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A blog about books and other things speculative

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James A. Moore on Writing Book Four in a Trilogy


Please welcome James A. Moore to The Qwillery. City of Wonders, the third and not final novel in the Seven Forges series, was published by Angry Robot Books on November 3rd. The fabulous cover illustrations for the series are by Alejandro Colucci.



James A. Moore on Writing Book Four in a Trilogy




Writing Book Four in a Trilogy

Well, this is a situation, isn’t it? Book four.

         It’s a little awkward. See, I thought I was going to write either a series, or a trilogy. Now I’m kind of doing both. Let me explain. When I started SEVEN FORGES. I knew what I wanted to do with the series, but I ran across a few problems. First, because of the nature of the business, I proposed a trilogy, fully expecting that I could A) Build a world, B) populate that world and give it a viable history and C) make drastic changes to the texture of that world within a certain parameter. I figured I could do everything I needed to do in 250,000 words or less. That sounds like a lot of words and it IS a lot of words, but, really, I forgot that I can be hideously wordy when I want to. (I normally want to.)
         I didn’t consider that I would get a two book deal. More explaining here. Angry Robot is wise in many ways and one of those is that they hedge their bets. Want to do a trilogy? Cool. Let’s give you two books to start with. If it’s going well we can add more later. That, folks, is common sense in this business. The publishing field is constantly changing right now. I find that both exhilarating and terrifying. I love change! I love when things are shaken up a bit and the newer, better ways of doing business show up. I also hate when the changes that are happening could affect my ability to pay my bills every month. See my dilemma? The challenge for me is that Angry Robot was taking a gigantic chance on me. See, I’m a writer, and I’ve got around 25 novels under my belt plus enough novel length works to round me up to around thirty. I have been at this for a while.
         And in all of that time, I wrote exactly one fantasy short story. One short story. That means I have absolutely no track record in the eyes of publishing. I might as well have decided to write a romance for all my previous credits meant. My numbers as a horror writer have almost no reflection on what my sales might do in any other genre. So for all intents and purposes, Angry Robot was taking a huge leap of faith with me.
         So I set out to write the best books I could and didn’t really think about the length of the works or what the end of the take would be and I got myself going full steam (give or take a few derailments for the real world) and I wrote SEVEN FORGES and THE BLASTED LANDS and went on to work on other projects. And While I was working on other projects the story started changing. Every time I turned around there was more that I wanted to add into that third book. The world I was building sort of suffered from the snowball effect. The more it rolled along, the more snow it gathered in the form of new characters, conflicts and locations.
         Happily, the changes are all for the better in my eyes. The story took on a life of its own and that is a good thing in my eyes. Even better, Angry Robot decided to keep taking chances and let me expand the world I was building.
         The end result is this: I just had book three of the trilogy come out. I’m writing book four right now.
         When I’m done with that book I have another series ready to go. That is to say, Angry Robot likes the ideas and they’re willing to take another chance with me. It’ll be another trilogy. After that, we’ve been talking about doing a few more books in the SEVEN FORGES series. There are only four novels, you see, and there are still Seven Forges.
         Time will tell, but either way, I think I’m going to enjoy the ride.

All the best,
James A. Moore





City of Wonders
Seven Forges 3
Angry Robot Books, November 3, 2015
Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 368 pages

James A. Moore on Writing Book Four in a Trilogy
Old Canhoon, the City of Wonders, is facing a population explosion as refugees from Tyrne and Roathes alike try to escape the Sa’ba Taalor. All along the border between the Blasted Lands and the Fellein Empire, armies clash and the most powerful empire in the world is pushed back toward the old Capital. From the far east, the Pilgrim gathers an army of the faithful, heading for Old Canhoon.

In Old Canhoon itself, the imperial family struggles against enemies old and new, as the agents of their enemies begin removing threats to the gods of the Seven Forges and prepare the way for the invading armies of the Seven Kings. In the distant Taalor valley, Andover Lashk continues his quest and must make a final decision, while at the Mounds, something inhuman is awakened and set free.

War is here. Blood will flow and bodies will burn.

File Under: Fantasy [ Unholy Pilgrimage | Mother Vine Provides | Heroes Needed | Forged by Death ]





Previously

Seven Forges
Seven Forges 1
Angry Robot Books, September 24, 2013
Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 400 pages

James A. Moore on Writing Book Four in a Trilogy
The people of Fellein have lived with legends for many centuries. To their far north, the Blasted Lands, a legacy of an ancient time of cataclysm, are vast, desolate and impassable, but that doesn’t stop the occasional expedition into their fringes in search of any trace of the ancients who once lived there… and oft-rumoured riches.

Captain Merros Dulver is the first in many lifetimes to find a path beyond the great mountains known as the Seven Forges and encounter, at last, the half‐forgotten race who live there. And it would appear that they were expecting him.

As he returns home, bringing an entourage of the strangers with him, he starts to wonder whether his discovery has been such a good thing. For the gods of this lost race are the gods of war, and their memories of that far-off cataclysm have not faded.

File Under: Fantasy [Savage Lands | Vengeful Gods | An Expected Journey | Battalions at War]



The Blasted Lands
Seven Forges 2
Angry Robot Books, June 24, 2014
Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 400 pages

James A. Moore on Writing Book Four in a Trilogy
The Empire of Fellein is in mourning. The Emperor is dead, and the armies of the empire have grown soft. Merros Dulver, their newly-appointed – and somewhat reluctant – commander, has been tasked with preparing them to fight the most savage enemy the world has yet seen.

Meanwhile, a perpetual storm ravages the Blasted Lands, and a new threat is about to arise – the Broken are coming, and with them only Death. 

File Under: Fantasy





Upcoming

The Silent Army
Seven Forges 4
Angry Robot Books, May 3, 2016
Mass Market Paperback and eBook

[cover to be revealed]
The City of Wonders has been saved by nearly miraculous forces and the Silent Army is risen, ready to defend the Fellein Empire and Empress Nachia at any cost.

The power that was hidden in the Mounds is on the move, seeking a final confrontation with the very entities that kept it locked away since the Cataclysm. Andover Lashk has finally come to accept his destiny and prepares to journey back to Fellein. The Sa’ba Taalor continue their domination over each country and people they encounter, but the final conflict is coming: The Great Wave of the Sa’ba Taalor stands to destroy an empire and the Silent Army prepares to stop them in their tracks.
Caught in the middle is the Fellein Empire and the people who have gathered together on the final battlefield. The faithful and the godless, the soldiers and killers alike all stand or fall as old gods and new bring their war to a world-changing end.

