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Tesseracts Twenty-one opens to submissions!


Press Release

Tesseracts Twenty-one opens to submissions!





Tesseracts Twenty-one opens to submissions!

The submission period for Tesseracts Twenty-one officially opens, February 15, 2017. Submissions will be accepted until Midnight April 30, 2017.

Edited by Rhonda Parrish and Greg Bechtel, the anthology focuses on optimistic speculative fiction and will be released by EDGE Science Fiction and Fantasy Publishing in the spring of 2018.

The theme of the anthology is ‘optimism’ – which doesn't necessarily exclude dark or scary settings – but requires some sort of optimistic twist or element. Whether that takes the form of a solar-punk tale set in a sustainable world with a post-scarcity economy, a POV character existing as an advocate of optimism or something else entirely, the editors want to see it.
“We're not looking for saccharine sweetness, but rather stories which offer a little brightness and hope in one way or another,” says Rhonda Parrish, co-editor.

“While we’re certainly interested in submissions where a Canadian setting (a specific city, region, or province) plays a role, we’re also open to stories set anywhere in the world, the universe, or the multiverse,” says Greg Bechtel, co-editor.
Stories must be previously unpublished, in English, between 500-6000 words.

Submissions are only open to Canadian writers (citizens, residents, expats, etc.). The editors will accept stories previously published in a language other than English, but they must first be translated into English before submission.

Submissions should be e-mailed to: tesseracts21@edgewebsite.com. The e-mail must contain the word "submission" in the subject line. Submissions must be sent as an attachment: in .DOCX, DOC. or .RTF format.

For more information please read the submission guidelines: http://edgewebsite.com/books/tess21/t21-catalog.html

About the Tesseracts Series

The Tesseracts anthology series is Canada's longest running anthology. It was first edited by the late Judith Merril in 1985, and has published more than 563 original Canadian speculative fiction (Science fiction, fantasy and horror) stories and poems by 335 Canadian authors, editors, translators and special guests.

Some of Canada's best known writers have been published within the pages of these volumes - including Margaret Atwood, William Gibson, and Spider Robinson.

Tesseracts Twenty-one will be released in Spring, 2018 in paperback and eBook editions.

About the editors

Rhonda Parrish is driven by a desire to do All The Things. She was the publisher and editor-in-chief of Niteblade Magazine, is an Assistant Editor at World Weaver Press and is the editor of several anthologies including, most recently, Sirens and C is for Chimera.
In addition, Rhonda is a writer whose work has been published in Tesseracts 17: Speculating Canada from Coast to Coast, Imaginarium: The Best Canadian Speculative Writing (2012 & 2015) and Mythic Delirium.

Greg Bechtel’s occasionally prize-winning writing has appeared in several magazines and anthologies, including Avenue Edmonton, The Fiddlehead, Prairie Fire, the Tesseracts anthologies, and Imaginarium 4: The Best Canadian Speculative Writing. His first story collection, Boundary Problems, won the Alberta Book of the Year Award for trade fiction and was a finalist for the William L. Crawford Fantasy Award, the ReLit Award, and the City of Edmonton Robert Kroetsch Book Prize. Currently, Greg is serving as 2016-2017 Writer in Residence for the Canadian Authors' Association (Alberta branch), and he also teaches writing and literature at the University of Alberta, where he completed his PhD on Canadian syncretic fantasy.

Line Up for Superhero Universe (Tesseracts Nineteen) announced by EDGE Science Fiction and Fantasy Publishing


EDGE Science Fiction and Fantasy Publishing has announced the line up for Superhero Universe (Tesseracts Nineteen) which will be available in digital format on January 1, 2016 and in print in Canada on March 15, 2016 and in print in the USA on April 15, 2016.



PRESS RELEASE
Line Up for Superhero Universe (Tesseracts Nineteen) announced by EDGE Science Fiction and Fantasy Publishing





EDGE Science Fiction and Fantasy Publishing
Announces Author Line Up for

Superhero Universe
(Tesseracts Nineteen)

(Calgary, Alberta) Not a hoax! Not an imaginary story! EDGE Science Fiction and Fantasy Publishing is proud to announce the lineup for Superhero Universe, the 19th edition of the prestigious Tesseracts anthology series.

