets | Algorithms For War | Omega John ]





About Matthew

Interview with Matthew De Abaitua
Matthew De Abaitua lived and worked as Will Self’s amanuensis in a remote cottage in Suffolk, after he graduated with an MA in Creative Writing.

His short story ‘Inbetween’ was included in the bestselling anthology Disco Biscuits and adapted as a short film by Channel 4. His first novel The Red Men (Snowbooks 2007, Gollancz ebook 2013) was shortlisted for the Arthur C. Clarke Award. In 2013, the first chapter was adapted as a short film ‘Dr. Easy’ by directors Shynola (produced by Film4 and Warp) as a precursor to a feature film, currently in development. ‘Dr. Easy’ currently has had 263k views on Vimeo.

Matthew currently lectures on Creative Writing at Brunel University and Writing Science Fiction at the University of Essex.


You can find Matthew online at his website: www.harrybravado.com and on Twitter @MDeAbaitua.

Interview with Michael Boatman


Please welcome Michael Boatman to The Qwillery. Who Wants to be the Prince of Darkness? was published by Angry Robot Books on March 1st.



Interview with Michael Boatman




TQWelcome to The Qwillery. What is the most challenging thing for you about writing? Are you a plotter, a pantser or a hybrid?

Michael:  Thanks for welcoming me. Typically I’ve found that when formulating a book, I tend to come up with a first scene, an opening moment that hopefully propels the narrative forward. Before I wrote Who Wants to be The Prince of Darkness I worked purely through inspiration. Usually some theme that’s been kicking around in my head initiates the writing process and I just sit down and start writing, moving forward by asking myself, “And then what happened?” But this book was different. It required plotting at a level I’d never attempted before. Because I had already created the world in which P.O.D. takes place, I found it incredibly difficult to stay true to the rules depicted in Last God Standing. Prince of Darkness had to address the fallout from Yahweh and Lucifer’s battle with Gabriel, only now I was telling that story from the now mortal Lucifer’s perspective. That left me with a huge dilemma: Lucifer is mortal, retired and essentially powerless. He’s been relegated to the sidelines, observing a resurgent Gabriel and his plot to create Hell on Earth, so whose story was it? That necessitated the creation of a new protagonist, someone close enough to Lucifer to include him in the adventure, while carving out his own new and different perspective. Enter…Manray Mothershed.



TQDescribe Who Wants to be The Prince of Darkness?

Michael:  The fallen angel Gabriel is remaking Hell into a global superpower. Still smarting from his humiliation at the hands of the retired Lucifer, Gabriel plots to bring Hell to Earth, and embarks upon a mad plan to steal innocent mortal souls and replace them with demons. And what better way to raise Hell than to use humanity’s greatest weapon against it: Reality T.V. Now demons are running rampant across the globe, consuming, living the American Dream while Hell is fills up with the wrongfully damned. But who on Earth is audacious enough to defend humanity and rescue the stolen mortal souls? Who possesses the nerve, the insight and the sheer arrogance to challenge Gabriel and his upwardly mobile forces of darkness? Manray Mothershed…the world’s hottest self-help guru. That’s who.



TQTell us something about Who Wants to be The Prince of Darkness? that is not found in the book description.

Michael:  Who Wants to be the Prince of Darkness was the most difficult story I’ve ever written. Apart from the struggle mentioned above, there was also the challenge of figuring out how to tell the story. I struggled mightily with perspective and characters. I struggled with the book’s tone. I knew that, like Last God Standing, it was a comedy, but little else beyond that. I tossed out so many false starts, different protagonists, while dealing with questions about timing. How long after the events depicted in LGS do the events in POD take place? Whose story is this? What is this book really about? Why should anybody care about what happens in Hell? But the biggest hurdle for me was figuring out how to make a character who is supposedly devoted to Evil…likable. How do you relate to such a character’s motivations? After numerous drafts and a billion tears, I realized that I needed to find a character readers can relate to. Manray Mothershed represents a popular meme in today’s culture; that of a man who is constantly striving to understand and improve himself. Manray is constantly asking the big questions: “Who am I…really?” “What’s it all about?” He’s at the top of the self-help game. A rich, charismatic celebrity, he’s figured it all out. Of course, that’s when his entire life explodes. By struggling to stop Gabriel, Manray also learns the devastating answers to those questions.



TQWhat inspired you to write Who Wants To Be The Prince of Darkness? What appeals to you about humorous Contemporary Fantasy?

Michael:  This book arose from the original themes I explored in Last God Standing, namely that humanity has evolved beyond its need for gods and supernatural agents. Science and common sense have taken the roles once filled by deities and devils. But dramatizing that evolution forces a necessary question: If humanity’s gods and devils are out of business…what do they do to keep themselves busy?



TQYour prior standalone novel for Angry Robot was Last God Standing. Do Last God Standing and Who Wants to be The Prince of Darkness? share anything thematically?

