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Interview with Kaethe Schwehn, author of The Rending and the Nest


Please welcome Kaethe Schwehn to The Qwillery as part of the 2018 Debut Author Challenge Interviews. The Rending and the Nest was published on February 20th by Bloomsbury USA.



Interview with Kaethe Schwehn, author of The Rending and the Nest




TQWelcome to The Qwillery. What is the first fiction piece you remember writing?

Kaethe:  Thanks so much for having me! I wrote a series of stories in high school that resulted in my English teacher pulling me aside to make sure I was O.K. The first was about suicide, the second was about abortion, and the third was an historical piece about a girl whose mom is about to be burned as a witch. I remember being mildly offended that the teacher expressed concern (didn’t she know it was fiction and it had nothing to do with me???) although now I genuinely understand her sense of trepidation.



TQAre you a plotter, a pantser or a hybrid?

Kaethe:  Pantser all the way! I’ve tried to plot because it seems like plotting would make life so much easier but I’m hopeless at it and once I have a plot I don’t feel nearly as motivated to write because I’ve lost the excitement of finding out what happens next.



TQWhat is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

Kaethe:  Self doubt. Especially with writing a novel. I think every published writer has a failed novel (or more likely multiple failed novels) and although we can all wax poetic about everything those novels taught us no one ever keeps working on a novel that she knows is going to fail. (Or maybe there’s a special kind of masochist that does, but I haven’t met her yet.) So writing a novel requires a great deal of faith, especially early in the process when the work is an oddly-formed thing for which you feel a great deal of strange but tentative affection. It’s kind of like having to be certain EVERY DAY that your newborn is going to become an astronaut.



TQWhat has influenced / influences your writing?

Kaethe:  Everything I’ve experienced in my lifetime, I suppose. A few things: motherhood, living in a remote community, Christianity, sexual encounters, Joni Mitchell, climate change, working in an orphanage in Ecuador, Minnesota winters, Dali, and that amazing scalp massage you receive when you get your hair cut.



TQDescribe The Rending and the Nest in 140 characters or less.

Kaethe:  Young woman finds identity, falls in love, tries to rescue best friend. Did I mention there’s been an apocalypse and women are giving birth to objects? That’s important, too.



TQTell us something about The Rending and the Nest that is not found in the book description.

Kaethe:  It’s set in Minnesota and features places like the Mall of America and the Minnesota Zoo.



TQWhat inspired you to write The Rending and the Nest? What appeals to you about writing Post-Apocalyptic SF?

Kaethe:  Although I love reading contemporary, “real-life” novels I have zero interest in writing one. While a finished post-apocalyptic/SF novel certainly has to contain certain “rules” that govern the created world, generating a first draft is so delicious and wild and fun because literally ANYTHING GOES. Anything. Richard Simmons can captain a cement mixer spewing doll parts! A jazzercise class can turn into an exorcism! Houses can siphon all of our happy memories into their duct systems while we sleep! These possibilities fill me with joy.



TQWhat sort of research did you do for The Rending and the Nest?

Kaethe:  My research was pretty sporadic (I say this as someone whose current project involves a ridiculous amount of research). I needed lots of little bits of information about subjects like hunting with snares, whittling, gasoline longevity, and firearms. I drove the roads the characters walk and took lots of pictures. I asked a sculptor friend questions about how she might make certain kinds of structures.



TQPlease tell us about the cover for The Rending and the Nest?

Kaethe:  It does depict something about the novel but explaining it would be a spoiler! What I love most about the cover is that I’ve had a few readers not recognize the connection while for others the connection is immediately obvious. So I love that the image functions as a Rorschach Test of sorts. The idea of what we reveal and what we are ready to see is central to the book and the cover reflects that—so the artists at Bloomsbury are kind of geniuses.



TQIn The Rending and the Nest who was the easiest character to write and why? The hardest and why?

Kaethe:  Mira (the protagonist) was both the easiest and hardest. I think most authors would say that there’s some aspect of themselves in every character; this was especially true for me with Mira so I had to be really careful to make sure her choices were authentically hers and that I wasn’t peer pressuring her.



TQWhy have you chosen to include or not chosen to include social issues in The Rending and the Nest?

