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2019 Locus Awards Winners


2019 Locus Awards Winners
The Locus Science Fiction Foundation has announced the winners of the 2019 Locus Awards. With the exception of the Special Award, The Locus Awards are chosen by a survey of readers in an open online poll.

Winners in green.



2019 Locus Awards Winners
SCIENCE FICTION NOVEL
  • Record of a Spaceborn Few, Becky Chambers (Harper Voyager US; Hodder & Stoughton)
  • The Calculating Stars, Mary Robinette Kowal (Tor)
  • If Tomorrow Comes, Nancy Kress (Tor)
  • Revenant Gun, Yoon Ha Lee (Solaris US; Solaris UK)
  • Blackfish City, Sam J. Miller (Ecco; Orbit UK)
  • Embers of War, Gareth L. Powell (Titan US; Titan UK)
  • Elysium Fire, Alastair Reynolds (Gollancz; Orbit US)
  • Red Moon, Kim Stanley Robinson (Orbit US; Orbit UK)
  • Unholy Land, Lavie Tidhar (Tachyon)
  • Space Opera, Catherynne M. Valente (Saga)



2019 Locus Awards Winners
FANTASY NOVEL
  • Lies Sleeping, Ben Aaronovitch (DAW; Gollancz)
  • Foundryside, Robert Jackson Bennett (Crown; Jo Fletcher)
  • The Monster Baru Cormorant, Seth Dickinson (Tor)
  • Deep Roots, Ruthanna Emrys (Tor.com Publishing)
  • Ahab’s Return, Jeffrey Ford (Morrow)
  • European Travel for the Monstrous Gentlewoman, Theodora Goss (Saga)
  • The Mere Wife, Maria Dahvana Headley (MCD)
  • The Wonder Engine, T. Kingfisher (Argyll Productions)
  • Spinning Silver, Naomi Novik (Del Rey; Macmillan)
  • Creatures of Want and Ruin, Molly Tanzer (John Joseph Adams)



2019 Locus Awards Winners
HORROR NOVEL
  • In the Night Wood, Dale Bailey (John Joseph Adams)
  • Unlanguage, Michael Cisco (Eraserhead)
  • We Sold Our Souls, Grady Hendrix (Quirk)
  • Coyote Songs, Gabino Iglesias (Broken River)
  • The Hunger, Alma Katsu (Putnam; Bantam Press UK)
  • The Outsider, Stephen King (Scribner; Hodder & Stoughton)
  • The Listener, Robert McCammon (Cemetery Dance)
  • Cross Her Heart, Sarah Pinborough (HarperCollins UK/Morrow)
  • The Cabin at the End of the World, Paul Tremblay (Morrow; Titan UK)
  • Tide of Stone, Kaaron Warren (Omnium Gatherum)



2019 Locus Awards Winners
YOUNG ADULT NOVEL
  • The Gone Away Place, Christopher Barzak (Knopf)
  • The Cruel Prince, Holly Black (Little, Brown; Hot Key)
  • The Belles, Dhonielle Clayton (Freeform; Gollancz)
  • Tess of the Road, Rachel Hartman (Random House)
  • Dread Nation, Justina Ireland (Balzer + Bray)
  • Cross Fire, Fonda Lee (Scholastic)
  • The Agony House, Cherie Priest & Tara O’Connor (Levine)
  • Half-Witch, John Schoffstall (Big Mouth House)
  • Impostors, Scott Westerfeld (Scholastic US; Scholastic UK)
  • Mapping the Bones, Jane Yolen (Philomel)



2019 Locus Awards Winners
FIRST NOVEL
  • Children of Blood and Bone, Tomi Adeyemi (Henry Holt; Macmillan)
  • Semiosis, Sue Burke (Tor)
  • Armed in Her Fashion, Kate Heartfield (ChiZine)
  • The Poppy War, R.F. Kuang (Harper Voyager US; Harper Voyager UK)
  • The Quantum Magician, Derek Künsken (Solaris US; Solaris UK)
  • Annex, Rich Larson (Orbit US)
  • Severance, Ling Ma (Farrar, Straus, Giroux)
  • Witchmark, C.L. Polk (Tor.com Publishing)
  • Trail of Lightning, Rebecca Roanhorse (Saga)
  • Empire of Sand, Tasha Suri (Orbit US; Orbit UK)