Michael:  They both share the idea that all of humanity’s gods and devils are real people. That, rather than one religion “winning” the battle for dominance…every religion was right. But all those deities are fighting amongst themselves to remain relevant. The books both explore what it might look like if all these supernatural skyfathers and dark lords were real but violently upset about their current state of cultural irrelevance. I love fantasy and horror and comedy, so these books were a natural blend of the literary genres I enjoy the most.



TQIn Who Wants to be The Prince of Darkness? who was the easiest character to write and why? The hardest and why?

Michael:  For some reason Asmodeus, the Lord of Lust was the easiest character to write. He’s a giant, demonic minotaur who leads Lucifer’s cadre of most trusted Lieutenants. Asmodeus helps Manray throughout the story, acting as a kind of dark Gandalf, advising the heroes just enough to get them into deeper and worse trouble. He speaks frequently and at great length, and only in alliterative phrases. He also constantly references his genitals. I loved writing him. The hardest character to write was actually Manray. I struggled for nearly two years trying to find his voice. But a timely bit of advice from my editor, Phil Jourdan, really unlocked Manray, and thus the whole story. He pointed out that Manray had issues with his emotionally abusive father; a world famous televangelist who falls from grace in the worst possible way. This book was largely about absent fathers. That was something I instantly understood, but had somehow overlooked in earlier drafts. Once that clicked, Manray came to life.


TQWhich question about Who Wants to be The Prince of Darkness? do you wish someone would ask? Ask it and answer it!

Michael:  I wish people would ask me, “So if Lucifer and Hades and Kali the Hindu goddess of destruction are all real (or unreal)…are you saying that God and Zeus and Changing Woman are equally real? Or unreal?” My answer to them would be a resounding… “YES!” (I love watching fundamentalists squirm over the implications of that kind of reasoning.)



TQWhat's next?

Michael:  Currently I’m kicking around a bunch of ideas. On the darker side I’m mulling an idea that retells the Superman story from the point of view of an alien who lands in a tobacco field in rural Georgia in the middle of a lynching. On the lighter side, I’ve been thinking about a modern vampire comedy that deals with class warfare in smalltown America. I’m really interested in artificial intelligence and post-human stories, so I’ve got a lot of ideas to play around with.



TQThank you for joining us at The Qwillery.





Who Wants to be the Prince of Darkness?
Angry Robot Books, March 1, 2016 (US/CAN Print and eBook)
    Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 400 pages
Angry Robot Books, March 3, 2016 (UK Print)

Interview with Michael Boatman
Lucifer is enjoying his retirement in an obscure corner of Limbo when he learns of a plot by Gabriel, the current ruler of Hell, to use humanity’s greatest weapon against it – Television!

Cue the hottest reality game-show ever conceived: Who Wants To Be The Prince Of Darkness? Gabriel orchestrates an “Infernal takeover” of Earth by stealing unwitting mortal souls and sending them to a mostly empty Hell, hoping to reinvigorate the Infernal Realm.

Now Lucifer must find a living champion to seize control of Hell and free millions of stolen mortal souls before the theft becomes permanent. But who would ever want to be Hell’s champion?

File Under: Fantasy [ Down Among The Dead Men | Fifteen Minutes For Eternity | Damned If You Do | The Morningstar ]




Last God Standing
Angry Robot Books, March 25. 2014 (US/CAN Print and eBook)
    Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 400 pages
Angry Robot Books, April 3, 2014 (UK Print)

Interview with Michael Boatman
Creator. Supreme being. Stand-up comic…?!
 
When God decides to quit and join the human race to see what all the fuss is about, all Hell breaks loose.

Sensing his abdication, the other defunct gods of Earth’s vanquished pantheons want a piece of the action He abandoned.

Meanwhile, the newly-humanised deity must discover the whereabouts and intentions of the similarly reincarnated Lucifer, and block the ascension of a murderous new God.

How is he ever going to make it as a stand-up comedian with all of this going on..?

File Under: Fantasy [ Gods Behaving Badly | Power Struggle | The Way He Tells ’Em | Simply Devine ]





About Michael

Interview with Michael Boatman
© 2013 Drake Photography HD, New York
Michael Boatman spends his days and nights pretending to be other people. For a living.

He’s acted in television shows – China Beach, Spin City, ARLI$$, Anger Management, Instant Mom, The Good Wife – films – Hamburger Hill, The Glass Shield, Bad Parents – and Broadway plays.

After many years in his chosen profession he’s decided to chuck it all and seek his fortune as a writer. (Just kidding. He secretly dreams of changing the world as a talkative mime.)

Website  ~   Twitter @MichaelBoatman_

Facebook  ~  IMDB.com



The Days of Tao by Wesley Chu


Wesley Chu has a Tao novella coming out in April from Subterranean Press: The Days of Tao takes place five years after the 3rd novel in the The Lives of Tao series, The Rebirths of Tao.

The Days of Tao links the Tao novels to events in the first book of the new Io series, The Rise of Io, which will be published by Angry Robot Books in October.