Some struggles are eternal. Some conflicts never cease. The Gods of War are here and they are determined to win.

File Under: Fantasy





About James

James A. Moore on Writing Book Four in a Trilogy
Photo by Stephen H. Moore
James A Moore is the author of over twenty novels, including the critically acclaimed Fireworks, Under The Overtree, Blood Red, Deeper, the Serenity Falls trilogy (featuring his recurring anti-hero, Jonathan Crowley) and his most recent novels Alien, Sea of Sorrows as well as Seven Forges series: Seven Forges, The Blasted Lands, City of Wonders and the forthcoming sequel The Silent Army.

He has twice been nominated for the Bram Stoker Award and spent three years as an officer in the Horror Writers Association, first as Secretary and later as Vice President.

James cut his teeth in the industry writing for Marvel Comics and authoring over twenty role-playing supplements for White Wolf Games, including Berlin by Night, Land of 1,000,000 Dreams and The Get of Fenris tribe. He also penned the White Wolf novels Vampire: House of Secrets and Werewolf: Hellstorm.

Website  ~  Live Journal  ~  Facebook  ~  Twitter @JamesAMoore

Interview with Patrick S. Tomlinson, author of The Ark


Please welcome Patrick S. Tomlinson to The Qwillery as part of the 2015 Debut Author Challenge Interviews. The Ark was published on November 3rd by Angry Robot Books.



Interview with Patrick S. Tomlinson, author of The Ark




TQWelcome to The Qwillery. When and why did you start writing?

Patrick:  I wish to say upfront that I’m only answering these questions because unnamed persons at The Qwillery are holding my dachshund hostage. I started writing in 2009 when I was horrified to discover just how much time each day I was spending not being rich and famous.



TQAre you a plotter or a pantser?

Patrick:  We really need another word for a writer who doesn’t use an outline. “Pantser” sounds just a little too indecent exposure-y. Anyway, I started out writing on instinct, but as I’ve come along, an outline has become an increasingly important tool for me. A good outline gives me direction, lets me spot problems in the plot before they force a big rewrite, and drastically increases my daily word count. But at the same time, I’m not a slave to them. Typically, my outlines run about ten chapters ahead of wherever I’m at in the WIP at any given time. Fewer than that and I pause to push it out a few more chapters to keep the story on course. THE ARK is the first book I wrote this way, and I finished the rough draft in six months, which was months faster than the other two novel length works I’d completed previously.



TQWhat is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

Patrick:  Watching the success of my friends and colleagues. Gods, how I loathe them.



TQWho are some of your literary influences? Favorite authors?

Patrick:  It’s a long list. Douglas Adams is why I started writing. My first novel began life as Hitchhiker’s Guide fanfic, because I was so upset over how the last book ended that I sat down to write a sixth. That one has since been massively rewritten and is now in the hands of my agent. Additionally, the satirical brilliance of Terry Pratchett has provided a nice warm little home for my sense of humor for many years. I can’t stop reading David Weber’s Honorverse books for military sci-fi. I think that Walter John Williams’ Praxis trilogy is the best space opera written in the last twenty years, with apologies to Ann Leckie’s excellent Ancillary cycle. Ramez Naam’s Nexus trilogy has been hugely impactful on the way I think about near-term futurism. I’m also a big fan of John Scalzi’s breezy character building and his plot pacing. I eat those books up.



TQDescribe The Ark in 140 characters or less.

Patrick:  THE ARK is a murder mystery set on a generation ship one month from reaching its destination. A “Sealed Airlock” thriller, to coin a phrase.



TQTell us something about The Ark that is not found in the book description.

Patrick:  The people living onboard are part of the most invasive and controlling surveillance state ever conceived. Their every movement is logged and tracked. Everything they consume and recycle is relentlessly monitored. Yet inside the modules, they are self-governing. The surveillance state exists with their full knowledge and consent, and is generally viewed as critical for both survival and basic fairness. Which, in a very real sense inside the delicate balance of an artificial environment, it is.



TQWhat inspired you to write The Ark?  What appeals to you about writing Science Fiction?

Patrick:  I’ve always been fascinated by the idea and the promise of generation ships. Realistically, if we’re going to send actual meat-bag humans to other star systems, generation ships are how we’ll do it. I was watching a show on Discovery channel, (I’m pretty sure) about all the hurdles to building one. But then I started thinking about what could motivate mankind to actually do it. Then what happens during the trip to change the nature of the society aboard. Then what happened on the other side. A story emerged quickly after that. Then I started making doodles of what the ship would look like and it was all over.

Science Fiction holds a special appeal for me because it requires so many different disciplines of story-telling. Not only do you have to create believable characters, but the entire world and society that they inhabit. And unlike pure fantasy, it has to have a level of internal consistency and scientific plausibility, which requires a whole other base of knowledge. Writing sci-fi forces us to walk on this weird tightrope of imaginative freedom and scientific constrictions. It’s fun finding the balance and trying to do it with narrative flare.



TQWhat sort of research did you do for The Ark?

Patrick:  All kinds. From a plausible propulsion system based on existing technology, to acreage requirements for food production, to a safe number of people to ensure genetic diversity. The size and design of the Ark itself was entirely driven by the scientific requirements of moving fifty-thousand people twelve lightyears. The story and characters were then placed inside that artificial environment and allowed to develop organically.



TQWho was the easiest character to write and why? The hardest and why?

Patrick:  There’s one character in particular, the museum curator, Devorah Feynman. She’s this tiny old lady, but is an absolute holy terror with a one-track mind and a sharp wit. I loved writing her. She’s just the star of every scene she’s in.

The hardest was definitely the main character’s love interest, Theresa Alexopoulos. I had real trouble trying to balance her role as Bryan Benson’s secret girlfriend and subordinate, while making her the strong and independent character I’d envisioned her to be. However, she’s promoted to a POV character in the next book in the series, TRIDENT’S FORGE, and I feel like she gets the attention and development there she deserves.



TQWhich question about The Ark do you wish someone would ask? Ask it and answer it!

Patrick:

Q) Could we really make a giant starship that moves by pooping out atomic bombs?

A) Yes! We really could! Indeed, the idea has existed since the 1950’s. A variety of different organizations pursued the technology under the label Project Orion, including the U.S. Air Force, NASA, and even the British. We even built a technology demonstrator that used conventional explosives. You can find the clip on YouTube. We only abandoned the concept as a result of the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, which was some hippie crap about not detonating thermonuclear weapons in the atmosphere. Boo, hippies, boooooo!