2019 Locus Awards Winners
NOVELLA
  • The Black God’s Drums, P. Djèlí Clark (Tor.com Publishing)
  • The Tea Master and the Detective, Aliette de Bodard (Subterranean)
  • “Umbernight“, Carolyn Ives Gilman (Clarkesworld 2/18)
  • Black Helicopters, Caitlín R. Kiernan (Tor.com Publishing)
  • Time Was, Ian McDonald (Tor.com Publishing)
  • Gods, Monsters, and the Lucky Peach, Kelly Robson (Tor.com Publishing)
  • The Freeze-Frame Revolution, Peter Watts (Tachyon)
  • Artificial Condition, Martha Wells (Tor.com Publishing)
  • Rogue Protocol, Martha Wells (Tor.com Publishing)
  • The Descent of Monsters, JY Yang (Tor.com Publishing)



2019 Locus Awards Winners
NOVELETTE
  • “The Donner Party”, Dale Bailey (F&SF 1–2/18)
  • “Okay, Glory”, Elizabeth Bear (Twelve Tomorrows)
  • “No Flight Without the Shatter“, Brooke Bolander (Tor.com 8/15/18)
  • The Only Harmless Great Thing, Brooke Bolander (Tor.com Publishing)
  • “The Last Banquet of Temporal Confections“, Tina Connolly (Tor.com 7/11/18)
  • “An Agent of Utopia”, Andy Duncan (An Agent of Utopia)
  • “Queen Lily“, Theodora Goss (Lightspeed 11/18)
  • “Nine Last Days on Planet Earth“, Daryl Gregory (Tor.com 9/19/18)
  • “Quality Time”, Ken Liu (Robots vs Fairies)
  • “How to Swallow the Moon“, Isabel Yap (Uncanny 11–12/18)



SHORT STORY
  • “The Secret Lives of the Nine Negro Teeth of George Washington“, Phenderson Djèlí Clark (Fireside 2/18)  [https://firesidefiction.com/the-secret-lives-of-the-nine-negro-teeth-of-george-washington]
  • “The Bookcase Expedition”, Jeffrey Ford (Robots vs Fairies)
  • “STET“, Sarah Gailey (Fireside 10/18)
  • “A Witch’s Guide to Escape: A Practical Compendium of Portal Fantasies“, Alix E. Harrow (Apex 2/6/18)
  • “Cuisine des Mémoires”, N.K. Jemisin (How Long ’til Black Future Month?)
  • “The Storyteller’s Replacement”, N.K. Jemisin (How Long ’til Black Future Month?)
  • “Firelight“, Ursula K. Le Guin (Paris Review Summer ’18; The Books of Earthsea: The Complete Illustrated Edition)
  • “The Starship and the Temple Cat“, Yoon Ha Lee (Beneath Ceaseless Skies 2/1/18)
  • “Mother of Invention“, Nnedi Okorafor (Future Tense)
  • “The Court Magician“, Sarah Pinsker (Lightspeed 1/18)



2019 Locus Awards Winners
ANTHOLOGY
  • The Best Horror of the Year Volume Ten, Ellen Datlow, ed. (Night Shade)
  • The Book of Magic, Gardner Dozois, ed. (Bantam; Harper Voyager UK)
  • The Year’s Best Science Fiction: Thirty-fifth Annual Collection, Gardner Dozois, ed. (St. Martin’s Griffin)
  • Worlds Seen in Passing, Irene Gallo, ed. (Tor.com Publishing)
  • The Best American Science Fiction and Fantasy 2018, N.K. Jemisin and John Joseph Adams, eds. (Mariner)
  • Robots vs Fairies, Dominik Parisien and Navah Wolfe, eds. (Saga)
  • The Best Science Fiction & Fantasy of the Year, Volume Twelve, Jonathan Strahan, ed. (Solaris US; Solaris UK)
  • Infinity’s End, Jonathan Strahan, ed. (Solaris US; Solaris UK)
  • The Underwater Ballroom Society, Tiffany Trent and Stephanie Burgis, eds. (Five Fathoms)
  • The Future Is Female!, Lisa Yaszek, ed. (Library of America)



2019 Locus Awards Winners
COLLECTION
  • The Tangled Lands, Paolo Bacigalupi & Tobias S. Buckell (Saga)
  • Brief Cases, Jim Butcher (Ace; Orbit UK)
  • An Agent of Utopia, Andy Duncan (Small Beer)
  • How Long ’til Black Future Month?, N.K. Jemisin (Orbit US; Orbit UK)
  • The Dinosaur Tourist, Caitlín R. Kiernan (Subterranean)
  • Fire & Blood, George R.R. Martin (Bantam; Harper Voyager UK)
  • All the Fabulous Beasts, Priya Sharma (Undertow)
  • The Future Is Blue, Catherynne M. Valente (Subterranean)
  • Starlings, Jo Walton (Tachyon)
  • How to Fracture a Fairy Tale, Jane Yolen (Tachyon)



