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A blog about books and other things speculative

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THEY REMAIN - New Clips


Artist: Jeanne D’Angelo


They Remain Clips -" I did hear a voice" from Will Battersby on Vimeo.




They Remain Clips - "Tortured and murdered" from Will Battersby on Vimeo.



Based on the 2010 short story, "-30-" by award-winning author Laird Barron, THEY REMAIN explores the evolving relationship between Keith and Jessica, two scientists who are employed by a vast, impersonal corporation to investigate an unspeakable horror that took place at the remote encampment of a mysterious cult. Working and living in a state-of-the-art, high tech environment that is completely at odds with their surroundings, they spend their days gathering physical evidence, analyzing it, and reporting on their findings.

The intensity of their work, and their extreme isolation, bring the pair closer. But, when Jessica discovers a mysterious artifact of unknown origin, the dynamic between them changes: secrets are kept, sexual tensions arise, and paranoia sets in. Keith begins to have visions and is unable to distinguish whether they are nightmares or hauntings. Having lost all sense of what is real and what is imagined, all he knows is that the horror he and Jessica have been sent to uncover—a horror that could be biological, psychological, or supernatural— now threatens his very survival.



Barron's short story "-30-" may be found in

Occultation and Other Stories
Night Shade Books, July 29, 2014
Trade Paperback, 256 pages
Hardcover and eBook, July 1, 2010

Winner of the 2010 Shirley Jackson Award, nine stories of cosmic horror from the heir apparent to Lovecraft’s throne.

Laird Barron has emerged as one of the strongest voices in modern horror and dark fantasy fiction, building on the eldritch tradition pioneered by writers such as H. P. Lovecraft, Peter Straub, and Thomas Ligotti. His stories have garnered critical acclaim and have been reprinted in numerous year’s best anthologies and nominated for multiple awards, including the Crawford, International Horror Guild, Shirley Jackson, Theodore Sturgeon, and World Fantasy awards. His debut collection, The Imago Sequence and Other Stories, was the inaugural winner of the Shirley Jackson Award.

He returns with his second collection, Occultation. Pitting ordinary men and women against a carnivorous, chaotic cosmos, Occulation’s nine tales of terror (two published here for the first time) were nominated for just as many Shirley Jackson awards, winning for the novella “Mysterium Tremendum” and the collection as a whole. Featuring an introduction by Michael Shea, Occultation brings more of the spine-chillingly sublime cosmic horror Laird Barron’s fans have come to expect.


Find Laird Barron at his Website, on Twitter and on Facebook.


See more about THEY REMAIN at this post: http://qwillery.blogspot.com/2018/02/they-remain-based-on-30-by-laird-barron.html and this post: http://qwillery.blogspot.com/2018/02/they-remain-new-poster-and-trailer.html

The Best Horror of the Year, Volume 10 - Cover and Table of Contents


Night Shade Books has announced the cover and Table of Contents for The Best Horror of the Year, Volume 10. The cover is by Chenthooran Nambiarooran. The editor is Ellen Datlow. The anthology will be published on June 5th.

The Best Horror of the Year, Volume 10 - Cover and Table of Contents



Table of Contents

Introduction

Better You Believe—Carole Johnstone
Liquid Air—Inna Effress
Holiday Romance—Mark Morris
Furtherest—Kaaron Warren
Where’s the Harm?—Rebecca Lloyd
Whatever Comes After Calcutta—David Erik Nelson
A Human Stain—Kelly Robson
The Stories We Tell about Ghosts—A. C. Wise
Endosketal—Sarah Read
West of Matamoros, North of Hell—Brian Hodge
Alligator Point—S. P. Miskowski
Dark Warm Heart—Rich Larson
There and Back Again—Carmen Maria Machado
Shepherd’s Business—Stephen Gallagher
You Can Stay All Day—Mira Grant
Harvest Song, Gathering Song—A. C. Wise
The Granfalloon—Orrin Grey
Fail-Safe—Philip Fracassi
The Starry Crown—Marc E. Fitch
Eqalussuaq—Tim Major
Lost in the Dark—John Langan

Interview with Tina LeCount Myers, author of The Song of All



Please welcome Tina LeCount Myers to The Qwillery as part of the 2018 Debut Author Challenge Interviews. The Song of All was published on February 20th by Night Shade Books.



Interview with Tina LeCount Myers, author of The Song of All




TQWelcome to The Qwillery. What is the first fiction piece you remember writing?

Tina: Thank you for including me in the Debut Author Challenge! It’s such an honor. I think I was 13 or 14. I wrote a story about torch singer. I remember describing her long, red hair in detail. She was a femme fatale. I might have watched one too many movies with Lauren Bacall in my early teens.



TQAre you a plotter, a pantser or a hybrid?

Tina: By nature, I’m a pantser. Through practice, I’ve become a hybrid. But I still dream of being a true plotter.



TQWhat is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

Tina: Sex scenes. Give me a battle any day. I get all squirmy and uncomfortable when I have to get into the nitty-gritty of a sex scene. I feel like a voyeur when I’m writing about my characters in their very intimate moments. I tend toward a “fade to black” compromise.