The Days of Tao
Subterranean Press, April 2016
Hardcover, 120 pages
Dust Jacket Illustration: Galen Dara

The Days of Tao by Wesley Chu
Cameron Tan wouldn’t have even been in Greece if he hadn’t gotten a ‘D’ in Art History.

Instead of spending the summer after college completing his training as a Prophus operative, he’s doing a study abroad program in Greece, enjoying a normal life – spending time with friends and getting teased about his crush on a classmate.

Then the emergency notification comes in: a Prophus agent with vital information needs immediate extraction, and Cameron is the only agent on the ground, responsible for getting the other agent and data out of the country. The Prophus are relying on him to uncomplicate things.
Easy.

Easy, except the rival Genjix have declared all-out war against the Prophus, which means Greece is about to be a very dangerous place. And the agent isn’t the only person relying on Cameron to get them safely out of the country – his friends from the study abroad program are, too. Cameron knows a good agent would leave them to fend for themselves. He also knows a good person wouldn’t. Suddenly, things aren’t easy at all.

The Days of Tao is the latest in the popular Tao series from award-winning author, Wesley Chu. Following after The Rebirths of Tao, this novella carries on the fast-moving and fun tone of the series.





The Lives of Tao

The Lives of Tao
The Lives of Tao 1
Angry Robot Books, April 30, 2013 (US/Canada and eBook)
     May 2, 2013 (UK print)
Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 464 pages
Cover Art: Argh! Oxford

The Days of Tao by Wesley Chu
When out-of-shape IT technician Roen woke up and started hearing voices in his head, he naturally assumed he was losing it.

He wasn’t.

He now has a passenger in his brain – an ancient alien life-form called Tao, whose race crash-landed on Earth before the first fish crawled out of the oceans. Now split into two opposing factions – the peace-loving, but under-represented Prophus, and the savage, powerful Genjix – the aliens have been in a state of civil war for centuries. Both sides are searching for a way off-planet, and the Genjix will sacrifice the entire human race, if that’s what it takes.

Meanwhile, Roen is having to train to be the ultimate secret agent. Like that’s going to end up well…

File Under: Science Fiction [ The Tug of War | I Was Genghis | Diary of a Slob | Spy vs Spy ]



The Deaths of Tao
The Lives of Tao 2
Angry Robot Books, October 29, 2013 (US/Canada and eBook)
     November 7, 2013 (UK print)
Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 464 pages
Cover Art: ARGH! Oxford

The Days of Tao by Wesley Chu
The Prophus and the Genjix are at war. For centuries they have sought a way off-planet, guiding humanity’s social and technological development to the stage where space travel is possible.

The end is now in sight, and both factions have plans to leave the Earth, but the Genjix method will mean the destruction of the human race.

That’s a price they’re willing to pay.

File Under: Science Fiction [ Manning Up | A Long Journey | Bye-Bye Mankind | Personal Space ]



The Rebirths of Tao
The Lives of Tao 3
Angry Robot Books, April 7, 2015 (North America and eBook)
    April 2, 2015 (UK print)
Mass Market Paperback and eBook,
Cover Art: Stewart Larking

The Days of Tao by Wesley Chu
Many years have passed since the events in The Deaths of Tao: the world is split into pro-Prophus and pro-Genjix factions, and is poised on the edge of a devastating new World War; the Prophus are hiding; and Roen has a family to take care of.

A Genjix scientist who defects to the other side holds the key to preventing bloodshed on an almost unimaginable scale.

With the might of the Genjix in active pursuit, Roen is the only person who can help him save the world, and the Quasing race, too.

And you thought you were having a stressful day…

File Under: Science Fiction
[ Father & Son • The Final Program • The Hero’s Path • The Circles of Life ]

2016 Debut Author Challenge Cover Wars - January Winner


The winner of the January 2016 Debut Author Challenge Cover Wars is Steal the Sky by Megan E. O'Keefe from Angry Robot Books with 63 votes equaling 36% of all votes. The jacket was designed by Kim Sokol.


Megan E. O'Keefe

Steal the Sky
Scorched Continent 1
Angry Robot Books, January 5, 2016
Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 448 pages
Cover: Kim Sokol

2016 Debut Author Challenge Cover Wars - January Winner
Detan Honding, a wanted conman of noble birth and ignoble tongue, has found himself in the oasis city of Aransa. He and his trusted companion Tibs may have pulled off one too many cons against the city’s elite and need to make a quick escape. They set their sights on their biggest heist yet – the gorgeous airship of the exiled commodore Thratia.

But in the middle of his scheme, a face changer known as a doppel starts murdering key members of Aransa’s government. The sudden paranoia makes Detan’s plans of stealing Thratia’s ship that much harder. And with this sudden power vacuum, Thratia can solidify her power and wreak havoc against the Empire. But the doppel isn’t working for Thratia and has her own intentions. Did Detan accidentally walk into a revolution and a crusade? He has to be careful – there’s a reason most people think he’s dead. And if his dangerous secret gets revealed, he has a lot more to worry about than a stolen airship.