Edited by Claude Lalumière and Mark Shainblum, Superhero Universe (Tesseracts Nineteen) features twenty-four stories (and one poem) by some of Canada’s best fantasy and science fiction writers:

John Bell,
P. E. Bolivar,
Kevin Cockle,
Evelyn Deshane,
Marcelle Dubé,
Chadwick Ginther,
Patrick T. Goddard,
Kim Goldberg,
Geoff Hart,
Sacha Howells,
Arun Jiwa,
D. K. Latta,
Michael Matheson,
Bernard E. Mireault,
Luke Murphy,
Brent Nichols,
David Perlmutter,
Mary Pletsch & Dylan Blacquiere,
Jennifer Rahn,
Corey Redekop,
Alex C. Renwick,
Jason Sharp,
Bevan Thomas,
Leigh Wallace,
and
A. C.Wise.

Superheroes! Supervillains! Superpowered antiheroes. Mad scientists. Adventurers into the unknown. Detectives of the dark night. Costumed crimefighters. Steampunk armoured avengers. Brave and bold supergroups. Crusading aliens in a strange land. Secret histories. Pulp action. Superhero Universe (Tesseracts Nineteen) features all of these permutations of the superhero genre and many others besides!


ABOUT THE EDITORS:

Claude Lalumière has edited thirteen previous anthologies, including one prior volume in the Tesseracts series (the Aurora nominee Tesseracts Twelve: New Canadian Fantastic Fiction) and two other superhero anthologies, including Super Stories of Heroes & Villains, which was hailed in a starred review by Publishers Weekly as “by far the best superhero anthology.” In addition to being a frequent contributor to Tesseracts anthologies, he’s the author of Objects of Worship, The Door to Lost Pages, and Nocturnes and Other Nocturnes.

Mark Shainblum was born and raised in Montreal, where he and illustrator Gabriel Morrissette co-created the comics series Northguard and the bestselling humour book series Angloman, which later appeared as a weekly strip in The Montreal Gazette. Mark also collaborated on the Captain Canuck daily newspaper strip and Canadiana: The New Spirit of Canada, a webcomic featuring the first female Canadian flag superhero with her own series. In the late 1990s he co-edited the Aurora Award-winning anthology Arrowdreams: An Anthology of Alternate Canadas with John Dupuis. Mark currently lives Ottawa with his wife Andrea and daughter Maya.


ABOUT THE TESSERACTS SERIES:

Each year EDGE Science Fiction and Fantasy Publishing chooses a team of editors - which keeps the collections fresh, new and ever changing - from among the best of Canada’s writers, publishers and critics. The editors then select innovative and futuristic short fiction and poetry from established and emerging voices of Canadian speculative fiction.

Since its first publication in 1985, more than 315 Canadian authors, editors, translators and special guests have contributed 529 short stories, poems, editorials and forwards to the series.

Each volume of the Tesseracts series features established as well as emerging authors. Some of Canada's best known fiction writers have been published within the pages of these volumes - including Margaret Atwood, Susan Swan, and Hugo and Nebula award winning authors William Gibson, Spider Robinson, and Robert J. Sawyer.

The entire series includes Tesseracts One through Nineteen, plus Tesseracts Q, which features translations of works by some of Canada's top francophone writers of science fiction and fantasy.

The series has won the prestigious Canadian Aurora Award.


ABOUT EDGE:

Celebrating its 15th anniversary, EDGE publishes thought-provoking full length novels and anthologies of Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror. Featuring works by established authors and emerging new voices, EDGE is pleased to provide quality literary entertainment in both print and pixels.

Excerpt from Blood Matters by Aviva Bel'Harold


Please welcome Aviva Bel'Harold to The Qwillery with an excerpt from Blood Matters.