TQWhat has influenced / influences your writing?

Tina: I came late to reading fantasy. I was in college when my best friend discovered I’d not read Tolkien. He rectified the oversight. Growing up, I read a lot of British and Russian literature. I think the epic nature of the stories by Tolstoy, Pushkin, and Dostoevsky stuck with me the most. I loved the drama and heartbreak in them.



TQDescribe The Song of All in 140 characters or less.

Tina: Two ancient tribes. Two innocent lives. One man who is willing to risk war in the Northlands to save his son.



TQTell us something about The Song of All that is not found in the book description.

Tina: The Immortals in the book, the Jápmemeahttun, have evolved to change their sex from female to male in the course of their long lifespan.



TQWhat inspired you to write The Song of All? What appeals to you about writing Fantasy?

Tina: The Song of All came out of a heated discussion with my husband on what distinguishes science fiction from fantasy. He made the point that science fiction presents what is possible based on science, while fantasy generally presents magic and the supernatural and is not based on science. I argued that a fantasy story could be grounded in science. What is quantum physics if not magic? And what’s to say biological evolution won’t lead to some supernatural creatures. Compare Homo sapiens to the Neanderthals. Homo sapiens have keener eyesight, hearing, and smell due to their skeletal morphology. Supernatural powers right there!



TQWhat sort of research did you do for The Song of All?

Tina: Since I was on the “challenge excepted” path of a fantasy grounded in science, I did research on sound theory, multiverses, and quantum physics. I also read quite a lot of articles on evolutionary biology. And, because the language I use in the story is based on Sami dialects, I did research on the various dialects, as well as the history and culture of the indigenous groups of northern Scandinavia. But The Song of All is definitely a fantasy story and not an ethnography.



TQPlease tell us about the cover for The Song of All.

Tina: The cover artist is Jeff Chapman and the layout and typography artist is Shawn King. I think they both worked well together to capture the concept of an individual facing extreme elements. The reindeer are integral to the main character’s journey to find himself. The bloody footprints are from my wonderful editor Jeremy Lassen.



TQIn The Song of All who was the easiest character to write and why? The hardest and why?

Tina: Gunna was the easiest write. She is this feisty crone who has lived a full life and knows exactly who she is and what is important. She represents the matriarchal spirit of my Finnish family. I grew up with someone like her so she was easy o write. The hardest character to write was Bávvál, the High Priest. He is such a Machiavellian character. His emotional world kept eluding me.



TQWhy have you chosen to include or not chosen to include social issues in The Song of All?

Tina: While it is not the dominant theme in the book, the topic of migration and diaspora was in the forefront of my mind as I was writing. The main struggle between the newcomers, the Olmmoš, and the native group, the Jápmemeahttun, revolves around issues of assimilation of an immigrant community. Looking at the history of humanity, the migration of peoples is at the core of human experience from its earliest inception. The fact that we continue struggle with this reality is significant and also heartbreaking to me.



TQWhich question about The Song of All do you wish someone would ask? Ask it and answer it!

Tina: What is your song?

I am the daughter of waves,
washed upon these distant shores.
My journey started in far off stars.
I light the way for my shadow to follow.
I am words upon a page.
I am ink and yet ephemeral.



TQGive us one or two of your favorite non-spoilery quotes from The Song of All.

Tina: “Aillun had been surprised she could understand them. They had a thick, round accent, as if they had a mouthful of berries and feared losing one. She had stared at them in wonder and it struck her that the Olmmoš were not so very different from herself, except that, given the opportunity, they would have killed her.”



TQWhat's next?

Tina: The Song of All has some sequels in the works. Dreams of the Dark Sky is due out in 2019 and The Northern Ones in 2020. I also have this voice clamoring for a prequel where...well, I guess that still remains to be sung.



TQThank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

Tina: Thank you for having me. I just got to answer some of my new, favorite questions!





The Song of All
The Legacy of the Heavens 1
Night Shade Books, February 20, 2018
Trade Paperback and eBook, 452 pages

Interview with Tina LeCount Myers, author of The Song of All
A former warrior caught between gods and priests must fight for the survival of his family in this dark epic fantasy debut, set in a harsh arctic world inspired by Scandinavian indigenous cultures.

On the forbidding fringes of the tundra, where years are marked by seasons of snow, humans war with immortals in the name of their shared gods. Irjan, a human warrior, is ruthless and lethal, a legend among the Brethren of Hunters. But even legends grow tired and disillusioned.

Scarred and weary of bloodshed, Irjan turns his back on his oath and his calling to hide away and live a peaceful life as a farmer, husband, and father. But his past is not so easily left behind. When an ambitious village priest conspires with the vengeful comrades Irjan has forsaken, the fragile peace in the Northlands of Davvieana is at stake.

His bloody past revealed, Irjan’s present unravels as he faces an ultimatum: return to hunt the immortals or lose his child. But with his son’s life hanging in the balance, as Irjan follows the tracks through the dark and desolate snow-covered forests, it is not death he searches for, but life.





