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What's Up for the Debut Author Challenge Authors? - Part 3


This is the third in this new series of updates about formerly featured Debut Author Challenge authors and their works published since their last update. The year in parentheses after the author's name is the year that author was featured in the Debut Author Challenge.



Part 1 here Part 11 here Part 21 here Part 31 here Part 41 here
Part 2 here Part 12 here Part 22 here Part 32 here Part 42 here
Part 3 here Part 13 here Part 23 here Part 33 here Part 43 here
Part 4 here Part 14 here Part 24 here Part 34 here Part 44 here
Part 5 here Part 15 here Part 25 here Part 35 here Part 45 here
Part 6 here Part 16 here Part 26 here Part 36 here Part 46 here
Part 7 here Part 17 here Part 27 here Part 37 here Part 47 here
Part 8 here Part 18 here Part 28 here Part 38 here Part 48 here
Part 9 here Part 19 here Part 29 here Part 39 here Part 49 here
Part 10 here Part 20 here Part 30 here Part 40 here Part 50 here



Jacob Bacharach (2014)

The Doorposts of Your House and on Your Gates
Liveright, March 14, 2017
Trade Paperback and eBook, 304 pages

What's Up for the Debut Author Challenge Authors? - Part 3
The biblical story of Abraham and Isaac is transposed into a modern world even madder than the ancient Middle East in Jacob Bacharach’s hilarious novel.

Does any family better fit the Anna Karenina principle— that happy families are alike but every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way—better than the patriarchs of the Book of Genesis? Is there any worse (or crazier) father than Abraham? These are some of the questions The Doorposts of Your House and on Your Gates asks, replacing the biblical Ur with New York and the land of Canaan with the rugged hills and rusted river valleys of western Pennsylvania. Fleeing a failed relationship, Isabel Giordani leaves New York and moves across the Appalachians to Pittsburgh, where she soon begins to insinuate herself into the lives of Isaac Mayer and his father, Abbie, an architect turned crooked real estate developer. As Isabel learns this family’s weird, often sordid, and occasionally violent history, her own motives for entering their lives are called into question, in Jacob Bacharach’s new novel that considers love, family, God, and, of course, real estate.





Clifford Beal (2013)

The Witch of Torinia
Valdur 2
Solaris, April 11, 2017
Trade Paperback and eBook, 400 pages

What's Up for the Debut Author Challenge Authors? - Part 3
Divide... and conquer. The thrilling new epic fantasy continues!

Lady Lucinda della Rovera, the renegade canoness of St Dionei, secret sorceress of the “old gods”, has cleverly split the One Faith into bitter factions and with the help of a pliant Duke of Torinia, launches a war to overthrow the king of Valdur and bring back the old ways. Brother Acquel Galenus, now Magister of the High Temple of Livorna, knows he must stop her, but doubts his own faith and ability. With powerful demons seeking to reenter the world through Lucinda, he must find allies, but how?

Julianus Strykar, now a coronel of the mercenary company of the Black Rose, finds himself thrust into the maelstrom of civil war but false pride leads him into a battle he may not be able to win -- or survive.

Captain Nicolo Danamis may have regained his fleet and command but the return of his long-lost father and lord, Valerian, has complicated his love affair with mer princess Citala. When his former lover -- the queen of Valdur -- demands his help, he and a suspicious Citala find themselves at the centre of palace intrigue as they try to avert an “alliance” with the predatory Silk Empire that will turn Valdur into a puppet kingdom. And then he learns that the crown prince may be his bastard son.

Friendships, loves, and the future of Valdur all hang by a thread….





Michelle Belanger (2015)

Harsh Gods
A Novel of the Shadowside 2
Titan Books, August 30, 2016
Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 480 pages

What's Up for the Debut Author Challenge Authors? - Part 3
The last thing Zack Westland expects on a frigid night is to be summoned to an exorcism. Demonic possession, however, proves the least of his problems. Father Frank, a veteran turned priest, knows Zack’s deepest secrets, recognizing him as Anakim, an angel belonging to that hidden tribe. And Halley, the girl they’ve come to save, carries a secret that could unlock a centuries-old evil. She chants an eerie rhyme, and she isn’t alone…

“HANDS TO TAKE AND EYES TO SEE.
A MOUTH TO SPEAK. HE COMES FOR ME.”



As Zack’s secrets spill out, far more than his life is at stake, for Halley is linked to an ancient conspiracy. Yet Zack can’t help her unless he’s willing to risk losing his immortality—and reigniting the Blood Wars.


Mortal Sins
A Novella of the Shadowside
Titan Books, October 25, 2016
eBook

What's Up for the Debut Author Challenge Authors? - Part 3
Zack Westland is one of the Anakim—an angel belonging to an ancient tribe trapped on Earth by the cataclysmic event known as the Blood Wars. His true name is Zaquiel, and to speak it unleashes a power beyond the ken of mortal men.

Accompanied by his temperamental ally Liliana—the Lady of Beasts—Zack encounters the ghost of an African-American woman murdered decades ago. She cannot speak, but implores him to help her, launching him along a bloody path that leads to the Strega, an Italian family of witches.

The Strega are led by Mama Tuscanetti, an ancient matriarch who brooks no interference. To cross her is to court death.


Note: Mortal Sins will be free on Amazon at launch and is free at Barnes and Noble now.





R.S. Belcher (2013)

Nightwise
Laytham Ballard 1
Tor Books, September 20, 2016
Trade Paperback, 320 pages
Hardcover and eBook, August 18, 2015

What's Up for the Debut Author Challenge Authors? - Part 3
R.S. Belcher, the acclaimed author of The Six-Gun Tarot and The Shotgun Arcana launches a gritty new urban fantasy series set in today's seedy occult underworld in Nightwise.

In the more shadowy corners of the world, frequented by angels and demons and everything in-between, Laytham Ballard is a legend. It's said he raised the dead at the age of ten, stole the Philosopher's Stone in Vegas back in 1999, and survived the bloodsucking kiss of the Mosquito Queen. Wise in the hidden ways of the night, he's also a cynical bastard who stopped thinking of himself as the good guy a long time ago.

Now a promise to a dying friend has Ballard on the trail of an escaped Serbian war criminal with friends in both high and low places-and a sinister history of blood sacrifices. Ballard is hell-bent on making Dusan Slorzack pay for his numerous atrocities, but Slorzack seems to have literally dropped off the face of the Earth, beyond the reach of his enemies, the Illuminati, and maybe even the Devil himself. To find Slorzack, Ballard must follow a winding, treacherous path that stretches from Wall Street and Washington, D.C. to backwoods hollows and truckstops, while risking what's left of his very soul . . . .