Indeed, the reason the Ark was designed as a Project Orion ship is because it’s the only proposal to facilitate interstellar travel we have that could realistically be scaled up with existing or near term technology. Since the disaster that convinces humankind to build the ship is discovered less than a hundred years from now, I didn’t want it using some far-future tech like an Alcubierre drive that might be possible someday. I wanted something that, if our backs were against the wall, we could start building today. And we have all these nukes lying around not doing anything…



TQGive us one or two of your favorite non-spoilery lines/paragraph from The Ark.

Patrick:  [Bryan Benson and curator Devorah Feynman viewing the gun that killed Arch Duke Ferdinand in Sarajevo]

“Is it dangerous?”
“Are you kidding? The last time some idiot got his hands on it, sixteen million people died. Then they did it all over again a couple decades later and thirty million people died. This gun shaped world affairs for an entire century.”
“Can I hold it?”
“Don’t press your luck, detective.”



TQWhat's next?

Patrick:  Well, next up immediately is another round of rewrites for the second book in the series, TRIDENT’S FORGE. It’s a very different book from THE ARK, less murder mystery and more action- adventure with some frontier survival thrown in for good measure. I’m already happy with it, but there are some spots that need to be fleshed out so readers have an easier time accessing what was in my head while it was being written.

But after that, the real fun starts. In addition to writing sci-fi full time, I’m also busy developing my career as a stand-up comedian. The very first novel I wrote, which I mentioned earlier, was a sci-fi comedy in the tradition of Adams and Pratchett. I’ve just finished rewriting it after four years away and have submitted it to my agent. If that thing gets the green light, look out. I’ve got synopses ready for the next five books in that series.



TQThank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

Patrick:  Whatever. I did your damned interview. Now give me back my dog, you monsters.



Note from unnamed persons at The Qwillery: No dog or author was harmed in the making of this interview though it was touch and go about the author for a while.





The Ark
Children of the Dead Earth 1
Angry Robot, November 3, 2015
     (North American Print and eBook)
November 5, 2015 (UK print)
Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 400 pages

Interview with Patrick S. Tomlinson, author of The Ark
Humankind has escaped a dying Earth and set out to find a new home among the stars aboard an immense generation spaceship, affectionately named the Ark. Bryan Benson is the Ark’s greatest living sports hero, enjoying retirement working as a detective in Avalon, his home module. The hours are good, the work is easy, and the perks can’t be beat.

But when a crew member goes missing, Benson is thrust into the centre of an ever-expanding web of deception, secrets, and violence that overturns everything he knows about living on the Ark and threatens everyone aboard. As the last remnants of humanity hurtle towards their salvation, Benson finds himself in a desperate race to unravel the conspiracy before a madman turns mankind’s home into its tomb.

File UnderScience Fiction [ Last Gun in the Universe / We’re Not Alone / Poison and Nukes / Race to the End ]





About Patrick

Interview with Patrick S. Tomlinson, author of The Ark
Patrick S. Tomlinson is the son of an ex-hippie psychologist and an ex-cowboy electrician. He lives in Milwaukee, Wisconsin with a menagerie of houseplants in varying levels of health, a Ford Mustang, and a Triumph motorcycle bought specifically to embarrass and infuriate Harley riders.


When not writing sci-fi and fantasy novels and short stories, Patrick is busy developing his other passion for performing stand-up comedy.


You can find Patrick online at his website: www.patrickstomlinson.com, on Twitter @stealthygeek and on Facebook.

2015 Debut Author Challenge Update - The Ark by Patrick S. Tomlinson


2015 Debut Author Challenge Update - The Ark by Patrick S. Tomlinson


The Qwillery is pleased to announce the newest featured author for the 2015 Debut Author Challenge.


Patrick S. Tomlinson

The Ark
Children of the Dead Earth 1
Angry Robot, November 3, 2015
Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 400 pages

2015 Debut Author Challenge Update - The Ark by Patrick S. Tomlinson
Humankind has escaped a dying Earth and set out to find a new home among the stars aboard an immense generation spaceship, affectionately named the Ark. Bryan Benson is the Ark’s greatest living sports hero, enjoying retirement working as a detective in Avalon, his home module. The hours are good, the work is easy, and the perks can’t be beat.

But when a crew member goes missing, Benson is thrust into the centre of an ever-expanding web of deception, secrets, and violence that overturns everything he knows about living on the Ark and threatens everyone aboard. As the last remnants of humanity hurtle towards their salvation, Benson finds himself in a desperate race to unravel the conspiracy before a madman turns mankind’s home into its tomb.

File UnderScience Fiction [ Last Gun in the Universe / We’re Not Alone / Poison and Nukes / Race to the End ]

Review: Cities and Thrones by Carrie Patel


Cities and Thrones
Author:  Carrie Patel
Series:  Recoletta 2
Publisher:  Angry Robot, July 7, 2015
Format:  Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 448 pages
List Price:  $7.99 (print); $6.99 (eBook)
ISBN:  9780857665539 (print); 9780857665546 (eBook)
Review Copy:  Provided by the Publisher

Review: Cities and Thrones by Carrie Patel
In the fantastical, gaslit underground city of Recoletta, oligarchs from foreign states and revolutionaries from the farming communes vie for power in the wake of the city’s coup. The dark, forbidden knowledge of how the city came to be founded has been released into the world for all to read, and now someone must pay.

Inspector Liesl Malone is on her toes, trying to keep the peace, and Arnault’s spy ring is more active than ever. Has the city’s increased access to knowledge put the citizens in even more danger? Allegiances change, long-held beliefs are adjusted, and things are about to get messy.

File Under: Fantasy [ Buried Cities / Secrets & Lies / Revolutionary / Total War ]



Melanie's Thoughts

Cities and Thrones starts not long after the dramatic events of book 1  - The Buried Life which finds Jane and Freddie above ground and far away from everything they know in their former home of Recoletta. Back in Recoletta the city has not fully recovered from the overthrow of the government. Liesl finds herself still chasing thieves and conspiracies through the now broken streets of the city wondering if Sato overthrowing Ruther's corrupt government has really made life any better for the city's inhabitants. Jane and Freddie end up in Madina along with a number of other refugees from Recoletta. Unexpectedly Jane lands herself a job in the Majlis which I took to believe was something similar to a civil court. Her role is to act as a liaison with between the city and the refugees from Recoletta which by its very nature brings her in contact with leaders of the city. She tries to keep her head down and do her job but fate draws her back into the world of watching, listening and uncovering secrets. Liesl however, wants nothing to do with secrets but when Sato sends her to the surface and to the farming communities who supply Recoletta with food it becomes apparent that she can't easily avoid being drawn into more secrets and lies. Conspiracies and mysteries abound in Cities and Thrones.  Still very central to the overall plot is the Library which holds the secrets of their past and which Ruthers didn't want anyone to know and Sato overthrew a government to find out. The various plot threads all come together in an action packed and exciting end at the Library that leaves the reader on a knife edge all the way through.