MAGAZINE
  • Analog
  • Asimov’s
  • Beneath Ceaseless Skies
  • Clarkesworld
  • F&SF
  • Fireside
  • Lightspeed
  • Strange Horizons
  • Tor.com
  • Uncanny



PUBLISHER
  • Angry Robot
  • Baen
  • DAW
  • Gollancz
  • Orbit
  • Saga
  • Small Beer
  • Subterranean
  • Tachyon
  • Tor



EDITOR
  • John Joseph Adams
  • Neil Clarke
  • Ellen Datlow
  • Gardner Dozois
  • C.C. Finlay
  • Jonathan Strahan
  • Lynne M. Thomas & Michael Damian Thomas
  • Ann & Jeff VanderMeer
  • Sheila Williams
  • Navah Wolfe



ARTIST
  • Kinuko Y. Craft
  • Galen Dara
  • Julie Dillon
  • Leo & Diane Dillon
  • Bob Eggleton
  • Victo Ngai
  • John Picacio
  • Shaun Tan
  • Charles Vess
  • Michael Whelan



2019 Locus Awards Winners
NON-FICTION
  • Space Odyssey: Stanley Kubrick, Arthur C. Clarke, and the Making of a Masterpiece, Michael Benson (Simon & Schuster)
  • Sense of Wonder: Short Fiction Reviews (2009-2017), Gardner Dozois (ReAnimus)
  • Strange Stars, Jason Heller (Melville House)
  • Dreams Must Explain Themselves: The Selected Non-Fiction of Ursula K. Le Guin, Ursula K. Le Guin (Gollancz)
  • Ursula K. Le Guin: Conversations on Writing, Ursula K. Le Guin and David Naimon (Tin House)
  • Old Futures: Speculative Fiction and Queer Possibility, Alexis Lothian (NYU Press)
  • Tolkien: Maker of Middle-earth, Catherine McIlwaine, ed. (Bodleian Library)
  • Astounding: John W. Campbell, Isaac Asimov, Robert A. Heinlein, L. Ron Hubbard, and the Golden Age of Science Fiction, Alec Nevala-Lee (Dey Street)
  • None of This Is Normal: The Fiction of Jeff VanderMeer, Benjamin J. Robertson (University of Minnesota Press)
  • An Informal History of the Hugos: A Personal Look Back at the Hugo Awards, 1953-2000, Jo Walton (Tor)




2019 Locus Awards Winners
ART BOOK
  • Yoshitaka Amano, Yoshitaka Amano: The Illustrated Biography – Beyond the Fantasy, Florent Gorges (Les Éditions Pix’n Love 2015; Dark Horse)
  • Spectrum 25: The Best in Contemporary Fantastic Art, John Fleskes, ed. (Flesk)
  • John Howe, A Middle-earth Traveler: Sketches from Bag End to Mordor (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; HarperCollins UK)
  • Jeffrey Alan Love, The Thousand Demon Tree (Flesk)
  • Simon Stålenhag, The Electric State (Fria Ligan ’17; Skybound)
  • Shaun Tan, Cicada (Lothian; Levine ’19)
  • Charles Vess, The Books of Earthsea: The Complete Illustrated Edition, Ursula K. Le Guin (Saga)
  • Michael Whelan, Beyond Science Fiction: The Alternative Realism of Michael Whelan (Baby Tattoo)
  • Dungeons & Dragons Art and Arcana: A Visual History, Michael Witwer, Kyle Newman, Jon Peterson & Sam Witwer (Ten Speed)
  • Lisbeth Zwerger, The Tales of Beedle the Bard, J.K. Rowling (Levine)



SPECIAL AWARD 2019: COMMUNITY OUTREACH & DEVELOPMENT
  • WINNER: Mary Anne Mohanraj

Melanie's Favourite books of 2015


I have read quite a few books in 2015 but I am going to share with you my top 5. This year I couldn't decide an order so these are in no particular order.


Melanie's Favourite books of 2015
UK Cover
Book 1 of my favourites for 2015 was The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman. I reviewed this book back in March and declared it one of my favourite books just a few months into the new year. For me, this book had almost every element that I enjoy in a book - a strong female lead, a richly textured world, the right amount of action and a great mystery. I loved the steampunky world where the main part of the story was set and Cogman sets up the Invisible Library as virtual cornucopia of future plots. Cogman cracked it with this fantastic debut.