The Brotherhood of the Wheel
Tor Books, March 21, 2017
Trade Paperback
Hardcover and eBook, March 1, 2016

What's Up for the Debut Author Challenge Authors? - Part 3
R.S. Belcher, the acclaimed author of The Six-Gun Tarot and The Shotgun Arcana launches a gritty new urban fantasy series about the mysterious society of truckers known only as, The Brotherhood of The Wheel.

In 1119 A.D., a group of nine crusaders became known as the Poor Fellow-Soldiers of Christ and of the Temple of Solomon--a militant monastic order charged with protecting pilgrims and caravans traveling on the roads to and from the Holy Land. In time, the Knights Templar would grow in power and, ultimately, be laid low. But a small offshoot of the Templars endure and have returned to the order's original mission: to defend the roads of the world and guard those who travel on them.

Theirs is a secret line of knights: truckers, bikers, taxi hacks, state troopers, bus drivers, RV gypsies--any of the folks who live and work on the asphalt arteries of America. They call themselves the Brotherhood of the Wheel.

Jimmy Aussapile is one such knight. He's driving a big rig down South when a promise to a ghostly hitchhiker sets him on a quest to find out the terrible truth behind a string of children gone missing all across the country. The road leads him to Lovina Hewitt, a skeptical Louisiana State Police investigator working the same case and, eventually, to a forgotten town that's not on any map--and to the secret behind the eerie Black-Eyed Kids said to prowl the highways.





Jenn Bennett (2011)

The Anatomical Shape of the Heart
Square Fish, January 17, 2017
Trade Paperback, 340 pages
Hardcover and eBook, 11/03/2015

What's Up for the Debut Author Challenge Authors? - Part 3
Winner of the Romantic Times Best YA Protagonist Award (2015)

Artist Beatrix Adams knows exactly how she's spending the summer before her senior year. Determined to follow in Da Vinci's footsteps, she's ready to tackle the one thing that will give her an advantage in a museum-sponsored scholarship contest: drawing actual cadavers. But when she tries to sneak her way into the hospital's Willed Body program and misses the last metro train home, she meets a boy who turns her summer plans upside down.

Jack is charming, wildly attractive . . . and possibly one of San Francisco's most notorious graffiti artists. On midnight buses and city rooftops, Beatrix begins to see who Jack really is-and tries to uncover what he's hiding that leaves him so wounded. But will these secrets come back to haunt him? Or will the skeletons in Beatrix's own family's closet tear them apart?

The Anatomical Shape of a Heart by Jenn Bennett is an irresistible, deeply romantic story about a girl and boy who help each other heal and grow.


Alex, Approximately
Simon Pulse, April 4, 2017
Hardcover and eBook, 320 pages

What's Up for the Debut Author Challenge Authors? - Part 3
In this delightfully charming teen spin on You’ve Got Mail, the one guy Bailey Rydell can’t stand is actually the boy of her dreams—she just doesn’t know it yet.

Classic movie buff Bailey “Mink” Rydell has spent months crushing on a witty film geek she only knows online by “Alex.” Two coasts separate the teens until Bailey moves in with her dad, who lives in the same California surfing town as her online crush.

Faced with doubts (what if he’s a creep in real life—or worse?), Bailey doesn’t tell Alex she’s moved to his hometown. Or that she’s landed a job at the local tourist-trap museum. Or that she’s being heckled daily by the irritatingly hot museum security guard, Porter Roth—a.k.a. her new arch-nemesis. But life is whole lot messier than the movies, especially when Bailey discovers that tricky fine line between hate, love, and whatever-it-is she’s starting to feel for Porter.

And as the summer months go by, Bailey must choose whether to cling to a dreamy online fantasy in Alex or take a risk on an imperfect reality with Porter. The choice is both simpler and more complicated than she realizes, because Porter Roth is hiding a secret of his own: Porter is Alex…Approximately.

What's Up for the Debut Author Challenge Authors in 2015? - Part 12


This is the twelfth in a series of updates about formerly featured Debut Author Challenge authors and their upcoming 2015 books. This update covers some of the 2014 Debut Author Challenge authors. What's Up for the Debut Author Challenge Authors in 2015? - Part 14 will cover additional 2014 DAC authors.

See Part 1 here
See Part 1.5 here
See Part 2 here
See Part 3 here
See Part 4 here
See Part 5 here
See Part 6 here
See Part 7 here
See Part 8 here
See Part 9 here
See Part 10 here
See Part 11 here

What's Up for the Debut Author Challenge Authors in 2015? - Part 12



Jacob Bacharach

What's Up for the Debut Author Challenge Authors in 2015? - Part 12
The Bend of the World
Liveright, April 13, 2015
Trade Paperback, 320 pages
Previously published in Hardcover and eBook, April 2014

“Bacharach has a great comic voice— shrewd, deadpan, and dirty—and The Bend of the World fears no weirdness.”—Sam Lipsyte

“Mighty strange doings” mark the Pittsburgh of Jacob Bacharach’s audacious and hilarious debut novel, a town where “yeti, UFOs, rumors of orgiastic rites, intimations of the Mayan apocalypse and ‘psycho-temporal distortions’ add that extra zing to the bustling night life” (James Wolcott). On the edge of thirty, and comfortably adrift in life, Peter Morrison finds his personal and professional life taking a turn for the weird as his attempts to transition into adulthood are thwarted by conspiracies both real and imagined. In this madcap coming-of-age novel, where no one quite comes of age, Bacharach brings an “immensely entertaining” and “Vonnegut-like sensibility” (Library Journal ) to the “aptly surreal satire” (Dan Chaon) of hipsters, corporations, and American life in the adolescent years of the twenty-first century. “A disarming, intelligent and seriously funny debut,” The Bend of the World “marks the arrival of Jacob Bacharach as a writer to watch” (Bob Hoover, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette).





Mary Behre

What's Up for the Debut Author Challenge Authors in 2015? - Part 12
Energized
Tidewater 3
Berkley, August 4, 2015
Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 

In the new Tidewater novel by the author of Guarded, a kiss between strangers draws both into unexpected danger and unforgettable desire . . .

She’s searching for a sign . . .