Patel continues to develop an interesting and rich environment for her characters to live. From the broken tunnels of Recoletta, to the rustic farmlands, to the opulence of Madina Patel paints a landscape that colourful and austere in equal measure. Patel describes Jane's new life in Madina so well that you can easily imagine her walking through the gilded labyrinth of the Maglis, taste the hot sweet tea she pretends to enjoy and feel the brush of her head scarf across her cheek. It does however, feel that Patel spent more time writing the chapters involving Jane and Madina than she did with Liesl, either in Recoletta or in the farming communities. These chapters weren't as descriptive or as engaging as those involving Jane.

I enjoyed this book, as much as I did book 1. However, I still don't believe that Patel has developed her characters as well as she has the setting or the plotline. I commented in my review of The Buried Life that the story was weak on characterisation and I feel this is still the case with book 2. We do get to learn a bit more about Jane's parents and how she came to be a laundress in Recoletta but this almost seemed a bit of a teaser rather than making Jane a fully rounded character. I still don't feel like I know much more about Liesl than I did during the first book which I find disappointing as there could be so much more to say about her.  If I had to do a comparison of the characterisation in this novel I would describe Patel's characters like a sketch where the artist hasn't finished colouring them in yet. Almost there but not quite.

Patel does excel at creating an engaging plot. I really had to keep on my toes to keep up with the various twists and turns and political machinations that are involved in the latter chapters of the book. It was clear that Jane and Liesl are just pawns in the very long game to get access to the Library. I was on the edge of my proverbial seat during the last few chapters.  Even with the lack of well rounded characters Cities and Thrones is a great book and I am really looking forward to finding out what is inside the Library and what part Liesl and Jane play in this discovery

Interview with Adam Rakunas, author of Windswept


Please welcome Adam Rakunas to The Qwillery as part of the 2015 Debut Author Challenge Interviews. Windswept was published on September 1st by Angry Robot Books.



Interview with Adam Rakunas, author of Windswept




TQWelcome to The Qwillery. When and why did you start writing?

Adam:  First grade.

No, really! The first story I ever wrote was after my dad took me to my first baseball game, the California Angels versus the Toronto Blue Jays. The Angels were my home team, and they got stomped. The next day, we had a class assignment to write a story, so I wrote one about I had gone to a baseball game and heard the Blue Jays’ manager say they were going to cheat. I told the umpire, the Angels won, and I saved the day. Clearly, I was meant to be a fantasist.



TQAre you a plotter or a pantser? What is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

Adam:  I’m a Reformed Pantser. I need structure to keep a story moving, so I spend all my agonizing time working on outlines. Windswept took two years for a first draft; its sequel took six months, all thanks to Mark Teppo’s Twenty-Five Chapter Structure (ALL PRAISE TEPPO). By having a framework, I can focus on having Padma talking.



TQYour bio states that you've been a "virtual world developer" among other things. How has this experience affected or not your novel writing?

Adam:  That was the weirdest desk job I ever had. I still can’t believe I was paid to do that or that people made large amounts of money during that Second Life land rush. I suppose that experience reminded me that business is weird, and that it’s a miracle the whole economy doesn’t implode on a more regular basis.

I supposed its greatest effect was that it reminded me that I am terrible at working with clients.



TQWho are some of your literary influences? Favorite authors?

Adam:  Douglas Adams for the absurdity. Kurt Vonnegut for the humanity. Beverley Cleary for the character focus.



TQDescribe Windswept in 140 characters or less.

Adam:  Padma Mehta is in a race against time to save her city, her world, and Occupied Space...all before Happy Hour.



TQTell us something about Windswept that is not found in the book description.

Adam:  It’s the science fiction screwball noir you never thought you needed until now.

I love screwball comedies. I love the way the dialogue crackles. I love how smart the characters are. I could see Padma mixing it up with Cary Grant and besting him.



TQWhat inspired you to write Windswept?

Adam:  I was in Honolulu to officiate a wedding (I’m a non-denominational minister, and I work for beer and tacos), and I was sitting at the hotel bar before the rehearsal dinner. All the people working there had name tags with their home towns, and no one was from Hawaii. Everyone had come here to one of the most beautiful places on Earth, and they were pouring drinks or bussing tables. All over the island, people were doing the jobs that kept the place running. If I were in their place, would I be able to focus on work, or would I be thinking about running around Diamondhead or surfing on the North Shore or doing anything other than wanting to work?

I started pecking away on my phone and wrote out the first scene: Padma sitting at her local bar, thinking about work. She wanted to quit to enjoy the beautiful place she lived in, but she couldn’t yet. Why?

And then we were off to the races.



TQWhat appeals to you about writing Science Fiction? In your opinion, should SF tackle big issues, just be entertaining, or do both?

Adam:  I grew up reading science fiction, starting with Douglas Adams and Star Trek before a college friend loaned me his copy of Kim Stanley Robinson’s Three Californias. It hadn’t occurred to me that you could write stories about futures like that. You can make a blueprint for the future you want (like Pacific Edge) or the ones to avoid (like The Wild Shore or The Gold Coast).

But you also have to tell a good story, and those books did that in spades. Tackling issues is important, but I like a story that sneaks in the editorials.



TQWhat sort of research did you do for Windswept?

Adam:  I bookmarked a lot of pages on Wikipedia about sugarcane, rum, and horrible plant diseases. I winged it for the rest.



TQWho was the easiest character to write and why? The hardest and why?

Adam:  Padma was both. It was a lot of fun to write her snappy rejoinders, but I had a hell of a time making her be little more than a quip machine. I hope I pulled it off.



TQWhich question about Windswept do you wish someone would ask? Ask it and answer it!

Adam:  Why a crane chase? Because I thought it would be funny.



TQGive us one or two of your favorite non-spoilery lines from Windswept.

Adam:  “Your level isn’t on the level. You’re so crooked it defies physics.”



TQWhat's next?

Adam:  I’m revising the sequel to Windswept right now. As soon as I turn that in to my cybernetic overlords at Angry Robot Books, I want to get started on a story about family stories and talking guns.



TQ:  Thank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

Adam:  Thanks for having me!





