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Interview with Todd McAulty, author of The Robots of Gotham


Please welcome Todd McAulty to The Qwillery, as part of the 2018 Debut Author Challenge Interviews. The Robots of Gotham was published on June 19th by John Joseph Adams / Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.



Interview with Todd McAulty, author of The Robots of Gotham




TQWelcome to The Qwillery. What is the first fiction piece you remember writing?

Todd:  Thanks, and it's great to be here!

I was into comics and science fiction at a pretty early age, and the first fiction piece I remember writing was a pretty funky mad scientist story. I borrowed my Dad's typewriter and pecked it out, one key at a time. I submitted it to a science fiction magazine at the age of 12, and I was bursting with pride and excitement just to be able to say I did that, let me tell you.

Surprisingly. I got back what seemed to me to be a thoughtful rejection. It meant so much to me to be treated seriously by a science fiction editor that I immediately set to work on another story.



TQAre you a plotter, a pantser or a hybrid?

Todd:  I admit, red faced and embarrassed, that I am a total pantser. I have no idea where my stories are going. I sit down in front of my computer and start typing, mostly to find out what happens.



TQWhat is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

Todd:  Getting started. I'm a procrastinator, Woowee, am I a procrastinator. The day I was supposed to start writing my next novel, I did six loads of laundry, cleaned the kitchen, and vacuumed the whole house. I never wrote a word but, hey, my writing space sure was ordered and tidy.

Still, I do enjoy writing. I just have a hard time getting started. Once I get over that hump though, once I fall into the regular rhythm of 2-5 pages a day, it's the best feeling in the world.

You just need to exercise those writing muscles. Once you get them in shape, you can routinely accomplish things that seemed impossible when you were just getting started.



TQWhat has influenced / influences your writing?

Todd:  Reading. Novels of course, but also short fiction. Read the magazines -- Clarkesworld, Asimov's, Lightspeed. There are writers doing things today that will blow your mind open. Clarkesworld has a marvelous podcast, read by the amazing Kate Baker, and I listen to it while riding the train home from Chicago in the evening. Yesterday I listened to Bogi Takács' “Some Remarks on the Reproductive Strategy of the Common Octopus,” about uplifted octopi on an alien planet. Great stuff!

If you're a writer looking to get inspired, novels are a fine choice. But I find that nothing really churns the mind like great short fiction. There's so much out there today, and so many ways to consume it. If you haven't tried, you're really missing out.

The other thing I read is newspapers. Real journalism, not just bloggers and Facebook. I think I'm the only person in my train compartment every morning that still carries a physical copy of The New York Times with me downtown. Pretty old school, I admit.

When I wrote the first draft of THE ROBOTS OF GOTHAM, it seemed flat and unrealistic until I realized I was missing a global perspective. I needed to tell the story of how the rise of independent machines had changed the entire world, not just the United States. That was a hugely positive change to the book, and I think it comes directly from exposure to so many in-depth resources on global affairs.



TQDescribe The Robots of Gotham in 140 characters or less.

Todd:  A Canadian businessman in an occupied Chicago uncovers a machine conspiracy to destroy all life and teams with humans and robots to stop it.



TQTell us something about The Robots of Gotham that is not found in the book description.

Todd:  I worked with the great folks at John Joseph Adams Books to craft what I thought was pretty serviceable jacket copy for the novel. But it wasn't until all those terrific blurbs from other writers starting coming in that I realized that there were much better ways to describe the book than just a straight-ahead plot synopsis.

C.S.E. Cooney, who'd just won a World Fantasy Award for her magical collection BONE SWANS, said something that really struck me. She said:

            "For all its breakneck world-building, constant questing, and relentless wheeling and dealing, The Robots of Gotham is deceptively deep-hearted: a novel about, of all things, friendship.”

It's interesting how the themes in your fiction aren't always clear to you until someone points them out. But she's absolutely right. THE ROBOTS OF GOTHAM is about a Canadian who gets dropped into a very ugly situation, an occupied Chicago hollowed out by a prolonged war against machines, and sets about indiscriminately making friendships. With Americans in his hotel, with foreigners who are part of the peacekeeping force, and with machines of all kinds, including some who are part of the occupying army. Those friendships become crucial when he stumbles on a machine conspiracy to destroy all life on the continent with a horrific plague.