Hannah Halloran has always believed in her gift. The things she sees through her psychic touch have never led her wrong before. Not when they led her to an unforgettable night with a sexy marine at a bar. Not when she felt a need to leave her home and find the sisters she barely knows. And not now, when she is an unwilling witness to a brutal murder . . .

He’s ready to show her . . .

All Niall Graham wants is some peace. He’s recovering from the horrors of war, struggling to save his family’s restaurant, and desperate to forget Hannah, the beautiful woman who left him with memories of a mind-blowing night together and a bogus phone number. But a quiet life is hard to manage—especially when Hannah strides back into his restaurant with the news that a serial killer is on the loose and lurking closer than anyone could have guessed . . .



Harmonized, a Tidewater eNovella, will be published in July 2015.




Pierce Brown

What's Up for the Debut Author Challenge Authors in 2015? - Part 12
Golden Son
Red Rising Trilogy 2
Del Rey, Janaury 6, 2015
Hardcover and eBook, 464 pages

With shades of The Hunger Games, Ender’s Game, and Game of Thrones, debut author Pierce Brown’s genre-defying epic Red Rising hit the ground running and wasted no time becoming a sensation. Golden Son continues the stunning saga of Darrow, a rebel forged by tragedy, battling to lead his oppressed people to freedom.

As a Red, Darrow grew up working the mines deep beneath the surface of Mars, enduring backbreaking labor while dreaming of the better future he was building for his descendants. But the Society he faithfully served was built on lies. Darrow’s kind have been betrayed and denied by their elitist masters, the Golds—and their only path to liberation is revolution. And so Darrow sacrifices himself in the name of the greater good for which Eo, his true love and inspiration, laid down her own life. He becomes a Gold, infiltrating their privileged realm so that he can destroy it from within.

A lamb among wolves in a cruel world, Darrow finds friendship, respect, and even love—but also the wrath of powerful rivals. To wage and win the war that will change humankind’s destiny, Darrow must confront the treachery arrayed against him, overcome his all-too-human desire for retribution—and strive not for violent revolt but a hopeful rebirth. Though the road ahead is fraught with danger and deceit, Darrow must choose to follow Eo’s principles of love and justice to free his people.

He must live for more.





Monica Byrne

What's Up for the Debut Author Challenge Authors in 2015? - Part 12
The Girl in the Road
Broadway Books, February 17, 2015
Trade Paperback, 352 pages
Previously published in Hardcover and eBook, May 2014

A debut that Neil Gaiman calls “Glorious. . . . So sharp, so focused and so human.” The Girl in the Road describes a future that is culturally lush and emotionally wrenching.
Monica Byrne bursts on to the literary scene with an extraordinary vision of the future.  In a world where global power has shifted east and revolution is brewing, two women embark on vastly different journeys—each harrowing and urgent and wholly unexpected.

When Meena finds snakebites on her chest, her worst fears are realized: someone is after her and she must flee India.  As she plots her exit, she learns of the Trail, an energy-harvesting bridge spanning the Arabian Sea that has become a refuge for itinerant vagabonds and loners on the run.  This is her salvation.  Slipping out in the cover of night, with a knapsack full of supplies including a pozit GPS, a scroll reader, and a sealable waterproof pod, she sets off for Ethiopia, the place of her birth.

Meanwhile, Mariama, a young girl in Africa, is forced to flee her home.  She joins up with a caravan of misfits heading across the Sahara. She is taken in by Yemaya, a beautiful and enigmatic woman who becomes her protector and confidante. They are trying to reach Addis Abba, Ethiopia, a metropolis swirling with radical politics and rich culture.  But Mariama will find a city far different than she ever expected—romantic, turbulent, and dangerous.

As one heads east and the other west, Meena and Mariama’s fates are linked in ways that are mysterious and shocking to the core.

Written with stunning clarity, deep emotion, and a futuristic flair, The Girl in the Road is an artistic feat of the first order: vividly imagined, artfully told, and profoundly moving.





Kenneth Calhoun

What's Up for the Debut Author Challenge Authors in 2015? - Part 12
Black Moon
Hogarth, January 20, 2015
Trade Paperback, 288 pages
Previously published in Hardcover and eBook, March 2014

For fans of The Age of Miracles and The Dog Stars, Black Moon is a hallucinatory and stunning debut that Charles Yu calls “Gripping and expertly constructed.”

Insomnia has claimed everyone Biggs knows.  Even his beloved wife, Carolyn, has succumbed to the telltale red-rimmed eyes, slurred speech and cloudy mind before disappearing into the quickly collapsing world.  Yet Biggs can still sleep, and dream, so he sets out to find her.

He ventures out into a world ransacked by mass confusion and desperation, where he meets others struggling against the tide of sleeplessness.  Chase and his buddy Jordan are devising a scheme to live off their drug-store lootings; Lila is a high school student wandering the streets in an owl mask, no longer safe with her insomniac parents; Felicia abandons the sanctuary of a sleep research center to try to protect her family and perhaps reunite with Chase, an ex-boyfriend.  All around, sleep has become an infinitely precious commodity. Money can’t buy it, no drug can touch it, and there are those who would kill to have it. However, Biggs persists in his quest for Carolyn, finding a resolve and inner strength that he never knew he had.

Kenneth Calhoun has written a brilliantly realized and utterly riveting depiction of a world gripped by madness, one that is vivid, strange, and profoundly moving.


Guest Blog by Jacob Bacharach - The First Novel as your Comic-con Costume - May 15, 2014


Please welcome Jacob Bacharach to The Qwillery as part of the 2014 Debut Author Challenge Guest Blogs. The Bend of the World was published on April 14, 2014 by Liveright. You may read our interview with Jacob here.



Guest Blog by Jacob Bacharach - The First Novel as your Comic-con Costume - May 15, 2014




The First Novel as your Comic-con Costume

I’ve always thought of Tom Stoppard as one of the great scifi and fantasy authors—I mean, he’s a literary playwright, but his characters encounter more Temporal Distortions than the Starship Enterprise and more gods than a remake of Clash of the Titans. There’s this line in The Invention of Love, his witty and erudite and funny sorta-biographical play about the poet, A.E. Housman, when Housman and Oscar Wilde are awaiting their ferry to the underworld. They are talking about the way their lives, and the lives of others, are constructed in writing and in memory. (Wilde is also bitching about Bosie, his lover, that spoiled boy.) Anyway, “Biography,” says Wilde, “is the mesh through which our real life escapes.”