Windswept
Windswept 1
Angry Robot Books, September 1, 2015
Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 400 pages

Interview with Adam Rakunas, author of Windswept
Padma Mehta has to save her city, her planet, and Occupied Space from a devastating crop-killing plague — all before Happy Hour.

Labor organizer Padma Mehta is on the edge of space and the edge of burnout. All she wants is to buy out a little rum distillery and retire, but she’s supposed to recruit 500 people to the Union before she can. She’s only thirty-three short. So when a small-time con artist tells her about forty people ready to tumble down the space elevator to break free from her old bosses, she checks it out — against her better judgment. It turns out, of course, it was all lies.

As Padma should know by now, there are no easy shortcuts on her planet. And suddenly retirement seems farther away than ever: she’s just stumbled into a secret corporate mission to stop a plant disease that could wipe out all the industrial sugarcane in Occupied Space. If she ever wants to have another drink of her favorite rum, she’s going to have to fight her way through the city’s warehouses, sewage plants, and up the elevator itself to stop this new plague.

File Under: Science Fiction [ Plagues, Plots & Planets • One-Eyed Wonder • Bad Tips, Good Tipples • This Little Bar I Know ]





About Adam

Interview with Adam Rakunas, author of Windswept
Adam Rakunas has worked a variety of weird jobs. He’s been a virtual world developer, a parking lot attendant, a triathlon race director, a fast food cashier, and an online marketing consultant.

Now a stay-at-home dad, Adam splits his non-parenting time between writing, playing the cello, and political rabble-rousing. His stories have appeared in Futurismic and the Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction. Windswept is his first novel.



You can find Adam online at his website: www.giro.org, on Twitter @rakdaddy and on Facebook and Tumblr.


2015 Debut Author Challenge Update - Windswept by Adam Rakunas


2015 Debut Author Challenge Update - Windswept by Adam Rakunas


The Qwillery is pleased to announce the newest featured author for the 2015 Debut Author Challenge.


Adam Rakunas

Windswept
Windswept 1
Angry Robot Books, September 1, 2015
Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 400 pages

2015 Debut Author Challenge Update - Windswept by Adam Rakunas
Padma Mehta has to save her city, her planet, and Occupied Space from a devastating crop-killing plague — all before Happy Hour.

Labor organizer Padma Mehta is on the edge of space and the edge of burnout. All she wants is to buy out a little rum distillery and retire, but she’s supposed to recruit 500 people to the Union before she can. She’s only thirty-three short. So when a small-time con artist tells her about forty people ready to tumble down the space elevator to break free from her old bosses, she checks it out — against her better judgment. It turns out, of course, it was all lies.

As Padma should know by now, there are no easy shortcuts on her planet. And suddenly retirement seems farther away than ever: she’s just stumbled into a secret corporate mission to stop a plant disease that could wipe out all the industrial sugarcane in Occupied Space. If she ever wants to have another drink of her favorite rum, she’s going to have to fight her way through the city’s warehouses, sewage plants, and up the elevator itself to stop this new plague.

File Under: Science Fiction [ Plagues, Plots & Planets • One-Eyed Wonder • Bad Tips, Good Tipples • This Little Bar I Know ]

Review: The Singular & Extraordinary Tale of Mirror & Goliath by Ishbelle Bee


The Singular & Extraordinary Tale of Mirror & Goliath
Author:  Ishbelle Bee
Series:  From the Peculiar Adventures of John Lovehart, Esq., Volume 1
Publisher:  Angry Robot Books, June 30, 2015 (North America Print)
       June 2, 2015 (eBook)
       June 4, 2015 (UK Print)
Format:  Trade Paperback and eBook, 336 pages
List Price:  $9.99 (print)
ISBN:  9780857664426 (print)
Review Copy:  Provided by the Publisher

Review: The Singular & Extraordinary Tale of Mirror & Goliath by Ishbelle Bee
1888. A little girl called Mirror and her extraordinary shape-shifting guardian Goliath Honeyflower are washed up on the shores of Victorian England. Something has been wrong with Mirror since the day her grandfather locked her inside a mysterious clock that was painted all over with ladybirds. Mirror does not know what she is, but she knows she is no longer human.

John Loveheart, meanwhile, was not born wicked. But after the sinister death of his parents, he was taken by Mr Fingers, the demon lord of the underworld. Some say he is mad. John would be inclined to agree.

Now Mr Fingers is determined to find the little girl called Mirror, whose flesh he intends to eat, and whose soul is the key to his eternal reign. And John Loveheart has been called by his otherworldly father to help him track Mirror down…

An extraordinary dark fairytale for adults, for fans of Catherine Valente and Neil Gaiman.

File Under: Fantasy [ Shapes Shifting / Inside the Clock / A Tasty Little Girl / 12 Dancing Princesses ]



Melanie's Review

This book is very difficult to explain but a must read for anyone who likes the unusual. In true gothic/horror style Bee tells the story of Mirror who as a young girl was almost murdered by her grandfather when he leaves her to die in a grandfather clock. She is rescued by the policeman Goliath Honeyflower who becomes her protector, guardian and companion. Mirror is no longer just a normal young girl and Goliath searches for answers as to what she has become. We also learn of the life of young John Loveheart whose family are cruelly murdered and he is taken by the demon Mr. Fingers to live in the underworld along with 13 other young boys. Mr. Fingers wants to eat Mirror and sends John Loveheart to find her. I could tell you more but that would spoil the story.

Bee has written one of the creepiest books I have ever read. Well done! She has also managed to create some fantastically evil characters that were quite frankly a delight to read about. The story is told from a number of different POVs including those of Mirror and John Loveheart which gives us a different perspective of the overall story. Bee also has a fantastic imagination especially when it comes to naming her characters. At the start it seemed like it was going to be a very quick read but due to the plot, the colourful characters and the different environment in which the story is staged I found I had to give myself some more time to read it. I didn't want to miss any of Bee's crazy and compelling story. This is an excellent debut and I look forward to reading more from this author. If you are a fan of the strange and unusual you won't want to miss out.

Interview with Alyc Helms, author of The Dragons of Heaven - June 30, 2015


Please welcome Alyc Helms to The Qwillery as part of the 2015 Debut Author Challenge Interviews. The Dragons of Heaven is published on June 30th (North American print) by Angry Robot Books and is already available in digital format.



Interview with Alyc Helms, author of The Dragons of Heaven - June 30, 2015




TQWelcome to The Qwillery. When and why did you start writing? How does having a background in Anthropology affect (or not) your writing?

Alyc:  Hello to all and sundry.