About Tina

Interview with Tina LeCount Myers, author of The Song of All
Tina LeCount Myers is a writer, artist, independent historian, and surfer. Born in Mexico to expat-bohemian parents, she grew up on Southern California tennis courts with a prophecy hanging over her head; her parents hoped she’d one day be an author. The Song of All is her debut novel.







Website  ~  Twitter @tlecountmyers

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THEY REMAIN - New Poster and Trailer

Based on the 2010 short story, "-30-" by award-winning author Laird Barron, THEY REMAIN explores the evolving relationship between Keith and Jessica, two scientists who are employed by a vast, impersonal corporation to investigate an unspeakable horror that took place at the remote encampment of a mysterious cult. Working and living in a state-of-the-art, high tech environment that is completely at odds with their surroundings, they spend their days gathering physical evidence, analyzing it, and reporting on their findings.

The intensity of their work, and their extreme isolation, bring the pair closer. But, when Jessica discovers a mysterious artifact of unknown origin, the dynamic between them changes: secrets are kept, sexual tensions arise, and paranoia sets in. Keith begins to have visions and is unable to distinguish whether they are nightmares or hauntings. Having lost all sense of what is real and what is imagined, all he knows is that the horror he and Jessica have been sent to uncover—a horror that could be biological, psychological, or supernatural— now threatens his very survival.



[click to embiggen]


See more about THEY REMAIN at this post: http://qwillery.blogspot.com/2018/02/they-remain-based-on-30-by-laird-barron.html


Barron's short story "-30-" may be found in

Occultation and Other Stories
Night Shade Books, July 29, 2014
Trade Paperback, 256 pages
Hardcover and eBook, July 1, 2010

Winner of the 2010 Shirley Jackson Award, nine stories of cosmic horror from the heir apparent to Lovecraft’s throne.

Laird Barron has emerged as one of the strongest voices in modern horror and dark fantasy fiction, building on the eldritch tradition pioneered by writers such as H. P. Lovecraft, Peter Straub, and Thomas Ligotti. His stories have garnered critical acclaim and have been reprinted in numerous year’s best anthologies and nominated for multiple awards, including the Crawford, International Horror Guild, Shirley Jackson, Theodore Sturgeon, and World Fantasy awards. His debut collection, The Imago Sequence and Other Stories, was the inaugural winner of the Shirley Jackson Award.

He returns with his second collection, Occultation. Pitting ordinary men and women against a carnivorous, chaotic cosmos, Occulation’s nine tales of terror (two published here for the first time) were nominated for just as many Shirley Jackson awards, winning for the novella “Mysterium Tremendum” and the collection as a whole. Featuring an introduction by Michael Shea, Occultation brings more of the spine-chillingly sublime cosmic horror Laird Barron’s fans have come to expect.


Find Laird Barron at his Website, on Twitter and on Facebook.

THEY REMAIN, Based on "-30-" by Laird Barron


THEY REMAIN, Based on

THEY REMAIN

Directed by: Phillip Gelatt

Starring: William Jackson Harper (“Paterson,” “True Story”) and Rebecca Henderson (“Mistress America”)

THEY REMAIN will open theatrically New York (Village East Cinema) on Friday, March 2 and Los Angeles (Laemmle Music Hall) on Friday, March 9 with a national release to follow.

See the trailer here: https://youtu.be/gXydn2_OW9I

Based on the 2010 short story, "-30-" by award-winning author Laird Barron, THEY REMAIN explores the evolving relationship between Keith and Jessica, two scientists who are employed by a vast, impersonal corporation to investigate an unspeakable horror that took place at the remote encampment of a mysterious cult. Working and living in a state-of-the-art, high tech environment that is completely at odds with their surroundings, they spend their days gathering physical evidence, analyzing it, and reporting on their findings.

The intensity of their work, and their extreme isolation, bring the pair closer. But, when Jessica discovers a mysterious artifact of unknown origin, the dynamic between them changes: secrets are kept, sexual tensions arise, and paranoia sets in. Keith begins to have visions and is unable to distinguish whether they are nightmares or hauntings. Having lost all sense of what is real and what is imagined, all he knows is that the horror he and Jessica have been sent to uncover—a horror that could be biological, psychological, or supernatural— now threatens his very survival.

THEY REMAIN, Based on
Phillip Gelatt
Gelatt’s acclaimed debut feature, "The Bleeding House," premiered at the 2011 Tribeca Film Festival. He combines multi-disciplinary experience as a graphic novelist and comic book creator for the “Indiana Jones” franchise, and for such companies as Dark Horse Comics and Oni Press, with his background as a video game writer for such companies as Crystal Dynamics and Frictional Games, and on “Rise of The Tomb Raider” (for which he won the WGA Award).

Barron’s novels, short fiction, and poems have earned him a substantial following among aficionados of fantasy, noir, horror, and sci-fi, and have twice won him the Shirley Jackson Award.

THEY REMAIN stars William Jackson Harper (“Paterson,” “True Story”) and Rebecca Henderson (“Mistress America”) as Keith and Jessica. The film's third "star" is cinematographer Sean Kirby, whose hallucinatory images contribute immeasurably to its disorienting, disturbing mood. Kirby's credits include the acclaimed documentaries "Racing Extinction," and "The Tillman Story," as well as Robinson Devor's notorious "Zoo," which created a sensation at both Sundance and Cannes.