When you write a first novel, and especially when you write it in the first person, you get a lot of “So, are you Peter?” Peter is the name of the protagonist in my first novel, The Bend of the World. You learn not to be annoyed by it, although you want to correct the order of the question. Properly, “Is Peter you?” Uh, me? In the broad sense, yes, of course, but so is every other person in there; characters exist on the page alone; they think only those thoughts that their author writes down for them; feel only the feelings mentioned in print; do only what you (he? I?) say that they do. The party doesn’t continue after the party scene concludes. The last line of dialogue is the last word any of them speaks.

In the more particular sense—in the sense that the question is meant—the answer is no, although I’ve taken to telling people that my protagonist and I would probably know each other if he existed. We live in the same town, after all, and frequent some of the same bars. And it’s fair to say that I’ve dabbled in the weird and alien and psychoactive here and there in the legitimately magical town of Pittsburgh, PA, where my book is largely set. But I have never actually seen a flying saucer, discovered an ancient conspiracy, or been upbraided by a Sasquatch for my romantic and career choices. These things all occur in the book, and they load the question of its autobiographical content with a heavy freight of absurdity.

I recently read The Weirdness, a début novel by Jeremy Bushnell. It appears briefly to be set among the milieu of sad young literary men before it descends—I choose this verb as a compliment—into a battle between Lucifer, a gaggle of warlocks, and a pack of werewolves. At least one review strongly lamented the sad young literary men part: la-de-da, another dull autobiographical work by a dude who had some disappointments with the Brooklyn book scene. However—and it’s hard to say; you never really know about these things—Bushnell and I follow each other on Twitter, and he doesn’t seem like a lycanthrope or a warlock.

The Weirdness’s protagonist, Billy, is an aspirant writer. Bushnell lets the book remain ambiguous on the question of whether or not Billy is actually any good, a question that keeps popping up even as the, well, the weirdness cranks into gear. Billy is also—and this is a gutsy choice for a writer creating a protagonist—boring; he is ordinary (well, mostly, but no spoilers). He knows that he’s boring, but he consoles himself with Flaubert’s famous maxim: “Be regular and orderly in your life like a bourgeois, so that you may be violent and original in your work.”

One truth is that the writing life is boring; a writer is not a protagonist; we are forever riding in the backseat or sitting quietly on the bus, eavesdropping and stealing the lives of the more genuinely interesting people you know and meet—I say stealing, because we rarely ask for consent. Writing, in this regard, is violent, but writers are mostly cowards; we seem to prefer apology to permission. The idea that novels—first novels in particular—are thinly veiled autobiography, the details just barely obscured, is an inversion of the actual: that these works are less disguise than they are cosplay. I have never seen a UFO or talked to Bigfoot or travelled through time or been the actual life of a party, but my God, if ever I could . . .





The Bend of the World

The Bend of the World
Liveright (W.W. Norton), April 14, 2014
Hardcover and eBook, 320 pages

Guest Blog by Jacob Bacharach - The First Novel as your Comic-con Costume - May 15, 2014
"A comedy of bad manners, darting wisecracks, deadpan chagrin, and drug-hazed pratfalls" (James Wolcott), The Bend of the World is a madcap coming-of-age novel in which no one quite comes of age and everything you know is not a lie, it's just, well, tangential to the truth.

In the most audacious literary debut to come out of the Steel City since The Mysteries of Pittsburgh, we meet Peter Morrison, twenty-nine and comfortably adrift in a state of not-quite-adulthood, less concerned about the general direction of his life than with his suspicion that all his closest relationships are the products of inertia. He and his girlfriend float along in the same general direction, while his parents are acting funny, though his rich, hypochondriac grandmother is still good for admission to the better parties. He spends his days clocking into Global Solutions (a firm whose purpose remains unnervingly ambiguous) and his weekends listening to the half-imagined rants of his childhood best friend, Johnny. An addict and conspiracy theorist, Johnny believes Pittsburgh is a "nexus of intense magical convergence" and is playing host to a cabal of dubious politicians, evil corporate schemes, ancient occult rites, and otherwise inexplicable phenomena, such as the fact that people really do keep seeing UFOs hovering over the city.

Against this strange background, Peter meets Mark and Helen, a slightly older couple, new to town, whose wealth and glamour never fully conceal the suggestion of something sinister, and with whom he becomes quickly infatuated. Mark is a corporate lawyer in the process of negotiating a buyout of Global Solutions, and initiates Peter into the real, mundane (maybe) conspiracies of corporations and careers, while Helen—a beautiful and once prominent artist—is both the echo and the promise of the sort of woman Peter always imagined, or was always told he ought to find for himself.

As Peter climbs the corporate ladder, Johnny is pulled into the orbit of a mysterious local author, Winston Pringle, whose lunatic book of conspiracies seems to be coming true. As Johnny falls farther down the rabbit hole, the surreal begins to seep into the mundane, and the settled rhythm of Peter's routine is disrupted by a series of close encounters of third, fourth, and fifth kinds. By the time Peter sets out to save his friend from Pringle's evil machinations (and pharmacological interventions), his familiar life threatens to transform into that most terrifying possibility: a surprise.

In The Bend of the World Philip K. Dick meets Michael Chabon, and Jacob Bacharach creates an appropriately hilarious, bizarre, and keenly observed portrait of life on the edge of thirty in the adolescent years of twenty-first-century America.





About Jacob

Guest Blog by Jacob Bacharach - The First Novel as your Comic-con Costume - May 15, 2014
Jacob Bacharach is a writer and nonprofit administrator living in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He has a BA in English and creative writing from Oberlin College and an MBA from the University of Pittsburgh. He is not, to the best of our knowledge, a shape-shifting reptiloid or a descendant of the Merovingian dynasty. In his spare time, he cooks, rides bikes, and occasionally plays the violin badly. He prefers "experiencer" to "abductee." This is his first novel.

Website  ~  Twitter @jakebackpack


Interview with Jacob Bacharach, author of The Bend of the World - April 15, 2014


Please welcome Jacob Bacharach to The Qwillery as part of the 2014 Debut Author Challenge Interviews. The Bend of the World was published on April 14, 2014 by Liveright.



Interview with Jacob Bacharach, author of The Bend of the World - April 15, 2014




TQ:  Welcome to The Qwillery. When and why did you start writing?