I could go with the old standard, which is that I've been writing for as long as I can remember. That's true after a fashion. My dad has a book I handmade when I was nine that has a few illustrated short stories, some very-dark-for-a-nine-year-old poetry, and some transcribed family folklore. I continued to noodle with writing throughout my teens and twenties, and I even sent a few short stories out. I just moved to a new home, and while I was unpacking I found a small stack of rejection letters from Shawna McCarthy at Realms of Fantasy from back in the *cough* 90s *cough*.

But the truth is that I didn't really get serious about writing – especially finishing things I'd started, which is my benchmark for 'serious' – until I was in graduate school. Writing fiction became my way of keeping sane when my coursework and dissertation research became too much to handle. With my fiction, I could have fun. Nobody cared if I was wrong. Nobody was judging me. I could be as ridiculous as I wanted to be.

I could also use all the things I'd learned about cultural structures, about representation and identity, about politics and economics and activism, to ground my writing. I sometimes joke that I really just write critical theory fanfic.



TQAre you a plotter or a pantser?

Alyc:  I started out a pure pantser, and for a long time I thought I was more of a pantser than I probably actually am because I like structures. I love structures. I'm a big fan of using ritual and structures to trick myself into doing work that I'd rather avoid. And because of my background in folklore (and anthropology), I've got a pretty good grasp of how we structure stories. I tend to determine my structure early on in my drafting process (in terms of acts and beats and rising/falling action), and then I refine my upcoming framework and leave the further-off stuff fuzzy until I get closer to it. So in that way, I'm definitely a plotter.

With The Dragons of Heaven, I had written several self-contained story chunks before I decided to turn it into something novel-shaped, but in doing that, I had to figure out a shape for the novel. That birthed the palimpsest-like Now-and-Then structure that goes a good deal beyond your typical flashbacks. I wanted the 'Then' sections to inform and give added meaning and depth to the 'Now' sections, so that when readers meet a major character in a 'Now' section, they know why the character is important to Missy and the story because they just saw the same character in a 'Then' section. It wasn't something I'd often seen done in popular fiction, and I knew it'd be a weird structure for some readers and potentially a hard sell to publishers, but I thought it offered some interesting storytelling opportunities. And now I can point to the television version of The Arrow (which I love like whoa) to show that it's not as weird a device as all that.



TQWhat is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

Alyc:  Butt-in-chair, because it pervades every aspect of the process. Need to write a first draft? You gotta get butt-in-chair. Research? Revisions? Butt-in-chair. Querying, marketing, all the business aspects also require you to show up and do the work. I know so many people who are super smart, who have fantastic ideas that I'd love to read, and who write beautiful or hilarious or profound snippets of prose. But none of that matters if you're not sitting down, finding the time, doing the work, getting it wrong, working toward making it right.

This is a challenge for me because (like many writers), I have what I call page-fear. Getting started is the hardest hurdle to get over because writers have excellent imaginations, and we're very good at turning them against ourselves. The game of 'what if?' becomes 'What if I get it wrong? What if it sucks? What if I'm not the right person to tell this story?' There's no right answer, so every word is a leap of faith. You have to be willing to be wrong. Writing is an alchemical process. A great idea transmutes into crap the moment it hits the page, and then you have to putrefy and purify it until it becomes gold. And that won't happen if you don't get butt-in-chair.



TQWho are some of your literary influences? Favorite authors?

Alyc:  I grew up reading Katherine Kurtz, Mercedes Lackey, Melanie Rawn, and (of course) Anne McCaffery. I was dragon-obsessed as only a girl weaned on McCaffery could be, and there were never enough non-McCaffery dragon books to satisfy me.

More recently, I've gobbled up everything Robin Hobb is willing to give me. The Fool is one of my favorite fictional characters for the way he skewers gender assumptions. Naomi Novak and Temeraire are up there, too. Marie Brennan is a good friend, but she's also one of my favorite authors, and I love her naturalist take on dragons. It makes me feel like I'm back in field school.

For The Dragons of Heaven, however, I had to wander outside of fantasy fiction for my inspiration. I drew from Chinese folklore and legends (The Romance of the Three Kingdoms and The Water Margin/Outlaws of the Marsh were brilliant for this). I also drew inspiration from pulp and wuxia in other media: Indiana Jones, The Mummy movies, The Shadow (radio show), Big Trouble in Little China, K-20: The Fiend with Twenty Faces. Bunraku. I read literary pulp to get a good grounding in it, but it didn't quite have what I was looking for. Filmic pulp adventure/wuxia was the vibe I wanted.



TQDescribe The Dragons of Heaven in 140 characters or less.

Alyc:  Oh man. You guys are mean with these questions. Okay, I just yoinked my unsuccessful #PitMad entry from two years ago:

Pulp and wuxia collide when Missy Masters faces off against an ancient dragon to save China and get the guy.



TQTell us something about The Dragons of Heaven that is not found in the book description.

Alyc:  I'm a sucker for complicated, adult romances. Also, consent is sexy.



TQWhat inspired you to write The Dragons of Heaven? How would you describe into which genre(s) The Dragons of Heaven fit(s)? Having asked that, do you think that genre classifications are useful?

Dragons started as a side-adventure fic for a character I was playing in a tabletop game, and it lives in the intersection between pulp adventure and wuxia. About the time I hit 40k words, I realized I had the longest thing I’d ever written, the seed of a novel, and I still wasn’t bored. Of course, it was a character fic. It wasn’t novel-shaped at all. Missy was unfocused as a character, and the story was based in a world owned by a large corporate gaming company. I spent the next several years carving down, building up, reshaping, rewriting. The current iteration contains less than 10% of the original character fic.

Neither pulp adventure nor wuxia are what you would call well-known genre categories, especially in prose fiction. I keep expecting them to be better-known, but the consistently confused looks I get when I call Dragons a pulp adventure/wuxia mash-up indicate that I am mistaken in my expectations. I have three frivolous goals with Dragons: a) to bring back fedoras and tailored suits for men and women, b) to encourage demand for more cart-delivered dim sum restaurants, and c) to encourage more demand for pulp adventure wuxia, preferably including Eastern dragons.



TQWhat sort of research did you do for The Dragons of Heaven?

Alyc:  I have an outdated and incomplete bibliography on my website that covers some of my research materials, but it only covers the things I read specifically for Dragons. It doesn't cover the years I spent studying world folklores, anthropology, representation and identity politics, etc.