File Under: Fantasy [ Sky Heist / Doppel Vision / Knives Out / Up Up & Away ]




The Results

2016 Debut Author Challenge Cover Wars - January Winner




The January 2016 Debuts

2016 Debut Author Challenge Cover Wars - January Winner




Thank you to everyone who voted, Tweeted, and participated. The 2016 Debut Author Challenge Cover Wars will continue with voting on the February Debut covers starting on February 15, 2015.

Review: Steal the Sky by Megan E. O'Keefe


Steal the Sky
Author:  Megan E. O'Keefe
Series:  Scorched Continent 1
Publisher:  Angry Robot Books, January 5, 2016
Format:  Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 448 pages
List Price:  US$7.99 (print);  US$6.99 (eBook)
ISBN:  9780857664907 (print);  9780857664914 (eBook)
Cover:  Kim Sokol

Review: Steal the Sky by Megan E. O'Keefe
Detan Honding, a wanted conman of noble birth and ignoble tongue, has found himself in the oasis city of Aransa. He and his trusted companion Tibs may have pulled off one too many cons against the city’s elite and need to make a quick escape. They set their sights on their biggest heist yet – the gorgeous airship of the exiled commodore Thratia.

But in the middle of his scheme, a face changer known as a doppel starts murdering key members of Aransa’s government. The sudden paranoia makes Detan’s plans of stealing Thratia’s ship that much harder. And with this sudden power vacuum, Thratia can solidify her power and wreak havoc against the Empire. But the doppel isn’t working for Thratia and has her own intentions. Did Detan accidentally walk into a revolution and a crusade? He has to be careful – there’s a reason most people think he’s dead. And if his dangerous secret gets revealed, he has a lot more to worry about than a stolen airship.

File Under: Fantasy [ Sky Heist / Doppel Vision / Knives Out / Up Up & Away ]



Trintytwo's Point of View

Detan Honding and his faithful sidekick/mechanic Tibs are in trouble, as usual. Their flier needs major repairs, leaving them stranded in the selium rich mining town of Aransa in the Scorched Continent which is as dried out as its name suggests. In this post-apocalyptic world, selium is the major source of energy and power. There's one drawback: only those born with sel-sensitivity can trace it. Regardless of rank or wealth, any person found to posses the gift is obliged to work in the mines divining new selium to harvest. Citizens look the other way, but these people are nothing short of slaves to the selium mines, and life expectancy is short owing to the combustible nature of the gas .

Due to the recent murder of the town's warden, Honding and Tibs soon discover that, with their checkered pasts, it's not a good time to be stuck in this particular part of the Scorched Continent. The local authorities, headed by watch captain Ripka Leshe, have enough trouble on their hands tracking the murderer; a suspected sel-sensitive or doppel, who can manipulate selium to masquerade as someone else. Honding's bravado and big mouth quickly entangle the pair in the political machinations of ruthless ex-Commodore Thratia Ganal who will stop at nothing to be elected the next warden. Lethal threats abound and, true to form, Honding devises a risky plan to escape the perilous sands of Aransa by stealing Thratia's prized airship, the Larkspur, right out from under her nose.

I liked O'Keefe's cast of characters right from the start. Detan Honding's a complicated mess, which makes him unique and extremely likeable. He's a charming, reckless con man who enjoys mouthing off to authority figures. He's smart enough to know better, but can't quite help himself which often made me cringe and giggle at the same time. I admire the fact that his sense of mischief is never quite beaten out of him no matter what hardships he encounters. Honding's irreverent personality balances the bleak setting of the arid mining town and the grim subject matter of a downtrodden population.

Tibs is constantly working to steer Honding out of trouble and is the best kind of sidekick; one who ignores and insults his friend whenever the opportunity arises yet is also unwaveringly loyal. His total disregard for Honding's wishes kept me entertained throughout the novel.

Steal the Sky was not the entertaining romp through a desert mining town that I expected after reading the opening chapters; it was so much more. O'Keefe's debut contains elements of action, adventure, steam punk, and espionage with a hefty dose of social inequality issues that make it an exciting and thought provoking read. Steal the Sky also receives high marks for transporting me to sun baked Aransa. Even though I was shivering in my wintry New England home, I could practically see the heat vapor rising from the hot sand and feel the parched air fill my lungs. Hitch a ride with Honding and Tibs and Steal the Sky; it's a journey you won't forget.

Interview with Megan E. O'Keefe, author of Steal the Sky


Please welcome Megan E. O'Keefe to The Qwillery as part of the 2016 Debut Author Challenge Interviews. Steal the Sky (Scorched Continent 1) was published on January 5th by Angry Robot.



Interview with Megan E. O'Keefe, author of Steal the Sky




TQWelcome to The Qwillery. When and why did you start writing?