Jacob:  Thanks for having me. I started writing when I was very young. I had always been a precocious reader, and when I was in, oh, probably second or third grade, someone--probably my mom--gave me this little anthology called 101 Famous Poems (which you can still find, by the way; it was compiled by a man named Roy J. Cook). For the next couple of years, I was obsessed with the poem, "Each in His Own Voice," by William Herbert Carruth, especially the first verse:

A fire-mist and a planet,--
A crystal and a cell,--
A jelly-fish and a saurian,
And caves where the cave-men dwell;
Then a sense of law and beauty,
And a face turned from the clod,--
Some call it Evolution,
And others call it God.

I must have written a hundred poems ripping it off. A few years later, my dad gave me The Edge of Tomorrow, which is a great Asimov collection. I fell in love with his short story, "The Final Question," which involves a giant computer called Multivac eventually merging with the collective mind of much-evolved humanity and creating the universe all over again. I ripped that off, too, which was the start of my interest in fiction.



TQ:  Are you a plotter or a pantser?

JacobThe Bend of the World is a book, in part, about occult conspiracies, so you'd think I would be a plotter, but in reality, I knew where it started and I knew where it ended and I noodled my way through the in-between. I didn't actually write a synopsis until my agent made me, at which point the first draft of the book was nearly complete.



TQ:  What is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

Jacob:  I am a serial procrastinator. Go to look up one fact, and I emerge three hours later having written a blog post, read a Wikipedia list of the world's longest bridges, tried to find a snippet of dialogue from some other book, made eggs, had tea, taken the dog for a walk, watched an old episode of Star Trek on Netflix . . .



TQ:  Who are some of your literary influences? Favorite authors?

Jacob:  There are so many. I love Philip K. Dick and Joseph Conrad--that's a weird pairing, I know, but both of them write astonishingly well about paranoia and the conspiratorial mindset, and both of them are underrated as humorists; Conrad's The Secret Agent is one of the great comic conspiracy-espionage novels of all time, and it even has a bit of a scifi tinge, as it involves a plot to blow up an astronomical observatory. I also love Ishmael Reed. Mumbo Jumbo is a sort of Afrocentric alternate history involving jazz, magic, and ancient Egyptian deities. I own every one of Iain M. Banks Culture novels, although my favorite of his is the non-Culture The Algebraist, which features what I consider the finest, funniest aliens anyone ever invented. I selfishly regretted his too-early death last year, because I was always waiting for his next book. I still love Frank Herbert, whose environmentalism was so prescient--a friend of mine was making fun of me for having all the Dune books by my bedside and called me "Kwisatz Bacharach."



TQ:  Describe The Bend of the World in 140 characters or less.

A coming of age novel in which no one comes of age. With UFOs and a sasquatch.



TQ:  Tell us something about The Bend of the World that is not in the book description.

There are a lot of drugs in the book, real and imagined, and they're sometimes played for laughs, but in a lot of ways, The Bend of the World is about our addictions: to drugs, to love, to status, to wealth, to our imagined futures. Even the book's different conspirators and conspiracy theories are treated in may ways as addicts and their addictions. I'm fascinated by the idea that addiction is in so many ways the mind conspiring against itself.



TQThe Bend of the World is a genre blending literary novel set in Pittsburgh, PA. Why Pittsburgh? How would you describe the genres mixed together in your novel?

Pittsburgh because it's the best town in the world! And my hometown. I like books and stories that have a real sense of place to them. It's a fascinating geography and topography against which to set a tale of the weird. Also, I believe, as one character says in the book, that the city is "a nexus of intense magical convergence, an axis mundi, if you will."

It's half a pretty classic literary Bildungsroman, a quarter X-Files, with the remainder a combination of late Philip K. Dick, disinfo, The Illuminatus! Trilogy, and The Gates of Prayer, which is the Reform Jewish Shabbat prayer book . . . although the narrator is in fact a Catholic.



TQ:  What sort of research did you do for The Bend of the World?

I re-watched The X-Files, spent hundreds of hours reading about the Philadelphia Project and MK Ultra and other classic conspiracy theories, and, because the book is as much about a place as about characters, I spent days staring at Google maps, trying to figure out exactly where everything should occur.



TQ:  Who was the easiest character to write and why? The hardest and why?

The easiest was Johnny, the narrator's best friend. He is the world-of-the-weird's main interlocutor in the book, and in many ways it was Johnny, rather than my narrator and protagonist, who provided the impetus to write the story. The hardest character was Helen, a beautiful and deeply troubled artist with whom Peter (the narrator) becomes infatuated. She had to be both impressive and pitiable, finely drawn and still mysterious--it was very difficult to find the proper balance.



TQ:  Give us one of your favorite lines from The Bend of the World.

I love the last line, but that would be telling. So I'll give you the opener instead: "It was a wet February in Pittsburgh, spring, early and without warning, and twice in one week UFOs had been spotted hovering over Mount Washington."



TQ:  What's next?

I'm working on a new novel, a sort of loose retelling of the Abraham story from Genesis, set in rural Western Pennsylvania in more-or-less present times, full of Real Estate scams and fracking and megalomaniacal architects who think they're prophets and a monster or a god who lives in the woods.



TQ:  Thank you for joining us at The Qwillery.





The Bend of the World

The Bend of the World
Liveright (W.W. Norton), April 14, 2014
Hardcover and eBook, 320 pages

Interview with Jacob Bacharach, author of The Bend of the World - April 15, 2014
"A comedy of bad manners, darting wisecracks, deadpan chagrin, and drug-hazed pratfalls" (James Wolcott), The Bend of the World is a madcap coming-of-age novel in which no one quite comes of age and everything you know is not a lie, it's just, well, tangential to the truth.

In the most audacious literary debut to come out of the Steel City since The Mysteries of Pittsburgh, we meet Peter Morrison, twenty-nine and comfortably adrift in a state of not-quite-adulthood, less concerned about the general direction of his life than with his suspicion that all his closest relationships are the products of inertia. He and his girlfriend float along in the same general direction, while his parents are acting funny, though his rich, hypochondriac grandmother is still good for admission to the better parties. He spends his days clocking into Global Solutions (a firm whose purpose remains unnervingly ambiguous) and his weekends listening to the half-imagined rants of his childhood best friend, Johnny. An addict and conspiracy theorist, Johnny believes Pittsburgh is a "nexus of intense magical convergence" and is playing host to a cabal of dubious politicians, evil corporate schemes, ancient occult rites, and otherwise inexplicable phenomena, such as the fact that people really do keep seeing UFOs hovering over the city.