Kaethe:  I did not consciously choose to include social issues but upon finishing the book I realized that they’re certainly present, though not as overtly as in The Handmaid’s Tale or Children of Men or When She Woke. Central to the book are a couple questions: who has control over women’s bodies and what they “produce” and who has control over the stories we tell about our bodies and ourselves? Two dear friends of mine both went through a series of miscarriages and stillbirths during the time I was writing the book and I also realized, upon finishing it, that the anguish the women feel in the book (about a very surreal phenomenon) is connected to the anguish women often currently feel over the loss of lives they have no real way to openly grieve or remember.



TQWhich question about The Rending and the Nest do you wish someone would ask? Ask it and answer it!

Kaethe:

Question: What was the most significant writing feedback you received while working on the novel?

Answer: Probably that one time when my agent mentioned I needed to add more to the ending and when I asked how much more she said “about twenty thousand words.” So I went ahead and added the entire last fourth of the book and I’m so glad I did.



TQGive us one or two of your favorite non-spoilery quotes from The Rending and the Nest.

Kaethe:

“And, stupidly, it didn’t occur to me that the other members of Zion might have similarly curated their own pasts, track lighting and gleaming pedestals for the parts of themselves they wanted to remember and temperature-controlled basement storage for the parts of themselves they would just as soon forget.”

“And I want to say that, faced with the loss of my friend, or the loss of the way our friendship had been, I grieved by spending more time on the Piles or composing sonnets from the list of objects at the back of my notebook, by helping in the orchard or practicing yoga breaths. But I didn’t. I went to Rodney instead.”



TQWhat's next?

Kaethe:  I’m working on a novel that begins in 4 BCE. A pregnant woman who is training to become a doctor and a couple fleeing political and religious persecution have an encounter in a Jewish community outside of Alexandria, Egypt that changes their lives—and maybe the history of the world—forever.



TQThank you for joining us at The Qwillery.





The Rending and the Nest
Bloomsbury USA, February 20, 2018
Hardcover and eBook, 304 pages

Interview with Kaethe Schwehn, author of The Rending and the Nest
A chilling yet redemptive post-apocalyptic debut that examines community, motherhood, faith, and the importance of telling one's own story.

When 95 percent of the earth's population disappears for no apparent reason, Mira does what she can to create some semblance of a life: She cobbles together a haphazard community named Zion, scavenges the Piles for supplies they might need, and avoids loving anyone she can't afford to lose. She has everything under control. Almost.

Four years after the Rending, Mira's best friend, Lana, announces her pregnancy, the first since everything changed and a new source of hope for Mira. But when Lana gives birth to an inanimate object--and other women of Zion follow suit--the thin veil of normalcy Mira has thrown over her new life begins to fray. As the Zionites wrestle with the presence of these Babies, a confident outsider named Michael appears, proselytizing about the world beyond Zion. He lures Lana away and when she doesn't return, Mira must decide how much she's willing to let go in order to save her friend, her home, and her own fraught pregnancy.

Like California by Edan Lepucki and Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel, The Rending and the Nest uses a fantastical, post-apocalyptic landscape to ask decidedly human questions: How well do we know the people we love? What sustains us in the midst of suffering? How do we forgive the brokenness we find within others--and within ourselves?





Kaethe On Tour

Northfield, MN
Thu Feb 22 7:00PM
There will be a launch party for Kaethe Schwehn, who will be signing copies of THE RENDING AND THE NEST at Imminent Brewing in Northfield, MN.
Iowa City, IA
Fri Feb 23 7:00PM
Kaethe Schwehn will be reading and signing copies of THE RENDING AND THE NEST at Prairie Lights in Iowa City, IA with Kiki Petrosino.
St. Paul, MN
Tue Feb 27 6:00PM
Kaethe Schwehn will be reading and signing copies of THE RENDING AND THE NEST with Patrick Nathan at Black Dog Cafe in St. Paul, MN.

St. Paul, MN
Wed Feb 28 7:00PM
Kaethe Schwehn will be reading and signing copies of THE RENDING AND THE NEST as part of the Fireside Reading Series at St. Paul Public Library in St. Paul, MN.
Tampa, FL
Fri Mar 9 11:00AM
Kaethe Schwehn will be signing copies of THE RENDING AND THE NEST at AWP Book Fair at the Tampa Convention Center in Tampa, FL.
Brooklyn, NY
Thu Mar 22 7:00PM
Kaethe Schwehn will be reading and signing copies of THE RENDING AND THE NEST with Anjali Sachdeva at WORD Bookstore in Brooklyn, NY.





