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2019 Locus Awards Winners


2019 Locus Awards Winners
The Locus Science Fiction Foundation has announced the winners of the 2019 Locus Awards. With the exception of the Special Award, The Locus Awards are chosen by a survey of readers in an open online poll.

Winners in green.



2019 Locus Awards Winners
SCIENCE FICTION NOVEL
  • Record of a Spaceborn Few, Becky Chambers (Harper Voyager US; Hodder & Stoughton)
  • The Calculating Stars, Mary Robinette Kowal (Tor)
  • If Tomorrow Comes, Nancy Kress (Tor)
  • Revenant Gun, Yoon Ha Lee (Solaris US; Solaris UK)
  • Blackfish City, Sam J. Miller (Ecco; Orbit UK)
  • Embers of War, Gareth L. Powell (Titan US; Titan UK)
  • Elysium Fire, Alastair Reynolds (Gollancz; Orbit US)
  • Red Moon, Kim Stanley Robinson (Orbit US; Orbit UK)
  • Unholy Land, Lavie Tidhar (Tachyon)
  • Space Opera, Catherynne M. Valente (Saga)



2019 Locus Awards Winners
FANTASY NOVEL
  • Lies Sleeping, Ben Aaronovitch (DAW; Gollancz)
  • Foundryside, Robert Jackson Bennett (Crown; Jo Fletcher)
  • The Monster Baru Cormorant, Seth Dickinson (Tor)
  • Deep Roots, Ruthanna Emrys (Tor.com Publishing)
  • Ahab’s Return, Jeffrey Ford (Morrow)
  • European Travel for the Monstrous Gentlewoman, Theodora Goss (Saga)
  • The Mere Wife, Maria Dahvana Headley (MCD)
  • The Wonder Engine, T. Kingfisher (Argyll Productions)
  • Spinning Silver, Naomi Novik (Del Rey; Macmillan)
  • Creatures of Want and Ruin, Molly Tanzer (John Joseph Adams)



2019 Locus Awards Winners
HORROR NOVEL
  • In the Night Wood, Dale Bailey (John Joseph Adams)
  • Unlanguage, Michael Cisco (Eraserhead)
  • We Sold Our Souls, Grady Hendrix (Quirk)
  • Coyote Songs, Gabino Iglesias (Broken River)
  • The Hunger, Alma Katsu (Putnam; Bantam Press UK)
  • The Outsider, Stephen King (Scribner; Hodder & Stoughton)
  • The Listener, Robert McCammon (Cemetery Dance)
  • Cross Her Heart, Sarah Pinborough (HarperCollins UK/Morrow)
  • The Cabin at the End of the World, Paul Tremblay (Morrow; Titan UK)
  • Tide of Stone, Kaaron Warren (Omnium Gatherum)



2019 Locus Awards Winners
YOUNG ADULT NOVEL
  • The Gone Away Place, Christopher Barzak (Knopf)
  • The Cruel Prince, Holly Black (Little, Brown; Hot Key)
  • The Belles, Dhonielle Clayton (Freeform; Gollancz)
  • Tess of the Road, Rachel Hartman (Random House)
  • Dread Nation, Justina Ireland (Balzer + Bray)
  • Cross Fire, Fonda Lee (Scholastic)
  • The Agony House, Cherie Priest & Tara O’Connor (Levine)
  • Half-Witch, John Schoffstall (Big Mouth House)
  • Impostors, Scott Westerfeld (Scholastic US; Scholastic UK)
  • Mapping the Bones, Jane Yolen (Philomel)



2019 Locus Awards Winners
FIRST NOVEL
  • Children of Blood and Bone, Tomi Adeyemi (Henry Holt; Macmillan)
  • Semiosis, Sue Burke (Tor)
  • Armed in Her Fashion, Kate Heartfield (ChiZine)
  • The Poppy War, R.F. Kuang (Harper Voyager US; Harper Voyager UK)
  • The Quantum Magician, Derek Künsken (Solaris US; Solaris UK)
  • Annex, Rich Larson (Orbit US)
  • Severance, Ling Ma (Farrar, Straus, Giroux)
  • Witchmark, C.L. Polk (Tor.com Publishing)
  • Trail of Lightning, Rebecca Roanhorse (Saga)
  • Empire of Sand, Tasha Suri (Orbit US; Orbit UK)