Megan:  My first experiences with writing were during role playing games (Dungeons & Dragons and White Wolf Games, primarily) in the 90’s and 00’s. I mucked about in BBS’s and forums playing characters, and also met with a local group of friends to play. We had a lot of fun crafting worlds, characters, and adventures, but I didn’t think about telling stories seriously until a few years ago, in 2013. I started listening to the Writing Excuses podcast, which put the idea in my head that I could try writing my own stories, and soon was jumping into writer-land with both feet.



TQAre you a plotter or a pantser?

Megan:  A little of both! I tend more toward the plotting side of things, but I always allow room to wander off the path I’ve set if inspiration draws me in a different direction.



TQWhat is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

Megan:  Patience, if I’m being honest. I love to push forward in a creative rush, which is why I love drafting. But when I hit a spot that requires me to slow down, and possibly allow my subconscious to work through a problem, I can get a little impatient. I usually handle this by doing something physical and repetitive, such as going for a walk.



TQWhat has influenced/influences your writing?

Megan:  The Writing Excuses podcast has been hugely influential in how I approach the actual process of writing. Listening to the wide variety of ways the different authors on the show approach the same problems has given me a pretty big toolbox when it comes to story-crafting, and a willingness to experiment with technique.



TQDescribe Steal the Sky in 140 characters or less.

Megan:  Two conmen attempt the heist of an airship. Things... do not go as planned.



TQTell us something about Steal the Sky that is not found in the book description.

Megan:  One of the cool behind-the-scenes bit of worldbuilding I did was to increase the oxygen in the atmosphere slightly. This does interesting things for flight capability, even outside of the magical selium gas they use to give their ships lift, but it also does something a bit sinister to the insect population. The bugs on the Scorched continent are huge. Spiders run as big as your face, and bees as big as your fist.



TQWhat inspired you to write Steal the Sky? What appeals to you about writing Fantasy?

Megan:  I wanted to write something fun and experimentative, something that pushed genre boundaries. I knew where I wanted the story to begin - with my conman protagonist waiting to be interviewed by the local police - and the rest flowed from there. Ultimately, fantasy appeals to me because of its inventiveness. The stranger a world and its characters, the better. It’s this strangeness, this removal from the expected, that can occasionally help us reexamine our own beliefs through fresh eyes.



TQWhat sort of research did you do for Steal the Sky?

Megan:  Quite a lot of research went into the geology involved in making the Scorched Continent, with its multitude of volcanoes, work properly while still being habitable. I also spent quite a lot of time working out the physics involved with the airships. Even when you have a magical, movable gas doing the lifting, you still have to create a believable steering system, otherwise you’d just end up with ships drifting along with the direction of the breeze - not so great for commerce!



TQWho was the easiest character to write and why? The hardest and why?

Megan:  Detan, my conman protagonist, was definitely the easiest for me to write. His voice has a certain rhythm to it that is really easy to get into the flow of. I had a lot of fun coming up with his quips, and diving into his convoluted thought processes. As for the most difficult, that would have to be Pelkaia. She’s fun to write for her own reasons; she’s determined, competent, and a little bit manic. But she’s dealing with some deep-seated trauma that, without being too spoilery, is driving her to do some really terrible things.



TQWhich question about Steal the Sky do you wish someone would ask? Ask it and answer it!

Megan:  Can I give you bags of money to make a movie of Steal the Sky? But really, I’d love the opportunity to talk more about the presence of women in the book. They’re everywhere throughout the plot, driving action and throwing wrenches in the works when necessary. They’re all vastly different people from each other, with their own likes, dislikes, and motivations. That may not seem that noteworthy, but as a young woman growing up reading fantasy I was always disappointed by how one-note the female characters often seemed. I wanted to make sure that any young woman reading my work would find many different possible representations of herself within the story; both heroes and villains.



TQGive us one or two favorite non-spoilery quotes from Steal the Sky.

Megan:  One of my favorite parts of the book is the dialogue between the major players in the story. In this snippet, Detan is protesting that the Watch-captain, Ripka, should know why he’s been arrested. Detan begins the dialogue:

“Why? You know it! You picked me up on Thratia’s airship and marched me in here like a common crook.”
“You are a common crook.”
“I am not common.”



TQWhat's next?

Megan:  Right now I’m in the middle of revisions for Book Two, and plan on diving into the draft of Book Three shortly thereafter. Then it’s on to the next series I want to tackle, and I’ve a list of ideas for books that my agent has helpfully arranged in order of what he would like to see next. Of course, the more I work on ideas, the more ideas I get. I’ll be typing away until my fingers fall off, and then I’ll use my toes.



TQThank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

Megan:  Thank you for hosting me!





Steal the Sky
Scorched Continent 1
Angry Robot Books, January 5, 2016
Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 448 pages
Cover: Kim Sokol

Interview with Megan E. O'Keefe, author of Steal the Sky
Detan Honding, a wanted conman of noble birth and ignoble tongue, has found himself in the oasis city of Aransa. He and his trusted companion Tibs may have pulled off one too many cons against the city’s elite and need to make a quick escape. They set their sights on their biggest heist yet – the gorgeous airship of the exiled commodore Thratia.