About Kaethe

Kaethe Schwehn’s first book, Tailings: A Memoir, won the 2015 Minnesota Book Award for Creative Nonfiction, and her chapbook of poems, Tanka & Me, was selected for the Mineral Point Chapbook Series. In addition to holding M.F.A.s from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and the University of Montana, Kaethe has been the recipient of an Academy of American Poets prize, a Minnesota Arts Board grant, and a Loft Mentor Series award. She teaches at St. Olaf College and lives in Northfield, Minnesota.

Website  ~ Twitter @KaetheSchwehn

2017 Debut Author Challenge Update: Indelible by Adelia Saunders


2017 Debut Author Challenge Update: Indelible by Adelia Saunders


The Qwillery is pleased to announce the newest featured author for the 2017 Debut Author Challenge.



Adelia Saunders

Indelible
Bloomsbury USA, January 17, 2017
Hardcover and eBook, 288 pages
Literary Fiction, Magical Realism

2017 Debut Author Challenge Update: Indelible by Adelia Saunders
A masterful, enthralling debut novel about fate, family secrets, and the stories our bodies tell.

Magdalena has an unsettling gift. She sees the truth about people written on their skin--names, dates, details both banal and profound--and her only relief from the onslaught of information is to take off her glasses and let the world recede. Mercifully, her own skin is blank.

When she meets Neil, she is intrigued to see her name on his cheek. He's in Paris for the summer, studying a medieval pilgrimage to the coast of Spain, where the body of Saint Jacques is said to have washed ashore, covered in scallop shells. Magdalena, desperate to make things right after her best friend dies--a tragedy she might have prevented--embarks on her own pilgrimage, but not before Neil falls for her, captivated by her pale eyes, charming Eastern European accent, and aura of heartbreak.

Neil's father, Richard, is also in Paris, searching for the truth about his late mother, a famous expatriate American novelist who abandoned him at birth. All his life Richard has clung to a single memory of his mother--her red shoes--which her biographers agree he never could have seen.

In Adelia Saunders' arresting debut, secrets are revealed among forgotten texts in the old archives of Paris, on a dusty cattle ranch in the American West, along ancient pilgrim paths, and in a run-down apartment in post-Soviet Lithuania. By chance, or perhaps by fate, the novel's unforgettable characters converge, and Magdalena's uncanny ability may be the key to their happiness.

Interview with Emma Geen, author of The Many Selves of Katherine North


Please welcome Emma Geen to The Qwillery as part of the 2016 Debut Author Challenge Interviews. The Many Selves of Katherine North is published on June 7th by Bloomsbury USA. Please join The Qwillery in wishing Emma a Happy Publication Day!



Interview with Emma Geen, author of The Many Selves of Katherine North




TQWelcome to The Qwillery. When and why did you start writing?

Emma:  Hello, Qwillery, thank you for having me!

Goodness. Stating exactly when I started writing is no easy question - in some ways I've been writing and telling stories ever since I could wrap my grubby mitt around a pen. Until the age of ten, however, I wanted to be an archaeologist; at least, until I realised that I might have to dig up skeletons and decided that being a writer would be less scary. (It is also possible that my family gently encouraged me towards a career that wouldn't involve digging up their garden). I was sidetracked from this dream by the fascinations of psychology and philosophy and it was only in 2010 that I started to pursue it seriously by undertaking a creative writing MA.



TQAre you a plotter, a pantser or a hybrid?

Emma:  I had never heard of the term 'pantser'! But as much as I love the term, I'm definitely something of a hybrid. Though I always know where I'm starting from and where I'm headed, there's a fair bit of winging (pantsing?) along the way. Not to mention that the journey is so long, I consider it a healthy part of the process if the final destination a little different to the one initially intended. The Many Selves of Katherine North was originally going to end with Kit, as a jaguar, jumping off a skyscraper with a bomb in her mouth but, thankfully, I came to my senses on that one.



TQWhat is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

Emma:  Every project has its own uniquely horrifying set of challenges but for The Many Selves of Katherine North it was the learning curve that almost broke me. When I first embarked on the novel one of my Creative Writing lecturers, who had the rare gift of telling you what you most needed to hear in the fashion you least needed to hear it, told me that it could be an incredible and hugely important book... but that I wasn't a good enough author to write it. And, infuriating, he was right. I had to cut my teeth on innumerable rewrites before I was skilful enough to do the idea justice. The experience was like trying to sprint a marathon; I'd collapse exhausted, drag myself back to my feet, sprint on, then collapse once more, again and again and again, until I lost all belief that I'd one day be allowed to stop. It took everything I had to give.



TQWhat has influenced / influences your writing?