2019 Locus Awards Winners
NOVELLA
  • The Black God’s Drums, P. Djèlí Clark (Tor.com Publishing)
  • The Tea Master and the Detective, Aliette de Bodard (Subterranean)
  • “Umbernight“, Carolyn Ives Gilman (Clarkesworld 2/18)
  • Black Helicopters, Caitlín R. Kiernan (Tor.com Publishing)
  • Time Was, Ian McDonald (Tor.com Publishing)
  • Gods, Monsters, and the Lucky Peach, Kelly Robson (Tor.com Publishing)
  • The Freeze-Frame Revolution, Peter Watts (Tachyon)
  • Artificial Condition, Martha Wells (Tor.com Publishing)
  • Rogue Protocol, Martha Wells (Tor.com Publishing)
  • The Descent of Monsters, JY Yang (Tor.com Publishing)



2019 Locus Awards Winners
NOVELETTE
  • “The Donner Party”, Dale Bailey (F&SF 1–2/18)
  • “Okay, Glory”, Elizabeth Bear (Twelve Tomorrows)
  • “No Flight Without the Shatter“, Brooke Bolander (Tor.com 8/15/18)
  • The Only Harmless Great Thing, Brooke Bolander (Tor.com Publishing)
  • “The Last Banquet of Temporal Confections“, Tina Connolly (Tor.com 7/11/18)
  • “An Agent of Utopia”, Andy Duncan (An Agent of Utopia)
  • “Queen Lily“, Theodora Goss (Lightspeed 11/18)
  • “Nine Last Days on Planet Earth“, Daryl Gregory (Tor.com 9/19/18)
  • “Quality Time”, Ken Liu (Robots vs Fairies)
  • “How to Swallow the Moon“, Isabel Yap (Uncanny 11–12/18)



SHORT STORY
  • “The Secret Lives of the Nine Negro Teeth of George Washington“, Phenderson Djèlí Clark (Fireside 2/18)  [https://firesidefiction.com/the-secret-lives-of-the-nine-negro-teeth-of-george-washington]
  • “The Bookcase Expedition”, Jeffrey Ford (Robots vs Fairies)
  • “STET“, Sarah Gailey (Fireside 10/18)
  • “A Witch’s Guide to Escape: A Practical Compendium of Portal Fantasies“, Alix E. Harrow (Apex 2/6/18)
  • “Cuisine des Mémoires”, N.K. Jemisin (How Long ’til Black Future Month?)
  • “The Storyteller’s Replacement”, N.K. Jemisin (How Long ’til Black Future Month?)
  • “Firelight“, Ursula K. Le Guin (Paris Review Summer ’18; The Books of Earthsea: The Complete Illustrated Edition)
  • “The Starship and the Temple Cat“, Yoon Ha Lee (Beneath Ceaseless Skies 2/1/18)
  • “Mother of Invention“, Nnedi Okorafor (Future Tense)
  • “The Court Magician“, Sarah Pinsker (Lightspeed 1/18)



2019 Locus Awards Winners
ANTHOLOGY
  • The Best Horror of the Year Volume Ten, Ellen Datlow, ed. (Night Shade)
  • The Book of Magic, Gardner Dozois, ed. (Bantam; Harper Voyager UK)
  • The Year’s Best Science Fiction: Thirty-fifth Annual Collection, Gardner Dozois, ed. (St. Martin’s Griffin)
  • Worlds Seen in Passing, Irene Gallo, ed. (Tor.com Publishing)
  • The Best American Science Fiction and Fantasy 2018, N.K. Jemisin and John Joseph Adams, eds. (Mariner)
  • Robots vs Fairies, Dominik Parisien and Navah Wolfe, eds. (Saga)
  • The Best Science Fiction & Fantasy of the Year, Volume Twelve, Jonathan Strahan, ed. (Solaris US; Solaris UK)
  • Infinity’s End, Jonathan Strahan, ed. (Solaris US; Solaris UK)
  • The Underwater Ballroom Society, Tiffany Trent and Stephanie Burgis, eds. (Five Fathoms)
  • The Future Is Female!, Lisa Yaszek, ed. (Library of America)



2019 Locus Awards Winners
COLLECTION
  • The Tangled Lands, Paolo Bacigalupi & Tobias S. Buckell (Saga)
  • Brief Cases, Jim Butcher (Ace; Orbit UK)
  • An Agent of Utopia, Andy Duncan (Small Beer)
  • How Long ’til Black Future Month?, N.K. Jemisin (Orbit US; Orbit UK)
  • The Dinosaur Tourist, Caitlín R. Kiernan (Subterranean)
  • Fire & Blood, George R.R. Martin (Bantam; Harper Voyager UK)
  • All the Fabulous Beasts, Priya Sharma (Undertow)
  • The Future Is Blue, Catherynne M. Valente (Subterranean)
  • Starlings, Jo Walton (Tachyon)
  • How to Fracture a Fairy Tale, Jane Yolen (Tachyon)