Feature Film, USA, Running Time: 102 Minutes; from Paladin


THEY REMAIN, Based on
THEY REMAIN, Based on
[click to embiggen]





Barron's short story "-30-" may be found in

Occultation and Other Stories
Night Shade Books, July 29, 2014
Trade Paperback, 256 pages
Hardcover and eBook, July 1, 2010

THEY REMAIN, Based on
Winner of the 2010 Shirley Jackson Award, nine stories of cosmic horror from the heir apparent to Lovecraft’s throne.

Laird Barron has emerged as one of the strongest voices in modern horror and dark fantasy fiction, building on the eldritch tradition pioneered by writers such as H. P. Lovecraft, Peter Straub, and Thomas Ligotti. His stories have garnered critical acclaim and have been reprinted in numerous year’s best anthologies and nominated for multiple awards, including the Crawford, International Horror Guild, Shirley Jackson, Theodore Sturgeon, and World Fantasy awards. His debut collection, The Imago Sequence and Other Stories, was the inaugural winner of the Shirley Jackson Award.

He returns with his second collection, Occultation. Pitting ordinary men and women against a carnivorous, chaotic cosmos, Occulation’s nine tales of terror (two published here for the first time) were nominated for just as many Shirley Jackson awards, winning for the novella “Mysterium Tremendum” and the collection as a whole. Featuring an introduction by Michael Shea, Occultation brings more of the spine-chillingly sublime cosmic horror Laird Barron’s fans have come to expect.


Find Laird Barron at his Website, on Twitter and on Facebook.

Michael J. Martinez Interviews Paul Weimer!


The Qwillery is extraordinarily thrilled to welcome Michael J. Martinez and Paul Weimer to The Qwillery discussing Paul's trip Down Under! The Qwillery highly recommends Paul's DUFF Report. It is beautifully written and lushly illustrated. And now over to Michael and Paul:


Fan Down Under: Paul Weimer on his DUFF experiences

By Michael J. Martinez

The absolutely lovely humans who run the Qwillery have been early and generous supporters of my work, for which I remain grateful indeed. And yes, I have a new book out Sept. 5, MJ-12: Shadows, the second in my series of super-powered Cold War spy thrillers.

But, you know, I figure if “super-powered Cold War spy thriller” didn’t grab you, I don’t know what a guest post could do to rectify that. So instead, I’m using this space to interview prolific SF/F reviewer, podcaster and super-fan Paul Weimer about his trip to Australia and New Zealand as part of the DUFF program. Because both Paul and DUFF are super cool.

What is DUFF? The Down Under Fan Fund helps American fans head to Australia and New Zealand for science fiction and fantasy conventions, and also helps fans from Down Under head to fan conventions elsewhere in the world. Paul was the DUFF delegate for 2017, and you can read about his adventures in his DUFF Report, available here for $7, with all proceeds going to the Down Under Fan Fund.

Without further ado, here’s the interview:

You've been involved in the SF/F community for a very long time. Tell me about the book, or books, that made you take the leap from reader to fan. Barring that, was there an incident or experience of some kind instead?

The advent of the High Blog Era of the Internet is what let me get into fandom in a real way, rather than just reading quietly. In the mid 2000's, I started to write short book reviews on my then-blog. This led to me participating in an online community that SF Signal was building. That got me gigs at The Functional Nerds, SF Signal itself, and I was off to the races. Podcasting came almost hand in hand with that, when I got invited to a SF Signal episode.


You're also an avid traveler. I've often thought travel has made me a better writer. Has it made you a better reader? A better community member/fan? A better reviewer?

Yes. Looking back on a travel adventure, its framed as a narrative, a story. Its moments, tender pieces, encounters, and an overall story from start to finish. Seeing how I construct my own story of my travels helps me write and think about how fictional stories work, or don't work.


What keeps you going within the fandom community? What keeps you coming back and staying involved?

Stubborness, persistence, determination and a desire to try and do good. I can try and do good, and use my powers to help illuminate authors, books, communities. Besides, I have one of the most mundane and boring jobs out there. Fandom is a way to channel my creative energies and escape the monochrome mundanity of daily life.


How different or similar is fandom in Aus/NZ? What stands out the most there?

For New Zealand, it was its tiny and very intertwined fandom/author community. The con in Taupo got 150 to attend, which means you could drop them into a Worldcon and have difficulty finding them again. There is also a strong recognition of the native (Maori) community and what that historical perspective and narrative brings to NZ SF and fantasy.

Australian fandom felt like a thousand points of light that do not interconnect as much as they themselves might like. The size of Australia meant that a National Convention (which moves every year) is mostly just the local population, with a few infusions from elsewhere. This means that the National Convention every year is a rotating set of people, rather than a repeat of the same far flung community. This gives Australian fandom the feel of a moveable feast.


For that matter, from what you've read and experienced, what perspectives to Aussies and Kiwis bring to the genre that we're missing out on?