Excerpt from Blood Matters by Aviva Bel'Harold




BLOOD MATTERS
         Chapter One: Found

         Brittany glared at her father. “If you hadn’t ordered him out of the house I would have still been taking care of him. Now I have to walk through the snow to see him.”
         “Are you telling me that having to bundle up is the excuse your using for not caring for your pet like you should?”
         Brittany wanted to retort that Ella was the reason she didn’t get to see her bunny any more, but she bit her tongue. The longer her father had been dating the woman, the more protective he was of her.
         Woman, she scoffed to herself as she trudged through the calf-deep snow, more like overgrown girl. Ella — even in her thoughts the name was said with a snide tone — isn’t even half my dad’s age. She’s closer to my age than his.
         Brittany’s next step sunk her leg deeper into the cold snow. She cursed Ella even more profusely. She doesn’t even live in our house! She’s not a part of our family! Mittens was here two years before she showed up.
         “It’s not fair,” Brittany said aloud as she made it to the door of her old fort.
         Normally, after all the snow that had fallen the day before, Brittany would have to struggle to get the door open. It opened with ease. She failed to notice this.
         She stepped in, still feeling the burning sensation of anger in her stomach ready to spout more insults. However, as her eyes focused on the scene in front of her, it all went away.
~~~
“Brittany? Brittany?” The man who was standing in front of her was a police officer. At least he was wearing a police officer’s uniform. There were several there — and not just police. “Brittany, is that where you found her?”
         Brittany blinked. She wanted to answer but she couldn’t seem to find her voice.
         “She’s in shock,” someone said.
         Brittany couldn’t turn to see who was talking — every one of her muscles was locked in place.
         The lights from several emergency vehicles flashed around her. They were dancing on the snow, making the ground glow red.
         Red, Brittany thought. That’s what had been missing — there had been no blood.
         The moment she saw the body she’d known it was Emily, even though she couldn’t see her face. She could see the hair. Emily had the most beautiful golden blond hair, and her short page cut made it unmistakable. Brittany also recognized the sweater she’d bought her best friend for her last birthday, and the sneakers from their latest trip to the mall.
         What Brittany didn’t recognize — what she didn’t understand — was the odd-shaped object that stuck out of Emily’s back. It looked like a crowbar. Brittany had bent down and touched it. It was as cold as ice. When she touched Emily, there was no contrast in temperature between Emily’s skin and the hard metal spike that went right through her.
         She’d heard people say that everyone reacts differently when they see a dead body. Some get ill. Some scream. Some sob. Brittany didn’t remember doing any of those. She didn’t remember doing anything at all. It was as if time had suddenly stopped, freezing her along with her cold, dead friend.
~~~
“Brittany, when was the last time you saw Emily alive?” The person who asked was a woman. Brittany couldn’t remember if she had heard the woman’s voice before.
         Brittany was still in her PJs. Still had a rough, grey blanket draped over her. But she was now in a brightly lit room. The doctor’s office? She blinked a few times. Hospital? The woman who’d asked the question was wearing a police uniform. The police station?
         “Brittany,” the woman’s voice rose, “the last time you saw Emily alive, did she say anything to you? Was she acting differently?”
         “She…” Brittany stopped. Her voice had distracted her. It sounded raw, like she hadn’t talked for days. How long had it been?
         “Brittany?” The woman was waiting for the rest of her answer.
         “She’s been different ever since she got back from her family’s farm.”
         “When was that?”
         “At the end of summer.”
         Brittany thought back to that summer. Had it really only been four months?
         “She looked different, I guess.”
         Brittany remembered the day Emily had returned. She was mad at her. She was mad because Emily had only called once all summer and even madder because of how happy she felt to see Emily again. She had figured Emily wouldn’t be coming back.
         “Different how?” the policewoman asked.
         “She was…sad,” Brittany said once she’d thought about it. “And she kinda looked smaller, like she’d shrunk. She was also quieter and…distracted.”
         The policewoman nodded and jotted down some notes. “Did you ever see Emily cutting herself?”
         Brittany shook her head. Never had she seen Emily cutting — but she had seen the cuts. At first just a few but as time went on there were more and more. Why would she do that? Brittany wondered, angry that Emily hadn’t trusted her enough to confide in her. She should have told me. I was her best friend.
         “Did you ever see Emily eat?”
         Brittany was brought up short by the question. Slowly she shook her head. “No.” She was surprised at her own answer. She had been mutilating herself and starving herself, Brittany thought now, feeling guilty. I should have told someone. Maybe I could have stopped Emily from…from…
         Brittany didn’t hear the policewoman telling her that there was nothing she could have done. Instead she thought of Emily while she rubbed her hand over her dirty jeans. Her palm itched and the sensation of it sliding over her rough jeans tingled half in relief and half in an even itchier feeling.
         She was still dazed and numb when she was released from the hospital nearly twenty-four hours later. Her father drove her home. They pulled up in front of their house to a wintery sunrise casting pink and red hues across the sky.
         Red, Brittany thought, feeling the colour burn the back of her eyes, why wasn’t there any blood?
         “I need to sleep.” Her father’s voice cut into her thoughts. She blinked.
         “Ya,” Brittany said, “I’m tired too.”





Blood Matters
EDGE Science Fiction and Fantasy Publishing, April 15, 2015
Trade Paperback and eBook, 336 pages

Excerpt from Blood Matters by Aviva Bel'Harold
Grief changes people.

Brittany used to be a normal teen. She ate like one, slept like one, and had typical teenage mood swings. But after she found her best friend dead, everything changed.