MAGAZINE
  • Analog
  • Asimov’s
  • Beneath Ceaseless Skies
  • Clarkesworld
  • F&SF
  • Fireside
  • Lightspeed
  • Strange Horizons
  • Tor.com
  • Uncanny



PUBLISHER
  • Angry Robot
  • Baen
  • DAW
  • Gollancz
  • Orbit
  • Saga
  • Small Beer
  • Subterranean
  • Tachyon
  • Tor



EDITOR
  • John Joseph Adams
  • Neil Clarke
  • Ellen Datlow
  • Gardner Dozois
  • C.C. Finlay
  • Jonathan Strahan
  • Lynne M. Thomas & Michael Damian Thomas
  • Ann & Jeff VanderMeer
  • Sheila Williams
  • Navah Wolfe



ARTIST
  • Kinuko Y. Craft
  • Galen Dara
  • Julie Dillon
  • Leo & Diane Dillon
  • Bob Eggleton
  • Victo Ngai
  • John Picacio
  • Shaun Tan
  • Charles Vess
  • Michael Whelan



2019 Locus Awards Winners
NON-FICTION
  • Space Odyssey: Stanley Kubrick, Arthur C. Clarke, and the Making of a Masterpiece, Michael Benson (Simon & Schuster)
  • Sense of Wonder: Short Fiction Reviews (2009-2017), Gardner Dozois (ReAnimus)
  • Strange Stars, Jason Heller (Melville House)
  • Dreams Must Explain Themselves: The Selected Non-Fiction of Ursula K. Le Guin, Ursula K. Le Guin (Gollancz)
  • Ursula K. Le Guin: Conversations on Writing, Ursula K. Le Guin and David Naimon (Tin House)
  • Old Futures: Speculative Fiction and Queer Possibility, Alexis Lothian (NYU Press)
  • Tolkien: Maker of Middle-earth, Catherine McIlwaine, ed. (Bodleian Library)
  • Astounding: John W. Campbell, Isaac Asimov, Robert A. Heinlein, L. Ron Hubbard, and the Golden Age of Science Fiction, Alec Nevala-Lee (Dey Street)
  • None of This Is Normal: The Fiction of Jeff VanderMeer, Benjamin J. Robertson (University of Minnesota Press)
  • An Informal History of the Hugos: A Personal Look Back at the Hugo Awards, 1953-2000, Jo Walton (Tor)




2019 Locus Awards Winners
ART BOOK
  • Yoshitaka Amano, Yoshitaka Amano: The Illustrated Biography – Beyond the Fantasy, Florent Gorges (Les Éditions Pix’n Love 2015; Dark Horse)
  • Spectrum 25: The Best in Contemporary Fantastic Art, John Fleskes, ed. (Flesk)
  • John Howe, A Middle-earth Traveler: Sketches from Bag End to Mordor (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; HarperCollins UK)
  • Jeffrey Alan Love, The Thousand Demon Tree (Flesk)
  • Simon Stålenhag, The Electric State (Fria Ligan ’17; Skybound)
  • Shaun Tan, Cicada (Lothian; Levine ’19)
  • Charles Vess, The Books of Earthsea: The Complete Illustrated Edition, Ursula K. Le Guin (Saga)
  • Michael Whelan, Beyond Science Fiction: The Alternative Realism of Michael Whelan (Baby Tattoo)
  • Dungeons & Dragons Art and Arcana: A Visual History, Michael Witwer, Kyle Newman, Jon Peterson & Sam Witwer (Ten Speed)
  • Lisbeth Zwerger, The Tales of Beedle the Bard, J.K. Rowling (Levine)



SPECIAL AWARD 2019: COMMUNITY OUTREACH & DEVELOPMENT
  • WINNER: Mary Anne Mohanraj

2017 Nebula Awards Winners


2017 Nebula Awards Winners
The Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA) has announced the winners of the 52nd Annual Nebula Awards, the Ray Bradbury Award for Outstanding Dramatic Presentation, and the Andre Norton Award for Outstanding Young Adult Science Fiction or Fantasy Book.

The awards were presented in Pittsburgh, PA at the Pittsburgh Marriott City Center on May 19, 2018 during the 2018 SFWA Nebula Conference.