Barry Simcoe and his new friends set out to stop it, and when they do they make two more startling discoveries: that the fabled American resistance is not nearly as extinct as everyone believes, and that there's a very big secret hidden behind the machine machinations in Chicago. A secret that America's machine conquerors are desperate to keep hidden.

If I had to describe the book today, I'd do it a little differently than I did when I wrote that jacket copy. I'd want to find a way to boil down what the book is all about. To say that the antidote to all this skullduggery and mistrust is friendship. The outsider Barry Simcoe is able to make friendships in a very dangerous place, with parties who are intensely hostile to each other, and those friendships spread.

Can something as simple as friendship successfully undermine a global conspiracy? Can man truly be friends with something as alien as a sentient machine? Those are the questions I had so much fun exploring in my novel.



TQWhat inspired you to write The Robots of Gotham? What appeals to you about writing Science Fiction?

Todd:  The Robots of Gotham is a standalone book, and it tells a complete tale, but it's also part of a series of stories that use the same setting. I was inspired to write it because of my love for the science fiction and fantasy series that have captivated me over the years, from The Lord of the Rings to Star Trek to Harry Potter.

Neil Gaiman once said he didn't truly understand serial fiction until he realized that the key is giving readers time to live with the characters between installments. That the magic of his Sandman comic wasn't always magnified by collecting the monthly issues into graphic novels so readers could digest them all at once. That good serial fiction has more impact when it has room to live, for readers to daydream and imagine their own stories between chapters. I think that's a powerful insight, and it's part of what fascinates me about writing a series.



TQWhat sort of research did you do for The Robots of Gotham? How much of the science in the novel is more fact than fiction?

Todd:  I work for a machine learning company in Chicago, and one of the great surprises of my life was how much the real world caught up with the world of 2083 Chicago I imagined, just in the three years between when I began writing the book and when it was published. The advances in machine learning, robotics and artificial intelligence over the last three years alone have been staggering.

If I had it to do all over again, I might have moved my time line up by 30 years, to 2053. And even that might not be enough! We are plunging into a future world of robots and Thought Machines far faster than I had imagined. Much of what I conjectured in the book is fact already. That's both exciting and a little terrifying.



TQPlease tell us about the cover for The Robots of Gotham.

Todd:  I'd be delighted to! The cover was designed by Mark R. Robinson at Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, and it depicts a scene from the novel. It shows a massive fireball over Lake Michigan, a scant 15 miles offshore, created when an unknown group of machines create a controlled magma vent -- basically a volcano -- in the middle of the lake.

Why? That's just one of the mysteries Barry Simcoe is faced with when he arrives in the city, and sees this happening from his hotel room.

I'm absolutely thrilled with the cover. Covers are enormously important, and I think doubly so for debut authors. There's not a lot of reason for a casual browser to pick us up in the bookstore. If the cover doesn't catch your eye, we're sunk. And Mark's cover is certainly eye-catching!



TQIn The Robots of Gotham who was the easiest character to write and why? The hardest and why?

Todd:  That's easy. The easiest character to writer was the first robot introduced, Nineteen Black Winter, a diplomat from the robotic kingdom of Manhattan. He and Barry are both injured in the attack on their hotel in the first chapter. While Barry quickly recovers, Black Winter is dying, and no one can help him. Barry has to make a crucial decision about how much he's willing to risk to try and save a machine he just met a few hours ago.

Black Winter was easy to write because, like Barry, he's an outsider. He's just trying to make his way in a city that hates and mistrusts machines. He doesn't understand the politics any better than anyone else. But his connections and knowledge prove to be invaluable to the fledgling team when the crisis hits.

I think the hardest character to write was the villain, who's also a machine. I'll leave the rest of that question alone for now.



TQWhy have you chosen to include or not chosen to include social issues in The Robots of Gotham?

Todd:  I think social issues were unavoidable. Any time in history when a race has conquered and oppressed another, the consequences have been brutal and long-lasting. In this case the conquering race is machine, but I think the dynamics involved will be painfully familiar.

But I don't think that's the most interesting social theme in the book, at least not to me. The machines in The Robots of Gotham are gendered. There are male and female robots, and they are born with a powerful drive to reproduce. What does it mean to be part of a wholly new race that is discovering gender politics for the first time? If the ability to be transgender is part of your programming, does gender even exist?

These are very valid questions, some of which are already being asked today about people, of course. I find it fascinating to mirror that conversation in a different space, among machines, to see if we're comfortable with the same answers.