Grief might explain her loss of appetite and her lack of sleep. It might even explain why she sees her dead friend everywhere she goes. But it certainly won't explain why everyone she touches develops bruises or why she's attracted to the smell of blood.

And, she's pretty sure grief doesn't make you want to rip apart your boyfriend just to get closer to his beating heart.

But what happens when it's the choices we make, not the creature inside, that proves the monster is in us all?





About Aviva

Excerpt from Blood Matters by Aviva Bel'Harold
Aviva Bel’Harold writes young adult fiction: Horror, Science Fiction, ­Urban Fantasy, etc. — as long as the ­characters are young, full of life, and out for adventure. When she’s writing, you’ll find her curled up on a sofa with a pen and a pad of paper, surrounded by her adorable puppies.Born in Winnipeg and raised in Vancouver, Aviva Bel’Harold ­currently resides in Calgary with her husband, four children, and six dachshunds.






Website ~ Facebook ~ Twitter @AvivaTheAuthor

Goodreads (author) ~ Goodreads (book)

Excerpt from Clockwork Secrets: Heavy Fire by Dru Pagliassotti - September 27, 2014


Please welcome Dru Pagliassotti to The Qwillery with an excerpt from Clockwork Secrets: Heavy Fire, the final novel in the Clockwork Heart Trilogy.



Excerpt from Clockwork Secrets: Heavy Fire by Dru Pagliassotti - September 27, 2014




Excerpt from Clockwork Secrets: Heavy Fire

         The Firebrand’s starboard cannon boomed and the entire ship gave a slight roll, swiftly compensated for by the alert helms.
         We’re too light, Taya thought. The heavy weapons’ recoil was affecting the ship’s aerodynamics.
         The dirigible to port fired again. This time bullets stitched metal and wood. Taya flinched. Why wasn’t Amcathra taking them out of there?
         The Firebrand’s port cannon gave a thunderous roar. She risked another glance through the rails.
         At least some of their shot had struck the Alzanan ship— the Firebrand’s spotlight revealed damage to the enemy’s gondola and envelope. The Alzanans returned fire. A lictor screamed, thrown overboard by the bullets’ impact. Taya instinctively started to stand, then clenched her fists and crouched back down. There was nothing she could do to help him.
         I want my wings, she thought fiercely, listening to the ships exchange fire. She was useless without her wings.
         More bullets hammered into the ornithopter, this time from starboard. The Firebrand’s cannon answered. Taya looked over her unprotected shoulder and saw the second dirigible looming beside them, its gondola splintering under the impact of the Firebrand’s larger missiles. Gun barrels swung back and forth from the gondola’s windows, and an Alzanan soldier fired down on them from the gunnery platform on top of the dirigible’s envelope.
         This is ridiculous, she thought. If I get killed, Cris will never forgive me.
         But gunfire separated her from the nearest hatch and nobody else was fleeing the barrage. The secondary helmswoman was being protected by one of the diplomatic-staff lictors, Bright, who stood beside her firing his rifle back at the Alzanans. Taya didn’t think he could hit anything at that range, but she admired his fearlessness.
         Faint cheers arose, barely audible over the din of battle. Taya craned her neck and saw the ship to port fall away. The Firebrand’s spotlight played over its smoking engines. Its crew was, no doubt, scrambling to put out the fire before any stray sparks ignited the inflammable gas within its envelope.
         The second vessel continued hammering them. Its small gondola must have been rattling with thrown brass casings, but the nonstop onslaught was having an effect. Lictors fell, bleeding, their replacements standing over their fallen bodies. Taya felt the Firebrand shudder as though something had gone awry with its wings. It banked and she grabbed the rail, her heart in her throat, as they began a descending spiral. Lictors plunged down the hatches, shouting. Taya breathed a prayer to the Lady, wishing she had stayed below. If they were about to die, she wanted to be with her husband when it happened.





Clockwork Secrets: Heavy Fire
Clockwork Heart Trilogy 3
EDGE, September 15, 2014
Trade Paperback and eBook, 320 pages
Cover Illustration by Timothy Lantz

Excerpt from Clockwork Secrets: Heavy Fire by Dru Pagliassotti - September 27, 2014
The final book in the Clockwork Heart trilogy. Framed for regicide and trapped on a ship crippled by enemy fire, Taya and Ondinium’s diplomatic contingent seem helpless to prevent the well-engineered war their enemies have put into motion. While Alzanan and Demican armies march across Ondinium’s borders, Taya and her husband fight airborne battles from the tropical islands of the Cabisi Thassalocracy to the war-ravaged mountains of Alzana. When Taya falls into her enemy’s hands, she fears that nobody will be able to save Ondinium from the devastating weapon about to be plunged into its mechanically ticking heart.