Melanie's Favourite books of 2015
Another of my favourites is Ilona Andrews' serial novel Sweep in Peace. While I read this book over many months, it was released as a complete novel in November. I am a big fan of Andrews and have read everything the writing duo have released. I do however have a special love of the Innkeeper Chronicles. Dina is another great female lead with some pretty cool powers. She is strong and smart and she doesn't have to get pummeled every instalment to prove it. She does seem to have a predilection for near death experiences though. This instalment had crossover characters from The Edge series and I felt this worked well even though that is my least favourite Andrews series. It could have been a hit or miss and it was a big hit for me. There were a couple of mini stories threaded throughout the main plot which kept my interest as Andrews continued to develop Dina as a character. Overall, this a great read with beautiful illustrations.



Melanie's Favourite books of 2015
Patrick Weekes is a lucky author this year by getting 2 books of the same series into my top 5 with The Prophecy Con and the The Paladin Caper. I would have included book 1 - The Palace Job but I read that last year. I am a big fan of the Dragon Age series of video games which Weekes writes for. Many of the characters in this series reminded me of my favourite characters in the game which just made these two books even more enjoyable. You will notice a theme in my favourite books - strong female leads which both of these books have in spades. The strong female characters are supported by veritable cast of interesting characters - even the baddies. Weekes has bundled great characters, with amusing dialogue with a fantastic plot arc. There were so many twists and turns and double crosses that I almost got whiplash. This is a must read for anyone who likes fantasy, great characters and witty dialogue.



Melanie's Favourite books of 2015
UK Cover
The final book to make my top 5 is Uprooted by Naomi Novik. Again, another book with a strong female character this time in the form of the rather 'plain Jane' Agnieszka. Uprooted has a real folklory feel to it and I was gripped from page one through to the final sentence with Agnieszka's story of being taken away from her family and everything she holds dear to live in a tower as the companion to a rather reclusive dragon. Novik has a wonderful imagination and very skilled at characterization. This was a story I just didn't want to end.



As you know I read A LOT of books so to pick only 5 was difficult. I urge you to pick up one of these great books and looking forward to finding out what 2016 has in store.





Melanie's Favourite books of 2015
US Cover
The Invisible Library
The Invisible Library 1
Roc, June 14, 2016
Trade Paperback and eBook, 352

Collecting books can be a dangerous prospect in this fun, time-traveling, fantasy adventure from a spectacular debut author.

One thing any Librarian will tell you: the truth is much stranger than fiction…

Irene is a professional spy for the mysterious Library, a shadowy organization that collects important works of fiction from all of the different realities. Most recently, she and her enigmatic assistant Kai have been sent to an alternative London. Their mission: Retrieve a particularly dangerous book. The problem: By the time they arrive, it’s already been stolen.

London’s underground factions are prepared to fight to the death to find the tome before Irene and Kai do, a problem compounded by the fact that this world is chaos-infested—the laws of nature bent to allow supernatural creatures and unpredictable magic to run rampant. To make matters worse, Kai is hiding something—secrets that could be just as volatile as the chaos-filled world itself.

Now Irene is caught in a puzzling web of deadly danger, conflicting clues, and sinister secret societies. And failure is not an option—because it isn’t just Irene’s reputation at stake, it’s the nature of reality itself…



Published in the UK by Pan.



Melanie's Favourite books of 2015
Sweep in Peace
Innkeeper Chronicles 2
NYLA, November 13, 2015
eBook, 237 pages

Dina DeMille doesn’t run your typical Bed and Breakfast. Her inn defies laws of physics, her fluffy dog is secretly a monster, and the only paying guest is a former Galactic tyrant with a price on her head. But the inn needs guests to thrive, and guests have been scarce, so when an Arbitrator shows up at Dina's door and asks her to host a peace summit between three warring species, she jumps on the chance.

Unfortunately, for Dina, keeping the peace between Space Vampires, the Hope-Crushing Horde, and the devious Merchants of Baha-char is much easier said than done. On top of keeping her guests from murdering each other, she must find a chef, remodel the inn...and risk everything, even her life, to save the man she might fall in love with. But then it's all in the day's work for an Innkeeper…




Melanie's Favourite books of 2015
The Prophecy Con
Rogues of the Republic 2
47North, September 23, 2015
Trade Paperback and Kindle eBook, 512 pages

Book Two in the Rogues of the Republic series.

Who would have thought a book of naughty poems by elves could mean the difference between war and peace? But if stealing the precious volume will keep the Republic and the Empire from tearing out each other’s throats, rogue soldier Isafesira de Lochenville—“Loch” to friends and foes alike—is willing to do the dishonest honors. With her motley crew of magic-makers, law-breakers, and a talking warhammer, she’ll match wits and weapons with dutiful dwarves, mercenary knights, golems, daemons, an arrogant elf, and a sorcerous princess.