Emma:  I write backwards to all the other writers I know, in that I start out explicitly intending to write about a specific concept, then find a story to dress it up in. My primarily influences are therefore often works of philosophy, psychology or feminism. The Many Selves of Katherine North started life as a child of Maurice Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of Perception (an excellent text on the philosophy of embodiment). It strayed somewhat from this origin but I hope that its parent text still shines through.

It therefore stands to reason that my fiction heroes are also feminist, science-fiction writers who are preoccupied with the body; namely, Ursula Le Guin, Margaret Atwood and Octavia Bulter. I'm writing these responses a few days after being told that Le Guin has put a note for in the post for me and I rush to check my letterbox every ten minutes, heart in mouth. (It's possible that the post might arrive quarter to midnight, right?)



TQDescribe The Many Selves of Katherine North in 140 characters or less.

Emma:  Become other species and explore the alien realities that fly, slink & creep around us #foxes



TQTell us something about The Many Selves of Katherine North that is not found in the book description.

Emma:  Though the main themes and plot are those explore the what-it-likeness of being other species, the backstory - if that can be a fair description, seeming it's fundamentally entangled throughout - is one of human frailty and grief. I believe that other people (including non-human creatures!) are a vital part of the singular selfhood and I hope that The Many Selves of Katherine North shows this.



TQWhat inspired you to write The Many Selves of Katherine North? What appeals to you about writing literary fantasy?

Emma:  My mother was very ill and disabled during my teenage years. Fully empathising with her situation was difficult, not to mention painful. Therefore, when I read a philosophy text that explored the first-person experience of how simple everyday realities like stairs are fundamentally reconfigured by a wheel-chair bound embodiment, it was a vital insight that stayed with me. So when I embarked on writing a novel, I decided to fictionally explore how embodiment fundamentally shapes the self and their reality.

I think that 'literary fantasy' is possibly a term used only in the US? I've certainly never heard it used outside the context of my US publisher telling me that this is what I've written. But if it can be conflated with what I call Speculative fiction, then I love how it allows the author to embed their intellectual points in the very metaphysics of their fictional world, in a fashion that allows the piece to, at once, act as both a vivid thought experiment and an adventure romp.



TQWhat sort of research did you do for The Many Selves of Katherine North?

Emma:  Aside from all the aformentioned reading into psychology and philosophy, I read lots of papers on animal ethology, physiology and psychology, desperately trying to find out niggling details like, 'would-what-earth would the colour of grass be in this body?' - only find out that the answer was very often that 'the sum total of human science and knowledge is still kinda bit hazy on that one, *shrug*'. I also pretended to be a polar bear in my local swimming pool, sniffed pavements, licked seaweed, and generally embarrassed and disgusted myself in a multifarious number of odd ways.



TQWho was the easiest character to write and why? The hardest and why?

Emma:  Kit was both the easiest and most difficult character to write. The easiest because she has a lot of me in her - or, at least, my messed up teenage self of ten years ago; and the most difficult because she has to carry so much of the novel in a fashion that became quite suffocating to write. Writing her in the sections where she is other animals helped with this claustrophobia but also provided their own difficulties, in that even entities and scenarios that would be utterly mundane and matter-of-fact as a human became intractable puzzles with regard how she would experience them. There's also the troubling question of whether she is the same character when she's in different bodies. I don't claim to have an answer to that.



TQWhy have you chosen to include or not chosen to include social issues in The Many Selves of Katherine North?

Emma:  All novels include social issues, in much the same way that all novels have subtext. I very much doubt that Austen or Bronte intended to write about Colonialism, and yet it's fundamentally tied to their fiction. (Though they, of course, both consciously set out to address other types of social issues). The only real question is whether the author chooses to address and/or challenge social assumptions in an attempt to try and move the cultural discussion forwards. I believe that authors have a huge responsibility for how society thinks and so I try the best I can to rise to it, no doubt making mistakes along the way.



TQWhich question about The Many Selves of Katherine North do you wish someone would ask? Ask it and answer it!

Emma:  Hmm, truthfully, the most interesting questions that could be asked about The Many Selves of Katherine North are also the most tricky and would either set me stuttering or off on a rant of several thousand words, so I'll save us all from that pain and, instead, distract you with a video of this majestic fox: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D2SoGHFM18I.



TQGive us one or two of your favorite non-spoilery quotes from The Many Selves of Katherine North.