Clockwork Lies: Iron Wind
Clockwork Heart Trilogy 2
EDGE, March 15, 2014
Trade Paperback and eBook, 336 pages
Cover Illustration by Timothy Lantz

Excerpt from Clockwork Secrets: Heavy Fire by Dru Pagliassotti - September 27, 2014
Ondinium stands on the brink of war...

Love and duty collide when Taya is appointed attaché to Ondinium's first exalted ambassador and is soon plunged into a sinister world of secrets and lies. After the diplomatic contingent’s hasty withdrawal from Mareaux to avoid an international incident, Taya's faith is shaken by a disastrous crash and a tragic murder, which reveals just how much she has to lose. Now, if she's going to fulfill her duty to her nation, she must risk everything she cares about. As the winds of war whip around Ondinium’s borders, Taya’s metal wings must bear her through storms, gunfire, and explosions as she fights to save them not only from their enemies, but also from their own government — a government that regards them as nothing more than clockwork cogs in a ruthless political machine.



Clockwork Heart
Clockwork Heart Trilogy 1
EDGE, September 15, 2013
Trade Paperback and eBook, 320 pages
Cover Illustration by Timothy Lantz

Excerpt from Clockwork Secrets: Heavy Fire by Dru Pagliassotti - September 27, 2014
Flight is freedom, but death hangs in the skies..

Taya soars over Ondinium on metal wings. She is an icarus, a courier privileged to travel freely across the city’s sectors and mingle indiscriminately amongst its castes. But even she cannot outfly the web of terrorism, loyalty, murder, and intrigue that snares her after a daring mid-air rescue. Taya finds herself entangled with the Forlore brothers, scions of an upperclass family: handsome, brilliant Alister, who sits on Ondinium’s governing council and writes programs for the Great Engine; and awkward, sharptongued Cristof, who has exiled himself from his caste and repairs clocks in the lowest sector of the city. Both hide dangerous secrets, in the city that beats to the ticking of a clockwork heart.





About Dru

Excerpt from Clockwork Secrets: Heavy Fire by Dru Pagliassotti - September 27, 2014
As a child I discovered that I was happier alone than with others. Words were my best friends, and the secluded laboratory-fortress in which I exercised my crazed imagination was constructed of typewriter keys, paper, and ink. Within its protective walls I created and destroyed individuals, civilizations, and entire worlds for my personal pleasure — a practice I’ve learned to share with others as a tabletop game master and a published writer. But on the whole, I’m afraid that I’m still more comfortable alone with the written word … and maybe a reptile or two.

I can be found on all those online places you'd expect (Website, Twitter, Facebook, Goodreads) and can be emailed at my name at gmail dot com.





Website  ~  Facebook  ~  Twitter @DruPagliassotti  ~  Goodreads


Interview with Adrian Cole - September 25, 2014


Please welcome Adrian Cole to The Qwillery. The Shadow Academy was published earlier in September by EDGE Science Fiction and Fantasy Publishing.







TQ:  Welcome to The Qwillery. When and why did you start writing?

Adrian:  Started hand writing my first “book” at 12, inspired by Black Beauty. I just loved writing and exercising what teachers referred to as an “overactive imagination.” Started my first novel (i.e. with serious intent to try and sell it) when I was 18. After a couple of re-writes (over 5 years) I had it published as The Dream Lords trilogy from US publisher, Zebra Books. I never felt passionate about anything – i.e. work-wise – other than writing. My working life was a necessity, never a career, or a prime drive.



TQ:  Are you a plotter or a pantser?

Adrian:  Well, I definitely plot my stuff carefully, including short stories. Word processing makes it a lot easier than the old hand-written days and I go over my stuff many times before I actually send it off to my agent or a publisher. The Shadow Academy went through 3 versions before it went to EDGE.

As for being a “pantser”, well, heck, here in the UK a “pantser” probably means something rude, so I’d rather not divulge any of my more dubious habits.



TQ:  What is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

Adrian:  Making my characters as strong as they need to be, that is, credible and vivid enough for my readers to empathize with them, even if they don’t sympathize with them. I like to think that now, at the ripe old age of 65 I’ve got a better handle on things than I did when I started out – in those early works I tended to swamp everything in plot and action – all good fun, but character did suffer, on reflection.



TQ: Who are some of your literary influences? Favorite authors?