But getting their hands on the prize—while keeping their heads attached to their necks—means Loch and company must battle their way from a booby-trapped museum to a monster-infested library, and from a temple full of furious monks to a speeding train besieged by assassins. And for what? Are a few pages of bawdy verse worth waging war over? Or does something far more sinister lurk between the lines?




Melanie's Favourite books of 2015
The Paladin Caper
Rogues of the Republic 3
47 North, October 27, 2015
Trade Paperback and Kindle eBook, 480 pages

A thief’s good deeds are never done.

Loch and her crew are determined to stop the ancients from returning to reclaim the world they once ruled, but the kidnapping of a friend throws their plans awry. When a desperate rescue turns into a shocking reunion, the ancients return and seize power. Determined to stop them, Loch and the group look for a way to close the gate to the ancients’ world, but this time, they find themselves up against an enemy that has insinuated itself into the highest ranks of the Republic. Cruel, cunning, and connected, the ancients target the crew’s families and histories, threatening to tear friendships apart.

If that weren’t bad enough, Loch must deal with her treacherous assassin sister, her turncoat ancient friend, and a daemon who has sworn to hunt her to the ends of the earth. In order to save the Republic and pull off her largest con ever, Loch will need her friends…and maybe her enemies too.




Melanie's Favourite books of 2015
North America Cover
Uprooted
Del Rey, May 19, 2015
Hardcover and eBook, 448 pages

Naomi Novik, author of the New York Times bestselling and critically acclaimed Temeraire novels, introduces a bold new world rooted in folk stories and legends, as elemental as a Grimm fairy tale.

“Every so often you come upon a story that seems like a lost tale of Grimm newly come to light. Uprooted is such a novel. Its narrative spell is confidently wrought and sympathetically cast. I might even call it bewitching.”—Gregory Maguire, bestselling author of Wicked and Egg & Spoon

“Our Dragon doesn’t eat the girls he takes, no matter what stories they tell outside our valley. We hear them sometimes, from travelers passing through. They talk as though we were doing human sacrifice, and he were a real dragon. Of course that’s not true: he may be a wizard and immortal, but he’s still a man, and our fathers would band together and kill him if he wanted to eat one of us every ten years. He protects us against the Wood, and we’re grateful, but not that grateful.”

Agnieszka loves her valley home, her quiet village, the forests and the bright shining river. But the corrupted Wood stands on the border, full of malevolent power, and its shadow lies over her life.

Her people rely on the cold, driven wizard known only as the Dragon to keep its powers at bay. But he demands a terrible price for his help: one young woman handed over to serve him for ten years, a fate almost as terrible as falling to the Wood.

The next choosing is fast approaching, and Agnieszka is afraid. She knows—everyone knows—that the Dragon will take Kasia: beautiful, graceful, brave Kasia, all the things Agnieszka isn’t, and her dearest friend in the world. And there is no way to save her.

But Agnieszka fears the wrong things. For when the Dragon comes, it is not Kasia he will choose.



Published in the UK by Macmillan.


Melanie's Week in Review - August 16, 2015




This was my first week at my new job which meant I was able to return to my regular reading patterns as I was back to commuting...well most days. Over the course of the week I made a couple of book choices that weren't what I usually like to read. So what did I choose?


Melanie's Week in Review - August 16, 2015I was enjoying some late summer sunshine last weekend and was looking for a book that wouldn't tax my brain too much. I came across Kristen Painter's The Vampire's Mail Order Bride. If you follow my WIR you will have guessed that I am a self confessed book cover snob and normally 'judge that book by the cover'. Based purely on the cover this is usually the type of book I skip by. However, I have read Painter's House of Comarré series and I assumed that while this sounded like one of those books I normally avoid I would give it a go as I knew the author. I wish I had listened to my instincts with this one.

In this first book of the Nocturne Falls series Delaney James is on the run after witnessing her mob boss kill someone. After an unlikely turn of events she finds herself pretending to be the mail order bride to a vampire in a Halloween themed town full of supernaturals. The vampire in question, Hugh, has been coerced by his grandmother to give Delaney a 1 month trial to see if she could be his one true love. Well it didn't take Hugh or Delaney that long to go all gooey inside like an extra large marshmallow. The main excitement of the whole story was a chapter that could have been called  'What happens when my mob boss comes into town'. The murdering boss sub-plot is wrapped up at barely half way through and there is another 100 + pages dedicated to Delaney and Hugh's misunderstandings. Not my favourite book ever but filled in a sunny afternoon.