Against this strange background, Peter meets Mark and Helen, a slightly older couple, new to town, whose wealth and glamour never fully conceal the suggestion of something sinister, and with whom he becomes quickly infatuated. Mark is a corporate lawyer in the process of negotiating a buyout of Global Solutions, and initiates Peter into the real, mundane (maybe) conspiracies of corporations and careers, while Helen—a beautiful and once prominent artist—is both the echo and the promise of the sort of woman Peter always imagined, or was always told he ought to find for himself.

As Peter climbs the corporate ladder, Johnny is pulled into the orbit of a mysterious local author, Winston Pringle, whose lunatic book of conspiracies seems to be coming true. As Johnny falls farther down the rabbit hole, the surreal begins to seep into the mundane, and the settled rhythm of Peter's routine is disrupted by a series of close encounters of third, fourth, and fifth kinds. By the time Peter sets out to save his friend from Pringle's evil machinations (and pharmacological interventions), his familiar life threatens to transform into that most terrifying possibility: a surprise.

In The Bend of the World Philip K. Dick meets Michael Chabon, and Jacob Bacharach creates an appropriately hilarious, bizarre, and keenly observed portrait of life on the edge of thirty in the adolescent years of twenty-first-century America.





About Jacob

Interview with Jacob Bacharach, author of The Bend of the World - April 15, 2014
Jacob Bacharach is a writer and nonprofit administrator living in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He has a BA in English and creative writing from Oberlin College and an MBA from the University of Pittsburgh. He is not, to the best of our knowledge, a shape-shifting reptiloid or a descendant of the Merovingian dynasty. In his spare time, he cooks, rides bikes, and occasionally plays the violin badly. He prefers "experiencer" to "abductee." This is his first novel.

Website  ~  Twitter @jakebackpack


The View From Monday - April 14, 2014


Happy Monday before the 15th of April (or as it's known in the US - tax day).



The View From Monday - April 14, 2014



It's another light release week, but this time with 3 debuts:

The Bend of the World by Jacob Bacharach;

Unwrapped Sky by Rjurik Davidson;

and

Dämoren by Seth Skorkowsky.


And from formerly featured Debut Author Challenge Authors:

Silver Skin (Cold Iron 2) by D. L. McDermott.




April 14, 2014
TITLEAUTHORSERIES
The Bend of the World (D) Jacob Bacharach LF/F
Silver Skin (e) D. L. McDermott PNR - Cold Iron 2
Marked By Hades (e) Reese Monroe PNR - Bound by Hades 1
Dämoren (D) (e) Seth Skorkowsky UF



April 15, 2014
TITLEAUTHORSERIES
Forbidden (e) Lori Adams PNR - Soulkeepers 1
The Line of Polity Neal Asher SF - Agent Cormac 2
Transhuman Ben Bova SF
The Kraken King Part I: The Kraken King and the Scribbling Spinster (e) Meljean Brook SPR - Iron Seas
Nightmare Ink (e) Marcella Burnard UF - Living Ink 1
Pack of Strays Dana Cameron UF - Fangborn 2
Green Planets: Ecology and Science Fiction (h2tp) Gerry Canavan (ed)
Kim Stanley Robinson (ed)
SF - Anthology
The Darkling (h2tp) R. B. Chesterton Go
Winds of Salem (h2tp) Melissa de la Cruz F - Witches of East End 3
Lovecraft's Monsters Ellen Datlow (ed) H - Anthology
Unwrapped Sky (D) Rjurik Davidson F/New Weird
When We Fall (e) Peter Giglio H
Darkest Flame: Part 2 Donna Grant PNR - Dark Kings
Purple Magic (e) Lisa Renee Jones PNR
What Mario Scietto Says: A Tor.Com Original (e) Emmy Laybourne SF - World of Monument 14
Northanger Abbey Val McDermid Mu/Th
Horus Heresy: Visions of Heresy Alan Merrett SF - Horus Heresy


April 17, 2014
TITLEAUTHORSERIES
Aunt Dimity and the Wishing Well Nancy Atherton PM - Aunt Dimity 19
Tithe of the Saviours A. J. Dalton F - Chronicles of a Cosmic Warlord



D - Debut
e - eBook
h2tp - Hardcover to Trade Paperback

F - Fantasy
Go - Gothic
H - Horror
LF - Literary Fiction
Mu - Mash-up
PM - Paranormal Mystery
PNR - Paranormal Romance
SF - Science Fiction
SPR - Steampunk Romance
Th - Thirller
UF - Urban Fantasy



2014 Debut Author Challenge - April 2014 Debuts



2014 Debut Author Challenge - April 2014 Debuts


There are 8 debuts for April. Please note that we use the publisher's publication date in the United States, not copyright dates or non-US publication dates.

The April debut authors and their novels are listed in alphabetical order by author (not book title or publication date). Take a good look at the covers. Voting for your favorite March cover for the 2014 Debut Author Challenge Cover Wars will take place starting on April 15th.

If you are participating as a reader in the Challenge, please let us know in the comments what you are thinking of reading or email us at DAC.TheQwillery  @  gmail . com (remove the spaces).

Updated to include The Word Exchange.
Update to include Dämoren.


Jacob Bacharach

The Bend of the World
Liveright (W.W. Norton), April 14, 2014
Hardcover and eBook, 320 pages

2014 Debut Author Challenge - April 2014 Debuts
"A comedy of bad manners, darting wisecracks, deadpan chagrin, and drug-hazed pratfalls" (James Wolcott), The Bend of the World is a madcap coming-of-age novel in which no one quite comes of age and everything you know is not a lie, it's just, well, tangential to the truth.

In the most audacious literary debut to come out of the Steel City since The Mysteries of Pittsburgh, we meet Peter Morrison, twenty-nine and comfortably adrift in a state of not-quite-adulthood, less concerned about the general direction of his life than with his suspicion that all his closest relationships are the products of inertia. He and his girlfriend float along in the same general direction, while his parents are acting funny, though his rich, hypochondriac grandmother is still good for admission to the better parties. He spends his days clocking into Global Solutions (a firm whose purpose remains unnervingly ambiguous) and his weekends listening to the half-imagined rants of his childhood best friend, Johnny. An addict and conspiracy theorist, Johnny believes Pittsburgh is a "nexus of intense magical convergence" and is playing host to a cabal of dubious politicians, evil corporate schemes, ancient occult rites, and otherwise inexplicable phenomena, such as the fact that people really do keep seeing UFOs hovering over the city.