2017 Nebula/Bradbury/Norton Award Winners
(Winners in green)

Novel
  • Amberlough, Lara Elena Donnelly (Tor)
  • The Strange Case of the Alchemist’s Daughter, Theodora Goss (Saga)
  • Spoonbenders, Daryl Gregory (Knopf; riverrun)
  • The Stone Sky, N.K. Jemisin (Orbit US; Orbit UK)
  • Six Wakes, Mur Lafferty (Orbit US)
  • Jade City, Fonda Lee (Orbit US; Orbit UK)
  • Autonomous, Annalee Newitz (Tor; Orbit UK 2018)


Novella
  • River of Teeth, Sarah Gailey (Tor.com Publishing)
  • Passing Strange, Ellen Klages (Tor.com Publishing)
  • “And Then There Were (N-One)”, Sarah Pinsker (Uncanny 3-4/17)
  • Barry’s Deal, Lawrence M. Schoen (NobleFusion Press)
  • All Systems Red, Martha Wells (Tor.com Publishing)
  • The Black Tides of Heaven, JY Yang (Tor.com Publishing)


Novelette
  • “Dirty Old Town”, Richard Bowes (F&SF 5-6/17)
  • “Weaponized Math”, Jonathan P. Brazee (The Expanding Universe, Vol. 3)
  • “Wind Will Rove”, Sarah Pinsker (Asimov’s 9-10/17)
  • “A Series of Steaks”, Vina Jie-Min Prasad (Clarkesworld 1/17)
  • “A Human Stain”, Kelly Robson (Tor.com 1/4/17)
  • “Small Changes Over Long Periods of Time”, K.M. Szpara (Uncanny 5-6/17)


Short Story
  • “Fandom for Robots”, Vina Jie-Min Prasad (Uncanny 9-10/17)
  • “Welcome to Your Authentic Indian ExperienceTM”, Rebecca Roanhorse (Apex 8/17)
  • “Utopia, LOL?”, Jamie Wahls (Strange Horizons 6/5/17)
  • “Clearly Lettered in a Mostly Steady Hand”, Fran Wilde (Uncanny 9-10/17)
  • “The Last Novelist (or A Dead Lizard in the Yard)”, Matthew Kressel (Tor.com 3/15/17)
  • “Carnival Nine”, Caroline M. Yoachim (Beneath Ceaseless Skies 5/11/17)


The Ray Bradbury Award for Outstanding Dramatic Presentation
  • Get Out (Written by Jordan Peele)
  • The Good Place: “Michael’s Gambit” (Written by Michael Schur)
  • Logan (Screenplay by Scott Frank, James Mangold, and Michael Green)
  • The Shape of Water (Screenplay by Guillermo del Toro & Vanessa Taylor)
  • Star Wars: The Last Jedi (Written by Rian Johnson)
  • Wonder Woman (Screenplay by Allan Heinberg)


The Andre Norton Award for Outstanding Young Adult Science Fiction or Fantasy Book
  • Exo, Fonda Lee (Scholastic Press)
  • Weave a Circle Round, Kari Maaren (Tor)
  • The Art of Starving, Sam J. Miller (HarperTeen)
  • Want, Cindy Pon (Simon Pulse)


Additional Awards Presented:

Kevin O’Donnell, Jr. Service to SFWA Award
  • John C. “Bud” Sparhawk


Kate Wilhelm Solstice Award
  • Gardner Dozois
  • Sheila Williams


SFWA Damon Knight Grand Master
  • Peter S. Beagle

Philip K. Dick Award Nominees Announced


The judges of the 2018 Philip K. Dick Award and the Philadelphia SF Society, along with the Philip K. Dick Trust, have announced the seven nominated works that comprise the final ballot for the award. First prize and any special citations will be announced on Friday, March 30, 2018 at Norwescon 41 at the DoubleTree by Hilton Seattle Airport, SeaTac, Washington.


THE BOOK OF ETTA by Meg Elison (47North)
SIX WAKES by Mur Lafferty (Orbit)
AFTER THE FLARE by Deji Bryce Olukotun (The Unnamed Press)
THE WRONG STARS by Tim Pratt (Angry Robot)
REVENGER Alastair Reynolds (Orbit)
BANNERLESS by Carrie Vaughn (Mariner/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)
ALL SYSTEMS RED by Martha Wells (Tor.com)


The Philip K. Dick Award is presented annually with the support of the Philip K. Dick Trust for distinguished science fiction published in paperback original form in the United States during the previous calendar year. The award is sponsored by the Philadelphia Science Fiction Society and the Philip K. Dick Trust and the award ceremony is sponsored by the Northwest Science Fiction Society. Last year’s winner was THE MERCY JOURNALS by Claudia Casper (Arsenal Press Publications) with a special citation to UNPRONOUNCEABLE by Susan DiRende (Aqueduct Press). The 2017 judges are Deborah J. Ross (chair), Robert Onopa, James Stoddard, Amy Thomson, and Rick Wilber.