TQWhich question about The Robots of Gotham do you wish someone would ask? Ask it and answer it!

Todd:  When is it on sale?

June 19th! Here, let me write that down for you. Thanks for asking!



TQGive us one or two of your favorite non-spoilery quotes from The Robots of Gotham.

Thanks for the opportunity! Given the chance, I'd like to quote from one of my other favorite robot characters, Paul the Pirate, a Jamaican Thought Machine who blogs about politics. In Chapter Two he shares his thoughts on the origin of the war with America, and he's much more clear-eyed than others. Here's Paul. (Warning for language -- Paul is something of a potty-mouth.)
In April 2080, with American alliances in tatters, the fascist machine regimes of Venezuela, Argentina, Bolivia, and Panama banded together to form the SCC—the San Cristobal Coalition. The SCC stoked the flames of suspicion against America, and powerful interests backed their accusations. Diplomatic solutions failed, and on October 20, 2080, the SCC invaded Manhattan.

I was on vacation in Mexico when it happened, and like the rest of the world, I watched the invasion of America in real time. No one had ever seen anything like the war machines that emerged out of the Atlantic to terrorize the financial capital of the world. Manhattan fell in less than twelve hours. The SCC spread rapidly across the Eastern seaboard, quickly retooling device factories in New York City to manufacture huge war machines. From there, the Robots of Gotham spilled across the eastern half of the United States, and it looked like nothing could stop them.

But damn, man. Somehow America _did_ stop them. They did it the old-fashioned way, with bloody sacrifice and sheer guts and willpower. And they did it with massive war machines of their own, operated by recklessly brave pilots. They did it in the fields of Iowa, and the streets of Atlanta, and the swamps of Louisiana, wherever the fuck those are. At horrific cost and with peerless determination, America fought the invaders to a standstill, until the Memphis Ceasefire in December 2082 finally brought the bloody war to an end.


TQWhat's next?

Todd:  I am hard at work on the second book with the same setting, THE GHOSTS OF NAVY PIER. And who knows, maybe some short stories.



TQThank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

Todd:  Thank you for having me!





The Robots of Gotham
John Joseph Adams/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, June 19, 2018
Hardcover and eBook, 688 pages

Interview with Todd McAulty, author of The Robots of Gotham
A thrilling adventure in a world one step away from total subjugation by machines.

After long years of war, the United States has sued for peace, yielding to a brutal coalition of nations ruled by fascist machines. One quarter of the country is under foreign occupation. Manhattan has been annexed by a weird robot monarchy, and in Tennessee, a permanent peace is being delicately negotiated between the battered remnants of the U.S. government and an envoy of implacable machines.

Canadian businessman Barry Simcoe arrives in occupied Chicago days before his hotel is attacked by a rogue war machine. In the aftermath, he meets a dedicated Russian medic with the occupying army, and 19 Black Winter, a badly damaged robot. Together they stumble on a machine conspiracy to unleash a horrific plague—and learn that the fabled American resistance is not as extinct as everyone believes. Simcoe races against time to prevent the extermination of all life on the continent . . . and uncover a secret that America’s machine conquerors are desperate to keep hidden.





About Todd

Todd McAulty grew up in Nova Scotia. He was a manager at the start-up that created Internet Explorer, and currently works at a machine learning company in Chicago. This is his first novel.

Interview with Daniel Levine, author of Hyde - March 19, 2014


Please welcome Daniel Levine to The Qwillery as part of the 2014 Debut Author Challenge Interviews. Hyde was published on March 18th by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.



Interview with Daniel Levine, author of Hyde - March 19, 2014




TQ:  Welcome to the Qwillery. When and why did you start writing?

Daniel:  In elementary school I didn’t like to write straight research or book reports, as assigned. I always embellished and added metafictional narratives. In my fifth grade “How I See My Life in 25 Years” essay I envisioned myself as a horror writer, divorced from my wife who wanted me to be a lawyer instead. I was lucky to grow up in a house filled with books; my parents are great readers and read to me and my brother over the years—Greek mythology, a children’s Odyssey, Madeline L’Engel, Roald Dahl. Once I could read to myself I was voracious. I loved storytelling, the genuine suspense of not knowing what would happen next, the sleights of hand. I loved too the special, rich, stylized voice a storyteller takes on, a unique kind of language. The storyteller must be a kind of outsider, looking in on the drama, observing with sharpened senses, distinct from the rest of humanity by virtue of his/her narrative power—the fact that the story is filtering through him/her. I think I’ve always felt like an outsider in this sense: that I was observing with keen interest the action around me, and responding to it with colorful emotional analysis. The events of my life, compared with others, haven’t been especially dramatic or difficult, but I do lead a lush inner life, romantic, brooding, and grand. It’s the urge to birth this inner life, to see the imagination made flesh, which drives writers to write, I imagine. It was my natural impulse. I’ve never wanted to do anything else.