Emma:

"Please look. I’d mutter beneath my breath. Please look. Please look.
And, sometimes, it would. Those eyes like molten silver, nailing me back inside my tingling skin; suddenly conscious of a full bladder and the itch of every muscle to move. A few scant seconds unfolding into infinity . . . over too quickly as the fox would turn and run."



TQWhat's next?

Emma:  What's 'next' is already the 'now' for me, seeming I've been working on my second novel for a year and a half. It falls somewhere between literary, magical realism, fantasy, science-fiction and dystopian, and is about a girl who stops speaking only to find that other people start telling her stories for her. It has postcolonial and psychosomatic themes- also, fairies.



TQThank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

Emma:  Thank you!





The Many Selves of Katherine North
Bloomsbury USA, June 7, 2016
Hardcover and eBook, 368 pages

Interview with Emma Geen, author of The Many Selves of Katherine North
When we first meet Kit, she's a fox.

Nineteen-year-old Kit works for the research department of Shen Corporation as a phenomenaut. She's been “jumping”--projecting her consciousness, through a neurological interface--into the bodies of lab-grown animals made for the purpose of research for seven years, which is longer than anyone else at ShenCorp, and longer than any of the scientists thought possible. She experiences a multitude of other lives--fighting and fleeing as predator and prey, as mammal, bird, and reptile--in the hope that her work will help humans better understand the other species living alongside them.

Her closest friend is Buckley, her Neuro--the computer engineer who guides a phenomenaut through consciousness projection. His is the voice, therefore, that's always in Kit's head and is the thread of continuity that connects her to the human world when she's an animal. But when ShenCorp's mission takes a more commercial--and ominous--turn, Kit is no longer sure of her safety. Propelling the reader into the bodies of the other creatures that share our world, The Many Selves of Katherine North takes place in the near future but shows us a dazzling world far, far from the realm of our experience.





About Emma

Interview with Emma Geen, author of The Many Selves of Katherine North
Photo by Ben Turner
Emma Geen is a speculative thinker and writer whose fiction draws on her education in Psychology and Philosophy. She is studying for a PhD in Creative Writing at Bath Spa University, where she won the 2012 Janklow & Nesbit Bath Spa Prize.

The Many Selves of Katherine North is her debut novel.


Website

Twitter @EmmaCGeen



2016 Debut Author Challenge Update - The Many Selves of Katherine North by Emma Geen


2016 Debut Author Challenge Update - The Many Selves of Katherine North by Emma Geen


The Qwillery is pleased to announce the newest featured author for the 2016 Debut Author Challenge.


Emma Geen

The Many Selves of Katherine North
Bloomsbury USA, June 7, 2016
Hardcover and eBook, 368 pages

2016 Debut Author Challenge Update - The Many Selves of Katherine North by Emma Geen
When we first meet Kit, she's a fox.

Nineteen-year-old Kit works for the research department of Shen Corporation as a phenomenaut. She's been “jumping”--projecting her consciousness, through a neurological interface--into the bodies of lab-grown animals made for the purpose of research for seven years, which is longer than anyone else at ShenCorp, and longer than any of the scientists thought possible. She experiences a multitude of other lives--fighting and fleeing as predator and prey, as mammal, bird, and reptile--in the hope that her work will help humans better understand the other species living alongside them.

Her closest friend is Buckley, her Neuro--the computer engineer who guides a phenomenaut through consciousness projection. His is the voice, therefore, that's always in Kit's head and is the thread of continuity that connects her to the human world when she's an animal. But when ShenCorp's mission takes a more commercial--and ominous--turn, Kit is no longer sure of her safety. Propelling the reader into the bodies of the other creatures that share our world, The Many Selves of Katherine North takes place in the near future but shows us a dazzling world far, far from the realm of our experience.

2016 Debut Author Challenge Update - Thirst by Benjamin Warner


2016 Debut Author Challenge Update - Thirst by Benjamin Warner


The Qwillery is pleased to announce the newest featured author for the 2016 Debut Author Challenge.


Benjamin Warner

Thirst
Bloomsbury USA, April 12, 2016
Hardcover and eBook,304 pages

2016 Debut Author Challenge Update - Thirst by Benjamin Warner
On a searing summer Friday, Eddie Chapman has been stuck for hours in a traffic jam. There are accidents along the highway, but ambulances and police are conspicuously absent. When he decides to abandon his car and run home, he sees that the trees along the edge of a stream have been burnt, and the water in the streambed is gone. Something is very wrong.