Meg Elison

The Book of Etta
The Road to Nowhere 2
47North, February 21, 2017
Trade Paperback and Kindle eBook, 314 pages

In the gripping sequel to the Philip K. Dick Award-winning novel The Book of the Unnamed Midwife, one woman undertakes a desperate journey to rescue the future.

Etta comes from Nowhere, a village of survivors of the great plague that wiped away the world that was. In the world that is, women are scarce and childbearing is dangerous…yet desperately necessary for humankind’s future. Mothers and midwives are sacred, but Etta has a different calling. As a scavenger. Loyal to the village but living on her own terms, Etta roams the desolate territory beyond: salvaging useful relics of the ruined past and braving the threat of brutal slave traders, who are seeking women and girls to sell and subjugate.

When slavers seize those she loves, Etta vows to release and avenge them. But her mission will lead her to the stronghold of the Lion—a tyrant who dominates the innocent with terror and violence. There, with no allies and few weapons besides her wits and will, she will risk both body and spirit not only to save lives but also to liberate a new world’s destiny.




Mur Lafferty

Six Wakes
Orbit, January 31, 2017
Trade Paperback and eBook, 400 pages

A space adventure set on a lone ship where the clones of a murdered crew must find their murderer -- before they kill again.

It was not common to awaken in a cloning vat streaked with drying blood.

At least, Maria Arena had never experienced it. She had no memory of how she died. That was also new; before, when she had awakened as a new clone, her first memory was of how she died.

Maria's vat was in the front of six vats, each one holding the clone of a crew member of the starship Dormire, each clone waiting for its previous incarnation to die so it could awaken. And Maria wasn't the only one to die recently...




Deji Bryce Olukotun

After the Flare
Nigerians in Space 2
The Unnamed Press, September 12, 2017
Trade Paperback and eBook, 288 pages

A catastrophic solar flare reshapes our world order as we know it – in an instant, electricity grids are crippled, followed by devastating cyberattacks that paralyze all communication.

Kwesi Bracket is an industrial engineer who works for NASA’s Neutral Buoyancy Lab, running space-walk simulations for astronauts when the flare hits. His life quickly disintegrates – he loses his job and his wife leaves him, forcing him to take care of his daughter by himself. Meanwhile, America slowly descends into chaos as people turn inward to protect themselves.

Bracket soon discovers that Nigeria operates the only functioning space program in the world, which is recruiting scientists to launch a daring rescue mission to save a famous astronaut stranded aboard the International Space Station. With Europe, Asia, and the U.S. knocked off-line, and thousands of dead satellites about to plummet to Earth, Bracket heads to Kano in Northeastern Nigeria. But what he finds there is anything but normal. In the aftermath of the flare, the country has been flooded with advanced biohacking technologies, and the scramble for space supremacy has attracted dangerous peoples from all over Africa. What’s more: the militant Islamic group Boko Haram is slowly encroaching on the spaceport, leaving a trail of destruction, while a group of nomads has discovered an ancient technology more powerful than anything he’s ever imagined.

With the clock ticking down, Bracket – helped by a brilliant scientist from India and an eccentric lunar geologist – must confront the looming threats to the spaceport in order to launch a harrowing rescue mission into space.

In this sequel to Nigerians in Space, Deji Bryce Olukotun poses deep questions about technology, international ambition, identity, and space exploration in the 21st century.




Tim Pratt

The Wrong Stars
Axiom
Angry Robot, November 7, 2017
Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 400 pages

A ragtag crew of humans and posthumans discover alien technology that could change the fate of humanity… or awaken an ancient evil and destroy all life in the galaxy.
 

The shady crew of the White Raven run freight and salvage at the fringes of our solar system. They discover the wreck of a centuries-old exploration vessel floating light years away from its intended destination and revive its sole occupant, who wakes with news of First Alien Contact. When the crew break it to her that humanity has alien allies already, she reveals that these are very different extra-terrestrials… and the gifts they bestowed on her could kill all humanity, or take it out to the most distant stars.

File Under: Science Fiction [ Adrift
| Liar Liar | Golden Spiders | Bridge the Void ]




Alastair Reynolds

Revenger
Orbit, February 28, 2017
Trade Paperback and eBook, 432 pages

Winner of the 2017 Locus Award

Revenger is a rocket-fueled tale of space pirates, buried treasure, and phantom weapons, of unspeakable hazards and single-minded heroism... and of vengeance...

Adrana and Fura Ness are the newest crew members of the legendary Captain Rackamore's ship, using their mysterious powers as Bone Readers to find clues about their next score. But there might be more waiting for them in space than adventure and fortune: the fabled and feared Bosa Sennen, in particular.