Against this strange background, Peter meets Mark and Helen, a slightly older couple, new to town, whose wealth and glamour never fully conceal the suggestion of something sinister, and with whom he becomes quickly infatuated. Mark is a corporate lawyer in the process of negotiating a buyout of Global Solutions, and initiates Peter into the real, mundane (maybe) conspiracies of corporations and careers, while Helen—a beautiful and once prominent artist—is both the echo and the promise of the sort of woman Peter always imagined, or was always told he ought to find for himself.

As Peter climbs the corporate ladder, Johnny is pulled into the orbit of a mysterious local author, Winston Pringle, whose lunatic book of conspiracies seems to be coming true. As Johnny falls farther down the rabbit hole, the surreal begins to seep into the mundane, and the settled rhythm of Peter's routine is disrupted by a series of close encounters of third, fourth, and fifth kinds. By the time Peter sets out to save his friend from Pringle's evil machinations (and pharmacological interventions), his familiar life threatens to transform into that most terrifying possibility: a surprise.

In The Bend of the World Philip K. Dick meets Michael Chabon, and Jacob Bacharach creates an appropriately hilarious, bizarre, and keenly observed portrait of life on the edge of thirty in the adolescent years of twenty-first-century America.




Rjurik Davidson

Unwrapped Sky
Tor Books, April 15, 2014
Hardcover and eBook, 432 pages

2014 Debut Author Challenge - April 2014 Debuts
A hundred years ago, the Minotaurs saved Caeli-Amur from conquest. Now, three very different people may hold the keys to the city's survival.

Once, it is said, gods used magic to create reality, with powers that defied explanation. But the magic—or science, if one believes those who try to master the dangers of thaumaturgy—now seems more like a dream. Industrial workers for House Technis, farmers for House Arbor, and fisher folk of House Marin eke out a living and hope for a better future. But the philosopher-assassin Kata plots a betrayal that will cost the lives of godlike Minotaurs; the ambitious bureaucrat Boris Autec rises through the ranks as his private life turns to ashes; and the idealistic seditionist Maximilian hatches a mad plot to unlock the vaunted secrets of the Great Library of Caeli-Enas, drowned in the fabled city at the bottom of the sea, its strangeness visible from the skies above.

In a novel of startling originality and riveting suspense, these three people, reflecting all the hopes and dreams of the ancient city, risk everything for a future that they can create only by throwing off the shackles of tradition and superstition, as their destinies collide at ground zero of a conflagration that will transform the world . . . or destroy it.

Unwrapped Sky is a stunningly original debut by Rjurik Davidson, a young master of the New Weird.




Alena Graedon

The Word Exchange
Doubleday, April 8, 2014
Hardcover and eBook, 384 pages

2014 Debut Author Challenge - April 2014 Debuts
A dystopian novel for the digital age, The Word Exchange offers an inventive, suspenseful, and decidedly original vision of the dangers of technology and of the enduring power of the printed word.

In the not-so-distant future, the forecasted “death of print” has become a reality. Bookstores, libraries, newspapers, and magazines are things of the past, and we spend our time glued to handheld devices called Memes that not only keep us in constant communication but also have become so intuitive that they hail us cabs before we leave our offices, order takeout at the first growl of a hungry stomach, and even create and sell language itself in a marketplace called the Word Exchange.
      Anana Johnson works with her father, Doug, at the North American Dictionary of the English Language (NADEL), where Doug is hard at work on the last edition that will ever be printed. Doug is a staunchly anti-Meme, anti-tech intellectual who fondly remembers the days when people used email (everything now is text or videoconference) to communicate—or even actually spoke to one another, for that matter. One evening, Doug disappears from the NADEL offices, leaving a single written clue: ALICE. It’s a code word he devised to signal if he ever fell into harm’s way. And thus begins Anana’s journey down the proverbial rabbit hole . . .
      Joined by Bart, her bookish NADEL colleague, Anana’s search for Doug will take her into dark basements and subterranean passageways; the stacks and reading rooms of the Mercantile Library; and secret meetings of the underground resistance, the Diachronic Society. As Anana penetrates the mystery of her father’s disappearance and a pandemic of decaying language called “word flu” spreads, The Word Exchange becomes a cautionary tale that is at once a technological thriller and a meditation on the high cultural costs of digital technology.




Aidan Harte

Irenicon
The Wave Trilogy 1
Jo Fletcher Books, April 1, 2014
Hardcover and eBook, 496 pages
(US Debut)

2014 Debut Author Challenge - April 2014 Debuts
The river Irenicon is a feat of ancient Concordian engineering. Blasted through the middle of Rasenna in 1347, using Wave technology, it divided the only city strong enough to defeat the Concordian Empire. But no one could have predicted the river would become sentient—and hostile. Sofia Scaligeri, the soon-to-be Contessa of Rasenna, has inherited a city tearing itself apart from the inside. And try as she might, she can see no way of stopping the culture of vendetta that has the city in its grasp. Until a Concordian engineer arrives to build a bridge over the Irenicon, clarifying everything: the feuding factions of Rasenna can either continue to fight each other or they can unite against their shared enemy. And they will surely need to stand together—for Concord is about to unleash the Wave again.




David Ramirez

The Forever Watch
Thomas Dunne Books, April 22, 2014
Hardcover and eBook, 336 pages

2014 Debut Author Challenge - April 2014 Debuts
An exciting new novel from a bold up-and-coming sci fi talent, The Forever Watch is so full of twists and surprises it's impossible to put down.

All that is left of humanity is on a thousand-year journey to a new planet aboard one ship, The Noah, which is also carrying a dangerous serial killer...

As a City Planner on the Noah, Hana Dempsey is a gifted psychic, economist, hacker and bureaucrat and is considered "mission critical." She is non-replaceable, important, essential, but after serving her mandatory Breeding Duty, the impregnation and birthing that all women are obligated to undergo, her life loses purpose as she privately mourns the child she will never be permitted to know.

When Policeman Leonard Barrens enlists her and her hacking skills in the unofficial investigation of his mentor's violent death, Dempsey finds herself increasingly captivated by both the case and Barrens himself. According to Information Security, the missing man has simply "Retired," nothing unusual. Together they follow the trail left by the mutilated remains. Their investigation takes them through lost dataspaces and deep into the uninhabited regions of the ship, where they discover that the answer may not be as simple as a serial killer after all.