Some of the most valuable texts are a little hard to come by (especially now that I don't have access to a university library ::sobs::). I've already mentioned The Romance of the Three Kingdoms and The Water Margin, which is a little like mainlining Aurthurian mythology and all the works of Shakespeare before writing a Western fantasy. Wasserstrom was my main source for contemporary Chinese history. Sheridan Prasso's The Asian Mystique: Dragon Ladies, Geisha Girls, and Our Fantasies of the Exotic Orient was a great starting point for considering problematic tropes and issues in representation. Booth's The Dragon Syndicates and Huston's Tongs, Gangs, and Triads formed my hopefully-a-little-more-nuanced portrayal of the Triads' role in Chinese diaspora communities. And I can't shower enough love on Kang's The Cult of the Fox, which is an obscure monograph about household fox worship in southern China, and why I decided my fox spirits would be called huxian rather than the more derogatory huli-jing.



TQWho was the easiest character to write and why? The hardest and why?

Alyc:  Easiest was Missy, definitely. If I've been away from her for a while then it can be a bit of work to get back into her voice, but once I'm in it, I'm in it. She says the things I wish I was quick enough to come up with on the fly.

Hardest was the dragons because I had to balance giving them the gravitas they deserved with making them personable to the reading audience. In addition, there are nine of them (though some get more screen time than others), each with their own concerns, personalities, and agendas, which meant that in addition to differentiating them from each other so readers didn't get confused, I had to do a lot of work figuring out their histories and relationships with each other, not just with Missy.



TQWhich question about The Dragons of Heaven do you wish someone would ask? Ask it and answer it!

Alyc:  Where can I go to get proper, cart-delivered dim-sum?

Sadly, my favorite cart-delivered dim-sum isn't in San Francisco at all. It's in Los Angeles. My go-to dim sum when I lived in L.A. was The Palace Seafood & Dim Sum on Wilshire on the Westside (I expect to get lots of hate-mail for this from San Gabriel Valley purists). For special occasions, though, we'd haul over to Chinatown to The Empress Pavilion. I understand The Empress Pavilion closed for a while and was recently re-opened under new ownership, so I can't say if it's as great as it used to be.

I've yet to find the right combination of carts, cost, and quality for dim sum in San Francisco, but this probably just means I need to go out for dim sum more often.

I'd love for readers to leave suggestions for good dim sum in the comments so I can try it if I ever visit wherever they are!



TQGive us one or two of your favorite non-spoilery lines from The Dragons of Heaven.

"Idealism is a series of compromises waiting to happen."



TQWhat's next?

Alyc:  I'm deep in the weeds on writing The Conclave of Shadow, the sequel to Dragons. In it, Mr. Mystic teams up with Professor Abigail Trent, aka The Antiquarian. My original pitch on this one was 'Thelma and Louise take on 1,001 Nights.' It's high on adventures and escapades, but I do get to jump around on my soapbox for a bit regarding archaeological ethics, looting, and repatriation. Sorry Indiana Jones. That artifact may 'belong in a museum,' but without decent provenance, it's not much use to anyone!

I just turned in some freelance game writing for the Dragon Age tabletop RPG, and I'm putting final touches on the manuscript for an Italianate secondary-world fantasy full of politics and poisoners, courtiers and courtesans, rapiers and repartee. My elevator pitch for that one is 'Game of Thrones meets Queer as Folk,' though in truth, it owes a bit more to Dumas than to Martin.



TQThank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

Alyc:  Thank you for having me!





The Dragons of Heaven
Dragons of Heaven 1
Angry Robot Books, June 30, 2015  (North America Print)
      June 2, 2015 (eBook)
      June 4, 2015 (UK Print)
Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 512 pages

Interview with Alyc Helms, author of The Dragons of Heaven - June 30, 2015
Would you deal with the devil to save the world?

Street magician Missy Masters inherited more than the usual genetic cocktail from her estranged grandfather – she also got his preternatural control of shadow and his legacy as the vigilante hero, Mr Mystic. Problem is, being a pulp hero takes more than a good fedora and a knack for witty banter, and Missy lacks the one thing Mr. Mystic had: experience. Determined to live up to her birthright, Missy journeys to China to seek the aid of Lung Huang, the ancient master who once guided her grandfather.

Lung Huang isn’t quite as ancient as Missy expected, and she finds herself embroiled in the politics of Lung Huang and his siblings, the nine dragon-guardians of creation. When Lung Di, Lung Huang’s brother and mortal enemy, raises a magical barrier that cuts off China from the rest of the world, it falls to the new Mr Mystic to prove herself by taking down the barrier. But is it too great a task for a lone adventure hero?

File Under: Fantasy [ Sins of the Grandfather / Missy and Master / Geek Fu / Little Trouble in Big China ]





About Alyc

Interview with Alyc Helms, author of The Dragons of Heaven - June 30, 2015
Alyc Helms fled her doctoral program in anthropology and folklore when she realized she preferred fiction to academic writing. She dabbles in corsetry and costuming, dances at Renaissance and Dickens fairs, gets her dander up about social justice issues, and games in all forms of media. She sometimes refers to her work as “critical theory fanfic,” which is a fancy way to say that she is obsessed with liminality, gender identity, and foxes.

She’s a freelance game writer and a graduate of Clarion West, and her short fiction has appeared in Beneath Ceaseless Skies, Daily Science Fiction, Crossed Genres, to name a few. Her first novel, The Dragons of Heaven, will be published by Angry Robot Books in June 2015.

You can find Alyc online at http://www.alychelms.com and follow her @alychelms on Twitter.

Interview with Ishbelle Bee, author of The Singular & Extraordinary Tale of Mirror & Goliath - June 29, 2015


Please welcome Ishbelle Bee to The Qwillery as part of the 2015 Debut Author Challenge Interviews. The Singular & Extraordinary Tale of Mirror & Goliath will be published on June 30th (North American print) by Angry Robot Books and is already available in digital format.



Interview with Ishbelle Bee, author of The Singular & Extraordinary Tale of Mirror & Goliath - June 29, 2015




TQWhen and why did you start writing?

Ishbelle:  I have been writing stories, poetry and film scripts since I was a little girl. I found the ‘real’ world boring and I was disappointed there were no magicians flying about.



TQAre you a plotter of a pantser?

Ishbelle:  Pantser. My prep work is a few pages of scribbles and then I start writing.



TQWhat is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

Ishbelle:  I get bored very easily



TQWho are some of your literary influences? Favourite authors?

Ishbelle:  Angela Carter, Philip K Dick, Terry Pratchett, Margaret Atwood and Lovecraft



TQDescribe The Singular & Extraordinary Tale of Mirror & Goliath in 140 characters or less?