The Aussies and Kiwis are very cognizant of being small players in the SF world. Getting visibility outside of their two smallish worlds is something they crave, and even more to the point, even New Zealand writers want more visibility just across "the ditch" in Australia.

There is also a strong ecological perspective in Australasian SF and fantasy, because climate change, invasive species, and other ecological problems are something they live with and cannot escape. It shows in their fiction, and in their panels and discussions.


What authors from Down Under should we be reading?

Plenty, but I will name just a couple: Thoraiya Dyer's debut fantasy novel, Crossroads of Canopy provides a lush world of Gods and life in the canopy of a rainforest. Cat Sparks strongly engages ecological perspectives in her fantasy and science fiction. Readers of Epic fantasy should be reading Helen Lowe, who has been quietly (too quietly from my perspective) putting out a strong, traditional epic fantasy series, the Wall of Night series. Even for its relatively comfortable lines, Lowe features strong female characters and a world where the often overweening patriarchal crap a lot of fantasy worlds revel in is nowhere to be seen.


What U.S. authors do you think would resonate particularly well with Aussie/Kiwi readers?

Kate Elliott, because I think writing in Hawaii as she does, has helped give her a perspective on worlds and societies and a global sort of understanding that Aussies and Kiwis can resonate with. Similarly, Max Gladstone, who has spent a lot of time in Asia, a part of the world very important to Australasia, has themes and ideas that will resonate well with readers down there. Similarly in the same vein, Ken Liu's fiction, both short and epic, would be something I think they could and should eat up with a spoon.


Your report has some gorgeous photography along with it. How long have you been shooting, what drew you to it, and for the photo nerds in the crowd, what rig are you using?

I came very late to photography in my life. Oh, I had a film camera since back in the early 90's, but many of the pictures I took on my first Trip to London them were plagued with pink blobs. I had no idea what I was doing and it showed. I discarded photography as a hobby worth doing for years.

Although I lost the roll and never developed the pictures, my last full day in Orange County, in 2003 was the next major attempt at trying photography again. I tried to document my trip to San Juan Capistrano, and started to feel what I had felt, and denied back on that London trip a decade earlier--that taking photographs of places, of adventures, was something I liked.

I got a digicam not long after arriving in Minnesota, ahead of a camping trip with my friends the Olsons. I thought taking some photos of our trip to Yellowstone might be fun. We went in 2005. Boy was I right. My first attempt at photography on a vacation turned out wonderfully, especially since I had a "big sister" in my friend Felicia, who had a DSLR and was not afraid to use it. I started practicing and learning more after that trip with my digicam, exploring Minnesota with my friends and on my own.

A second camping trip in 2007 to the Canadian Rockies was the clincher. Plenty of waterfalls and mountains convinced me that, yes, I liked this photography thing, especially a travel photography thing, and I wanted to capture better images. I bought a DSLR not long after that trip.

I currently shoot with a Canon 7D. My usual lens of choice is a 24mm Prime lens, although the "beast" of a 100mm macro lens got to see some good use on my DUFF trip.


Finally, waterfalls. What is it about shooting waterfalls?

Why waterfalls? First and foremost, the sound of rushing water makes them an appealing place to be around. I love visiting waterfalls because of the peace and balm they bring to me.

But why photograph them while I am at it?

Because waterfalls are in that space of being static and dynamic, remaining in place and yet ever changing, moment by moment, season by season. I can visit a waterfall in different seasons, different years, and due to the flow, the foliage, time of day, lighting and more, get an infinite variety of shots from the same cascade.

And if that wasn't enough, the sheer variety of waterfalls, from huge curtain ones to thin ones that plunge into a punchbowl means that a new-to-me waterfall will always have something I've not quite seen before.


--
Again, I urge you to buy Paul’s report and give it a read. It’s a very cool travelogue, has some great photos, and will make you want to book a trip post-haste. And the money is going to the Down Under Fan Fund to keep fans around the world connected.





Michael J. Martinez Interviews Paul Weimer!
About Paul

Paul Weimer is a SF writer, reviewer, and podcaster and an avid amateur photographer. When he isn’t doing any of that, he’s often found rolling dice and roleplaying. His audio work can be found on the Skiffy and Fanty Show and SFF audio. His reviews and columns can also be found at Tor.com and the Barnes and Noble SF/F blog, amongst other places. Paul is best seen on Twitter as @princejvstin.








Michael J. Martinez Interviews Paul Weimer!
About Michael

Michael J. Martinez is the author of five novels, including the Daedalus trilogy of Napoleonic era space opera adventures and the MAJESTIC-12 series of spy-fi thrillers. His short fiction has appeared in Cthulhu Fhtagn!, Unidentified Funny Objects 4, Geeky Giving and Endless Ages: Vampire. He's a proud member of the Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America and International Thriller Writers. You can find him online at michaeljmartinez.net or on Twitter at @mikemartinez72.



Michael's latest novel:

Michael J. Martinez Interviews Paul Weimer!
MJ-12: Shadows
A MAJESTIC-12 Thriller 2
Night Shade Books, September 5, 2017
Mass Market Paperback and eBook, 384 pages

It’s 1949, and the Cold War is heating up across the world. For the United States, the key to winning might be Variants—once ordinary US citizens, now imbued with strange paranormal abilities and corralled into covert service by the government’s top secret MAJESTIC-12 program.