Adrian:  Obvious influences from the early days were Edgar Rice Burroughs, Henry Rider Haggard and Tolkien, to name just a few (and I still love them) but I am very fond of Shakespeare and I don’t know if there is anyone else I can read and re-read as much (as well as get to see live performances). Also love Dickens, and on the lighter front I go for John le Carré. Favorite modern fantasy writers would be Dan Simmons and Jonathan Carroll.



TQ:  Describe The Shadow Academy in 140 characters or less.

Adrian:  A novel about power and its abuse set in a world not far removed from our own. (You did mean characters, not words? I could do a better job in 140 words!)



TQ:  Tell us something about The Shadow Academy that is not in the book description.

Adrian:  I worked as a Business Manager in a secondary sixth-form college for over 20 years and there were inevitably parallels between central government (in Westminster), local government (County level) and college government – the effects of authority on adults and children alike undoubtedly sparked off in me a reaction that powered the book.



TQ:  What inspired you to write The Shadow Academy and how would you describe the genre or range of genres into which it fits?

Adrian:  I hadn’t written a novel for several years, but as I neared retirement, I felt a strong urge to start something new and as I mentioned in the last paragraph above, I could see how easily authority, although possibly well-meaning, could be corrupted and directed in ways that would not be beneficial. Also, of course, I wanted to tell a good story – my old urge to try and thrill readers and surprise them still burned strongly, so The Shadow Academy is primarily an SF thriller, but with food for thought thrown in for good measure.



TQ:  What sort of research did you do for The Shadow Academy?

Adrian:  A lot of the book was based on my own experiences, both geographically and from working for an Authority and in a large school. But I needed to do a certain amount of research into paganism, given that the Green Man plays an important part in the book. A lot of my books have a strong Celtic influence and at least one reviewer of The Shadow Academy was quick to pick up on that.



TQ:  Who was the easiest character to write and why? The hardest and why?

Adrian:  Easiest was probably the devious and always plotting Deadspike, probably because, in my worst moments I’m a bit like that! No, that’s not quite true – I’m much more lovable and less self-centred. Quite a few of the other characters were harder to write because I did not want to use anyone that I had known as part of the cast – of course, any good writer would use characteristics and traits based on what he/she has experienced in meeting people – so my characters are not based on real people. They are, though, realistic, at least that is the intention.



TQ:  Give us one or two of your favorite non-spoilery parts from The Shadow Academy.

Adrian:  When the tension is cranking up in the earlier part of the novel, there is a scene where the main protagonist, Chad Mundy, is apparently being hunted by a number of ruthless men, and it’s clear that they mean him harm. At this point in the narrative, the reader does not know if the hint of a supernatural element to the book is going to make itself manifest, so the atmosphere grows ever tauter.

And there’s a scene near the climax of the book, at the Green Man Festival, where the forces of the Authority are about to unleash a terrible fate on the pagans…



TQ:  What's next?

Adrian:  I’ve just had a collection of stories published in the UK (by Alchemy Press) about a no-holds barred, tough guy private eye, Nick Nightmare Investigates. These stories are in a very different style to The Shadow Academy, written in the first person by a droll Mickey Spillane type hero, whose main antagonists are the type of horrors usually found in the Cthulhu Mythos of H. P. Lovecraft. Very tongue in cheek and a tribute to the old pulp heroes of yore.

Also very hard at work on a detailed fantasy trilogy of novels – an “alternative” history of Romano-Celtic Europe at the time of the Augustans. Centred around the Germanic warlord, Arminius and his on-going struggle with Germanicus, neither of whom are assassinated in my alternative world. The consequences of their surviving will re-shape European history…



TQ:  Thank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

Adrian:  Thank you for having me.





The Shadow Academy
EDGE, September 1, 2014
Trade Paperback and eBook, 224 pages

After the Plague Wars they waited for the invasion. And as the new Dark Age dawns... there is one who can bring light.
In a world little more than a whisper away from ours, the islands of Grand Brittannia lie just off the shores of the deeply forested content of Evropa, the dark and forbidding realm of legends scarcely remembered.

Grand Brittannia, itself almost completely a place of deep forest and mystery, has at its heart the crumbling, anachronistic administrative city of Londonborough. From here the Central Authority wields power over the Islands and exercises its control rigidly and clinically. Since the rigours of the Plague Wars, some hundred years in the past, when almost the entire population of the world was wiped out and the gradual decline of civilization began, industry and technology have atrophied, their development now strictly vetted by the Authority.