Melanie's Week in Review - August 16, 2015Book 2 of my week of unusual choices was a debut - The Girls Guide to the Apocalypse by Daphne Lamb. I got this book from NetGalley and based on the description I thought that this was going to be a light hearted, amusing read. Boy was I wrong. It started out quite amusing with the 30 something Verdell contemplating breaking up with her boyfriend in the staff canteen at her 'going nowhere' job. Everything changes when a series of events results in an apocalypse. Along with her boss, her possibly ex-boyfriend and a few others Verdell is forced into the brave new world (or not very brave in Verdell's case). Acid rain, cannibalism, no food or water does not keep Verdell from worrying where her lipstick went. After about the 3rd or 4th chapter I didn't think there could be anyone more unlikable than Verdell but, unfortunately, there was a whole book of them. I am pretty sure its not possible to have a more vacuous character and I found myself skim reading from about the 3/4 mark of the book. Lamb had written some truly funny lines but Verdell was neither convincing or likeable and I didn't feel like the book lived up to its name.


Melanie's Week in Review - August 16, 2015
Another book calling to me from Amazon that I succumbed to was Temeraire by Naomi Novik. If you will remember from my WIR last week I had thoroughly enjoyed Novik's Uprooted and decided to give one of her other novels a go. The story is set in the early 1800's which finds the naval captain Will Laurence in possession of a very valuable unhatched dragon egg. His life will never been the same when the newborn dragon immediately bonds with him and catapults him from a naval captain on the rise to the seemingly lonely life in the Aerial Corps. Reticent at first Will soon learns that his dragon - Temeraire is more than just an extraordinary creature and becomes his best friend and companion. Both Will and Temeraire have their work cut out for them as they are both heading to boot camp before pitting their unique skills against none other than Napoleon, his war ships and his fleet of dragons. Will they survive and save all of England?

I am a bit of a sucker for historical fantasy although the Napoleonic Wars isn't my favourite period of history. The story flows really well and the war between the two naval fleets is an excellent backdrop to the rest of the story. Novik is a very descriptive writer but you don't feel like you are being overloaded with too much description as this is carefully balanced with character development. I did however, feel that this book was aimed at a slightly younger reader - mid to late teens? This could have been more down to this period of history was very conservative and Will was very influenced by class structure and political correctness while Temeraire was young and virtually innocent. These elements combined made it bit more of a 'staid' read than my other books this week.


Melanie's Week in Review - August 16, 2015
UK Cover
Finally, I read Regneration which is the final of the (R)evolution series by Stephanie Saulter. This was a fantastic conclusion to the series but alas, it is not out in the US until next year and I don't want to ruin the surprise for you. I hope to write a full review closer to the US release date. Sorry!


That is it for me for this week. I hope you have had a better week than I choosing books. Fingers crossed that I have more interesting reads to tell you about next week but until then Happy Reading.








The Vampire's Mail Order Bride
Nocturne Falls 1
Kristen Painter, June 1, 2015
Trade Paperback and eBook, 370 pages

Melanie's Week in Review - August 16, 2015
Welcome to Nocturne Falls, the town where Halloween is celebrated 365 days a year. The tourists think it’s all a show: the vampires, the werewolves, the witches, the occasional gargoyle flying through the sky. But the supernaturals populating the town know better.

Living in Nocturne Falls means being yourself. Fangs, fur, and all.

After seeing her maybe-mobster boss murder a guy, Delaney James assumes a new identity and pretends to be a mail order bride. She finds her groom-to-be living in a town that celebrates Halloween every day. Weird. But not as weird as what she doesn’t know. Her groom-to-be is a 400-year-old vampire.

Hugh Ellingham has only agreed to the arranged set up to make his overbearing grandmother happy. In thirty days, whatever bridezilla shows up at his door will be escorted right back out. His past means love is no longer an option. Not if the woman’s going to have a future. Except he never counted on Delaney and falling in love for real.

Too bad both of them are keeping some mighty big secrets…



The Girl's Guide to the Apocalypse
Booktrope Editions, August 11, 2015
Trade Paperback and eBook, 218 pages

Melanie's Week in Review - August 16, 2015
Welcome to the Apocalypse. Your forecast includes acid rain, roving gangs and misplaced priorities, in this comedic take on the end of the world as we know it, from debut author Daphne Lamb. As a self-entitled, self-involved, and ill equipped millennial, Verdell probably wouldn’t have ranked very high on the list of those most likely to survive the end of the world, but here she is anyway. Add in traveling with her work addicted boss, her boyfriend who she has “meh” feelings for, and a handful of others who had no businesses surviving as long as they have, and things aren’t exactly going as planned. But despite threats of cannibalism, infected water supplies, and possibly even mutants, Verdell is willing to put in as little effort as she can get away with to survive.