The galaxy is filled with treasures... if you have the courage to find them.




Carrie Vaughn

Bannerless
The Bannerless Saga 1
John Joseph Adams/Mariner Books, July 11, 2017
Trade Paperback and eBook, 288 pages

A mysterious murder in a dystopian future leads a novice investigator to question what she’s learned about the foundation of her population-controlled society.

Decades after economic and environmental collapse destroys much of civilization in the United States, the Coast Road region isn’t just surviving but thriving by some accounts, building something new on the ruins of what came before. A culture of population control has developed in which people, organized into households, must earn the children they bear by proving they can take care of them and are awarded symbolic banners to demonstrate this privilege. In the meantime, birth control is mandatory.

Enid of Haven is an Investigator, called on to mediate disputes and examine transgressions against the community. She’s young for the job and hasn't yet handled a serious case. Now, though, a suspicious death requires her attention. The victim was an outcast, but might someone have taken dislike a step further and murdered him?

In a world defined by the disasters that happened a century before, the past is always present. But this investigation may reveal the cracks in Enid’s world and make her question what she really stands for.




Martha Wells

All Systems Red
The Murderbot Diaries 1
Tor.com, May 2, 2017
Trade Paperback and eBook, 160 pages

A murderous android discovers itself in All Systems Red, a tense science fiction adventure by Martha Wells that interrogates the roots of consciousness through Artificial Intelligence.

In a corporate-dominated spacefaring future, planetary missions must be approved and supplied by the Company. Exploratory teams are accompanied by Company-supplied security androids, for their own safety.

But in a society where contracts are awarded to the lowest bidder, safety isn’t a primary concern.

On a distant planet, a team of scientists are conducting surface tests, shadowed by their Company-supplied ‘droid — a self-aware SecUnit that has hacked its own governor module, and refers to itself (though never out loud) as “Murderbot.” Scornful of humans, all it really wants is to be left alone long enough to figure out who it is.

But when a neighboring mission goes dark, it's up to the scientists and their Murderbot to get to the truth.

The Murderbot Diaries by Martha Wells


I have fallen in love with Murderbot, the soap opera watching Security Unit, introduced in All Systems Red by Martha Wells. There are additional novellas upcoming and I can't wait to read them.

Check out the gorgeous covers for the Murderbot Diaries by Jaime Jones. Murderbot is the A.I. you've been looking for!


Artificial Condition
The Murderbot Diaries 2
Tor.com, May 8, 2018
Hardcover and eBook, 160 pages

The Murderbot Diaries by Martha Wells
"I love Murderbot!" —Ann Leckie

The follow-up to the hugely popular science fiction action and adventure All Systems Red

It has a dark past—one in which a number of humans were killed. A past that caused it to christen itself “Murderbot”. But it has only vague memories of the massacre that spawned that title, and it wants to know more.

Teaming up with a Research Transport vessel named ART (you don’t want to know what the “A” stands for), Murderbot heads to the mining facility where it went rogue.

What it discovers will forever change the way it thinks…





Rogue Protocol
The Murderbot Diaries 3
Tor.com, August 7, 2018
Hardcover and eBook, 160 pages

The Murderbot Diaries by Martha Wells
SciFi’s favorite crabby A.I. is again on a mission. The case against the too-big-to-fail GrayCris Corporation is floundering, and more importantly, authorities are beginning to ask more questions about where Dr. Mensah's SecUnit is.

And Murderbot would rather those questions went away. For good.
___

Martha Wells' Rogue Protocol is the third in the Murderbot Diaries series, starring a human-like android who keeps getting sucked back into adventure after adventure, though it just wants to be left alone, away from humanity and small talk.

Read Rogue Protocol and find out why Hugo Award winner Ann Leckie wrote, "I love Murderbot!"





Previously

All Systems Red
The Murderbot Diaries 1
Tor.com, May 2, 2017
Trade Paperback and eBook, 160 pages

The Murderbot Diaries by Martha Wells
A murderous android discovers itself in All Systems Red, a tense science fiction adventure by Martha Wells that interrogates the roots of consciousness through Artificial Intelligence.

In a corporate-dominated spacefaring future, planetary missions must be approved and supplied by the Company. Exploratory teams are accompanied by Company-supplied security androids, for their own safety.

But in a society where contracts are awarded to the lowest bidder, safety isn’t a primary concern.