Out on the far-flung coasts, a network of ancient fortress ports wait in readiness for an invasion that some say will never come, their ancient, declining Academies committed to the rigours of training the defenders of the Islands. These Academies are subjected to regular inspections by Enforcers from Londonborough, and their native inhabitants are constantly being swelled by the young military graduates from the Authority's own Military Academies in the center. Into a cauldron of intrigue and subterfuge that is the town and Academy of Petra comes Chad Mundy, the Authority's replacement for Drew Vasillius, a veteran teacher who has committed suicide. At least, that is what he's been told...







About Adrian

Adrian Cole was born in Plymouth, Devonshire in 1949. He is currently the Director of College Resources in a large secondary school in Bideford, where he now lives with his wife, Judy, son Sam, and daughter Katia. He remains best known for his Dream Lords trilogy as well as his young adult novels, Moorstones and The Sleep of Giants.










Website  ~  Goodreads



Interview with Dru Pagliassotti - April 26, 2014


Please welcome Dru Pagliassotti to The Qwillery. Clockwork Lies: Iron Wind, the second novel in the Clockwork Heart Trilogy, was published on March 15, 2014.



Interview with Dru Pagliassotti - April 26, 2014




TQ:  Welcome to The Qwillery. When and why did you start writing?

Dru:  I’ve been writing fiction since I learned the alphabet, but I didn’t get serious about publishing it until I finished my dissertation and settled into a university position. I’ve managed to work my way up from for-the-love to check’s-in-the-mail, but, alas, I won’t be quitting my day job any time soon.



TQ:  Are you a plotter or a pantser?

Dru:  A pantser. I should be a plotter. I admire plotters. I aspire to be a plotter. But I write the way I run tabletop RPGs — I figure out the key scenes and simply let the characters loose. With luck, they get to each scene with minimal authorial assistance.



TQ:  What is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

Dru:  Finding the time. I’m a full-time university professor and department chair, so I squeeze most of my writing into the three months of my summer break.



TQ:  Tell us something about Clockwork Lies: Iron Wind (Clockwork Heart Trilogy 2) that is not in the book description.

Dru:  As one of my friends pointed out with amusement, Iron Wind brings up the problem of urinating while traveling three separate times. …Well, what can I say? Finding the right time and place to pee is serious business when you’re on the road!

Also, if anybody’s wondering, “iron wind” refers to weapons fire, as in an iron wind of bullets.



TQ:  What inspired you to write Clockwork Lies: Iron Wind?

Dru:  Someone asked, “what happens next?”



TQ:  What sort of research did you do for Clockwork Lies: Iron Wind?

Dru:  Much of my research involved various modes of flight and steam-powered locomotion, but I also looked into weather and altitude effects, military organization and rank systems, and quite a bit of weaponry, including acid delay incendiaries. (I suspect my IP address is now on an NSA watchlist…).



TQ:  Why did you write Steampunk Fantasy? What is the difference between Steampunk and Steampunk Fantasy? What do you find appealing about Steampunk?

I grew up writing fantasy and horror. In 2004, however, I decided to make National Novel Writing Month a little more challenging by writing in two genres I’d never tried before — steampunk and romance. I had a vision of wings and giant gears that I wanted to develop, so I decided to write in a fantasy world instead of an alternate Earth. Clockwork Heart was the result.

I referred to Clockwork Heart as steampunk fantasy because, in its early days, steampunk was considered an alternate-history genre. My hope was that the word “fantasy” would warn people that this novel wasn’t set in Victorian England. Today, of course, steampunk has embraced all kinds of settings, but Victorian England and the 19th-century United States still dominate the genrescape.

The problem with using “fantasy” as a descriptor is that a lot of people associate fantasy with magic and monsters. Neither exist in this particular series. The Clockwork Heart trilogy does propose the existence of a handful of pseudoscientific elements — most notably a buoyant metal, ondium — but otherwise I’ve avoided supernatural and inhuman elements. I know many writers include magic and monsters in their steampunk, and I’ve thrown them into a few of my steampunk short stories, but in this trilogy I’ve enjoyed the personal challenge of keeping the supernatural out and focusing on what humans can do with ingenuity, perseverance, and the resources around them.

That emphasis on heroic self-reliance is part of what makes steampunk so appealing to me. Steampunk protagonists are intelligent, talented, and hard-working, just like makers in the real world. They value craftsmanship and artisanry, building things that look good and that last over time. They control their tools, rather than let their tools control them. Even at its most dystopic, steampunk suggests that we humans got ourselves into this mess, and we humans can get ourselves back out of it — no supernatural intervention required. I think that’s an inspiring message for these often overwhelming times.