Her Majesty's Dragon / Temeraire (UK)

Temeraire 1
Del Rey, March 28, 2006
Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 384 pages

Melanie's Week in Review - August 16, 2015
Aerial combat brings a thrilling new dimension to the Napoleonic Wars as valiant warriors rise to Britain’s defense by taking to the skies . . . not aboard aircraft but atop the mighty backs of fighting dragons.

When HMS Reliant captures a French frigate and seizes its precious cargo, an unhatched dragon egg, fate sweeps Capt. Will Laurence from his seafaring life into an uncertain future–and an unexpected kinship with a most extraordinary creature. Thrust into the rarified world of the Aerial Corps as master of the dragon Temeraire, he will face a crash course in the daring tactics of airborne battle. For as France’s own dragon-borne forces rally to breach British soil in Bonaparte’s boldest gambit, Laurence and Temeraire must soar into their own baptism of fire.



And for those who can't wait...

Regeneration
(R)evolution 3
Jo Fletcher Books, August 6, 2015
Trade Paperback and eBook, 384 pages

Melanie's Week in Review - August 16, 2015
The gillungs - waterbreathing, genetically modified humans - are thriving. They've colonised riverbanks and ports long since abandoned to the rising seas and the demand for their high-efficiency technologies is growing fast.

But as demand grows, so do fears about their impact on both norm businesses and the natural environment.

Then, a biohazard scare at Sinkat, their colony on the Thames, fuels the opposition and threatens to derail the gillungs' progress. But was it an accident, or was it sabotage?

DCI Sharon Varsi has her suspicions, but her investigations are compromised by family ties. And now there is a new threat: Zavcka Klist is about to be released from prison - and she wants her company back.


Melanie's Week in Review - August 9, 2015


Melanie's Week in Review - August 9, 2015


Apologies for missing last week but I had my eldest sister visiting and we went to the Peak District last weekend. For those of you who aren't that familiar with British geography the Peak District is in the middle of England AND perhaps more importantly  - the home of Mr Darcy from Jane Austin's Pride and Prejudice. As big Jane Austin fans my sister and I couldn't miss the opportunity to go visit Chatsworth which was used in the 2005 version of the movie as Mr Darcy's estate - Pemberley.  Check it out! It was pretty cool but sadly most of my potential 're-enactment' areas were marked as private so I didn't get to pretend I was Eliza Bennett! Oh well, I guess I have will have to resign myself to another re-read of the story instead.

Melanie's Week in Review - August 9, 2015


Melanie's Week in Review - August 9, 2015
Anyway enough of my holiday you probably want to know what I have been reading since I last posted. I did a bit of a swapsy with my sister on reading devices so I got to read 3 great books on our travels.  I started with Skin Game by Jim Butcher which is the 15th book in the Harry Dresden series. This was the book I meant to read a few weeks ago but bought Cold Days by mistake. Skin Days is a bit of a departure from the plots of the previous books with Harry given a task by his new boss Mab to team up with one of his many, but perhaps most hated arch enemies Nicodemus Archleone. The task is to break into the near impenetrable vaults of non other than the king of the Underworld Hades and steal a holy relic. All in a days work for Mab's new Winter Knight.

I did enjoy Skin Game and I was glad that I had just recently read book 14 as I didn't have to jog my memory (too much). There were some quite touching scenes with Michael, who I have always liked, who gives Harry a talking to and makes him realise why he needs to be involved in his daughter's life. Harry gets put through the ringer in this instalment with broken limbs, gunshot wounds and a resolution to the 'bug in his brain' storyline from previous novels. I wonder when Butcher is going to cut Harry a break and have something nice happen to him that lasts more than a few minutes.


One of the books that regularly comes up on my Amazons recommendations is the Reluctant
Melanie's Week in Review - August 9, 2015
Concubine by Dana Marton which is the first of the Hardstorm Saga series. This is the story of Tera who is sold as a slave to a more barbarian race where she is expected to use her healing skills before becoming one of lord's many concubines. Before that happens an ancient prophecy comes into play and Tera may be the key to saving the realm.

I found this story a tad dull. Tera's healing skills reminded me of Maria V Synder's Avry in her Healer series but she wasn't as interesting of a character as Avry. There also wasn't much chemistry between Tera and her love interest the High Lorder. I can only describe their romance as lukewarm at best. I won't be continuing with this series.