When he arrives home, the power is out and there is no running water. The pipes everywhere, it seems, have gone dry. Eddie and his wife, Laura, find themselves thrust together with their neighbors while a sense of unease thickens in the stifling night air.

Thirst
takes place in the immediate aftermath of a mysterious disaster--the Chapmans and their neighbors suffer the effects of the heat, their thirst, and the terrifying realization that no one is coming to help. As violence rips through the community, Eddie and Laura are forced to recall secrets from their past and question their present humanity. In crisp and convincing prose, Ben Warner compels readers to do the same. What might you do to survive?

Review: The Watchmaker of Filigree Street by Natasha Pulley


The Watchmaker of Filigree Street
Author:  Natasha Pulley
Publisher:  Bloomsbury USA, July 14, 2015
Format:  Hardcover and eBook, 336 pages
List Price:  $26.00 (print)
ISBN:  9781620408339 (print)
Review Copy:  Provided by the Publisher via NetGalley

Review: The Watchmaker of Filigree Street by Natasha Pulley
1883. Thaniel Steepleton returns home to his tiny London apartment to find a gold pocket watch on his pillow. Six months later, the mysterious timepiece saves his life, drawing him away from a blast that destroys Scotland Yard. At last, he goes in search of its maker, Keita Mori, a kind, lonely immigrant from Japan. Although Mori seems harmless, a chain of unexplainable events soon suggests he must be hiding something. When Grace Carrow, an Oxford physicist, unwittingly interferes, Thaniel is torn between opposing loyalties.

The Watchmaker of Filigree Street is a sweeping, atmospheric narrative that takes the reader on an unexpected journey through Victorian London, Japan as its civil war crumbles long-standing traditions, and beyond. Blending historical events with dazzling flights of fancy, it opens doors to a strange and magical past.
Google Play : iTunes : Kobo



Melanie's Thoughts

Thaniel Steepleton's life irrevocably changes when stranger leaves a gold pocket watch on his bed. Up to this point he has had a fairly lonely life as a telegrapher for the Ministry of Defence, lives a small bedsit, and sends half his meager wages to his widowed sister. His biggest challenge was trying to decide when to have his tea break. When the watch saves him from becoming yet another victim of the bombing of Scotland Yard, Thaniel is determined to find out who made it and how he ended up with it. His investigation takes him to none other than the watchmaker of Filigree Street - Keita Mori. Nathaniel's life soon becomes entangled with the unassuming watchmaker. The story moves from present to the past as we learn about Mori's past in Japan and the circumstances of his arrival in England. We also meet Grace who has returned home after studying physics at university. Grace wants to continue her experiments but is being pressured by her parents to get married first. When Thaniel meets Grace at a ball he couldn't possibly anticipate the chain of events that would ensue.

Pulley sets her debut novel in a grey and bleak London during a time when the Fenian's (or Irish Republican Brotherhood) were setting off bombs in key cities, mainly London. It is also a time when both foreigners and women were openly discriminated against. Setting her story during real events helps to create a feeling of legitimacy to the story and to the characters. I found the whole novel very atmospheric and felt that Pulley picked an excellent time period in which to set her story. I was however let down by the lack of characterisation. Neither Thaniel nor Grace stood out and, in fact, I found Grace extremely self-centered. She acts appallingly towards the end of the novel and no one seems to bat an eyelash. This seemed incongruous with the rest of the story and focus on finding the person who bombs Scotland Yard. Of all the characters Mori was the most developed and was by far the most interesting. I think this is down to the chapters dedicated to his history back in Japan.

My final bug bear with this novel and which made the whole novel a bit of a struggle for me is the typeface. I realise that the choice of typeface can be outside of the hands of the author but I struggle to understand why anyone would chose to use a typeface that used random capitalisation. A first I thought it was bad editing as I had an eARC but I flipped to the back and read the author's notes which explained the typeface. Very odd choice.

I had high hopes for the The Watchmaker of Filigree Street as I have read some other excellent debuts in the last few months, but overall I was disappointed. The characters lack the depth they require in order to pull off the convoluted plot. 

Interview with Kaethe Schwehn, author of The Rending and the Nest2017 Debut Author Challenge Update: Indelible by Adelia SaundersInterview with Emma Geen, author of The Many Selves of Katherine North2016 Debut Author Challenge Update - The Many Selves of Katherine North by Emma Geen2016 Debut Author Challenge Update - Thirst by Benjamin WarnerReview: The Watchmaker of Filigree Street by Natasha Pulley

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