TQ:  Who was the easiest character to write and why? The hardest and why? Who is your favorite good 'guy', bad 'guy' or ethically ambiguous character in the Clockwork Heart Trilogy (so far)?

Dru:  The easiest character to write was Cristof, because both he and I are socially awkward introverts.

The hardest character to write was Taya, because of the many challenging moral dilemmas she’s faced. Taya’s innately optimistic, enthusiastic, and friendly, but it’s hard to stay positive when people are trying to destroy you and your loved ones. She makes some tough decisions over the course of the trilogy, and I’ve done my best to show how she manages to live with her choices.

As far as ethically ambiguous characters go, I like Alister, of course — he’s a hero in his own mind — but there’s not much I can say about him without spoilage. A good guy whose role expanded a lot from Clockwork Heart to Iron Wind is stoic Lieutenant Amcathra. The poor man does his best to impose order and propriety on the chaos that whirls around Taya and Cristof, but it’s a thankless job.



TQ:  What's next?

Dru:  The third and final book in the trilogy, Clockwork Secrets: Heavy Fire, comes out in September. In the meantime, I’ve dusted off a post-apocalyptic dieselpunk political fantasy and made it my summer writing project.



TQ:  Thank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

Dru:  Thank you!





Clockwork Lies: Iron Wind
Clockwork Heart Trilogy 2
EDGE Science Fiction and Fantasy Publishing, March 15, 2014
Trade Paperback and eBook, 336 pages
Cover Illustration by Timothy Lantz

Interview with Dru Pagliassotti - April 26, 2014
Ondinium stands on the brink of war...

Love and duty collide when Taya is appointed attaché to Ondinium's first exalted ambassador and is soon plunged into a sinister world of secrets and lies. After the diplomatic contingent’s hasty withdrawal from Mareaux to avoid an international incident, Taya's faith is shaken by a disastrous crash and a tragic murder, which reveals just how much she has to lose. Now, if she's going to fulfill her duty to her nation, she must risk everything she cares about. As the winds of war whip around Ondinium’s borders, Taya’s metal wings must bear her through storms, gunfire, and explosions as she fights to save them not only from their enemies, but also from their own government — a government that regards them as nothing more than clockwork cogs in a ruthless political machine.


Clockwork Heart
Clockwork Heart Trilogy 1
EDGE Science Fiction and Fantasy, September 15, 2013
Trade Paperback and eBook, 320 pages
Cover Illustration by Timothy Lantz

Interview with Dru Pagliassotti - April 26, 2014
Flight is freedom, but death hangs in the skies..

Taya soars over Ondinium on metal wings. She is an icarus, a courier privileged to travel freely across the city’s sectors and mingle indiscriminately amongst its castes. But even she cannot outfly the web of terrorism, loyalty, murder, and intrigue that snares her after a daring mid-air rescue. Taya finds herself entangled with the Forlore brothers, scions of an upperclass family: handsome, brilliant Alister, who sits on Ondinium’s governing council and writes programs for the Great Engine; and awkward, sharptongued Cristof, who has exiled himself from his caste and repairs clocks in the lowest sector of the city. Both hide dangerous secrets, in the city that beats to the ticking of a clockwork heart.





Dru Pagliassotti is the author of the Clockwork Heart trilogy, Clockwork Heart, Clockwork Lies: Iron Wind, and the upcoming Clockwork Secrets: Heavy Fire (EDGE). She’s also written the horror novel An Agreement with Hell (Apex Publications) and various short stories. She’s a professor of communication at California Lutheran University.

Website  ~  Facebook  ~  Twitter @DruPagliassotti


Tesseracts Twenty-one opens to submissions!EDGE SF&F Week - Expiration Date edited by Nancy KilpatrickEDGE SF&F Week - Blood Matters by Aviva Bel’HaroldEDGE SF&F Week - Wrestling with Gods: Tesseracts 18 edited by Liana Kerzner and Jerome StueartEDGE SF&F Week - The Occasional Diamond Thief by J.A. McLachlanLine Up for Superhero Universe (Tesseracts Nineteen) announced by EDGE Science Fiction and Fantasy PublishingExcerpt from Blood Matters by Aviva Bel'HaroldExcerpt from Clockwork Secrets: Heavy Fire by Dru Pagliassotti - September 27, 2014Interview with Adrian Cole - September 25, 2014Interview with Dru Pagliassotti - April 26, 2014

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