But in the middle of his scheme, a face changer known as a doppel starts murdering key members of Aransa’s government. The sudden paranoia makes Detan’s plans of stealing Thratia’s ship that much harder. And with this sudden power vacuum, Thratia can solidify her power and wreak havoc against the Empire. But the doppel isn’t working for Thratia and has her own intentions. Did Detan accidentally walk into a revolution and a crusade? He has to be careful – there’s a reason most people think he’s dead. And if his dangerous secret gets revealed, he has a lot more to worry about than a stolen airship.

File Under: Fantasy [ Sky Heist / Doppel Vision / Knives Out / Up Up & Away ]





About Megan

Interview with Megan E. O'Keefe, author of Steal the Sky
Megan E. O’Keefe lives in the Bay Area of California and makes soap for a living. (It’s only a little like Fight Club.) She has worked in arts management and graphic design, and spends her free time tinkering with anything she can get her hands on.

Megan is a first place winner in the Writers of the Future competition, vol. 30. Steal the Sky is her first novel.

You can find Megan online at meganokeefe.com and @MeganofBlushie on Twitter.




Interview with Peter McLean and Review of Drake


Please welcome Peter McLean to The Qwillery as part of the 2016 Debut Author Challenge Interviews. Drake (Burned Man 1) was published on January 5th by Angry Robot.



Interview with Peter McLean and Review of Drake





TQWelcome to The Qwillery. When and why did you start writing?

Peter:  Hi! I’ve been writing since I was in school, well over twenty years now although I’ve only really had the time and the drive to take it seriously in the last five years or so. As for why… well, that’s probably a question for a psychologist! I’ve always had a head full of characters and places and fragments of story, and writing them down gets them out of the page where I can keep an eye on them.



TQAre you a plotter or a pantser?

Peter:  A bit of both really - I tend to pants the first chapter and the last scene first, then plot out how to get from one to the other. I may not completely stick to the original plan along the way, but having a clear end in sight from the beginning certainly helps me keep my sanity while I’m doing it.



TQWhat is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

Peter:  Simply making the time to do it is always the hardest thing. I work a busy full-time job and am frequently on call out of business hours too so sacrifices have to be made in other areas to clear time to write. Don’t ask me what movies I’ve seen recently because I haven’t!

In terms of the actual writing the most effort goes into creating the plot. I find characters and dialogue really easy, whereas I do have to work at storylines.



TQ:  What has influenced/influences your writing?

Peter:  My biggest influence in terms of becoming a writer was Tanith Lee, although my writing isn’t anything at all like hers. I loved her books so much when I was younger (and indeed I still do) that it gave me the urge to try and write for myself. I also had a wonderful highschool English teacher who encouraged me a great deal, and to whom I will always be grateful.



TQDescribe Drake in 140 characters or less.

A demon-summoning hitman and a murderous, chain-smoking angel fight Furies and the Devil himself in a search for redemption.



TQTell us something about Drake that is not found in the book description.

Drake actually started life in a thread over on the Absolute Write forums where we were challenging each other to write a great opening line to a story we hadn’t written yet. I came up with what is still the opening line of Drake, and I knew I had to follow it up with a short story. That short story turned into a novel, and with the editorial help of Phil Jourdan at Angry Robot that novel turned into Drake.



TQWhat inspired you to write Drake? What appeals to you about writing genre?

The inspiration for Drake comes from the old black and white “men-in-hats” noir movies of the 30s and 40s, blended with religion, mythology and magic. Although Drake is set in the modern day I’ve tried to take that noir vibe and adapt it to the setting. The book is set in the ganglands of South London which lend themselves well to that whole oppressive feel.

I grew up on the genre. My mother was very academic but she was also a huge Tolkien fan, and I remember her reading Narnia and The Hobbit to me before I even started school. I grew reading Joan Aiken and Dianna Wynne Jones and Alan Garner, and progressed to Tanith Lee and Stephen King via James Herbert and Dennis Wheatley. The genre has always been my go-to place, and other than possibly straight-out crime fiction I can’t imagine ever writing anything else.



TQWhat sort of research did you do for Drake?

Peter:  In all honesty I don’t really do research if I can help it. There are two main things in Drake – gangland, and magic. That gangland is drawn from a largely fictional set of tropes and easily-recognisable archetypes that are already nice and familiar. The other main thing in the book is magic, and again I didn’t have to research that much for the book but only because I’ve been studying it for years anyway.

The magic in Drake is mostly drawn from real-world occultism, although obviously greatly exaggerated for dramatic effect. Don Drake practices a variant of the classic grimoire tradition of the Goetia, aided and abetted by his very own enslaved archdemon in the form of the Burned Man. You’re not going to learn any magic spells from reading the book, but anyone already familiar with classical magic will probably find a few things in there that will make them smile.