On a distant planet, a team of scientists are conducting surface tests, shadowed by their Company-supplied ‘droid — a self-aware SecUnit that has hacked its own governor module, and refers to itself (though never out loud) as “Murderbot.” Scornful of humans, all it really wants is to be left alone long enough to figure out who it is.

But when a neighboring mission goes dark, it's up to the scientists and their Murderbot to get to the truth.

Qwill's Thoughts

All Systems Red is the first Murderbot Diaries novella by Martha Wells. I have always been fascinated by robots, androids, things related and in between. I now have a new favorite to add to my list - Murderbot from All Systems Red.

All Systems Red is told from the point of view of Murderbot, a self-given name after an unpleasant malfunction on a previous mission. Murderbot has hacked its governor module so it's under no one's control but its own. More than anything Murderbot would like to finish its daily jobs and get back to watching some of the 35,000 hours of movies, books, etc. it has downloaded.

Murderbot is both mechanical and organic with the ability to regrow and repair via the help of the MedSystem. It's a SecUnit - Security Unit - hired out to various missions to protect those who hire it. It's not a robot but an android.

On this particular mission Murderbot is contracted for by PreservationAux who had bought an option on the resources of the planet they are on. This is a survey trip to see if they should bid on a share of the planet's resources. Things start to go awry when another group on the planet is killed by what appears to be rogue SecUnits. Murderbot and those it's protecting need to figure out what is going on and get off the planet before they too are killed.

This is Murderbot's story and journey. Murderbot is fabulous - self-deprecating, smart, worried, and trying to find its place in the universe. Murderbot tries to pretend it's a robot so others don't want to interact with it much. Murderbot is awkward around humans and watching it interact with the humans on this mission is sometimes heartbreaking and sometimes heartwarming. Wells surrounds Murderbot with a great supporting cast some more supportive of Murderbot than others.

All Systems Red is simply wonderful. Wells fits so much into this story - mystery, action, thrills, and more. The story and writing are superb with great world and character building. Wells has created an iconic character with Murderbot; a character who will explore the issue of what it is to be human. I am looking forward to more Murderbot Diaries.

Review originally posted here.

Review: All Systems Red (The Murderbot Diaries 1) by Martha Wells


All Systems Red
Author:  Martha Wells
Series:  The Murdbot Diaries 1
Publisher:  Tor.com, May 2, 2017
Format:  Trade Paperback and eBook, 160 pages
List Price:  US$14.99 (print); US$3.99 (eBook)
ISBN:  9780765397539 (print); 9780765397522 (eBook)

Review: All Systems Red (The Murderbot Diaries 1) by Martha Wells

A murderous android discovers itself in All Systems Red, a tense science fiction adventure by Martha Wells that interrogates the roots of consciousness through Artificial Intelligence.

In a corporate-dominated spacefaring future, planetary missions must be approved and supplied by the Company. Exploratory teams are accompanied by Company-supplied security androids, for their own safety.

But in a society where contracts are awarded to the lowest bidder, safety isn’t a primary concern.
On a distant planet, a team of scientists are conducting surface tests, shadowed by their Company-supplied ‘droid — a self-aware SecUnit that has hacked its own governor module, and refers to itself (though never out loud) as “Murderbot.” Scornful of humans, all it really wants is to be left alone long enough to figure out who it is.

But when a neighboring mission goes dark, it's up to the scientists and their Murderbot to get to the truth.



Qwill's Thoughts

All Systems Red is the first Murderbot Diaries novella by Martha Wells. I have always been fascinated by robots, androids, things related and in between. I now have a new favorite to add to my list - Murderbot from All Systems Red.

All Systems Red is told from the point of view of Murderbot, a self-given name after an unpleasant malfunction on a previous mission. Murderbot has hacked its governor module so it's under no one's control but its own. More than anything Murderbot would like to finish its daily jobs and get back to watching some of the 35,000 hours of movies, books, etc. it has downloaded.

Murderbot is both mechanical and organic with the ability to regrow and repair via the help of the MedSystem. It's a SecUnit - Security Unit - hired out to various missions to protect those who hire it. It's not a robot but an android.

On this particular mission Murderbot is contracted for by PreservationAux who had bought an option on the resources of the planet they are on. This is a survey trip to see if they should bid on a share of the planet's resources. Things start to go awry when another group on the planet is killed by what appears to be rogue SecUnits. Murderbot and those it's protecting need to figure out what is going on and get off the planet before they too are killed. 

This is Murderbot's story and journey. Murderbot is fabulous - self-deprecating, smart, worried, and trying to find its place in the universe. Murderbot tries to pretend it's a robot so others don't want to interact with it much. Murderbot is awkward around humans and watching it interact with the humans on this mission is sometimes heartbreaking and sometimes heartwarming. Wells surrounds Murderbot with a great supporting cast some more supportive of Murderbot than others.