Some Variants are testing the murky international waters in Syria, while others are back at home, fighting to stay ahead of a political power struggle in Washington. And back at Area 51, the operation’s headquarters, the next wave of recruits is anxiously awaiting their first mission. All the while, dangerous figures flit among the shadows and it’s unclear whether they are threatening to expose the Variants for what they are . . . or to completely destroy them. Are they working for the Soviet Union, or something far worse?



Spotlight on Neal Asher's Transformation


Infinity Engine, the 3rd novel in Neal Asher's Transformation trilogy was published on March 21st. No more waiting for the final novel! If you are a reader who waits for the last novel in a trilogy, it's time to pick up the series

“Asher completes his Transformation series with this powerful work that transcends the borders of morality, existence, and spacetime itself .”—Publishers Weekly (starred review), for Infinity Engine



Dark Intelligence
Transformation 1
Night Shade Books, January 5, 2016
Trade Paperback, 412 pages
Hardcover and eBook, February 3, 2015

Spotlight on Neal Asher's Transformation
One man will transcend death to seek vengeance. One woman will transform herself to gain power. And no one will emerge unscathed…

Thorvald Spear wakes in a hospital to find he’s been brought back from the dead. What’s more, he died in a human versus alien war that ended a century ago. Spear had been trapped on a world surrounded by hostile Prador forces, but Penny Royal, the AI inside the rescue ship sent to provide backup, turned rogue, annihilating friendly forces in a frenzy of destruction and killing Spear. One hundred years later the AI is still on the loose, and Spear vows for revenge at any cost.

Isobel Satomi ran a successful crime syndicate, but after competitors attacked she needed power and protection. Negotiating with Penny Royal, she got more than she bargained for: Turning part-AI herself gave Isobel frightening power, but the upgrades hid a horrifying secret, and the dark AI triggered a transformation that has been turning her into something far from human . . .

Spear hires Isobel to track Penny Royal across worlds to its last known whereabouts. But he cheats her in the process and quickly finds himself in her crosshairs. As Isobel continues to evolve into a monstrous predator, it’s clear her rage will eventually win out over reason. Will Spear finish his hunt before he himself becomes the hunted?

Dark Intelligence is the explosive first novel in a brand-new trilogy from military SF master Neal Asher and a new chapter in his epic Polity universe.



War Factory
Transformation 2
Night Shade Books, January 17, 2017
Trade Paperback, 476 pages
Hardcover and eBook, May 3, 2016,

Spotlight on Neal Asher's Transformation
A berserk AI runs rampant across galaxies in this explosive, fast-paced follow-up to Dark Intelligence, a new Polity novel from UK space opera master Neal Asher.

Thorvald Spear, resurrected from his death over a hundred years earlier, continues to hunt Penny Royal, the rogue AI and dangerous war criminal on the run from Polity forces. Beyond the Graveyard, a lawless and deadly area in deep space, Spear follows the trail of several enemy Prador, the crab-like alien species with a violent history of conflict with humanity.

Sverl, a Prador genetically modified by Penny Royal and slowly becoming human, pursues Cvorn, a Prador harboring deep hatred for the Polity looking to use him and other hybrids to reignite the dormant war with mankind.

Blite, captain of a bounty hunting ship, hands over two prisoners and valuable memplants from Penny Royal to the Brockle, a dangerous forensics entity under strict confinement on a Polity spaceship that quickly takes a keen interest in the corrupted AI and its unclear motives.

Penny Royal meanwhile continues to pull all the strings in the background, keeping the Polity at bay and seizing control of an attack ship. It seeks Factory Station Room 101, a wartime manufacturing space station believed to be destroyed. What does it want with the factory? And will Spear find the rogue AI before it gets there?

War Factory, the second book in the Transformation trilogy, is signature space opera from Neal Asher: breakneck pacing, high-tech science, bizarre alien creatures, and gritty, dangerous far-future worlds.



Infinity Engine
Transformation 3
Night Shade Books, March 21, 2017
Hardcover and eBook, 488 pages

Spotlight on Neal Asher's Transformation
The rogue AI Penny Royal makes a final stand in the explosive conclusion to Neal Asher’s hard-hitting and high-tech Polity space opera trilogy.

In the outskirts of space, and the far corners of the Polity, complex dealings are in play.
Several forces continue to pursue the deadly and enigmatic Penny Royal, none more dangerous than the Brockle, a psychopathic forensics AI and criminal who has escaped the Polity’s confinements and is upgrading itself in anticipation of a deadly showdown, becoming ever more powerful and intelligent.

Aboard Factory Station Room 101, the behemoth war factory that birthed Penny Royal, groups of humans, alien prador, and AI war drones grapple for control. The stability of the ship is complicated by the arrival of a gabbleduck known as the Weaver, the last living member of the ancient and powerful Atheter alien race.