The only thing I really did have to research was the Vodou that Papa Armand practices. This isn’t something I have any personal experience of but I do have a great respect for the tradition so I wanted to get it as right as I could.



TQWho was the easiest character to write and why? The hardest and why?

Peter:  Don himself was far and away the easiest to write. Once I nailed his voice he almost started to write himself in fact. That said my favourite character is Trixie. She’s an angel but she’s a very Old Testament type of angel rather than the sparkly New Age kind. She has most definitely not fallen, she’s very clear on that point, but she has certainly slipped a bit to put it mildly. She chain-smokes Black Russians and is not above killing people who stand in her way, and was just tremendous fun to write.

The hardest was probably Debbie, Don’s long suffering girlfriend. She’s a very intelligent woman, a chemistry PhD and a practising alchemist, and I knew from the outset I wanted her to be a real person and not just another “damsel in distress” type of character who’s only there for the hero to rescue. Getting this across while only being able to show her through Don’s eyes took some work, but I think she makes her point in the end.



TQWhy have you chosen to include or not chosen to include social issues in Drake?

Peter:  I think it depends on your definition of social issues. Drake is fiction and is by necessity is set in a slightly fictional version of London. A lot of the London in Drake just isn’t there anymore outside of the collective unconscious of everyone who grew up in England in the 1980s. Although Drake is set in the modern day it’s a modern day in which inner city house prices never soared through the roof and brownfield gentrification simply hasn’t happened. Don Drake lives in a London that grew out of 1970s crime dramas and cop shows, a London of diamond geezers and drinking clubs and dodgy pubs, flash motors and hooky shooters, the London that Michael Caine and Edward Woodward came from. It’s the London I remember from my childhood but it’s not really today’s London.



TQWhich question about Drake do you wish someone would ask? Ask it and answer it!

Peter:  I’m really surprised no one ever asks me about the Burned Man itself. It’s only a nine inch tall fetish but that fetish contains the soul of an imprisoned archdemon with absolutely no morals or sense of right and wrong whatsoever. It’s like Mr Hyde on steroids, a truly repugnant thing that none the less gets some of the best lines of dialogue in the book. Writing the Burned Man requires looking into the dark depths and asking “what would I say if I honestly and utterly didn’t give a damn about you or anything else?”



TQGive us one or two favorite non-spoilery quotes from Drake.

Peter:

The Rose and Crown was one of those places where you could buy anything from a van load of Polish cigarettes to a stolen Maserati without anyone batting an eyelid. Most of the regulars were what were affectionately termed “characters” in the local parlance, which was a sort of friendly euphemism for “hardened criminals”.



“Ah,” she said. “Are you all right?”
“Yeah,” I said. “Actually, no. I’m half dead from heroin comedown, and I’ve been paralysed with borrowed magic. There’s a dead body on my office floor, brains and bits of head all up my wall, and apparently you’re mates with a fallen angel. I am a pretty long way from fucking all right as it goes, Trixie.”



TQWhat's next?

Peter:  At the moment I’m putting the finishing touches to the second Burned Man book ready to ship to Angry Robot, and a third is already in the first draft stage so there will definitely be more Don Drake in the future.

I’ll be at EasterCon in Manchester, UK in March, and hopefully at FantasyCon UK in September as well.



TQThank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

Peter:  Thank you for having me!



TQAs a special treat here is the synopsis reveal for the next Burned Man novel:
Deep in the tunnels under London, Don Drake and an Earth Elemental called Janice are searching for an entity the gnomes call Rotman.

The gnome Matriarch tells Don that Rotman is actually the archdemon Bianakith, the spirit of disease and decay whose aura corrupts everything it comes near. Now Don, Trixie and the Burned Man have to hatch a plan to keep Bianakith from bringing down London.

But the past never stays buried, and old sins must be atoned for. Judgement is coming, and its name is Dominion.





Drake
Burned Man 1
Angry Robot Books, January 5, 2015
Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 320 pages
Cover Art: Raid71

Interview with Peter McLean and Review of Drake
Hitman Don Drake owes a gambling debt to a demon. Forced to carry out one more assassination to clear his debt, Don unwittingly kills an innocent child and brings the Furies of Greek myth down upon himself.

Rescued by an almost-fallen angel called Trixie, Don and his magical accomplice the Burned Man, an imprisoned archdemon, are forced to deal with Lucifer himself whilst battling a powerful evil magician.

Now Don must foil Lucifer’s plan to complete Trixie’s fall and save her soul whilst preventing the Burned Man from breaking free from captivity and wreaking havoc on the entire world.

File Under: Urban Fantasy [ One Last Hit / Both Ends Burning / Going Underground / London’s Finest ]


Qwill's Thoughts

Don Drake, a down and out diabolist/hitman, has feelings for his ex-girlfriend, drinks a lot, gets in serious trouble with the Furies (who are extremely unpleasant), has to deal with an angel who is a bit less angelic then she used to be, has to face off against various demons, magic users, and more. To say he's having a bad time of things would be a massive understatement. Don is not truly a bad guy, but he does have a tendency to make very bad decisions.