All Systems Red is simply wonderful. Wells fits so much into this story - mystery, action, thrills, and more. The story and writing are superb with great world and character building. Wells has created an iconic character with Murderbot; a character who will explore the issue of what it is to be human. I am looking forward to more Murderbot Diaries.

Review - Stories of the Raksura : Volume Two: The Dead City & The Dark Earth Below by Martha Wells


Stories of the Raksura
   Volume Two: The Dead City & The Dark Earth Below
AuthorMartha Wells
Series:  Stories of the Raksura
Publisher:  Night Shade Books, June 2, 2015
Format:  Trade Paperback and eBook, 232 pages
List Price:  $15.99 (print)
ISBN:  9781597805377 (print)
Review Copy:  Provided by the Publisher

Review - Stories of the Raksura : Volume Two: The Dead City & The Dark Earth Below by Martha Wells
Moon, Jade, and other favorites from the Indigo Cloud Court return with two new novellas from Martha Wells.

Martha Wells continues to enthusiastically breach genre conventions in her exploration of the fascinating world of the Raksura. Her novellas and short stories contain all the elements fans have come to love from the Raksura books: courtly intrigue and politics, unfolding mysteries that reveal an increasingly strange wider world, and threats both mundane and magical.

“The Dead City” is a tale of Moon before he came to the Indigo Court. As Moon is fleeing the ruins of Saraseil, a groundling city destroyed by the Fell, he flies right into another potential disaster when a friendly caravanserai finds itself under attack by a strange force. In “The Dark Earth Below,” Moon and Jade face their biggest adventure yet: their first clutch. But even as Moon tries to prepare for impending fatherhood, members of the Kek village in the colony tree’s roots go missing, and searching for them only leads to more mysteries as the court is stalked by an unknown enemy.

Stories of Moon and the shape changers of Raksura have delighted readers for years. This world is a dangerous place full of strange mysteries, where the future can never be taken for granted and must always be fought for with wits and ingenuity, and often tooth and claw. With these two new novellas, Martha Wells shows that the world of the Raksura has many more stories to tell . . .


Brannigan's Review

Stories of The Raksura: Volume Two: The Dead City & The Dark Earth Below by Martha Wells is strange, which in this case is a compliment. I've read some of Well's earlier books and enjoyed them a lot, so I jumped at the chance to review one of her newer works—little did I know what I was getting myself into.

Wells is a master writer and has been doing it long enough that even now as she delves into Strange Fantasy she can still keep me invested in the story. For those of you unfamiliar with Strange Fantasy, it's a sub-genre that focuses on exploring worlds and creatures that are completely unfamiliar to your average fantasy story. Now, almost every fantasy writer likes to create something unique to their world, but they still use familiar creatures and humanoid races that readers can identify with. Strange Fantasy doesn't. It gives you very little you recognize. On the positive side, there's plenty of wonder and exploration for the reader as you discover new things on every page. The negative side is there are so many new things that it's easy to get overwhelmed and feel disconnected to the actual story.

There are four short stories and one novella in this volume of short stories. The only common race throughout most of the stories are the Raksura, a cross between a dragon and humanoid creature that can phase between different shapes. Moon and Jade are two of the Raksura that appear in more than a few of the stories, and I would deem them the main characters. Moon, a male, spent most of his youth away from his own race, and Jade, a female, is a sister queen to her court. In a later story, Moon is Jade's consort.

I'm a character and world fan. I love getting connected to characters and lost in a world. With all the strangeness of the characters and world, Wells drew me in the different stories and I found myself enjoying my time in her world. However, I did feel very lost, as there was a lot I knew I was missing by not reading other books in the series. I also had a hard time relating to the characters even though I was engaged in the story. It's already a difficult read without jumping in on volume two of a short story collection.

Stories of The Raksura: Volume Two: The Dead City & The Dark Earth Below is a fascinatingly strange world to immerse yourself in. I would only recommend it to those already familiar with this world or up for a challenge and bored with the regular fantasy tropes. There are acts of violence, no bad language and only implied adult situations. I would recommend it to teens and adults. This series is for die-hard fans of Wells and those looking for something they won't find in every other fantasy book.

2019 Locus Awards Winners2017 Nebula Awards Winners Philip K. Dick Award Nominees AnnouncedThe Murderbot Diaries by Martha WellsReview: All Systems Red (The Murderbot Diaries 1) by Martha WellsReview - Stories of the Raksura : Volume Two: The Dead City & The Dark Earth Below by Martha Wells

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