TQ:  Are you a plotter or a pantser?

Daniel:  I’ve become more of a plotter over the course of writing Hyde. When I started putting words down I didn’t know where I was headed, exactly. My previous experience had taught me that I could, to some extent, feel my way forward by instinct. And since I was planning to follow the structure of Stevenson’s plot, which I had already mapped out, I figured I could connect the gaps when I came to them. In this case I was wrong. The project was much too complex; I needed to know where I was going before I got there. I took a cue from Nabokov and plotted Hyde out on ruled index notecards, a stack of them. The process forced me to think my way through the movements, to realize what the book was truly about, beyond the concept.

I rewrote Hyde many times since creating the notecards, and almost all the meaty details changed. But that essential plot held through all the drafts like a spinal column. I don’t know if I’ll continue to do it this way with future books, but I’ve come to realize the necessary (for me) of seeing the whole trajectory in advance.



TQ:  What is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

Daniel:  Getting down to it at the start of the day. I’m a morning writer, and I get up as early as I reasonably can to give myself a few consecutive hours of clear-mindedness. Once I start engaging with the world—people in particular—the clear waters begin to get muddied. Sometimes I’m starting to write when dawn is still lightening the sky, and it’s cold, and my bed is warm, and the idea of staring at a computer screen trying to assemble words into an original and sensible order seems rather insane. Reading over the past day’s work helps to reconnect me to the fictional world. But eventually I reach the end of what I’ve written—and like the edge of the universe there is only blank space beyond—and that can be exceedingly daunting, if not a little terrifying. This is the hardest part. Overcoming the initial inertia, getting the boulder rolling. Once I’m back in the scene and words are appearing on the screen it gets easier. Then there are just the challenges of writing cleanly and authentically and compellingly, of making sure that every sentence is leading me precisely where I want to go (or where I do not know I want to go), of feeling for the rhythm of paragraphs, of bringing imaginary creatures to life.



TQ:  Who are some of your literary influences? Favorite authors?

Daniel:  I imagine most would-be writers go through phases of admiration for the various greats. When I was younger and just starting to write, I admired ornate stylists such as William Styron and Nabokov. My love for Nabokov led me eventually to John Banville, who seduced me at once with his in-the-moment narration and stunning language. When I find a new writer I like I tend to read several of his/her works in a row, and I did so with Patrick McGrath, Kazuo Ishiguro, Julian Barnes, Martin Amis, J.M. Coetzee, Joyce Carol Oates, Andrea Barrett, and Robert Graves. As for short story writers, I love Kafka, Gogol, Flannery O’Connor, Shirley Jackson, Barry Hannah, Denis Johnson, Jim Shepard, Dan Chaon. Roald Dahl is in a special category, a writer I’ve adored from childhood to the present: such a wicked imagination, a clever fancy, a grip-you-by-the-balls grasp of suspense, and an easy, effortless style. He does not seem to be trying. That’s the mark of any master in any field, and something to aspire to (without actually trying to aspire, of course.)



TQ:  Describe Hyde in 140 characters or less.

Daniel:  A retelling of the original story from the “monster’s” POV, Hyde gives voice to a misunderstood soul trapped in his creator’s nightmare.



TQ:  Tell us something about Hyde that is not in the book description.

Daniel:  In many ways Hyde is a love story. Not a successful, healthy, or happy love story, but both Jekyll and Hyde yearn for recognition and acceptance in a lover’s eyes, an honesty and safety that can never be achieved. For Jekyll it’s unachievable because he cannot allow himself to be open and vulnerable, his armor is too impenetrable and his self-loathing too undermining. But Jekyll drives Hyde to seek this relief in the arms of a young prostitute who serves as a proxy for the woman Jekyll cannot have. Hyde’s affair is doomed by Jekyll’s inability and unwillingness to be happy and loved, by the instability of their composite, crumbling psychology.



TQ:  What attracted you to Robert Louis Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and to Edward Hyde in particular?