He lives in a seedy part of London and ends up owing money to an unpleasant demon named Wormwood. Drake is working off his debt to Wormwood by killing people who Wormwood wants killed when things go terribly wrong.

His partner in things magical is the Burned Man. He may be an archdemon chained to the mortal world but he is often the funniest thing in the room. He's awful, foul-mouthed, nasty, rude, and I enjoyed reading about him immensely despite how terrible he is. Don is the sardonic straight man to the Burned Man's off beat and off color humor. McLean intersperses the history of Don and the Burned Man throughout the novel and it is both illuminating and fascinating.

Don manages to get himself in and out out of trouble repeatedly in Drake. He doesn't do the getting out of trouble alone most of the time. The Burned Man helps (as if he had a choice), but so does Trixie (the falling angel). The story is deeply engaging in part because you just have to see what Don will do next and how the Burned Man will respond.

There is a lot of action, unspeakable creatures, magic, and unusual and engaging characters. Drake is dark, sometimes violent, often very funny, and very well-written. This is a terrific debut! I'd almost make a pact with a devil to get the next Burned Man book now.





About Peter

Interview with Peter McLean and Review of Drake
Peter McLean was born near London in 1972, the son of a bank manager and an English teacher. He went to school in the shadow of Norwich Cathedral where he spent most of his time making up stories. By the time he left school this was probably the thing he was best at, alongside the Taoist kung fu he had begun studying since the age of 13.

He grew up in the Norwich alternative scene, alternating dingy nightclubs with studying martial arts and practical magic.

He has since grown up a bit, if not a lot, and now works in corporate datacentre outsourcing for a major American multinational company. He is married to Diane and is still making up stories.



You can find Peter online at his website, on Twitter @petemc666 and on Facebook.

2016 Debut Author Challenge Update - Steal the Sky by Megan E. O'Keefe


2016 Debut Author Challenge Update - Steal the Sky by Megan E. O'Keefe


The Qwillery is pleased to announce the newest featured author for the 2016 Debut Author Challenge.


Megan E. O'Keefe

Steal the Sky
Scorched Continent 1
Angry Robot Books, January 5, 2016
Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 448 pages
Cover: Kim Sokol

2016 Debut Author Challenge Update - Steal the Sky by Megan E. O'Keefe
Detan Honding, a wanted conman of noble birth and ignoble tongue, has found himself in the oasis city of Aransa. He and his trusted companion Tibs may have pulled off one too many cons against the city’s elite and need to make a quick escape. They set their sights on their biggest heist yet – the gorgeous airship of the exiled commodore Thratia.

But in the middle of his scheme, a face changer known as a doppel starts murdering key members of Aransa’s government. The sudden paranoia makes Detan’s plans of stealing Thratia’s ship that much harder. And with this sudden power vacuum, Thratia can solidify her power and wreak havoc against the Empire. But the doppel isn’t working for Thratia and has her own intentions. Did Detan accidentally walk into a revolution and a crusade? He has to be careful – there’s a reason most people think he’s dead. And if his dangerous secret gets revealed, he has a lot more to worry about than a stolen airship.

File Under: Fantasy [ Sky Heist / Doppel Vision / Knives Out / Up Up & Away ]

2016 Debut Author Challenge Update - Drake by Peter McLean


 2016 Debut Author Challenge Update - Drake by Peter McLean


The Qwillery is pleased to announce the newest featured author for the 2016 Debut Author Challenge.


Peter McLean

Drake
Burned Man 1
Angry Robot Books, January 5, 2015
Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 320 pages
Cover Art: Raid71

 2016 Debut Author Challenge Update - Drake by Peter McLean
Hitman Don Drake owes a gambling debt to a demon. Forced to carry out one more assassination to clear his debt, Don unwittingly kills an innocent child and brings the Furies of Greek myth down upon himself.

Rescued by an almost-fallen angel called Trixie, Don and his magical accomplice the Burned Man, an imprisoned archdemon, are forced to deal with Lucifer himself whilst battling a powerful evil magician.

Now Don must foil Lucifer’s plan to complete Trixie’s fall and save her soul whilst preventing the Burned Man from breaking free from captivity and wreaking havoc on the entire world.

File Under: Urban Fantasy [ One Last Hit / Both Ends Burning / Going Underground / London’s Finest ]

Interview with Rod DuncanInterview with Matthew De AbaituaInterview with Michael BoatmanThe Days of Tao by Wesley Chu2016 Debut Author Challenge Cover Wars - January WinnerReview: Steal the Sky by Megan E. O'KeefeInterview with Megan E. O'Keefe, author of Steal the SkyInterview with Peter McLean and Review of Drake2016 Debut Author Challenge Update - Steal the Sky by Megan E. O'Keefe 2016 Debut Author Challenge Update - Drake by Peter McLean

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