What would an Atheter want with the complicated dealings of Penny Royal? Are the Polity and prador forces playing right into the dark AI’s hand, or is it the other way around? Set pieces align in the final book of Neal Asher’s action-packed Transformation trilogy, pointing to a showdown on the cusp of the Layden’s Sink black hole, inside of which lies a powerful secret, one that could destroy the entire Polity.

Review: Reanimatrix by Pete Rawlik


Reanimatrix
Author:  Pete Rawlik
Publisher:  Night Shade Books, October 18, 2016
Format:  Trade Paperback and eBook, 364 pages
List Price:  US$15.99 (print); US$11.99 (eBook)
ISBN:  9781597808804 (print); 9781597806015 (eBook)

Review: Reanimatrix by Pete Rawlik
An obsessed detective on the trail on a murdered young woman finds more than he bargained for in this tale of hard-boiled cosmic horror, an inventive mash-up of the pulp detective story and Lovecraftian terror.

Some say the war drove Robert Peaslee mad. Others suggest that given what happened to his father, madness was inevitable. He’s spent years trying to forget the monsters that haunt his dreams, but now has returned to witch-haunted Arkham to do the only job that he’s qualified for, handling the crimes other cops would prefer to never talk about. He’s the hero Arkham doesn’t even know it has.

Megan Halsey is dead, her body missing. She might have been one of the richest young women in Arkham, but all that money couldn’t make her happy. Word on the street is that her mother split a long time ago, and Megan had spent a lot of her money trying to find her.

Peaslee soon becomes obsessed with the murdered Megan. Retracing the steps of her own investigation, traveling from Arkham to Dunwich, and even to the outskirts of Innsmouth, he will learn more about Megan and Arkham than he should, and discover things about himself that he’d tried to bury.

It’s 1928, and in the Miskatonic River Valley, women give birth to monsters and gods walk the hills. Robert Peaslee will soon learn the hard way that some things are better left undead.



Brannigan's Review

Reanimatrix is a genre-blending thrill ride. Pete Rawlik mixed Lovecraft with pulp fiction detective mystery with romance. It's post World War I and the two main characters are Robert Peaslee and Megan Halsey. They both grew up in Arkham, Mass. Robert was in the war, where he saw his first signs of otherworldly power. After the war he spent time as an agent traveling Europe. It's here he hears about Megan's murder and decides to make his way back home to solve her murder, only to find true madness and evil.

Rawlik does a wonderful job of grabbing you and immersing you into his world. It's a true pleasure to read. For those of you familiar with Lovecraft, you'll be rewarded as well as other literary characters that pop in and out of the storyline. I won't ruin the surprise of who makes appearances, but I'm confident even I missed some of them. One major aspect of the story revolves around the reanimated dead. I have to say I really like the way Rawlik handles this as it felt like a truly fresh take.

Rawlik chose to write his story in the format of letters written by Robert and Megan, giving the reader immediate understanding of the two main characters and their inner workings. The only downfall is you can't completely trust the representation of other characters as they are filtered through the eyes of Robert and Megan.

My only real complaint is the writing style and narrative choice. It's a lot harder for me to get truly sucked into First Person Narratives and then the added choice of Letters to convey the story slows things down for me.

Reanimatrix is a unique take on genre blending that worked out better than I could have hoped for. Rawlik brought a fresh perspective on some familiar tropes. I can say you'll be glad you picked up this book. There is violence and minor adult themes. I'd recommend it to teens and adults. There are so many different genres covered in this book with other fun literary easter eggs, anyone that likes to read will find something to enjoy.

Guest Blog by Michael J. Martinez and Review of MJ-12: Inception


Please welcome Michael J. Martinez to The Qwillery writing about his new series: MAJESTIC-12. The first novel in this series, MJ-12: Inception, was published on September 6th by Night Shade Books.



Guest Blog by Michael J. Martinez and Review of MJ-12: Inception




Here We Go Again: Starting a New Series

By Michael J. Martinez


I won’t kid you. Starting a brand new series is daunting.

I started writing the book that became The Daedalus Incident in 2010, and I had worldbuilding notes on it dating from 2003. The book came out in 2013, with The Enceladus Crisis in 2014 and The Venusian Gambit last year.

Basically, I spent at least six years with these characters, and well over a decade with the whole notion of Napoleonic era sailing ships in space. That’s a long time to get comfortable with something, and I think if you read all three books, you’ll see me get better as a writer and storyteller as you go.

And now for something completely different.

I certainly could’ve told more Daedalus stories; there are large gaps in the timeline that could’ve been fun to fill in. Maybe I’ll go back and do that someday. But it struck me that it was time to try a new thing, to stretch writerly muscles that hadn’t been used much when writing Daedalus and the others.

I wanted to do something darker and more nuanced, and my teenaged love of spy thrillers kept popping into my head. It was time to give it a whirl. The MAJESTIC-12 series is the result, starting with MJ-12: Inception, out this week in hardcover.

The trick here, of course, was to try to make something that really was different. It couldn’t be the same swashbuckling adventure as the Daedalus series. The characters in MJ-12: Inception shouldn’t be papered-over characters from the other books. I was really conscious of trying to differentiate, and that’s the daunting part. I didn’t want to be formulaic.