Melanie's Week in Review - August 9, 2015
The final book I wanted to tell you about is Uprooted by Naomi Novik. Agnieszka loves her family, her home and everything about the valley in which she lives. However, her village relies on the help from a wizard to keep the evil powers of a malevolent force in the surrounding forest at bay. In payment the wizard, known as the Dragon, takes one of the girls from the village to live with him and then releases them 10 years later. The girls never return to live in the village and no one really knows what happens to them while they live in the wizard's tower. Agnieszka (and everyone else in her village) is certain her best friend Kasia will be the next girl who is selected to live with the wizard. When the Dragon comes to chose his new companion no one is more surprised than Agnieszka when he doesn't leave with Kasia. Agnieszka finds herself in the Dragon's tower and soon becomes embroiled in a battle to save everything and everyone she holds dear.

This is a great book. I loved reading every minute of it. I even broke one of my own rules and paid almost £8.00 for the Kindle version but it was worth every penny. Novik paints such a clear picture of her characters and the lives they lead. You can really picture Agnieszka's village and feel her pain and sorrow when she thinks she has lost her best friend Kasia. Agnieszka is a great character who you can't wait to read more about. Dragon starts out the antagonist, or so it seems but then you start to see him through Agnieszka's eyes and watch him become very much a hero. There is a real sense of folklore and fairytale in this story and if you enjoy high fantasy I highly recommend it.


That is it for me for this week. I hope you have found some books that you have enjoyed as much as I enjoyed Uprooted and until next week Happy Reading.





Skin Game
Harry Dresden 15
Roc, March 3, 2015
Mass Market Paperback, 608 pages
Hardcover and eBook, May 27, 2014

Melanie's Week in Review - August 9, 2015
From Jim Butcher comes the newest novel in the #1 New York Times bestselling Dresden Files…

Harry Dresden, Chicago’s only professional wizard, is about to have a very bad day. Because as Winter Knight to the Queen of Air and Darkness, Harry never knows what the scheming Mab might want him to do. Usually, it’s something awful.

Mab has traded Harry’s skills to pay off a debt. And now he must help a group of villains led by Harry’s most despised enemy, Nicodemus Archleone, to break into a high-security vault so that they can then access a vault in the Nevernever.

Problem is, the vault belongs to Hades, Lord of the freaking Underworld. And Dresden is dead certain that Nicodemus has no intention of allowing any of his crew to survive the experience. Dresden’s always been tricky, but he’s going to have to up his backstabbing game to survive this mess.…



Reluctant Concubine
Hardstorm Saga 1
March 2, 2015
eBook, 297 pages

Melanie's Week in Review - August 9, 2015
To escape punishment, Tera, a maiden healer sold to barbarians must hide the truth: she has not yet come into her healing powers. Born into a much gentler world, she struggles to survive in a land of savage warlords and their cruel concubines. When ancient prophecies begin to come to pass, can the healer-slave save the realm and awaken the High Lord’s heart?



Uprooted
Del Rey, May 19, 2015
Hardcover and eBook, 448 pages

Melanie's Week in Review - August 9, 2015
North America Cover
Naomi Novik, author of the New York Times bestselling and critically acclaimed Temeraire novels, introduces a bold new world rooted in folk stories and legends, as elemental as a Grimm fairy tale.

“Every so often you come upon a story that seems like a lost tale of Grimm newly come to light. Uprooted is such a novel. Its narrative spell is confidently wrought and sympathetically cast. I might even call it bewitching.”—Gregory Maguire, bestselling author of Wicked and Egg & Spoon

“Our Dragon doesn’t eat the girls he takes, no matter what stories they tell outside our valley. We hear them sometimes, from travelers passing through. They talk as though we were doing human sacrifice, and he were a real dragon. Of course that’s not true: he may be a wizard and immortal, but he’s still a man, and our fathers would band together and kill him if he wanted to eat one of us every ten years. He protects us against the Wood, and we’re grateful, but not that grateful.”

Agnieszka loves her valley home, her quiet village, the forests and the bright shining river. But the corrupted Wood stands on the border, full of malevolent power, and its shadow lies over her life.

Her people rely on the cold, driven wizard known only as the Dragon to keep its powers at bay. But he demands a terrible price for his help: one young woman handed over to serve him for ten years, a fate almost as terrible as falling to the Wood.

The next choosing is fast approaching, and Agnieszka is afraid. She knows—everyone knows—that the Dragon will take Kasia: beautiful, graceful, brave Kasia, all the things Agnieszka isn’t, and her dearest friend in the world. And there is no way to save her.

But Agnieszka fears the wrong things. For when the Dragon comes, it is not Kasia he will choose.


Melanie's Week in Review - August 9, 2015
UK Cover

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