What they do with that answer will determine the fate of all humanity in David Ramirez's thrilling page turner.




Robin Riopelle

Deadroads
Night Shade Books, April 15, 2014
Trade Paperback and eBook, 320 pages

2014 Debut Author Challenge - April 2014 Debuts
Lutie always wanted a pet ghost-but the devil's in the details.

The Sarrazins have always stood apart from the rest of their Bayou-born neighbors. Almost as far as they prefer to stand from each other. Blessed-or cursed-with the uncanny ability to see beyond the spectral plane, Aurie has raised his children, Sol, Baz, and Lutie, in the tradition of the traiteur, finding wayward spirits and using his special gift to release them along Deadroads into the afterworld. The family, however, fractured by their clashing egos, drifted apart, scattered high and low across the continent.

But tragedy serves to bring them together. When Aurie, while investigating a series of ghastly (and ghostly) murders, is himself killed by a devil, Sol, EMT by day and traiteur by night, Baz, a traveling musician with a truly spiritual voice, and Lutie, combating her eerie visions with antipsychotics, are thrown headlong into a world of gory sprites, brilliant angels, and nefarious demons-small potatoes compared to reconciling their familial differences.

From the Louisiana swamps to the snowfields of the north and everywhere in between, Deadroads summons you onto a mysterious trail of paranormal proportions.





Seth Skorkowsky

Dämoren
Ragnarok Publications, April 14, 2014
eBook

2014 Debut Author Challenge - April 2014 Debuts
Fourteen years ago a pack of wendigos killed Matt Hollis’ family and damned his soul. Now, Matt is a demon hunter armed with a holy revolver named Dämoren.

After a violent series of murders leaves only fifty holy weapons in the world, Matt is recruited by the Valducans, an ancient order of demon hunters. Many of the knights do not trust him because he is possessed. When sabotage and assassinations begin, the Valducans know there is a spy in their ranks, and Matt becomes the core of their suspicions. Desperate to prove himself, and to protect Dämoren, Matt fights to gain their trust and discover the nature of the entity residing within him.




Tom Wilde

The Blood of Alexander
Forge, April 29, 2014
Hardcover and eBook, 320 pages

2014 Debut Author Challenge - April 2014 Debuts
A modern Indiana Jones steals a relic of Alexander the Great in Blood of Alexander, the thrilling debut from Tom Wilde.

Jonathan Blake makes a living stealing antiquities—stealing them back, that is. A field agent for the Argo Foundation, a company that makes it their business to preserve humanity’s history by liberating stolen artifacts from thieves and looters, Blake is used to dangerous assignments. But when he is forced by the US government into a deadly mission involving a missing Napoleonic standard, he finds himself in over his head.

Blake is pitted against Vanya, the head of a fanatical cult, who seeks a gilded bronze eagle that holds a vital clue to the lost tomb of Alexander the Great.

From ancient ruins in Afghanistan to the catacombs of Paris to a chateau high in the French Alps, Blake must unravel the secret truth of the final fate of Napoleon Bonaparte, the murder of Percy Bysshe Shelly, and the hidden remains of Alexander. And he must do it before Vanya's apocalyptic plans for humanity come to their deadly fruition.




2014 Debut Author Challenge Update - The Bend of the World by Jacob Bacharach



2014 Debut Author Challenge Update - The Bend of the World by Jacob Bacharach


The Qwillery is pleased to announce the newest featured author for the 2014 Debut Author Challenge.



Jacob Bacharach

The Bend of the World
Liveright (W.W. Norton), April 14, 2014
Hardcover and eBook, 320 pages

2014 Debut Author Challenge Update - The Bend of the World by Jacob Bacharach
"A comedy of bad manners, darting wisecracks, deadpan chagrin, and drug-hazed pratfalls" (James Wolcott), The Bend of the World is a madcap coming-of-age novel in which no one quite comes of age and everything you know is not a lie, it's just, well, tangential to the truth.

In the most audacious literary debut to come out of the Steel City since The Mysteries of Pittsburgh, we meet Peter Morrison, twenty-nine and comfortably adrift in a state of not-quite-adulthood, less concerned about the general direction of his life than with his suspicion that all his closest relationships are the products of inertia. He and his girlfriend float along in the same general direction, while his parents are acting funny, though his rich, hypochondriac grandmother is still good for admission to the better parties. He spends his days clocking into Global Solutions (a firm whose purpose remains unnervingly ambiguous) and his weekends listening to the half-imagined rants of his childhood best friend, Johnny. An addict and conspiracy theorist, Johnny believes Pittsburgh is a "nexus of intense magical convergence" and is playing host to a cabal of dubious politicians, evil corporate schemes, ancient occult rites, and otherwise inexplicable phenomena, such as the fact that people really do keep seeing UFOs hovering over the city.

Against this strange background, Peter meets Mark and Helen, a slightly older couple, new to town, whose wealth and glamour never fully conceal the suggestion of something sinister, and with whom he becomes quickly infatuated. Mark is a corporate lawyer in the process of negotiating a buyout of Global Solutions, and initiates Peter into the real, mundane (maybe) conspiracies of corporations and careers, while Helen—a beautiful and once prominent artist—is both the echo and the promise of the sort of woman Peter always imagined, or was always told he ought to find for himself.

As Peter climbs the corporate ladder, Johnny is pulled into the orbit of a mysterious local author, Winston Pringle, whose lunatic book of conspiracies seems to be coming true. As Johnny falls farther down the rabbit hole, the surreal begins to seep into the mundane, and the settled rhythm of Peter's routine is disrupted by a series of close encounters of third, fourth, and fifth kinds. By the time Peter sets out to save his friend from Pringle's evil machinations (and pharmacological interventions), his familiar life threatens to transform into that most terrifying possibility: a surprise.

In The Bend of the World Philip K. Dick meets Michael Chabon, and Jacob Bacharach creates an appropriately hilarious, bizarre, and keenly observed portrait of life on the edge of thirty in the adolescent years of twenty-first-century America.


What's Up for the Debut Author Challenge Authors? - Part 3What's Up for the Debut Author Challenge Authors in 2015? - Part 12Guest Blog by Jacob Bacharach - The First Novel as your Comic-con Costume - May 15, 2014Interview with Jacob Bacharach, author of The Bend of the World - April 15, 2014The View From Monday - April 14, 20142014 Debut Author Challenge - April 2014 Debuts2014 Debut Author Challenge Update - The Bend of the World by Jacob Bacharach

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