Ishbelle:  (A very strange Victorian fairy tale) - A little girl is locked inside a grandfather clock. She is rescued by a policeman who becomes her supernatural guardian. The Lord of the Underworld orders his assassin/ son Mr Loveheart to hunt her down because he wants to eat her.



TQWhat inspired you to write The Singular & Extraordinary Tale of Mirror & Goliath? What appealed to you about writing a dark fairytale? Do you have any favorite fairytales?

Ishbelle:  I am fascinated by fairy tales, as I am a huge fan of symbolism and fairy tales are stuffed full of them. My favourite fairy tale is BLUEBEARD. Nearly all fairy tales were originally very dark and have been sadly sanitized over the years.



TQTell us something about The Singular & Extraordinary Tale of Mirror & Goliath that is not found in the book description.

Ishbelle:  It explores a little of the mythology of the kidnaping of Persephone and her descent into the Underworld.



TQWhat inspired you to write The Singular & Extraordinary Tale of Mirror & Goliath?

Ishbelle:  I wanted, initially to write a book about exorcisms and the idea of having a demon inside a child. The character of Goliath was going to be priest.



TQWhat sort of research did you do for The Singular & Extraordinary Tale of Mirror & Goliath?

Ishbelle:  I read a lot of books on mythology and fairy tales, and also looked into Victorian Spiritualism.



TQWho was the easiest character to write and why? The hardest and why?

Ishbelle:  The easiest was Mr Loveheart, whose madness is a joy to write. The hardest was perhaps Detective White, who, because he is neither quirky or deranged, actually makes it trickier for me. (I prefer narrative voices which are unbalanced)



TQWhich question about The Singular & Extraordinary Tale of Mirror & Goliath do you wish someone would ask you? Ask it and answer it!

Ishbelle:  The book seems to be obsessed with food and eating. WHY?

I am fascinated with cannibalism in fairy tales and mythology and this reoccurring theme appears in all my books



TQGive us two of your favorite non-spoilery lines from The Singular & Extraordinary Tale of Mirror & Goliath.

Ishbelle:

“… I’ve witnessed some horrible things in my life. Musical Theatre! Frightened the buggery out of me.” ( Rufus Hazard )

“ Sometimes I think I am a strange key. Swallow me and I will unlock every door inside of you.” (Loveheart)



TQWhat’s next?

Ishbelle:   Book 2 : The Contrary Tale of the Butterfly Girl is being published in August and features an insane collector of butterflies.



TQThank you for joining us at The Qwillery!





The Singular & Extraordinary Tale of Mirror & Goliath
From the Peculiar Adventures of John Loveheart, Esq., Volume 1
Angry Robot Books, June 30, 2015 (North America Print)
     June 2, 2015 (eBook)
     June 4, 2015 (UK Print)
Trade Paperback and eBook, 336 pages

Interview with Ishbelle Bee, author of The Singular & Extraordinary Tale of Mirror & Goliath - June 29, 2015
1888. A little girl called Mirror and her extraordinary shape-shifting guardian Goliath Honeyflower are washed up on the shores of Victorian England. Something has been wrong with Mirror since the day her grandfather locked her inside a mysterious clock that was painted all over with ladybirds. Mirror does not know what she is, but she knows she is no longer human.

John Loveheart, meanwhile, was not born wicked. But after the sinister death of his parents, he was taken by Mr Fingers, the demon lord of the underworld. Some say he is mad. John would be inclined to agree.

Now Mr Fingers is determined to find the little girl called Mirror, whose flesh he intends to eat, and whose soul is the key to his eternal reign. And John Loveheart has been called by his otherworldly father to help him track Mirror down…

An extraordinary dark fairytale for adults, for fans of Catherine Valente and Neil Gaiman.

File Under: Fantasy [ Shapes Shifting / Inside the Clock / A Tasty Little Girl / 12 Dancing Princesses ]




The Contrary Tale of the Butterfly Girl
From the Peculiar Adventures of John Loveheart, Esq., Volume2
Angry Robot Books, August 4, 2015 (North America Print and eBook)
        August 6, 2015 (UK Print)
Trade Paperback and eBook

Interview with Ishbelle Bee, author of The Singular & Extraordinary Tale of Mirror & Goliath - June 29, 2015
A dark and twisted Victorian melodrama, like Alice in Wonderland goes to Hell, from the author of The Singular & Extraordinary Tale of Mirror & Goliath.
 
Two orphans, Pedrock and Boo Boo, are sent to live in the sinister village of Darkwound. There they meet and befriend the magical and dangerous Mr Loveheart and his neighbour, Professor Hummingbird, a recluse who collects rare butterflies. Little do they know that Professor Hummingbird has attracted the wrath of a demon named Mr Angelcakes.

One night, Mr Angelcakes visits Boo Boo and carves a butterfly onto her back. Boo Boo starts to metamorphose into a butterfly/human hybrid, and is kidnapped by Professor Hummingbird. When Mr Loveheart attempts to rescue her with the aid of Detective White and Constable Walnut, they too are turned into butterflies.

Caught between Professor Hummingbird and the demon Angelcakes, Loveheart finds himself entangled in a web much wider and darker than he could have imagined, and a plot that leads him right to the Prime Minister and even Queen Victoria herself …

File Under: Fantasy [ Closing the Net / Heads in the Trees / The Angel-Eater / Prime Minister’s Questions ]





About Ishbelle

Interview with Ishbelle Bee, author of The Singular & Extraordinary Tale of Mirror & Goliath - June 29, 2015
Ishbelle Bee writes horror and loves fairy-tales, the Victorian period (especially top hats!) and cake tents at village fêtes (she believes serial killers usually opt for the Victoria Sponge).
She currently lives in Edinburgh. She doesn’t own a rescue cat, but if she did his name would be Mr Pickles.










Twitter @ishbellebee


James A. Moore on Writing Book Four in a TrilogyInterview with Patrick S. Tomlinson, author of The Ark2015 Debut Author Challenge Update - The Ark by Patrick S. TomlinsonReview: Cities and Thrones by Carrie PatelInterview with Adam Rakunas, author of WindsweptCover Reveal: The Conclave of Shadow by Alyc Helms2015 Debut Author Challenge Update - Windswept by Adam RakunasReview: The Singular & Extraordinary Tale of Mirror & Goliath by Ishbelle BeeInterview with Alyc Helms, author of The Dragons of Heaven - June 30, 2015Interview with Ishbelle Bee, author of The Singular & Extraordinary Tale of Mirror & Goliath - June 29, 2015

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