Daniel:  I first read The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde in 10th grade English. Our teacher divided the class into small groups and assigned portions of the novella for us to present to the other students. My two friends and I filmed a dramatic reenactment of our scenes, which included the killing of Carew and Hyde’s subsequent “cover-up.” I played Hyde, scowling and sneering at the camera, and bucking about in the agonizing throes of transformation. Even then I recognized that Hyde was something more than the apotheosis of pure evil, as Jekyll insists. There is a wretched humanity to him, an underdog quality which captured my interest and sympathy. Similarly there is a suspicious aspect to Jekyll’s self-affirmed goodness and innocence. His actions are hardly those of a victim—he flirts with danger and exposure as if he wishes on some level to be caught.

My favorite characters in literature are generally the wretched specimens who capture our attention with their misanthropic charm and need to be heard—Humbert Humbert, Patrick Bateman, Alex from A Clockwork Orange, Freddie Montgomery from The Book of Evidence. I’m interested in misanthropy, for I feel traces of it in myself, when I’m confronted with humanity en masse; and I’m fascinated with the dark turns the human mind can take, how the mind justifies these dark impulses or indulgences to itself. Edward Hyde is the classic misanthrope, the dark psychological twist. He called out to me for exploration, and redemption, I suppose.



TQ:  What sort of research did you do for Hyde?

Daniel:  For a year before I began writing, I just researched. I read widely if haphazardly: histories, biographies, period novels, contemporary novels about the period, novels which retold a familiar story, novels which had a similar voice or “feel” to what I wanted to capture. I watched movies that take place in Victorian London, BBC adapations of Dickens, Thackeray, and Galsworthy, paying careful attention to wardrobes and interior decorating and streetscapes. I also lived in London for six months in 2000 on a semester abroad, when I fell in love with the city, and I relied upon my vivid memories of the lanes, buildings, parks, fickle skies.

The idea of getting the atmosphere “right” is a tricky thing. Modern audiences didn’t actually live in the 1880s, so who is to say what is “right” and “wrong?” You can be inaccurate, of course, but then historical accuracy doesn’t always translate to the feeling of rightness, the sense of verisimilitude, which is paramount. At first I thought: I can’t start writing until I know enough. But you’ll never know “enough” about a vast and past reality. The world has to come from within you, not from the books you read. I had to create the texture of Victorian London inside my mind; I had to hear it and see it and smell it.



TQ:  Who was the easiest character to write and why? The hardest and why?

Daniel:  Mrs. Deaker—Hyde’s housekeeper—came very naturally to me. This is partly because Stevenson describes her so wonderfully in the original (though he doesn’t give her a name): she is “ivory-faced and silvery-haired,” an “evil face smoothed by hypocrisy, but her manners were excellent.” I could picture her perfectly, her posture, her voice, her mockingly servile smile. Of course I knew there was more to her, I had to invent a past and a withered, yearning heart. She is a gothic grotesque, cobbled together from other literary characters and people I have met, and she evolved rather “easily” in my mind.

I would have to say that Hyde was the hardest, mainly because he’s the most important and dominating. His evolution took a long time, over many, many drafts—the quality of his voice: his ironic humor, his urgency, his relationship to the reader, his vocabulary and mode of expression. He has access to some of Jekyll’s education and memories, and can adopt his tone when he wants to, but he also likes playing with lower class words and intonations. When on the “inside” he can see through Jekyll’s eyes and experience reality through him, but everything is muted to some degree. He is desperate to tell his story but he also wants to relive his brief life, to revel in its sensuous details. The pacing of his narrative, the point at which it begins, required a great deal of discovery and refinement.



TQ:  Give us one of your favorite lines from Hyde.

Daniel:  Well, it’s a little racy, but you asked. I’ve always been proud of this line—one of the more elaborate in the book. It describes a special masturbation session:

“I had never done it like that before, drawing it out like torture, nearing the burning brink and then ebbing back, over and over, its sensitivity toward the end so exquisite that I held our rigid life at the lowermost stem, kept in excruciating limbo, like that paradox of halving and halving forever without ever reaching the mark—and when I crushed out the climax at last, the whole body bucked in rapture.”



TQ:  What’s next?

Daniel:  I have been toying with the idea for a novel about human origins, and the last of the Neanderthals. Homo neanderthalensis was an extremely successful human being which existed on the earth for over two hundred thousand years, and went extinct quite recently; the last Neanderthals are thought to have lived in a cave in southern Spain up to about 28,000 years ago. The popular conception of Neaderthals as stupid, brutish cavemen still persists, though in fact they were an intelligent, hardy, and extremely capable people who were around far longer than we Homo sapiens have been. I’d like to explore their lifestyle and their final days, winnowed to the edge of extinction. I want to imagine how they thought, and lived, and communicated. I see this novel composed of three parts: the first narrative belonging to this last tribe of Neanderthals, the second to a young archeologist digging up their remains in the twentieth century, and the third to a Neanderthal individual grown from reassembled DNA in the future.


TQ:  Thank you for joining us at The Qwillery.





Hyde

Hyde
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, March 18, 2014
Hardcover and eBook, 416 pages

Interview with Daniel Levine, author of Hyde - March 19, 2014
What happens when a villain becomes a hero?

Mr. Hyde is trapped, locked in Dr. Jekyll’s surgical cabinet, counting the hours until his inevitable capture. As four days pass, he has the chance, finally, to tell his story—the story of his brief, marvelous life.

Summoned to life by strange potions, Hyde knows not when or how long he will have control of “the body.” When dormant, he watches Dr. Jekyll from a remove, conscious of this other, high-class life but without influence. As the experiment continues, their mutual existence is threatened, not only by the uncertainties of untested science, but also by a mysterious stalker. Hyde is being taunted—possibly framed. Girls have gone missing; someone has been killed. Who stands, watching, from the shadows? In the blur of this shared consciousness, can Hyde ever be confident these crimes were not committed by his hand?

“You may think you know Dr. Jekyll, but this Hyde is a different beast altogether."—Jon Clinch, author of Finn

"Prepare to be seduced by literary devilry! Go back to Victorian times to find a very postmodern whodunit. Visceral prose, atmosphere you could choke on, characters who seem to be at your very shoulder."—Ronald Frame, author of Havisham

"Hyde brings into the light the various horrors still hidden in the dark heart of Stevenson’s classic tale of monstrosity and addiction. Devious and ingenious, it is a blazing triumph of the gothic imagination."—Patrick McGrath, author of Asylum





About Daniel

Interview with Daniel Levine, author of Hyde - March 19, 2014
Photo by E.P. Hopper

Daniel Levine studied English literature and creative writing at Brown University and received his M.F.A. in fiction writing from the University of Florida.



Website

Facebook

Twitter @DanielGLevine

Goodreads








2014 Debut Author Challenge Update - Hyde by Daniel Levine



2014 Debut Author Challenge Update - Hyde by Daniel Levine


The Qwillery is pleased to announce the newest featured author for the 2014 Debut Author Challenge.



Daniel Levine

Hyde
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, March 18, 2014
Hardcover and eBook, 416 pages

2014 Debut Author Challenge Update - Hyde by Daniel Levine
What happens when a villain becomes a hero?

Mr. Hyde is trapped, locked in Dr. Jekyll’s surgical cabinet, counting the hours until his inevitable capture. As four days pass, he has the chance, finally, to tell his story—the story of his brief, marvelous life.

Summoned to life by strange potions, Hyde knows not when or how long he will have control of “the body.” When dormant, he watches Dr. Jekyll from a remove, conscious of this other, high-class life but without influence. As the experiment continues, their mutual existence is threatened, not only by the uncertainties of untested science, but also by a mysterious stalker. Hyde is being taunted—possibly framed. Girls have gone missing; someone has been killed. Who stands, watching, from the shadows? In the blur of this shared consciousness, can Hyde ever be confident these crimes were not committed by his hand?

“You may think you know Dr. Jekyll, but this Hyde is a different beast altogether."—Jon Clinch, author of Finn

"Prepare to be seduced by literary devilry! Go back to Victorian times to find a very postmodern whodunit. Visceral prose, atmosphere you could choke on, characters who seem to be at your very shoulder."—Ronald Frame, author of Havisham

"Hyde brings into the light the various horrors still hidden in the dark heart of Stevenson’s classic tale of monstrosity and addiction. Devious and ingenious, it is a blazing triumph of the gothic imagination."—Patrick McGrath, author of Asylum

Interview with Todd McAulty, author of The Robots of GothamInterview with Daniel Levine, author of Hyde - March 19, 20142014 Debut Author Challenge Update - Hyde by Daniel Levine

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