If you’ve read Dan Brown, you’ll know what I mean. If you look at the plots of The Da Vinci Code and Deception Point, you’ll find some really striking similarities – a code to crack, a shadowy conspiracy, a mentor-figure that switches sides at the last minute, global repercussions. Honestly, and with all due respect to Dan and his success, I found the similarities in plot beats striking.

But you could say the same thing about many authors – there’s a formula to what they do, and it works. More power to ‘em. I wanted to be different.

That meant building MAJESTIC-12 from the ground up, with a variety of different and nuanced characters, with a different pace and different plot devices. To me, the only real similarities between Daedalus and MJ-12: Inception is that they’re both historical fantasy, they both mash-up a variety of genres, and I wrote ‘em.

I learned a lot writing the Daedalus books, and I’m hopeful that the learning has translated well into the MAJESTIC-12 series. I’m already as comfortable with these characters and this setting as I ever was with those in the Daedalus series, which I consider a plus. They feel right.

I feel like if I’m going to start a new series, then for better or worse, it’s going to be a very different thing, even if it means more work for me, and more risk as well. As my alleged career progresses, I may find I have a firmer footing in certain genres or subgenres, or a facility with certain tropes or themes more than others. But I’m still finding out. And as I do…thanks for coming along for the ride.





MJ-12: Inception
Series:  MAJESTIC-12 #1
Publisher:  Night Shade Books, September 6, 2016
Format:  Hardcover and eBook,
List Price:  US$24.99 (print); US$16.99 (eBook)
ISBN:  978-1-59780-877-4 (print): 978-1-59780-887-3 (eBook)

Guest Blog by Michael J. Martinez and Review of MJ-12: Inception
A team of superhuman covert operatives emerges from the ashes of World War II in a Cold War-era paranormal espionage thriller from acclaimed genre-bender Michael J. Martinez.

It is a new world, stunned by the horrors that linger in the aftermath of total war. The United States and Soviet Union are squaring off in a different kind of conflict, one that’s fought in the shadows, where there are whispers of strange and mysterious developments. . .

Normal people across the United States have inexplicably gained paranormal abilities. A factory worker can heal the sick and injured. A schoolteacher bends emotions to her will. A car salesman alters matter with a simple touch. A former soldier speaks to the dying and gains their memories as they pass on.

They are the Variants, controlled by a secret government program called MAJESTIC-12 to open a new front in the Cold War.

From the deserts of Nevada to the palaces of Istanbul, the halls of power in Washington to the dark, oppressive streets of Prague, the Variants are thrown into a deadly game of shifting alliances. Amidst the seedy underbelly of nations, these once-ordinary Americans dropped in extraordinary circumstances will struggle to come to terms with their abilities as they fight to carve out a place for themselves in a world that may ultimately turn against them.

And as the MAJESTIC-12 program will soon discover, there are others out there like them, some with far more malevolent goals. . .



Tracey's/Trinitytwo's Point of View

MJ-12: Inception is the first novel in an early Atomic Age, paranormal spy series by Michael J. Martinez, author of the Daedalus series. It opens with a devastating post WWII situation during a routine night patrol in the American sector of Berlin. Only Lieutenant Frank Lodge survives the ambush, but he emerges changed. A few months later in Hiroshima, U.S. Navy Lt. Danny Wallace investigates an anomaly given top secret priority. In the tunnels below the wreckage of a hospital, Wallace discovers a phenomenon of intense white light thought to have a connection with the detonation of the A-bomb. This light is believed by an elite few to be linked to the changes experienced by several unsuspecting Americans. U.S. officials call these people Variants; normal people who have been spontaneously endowed with unique abilities that they are not sure how to control and don't fully understand. President Harry S. Truman green lights a highly classified agenda designed to contain, control, and possibly exploit these metahumans' abilities and, in doing so, Operation Majestic Twelve is born.

The main characters in this story are feared because they possess paranormal powers. It's all too easy to believe that our government would go to great lengths to keep their existence a secret. It's also conceivable that they would immediately try to use them as spies. Martinez brilliantly introduces the U.S. government's first paranormal team, Frank, Cal, Ellis, and Maggie, by revealing their bios via confidential reports, and by narrating in the POVs of the Variants themselves. The story follows them through their military quarantine and training, as they learn to control their abilities and work as a unit. I was fascinated by the psychological impact that becoming a metahuman under the government's influence had on each of the Variants.

Martinez also takes the time to detail some of the social injustices experienced by his diverse cast of characters in this Cold War era tale. I was outraged for Cal, the African American factory worker who is definitely my favorite character. His interactions with the bigoted Ellis alternately made me uncomfortable and frustrated by the lack of justice in the world. Through it all, Cal maintains his compassionate nature and I never stopped rooting for him. Maggie, the school teacher who can manipulate people's emotions, is the most terrifying. Her lack of deep emotional commitment or connection to anyone makes her truly scary. Martinez achieves a perfect balance of delving just deep enough into each character to give the reader a detailed understanding while still leaving a tantalizing amount of information open for exploration in future novels in the MAJESTIC-12 series.

Martinez is truly a gifted writer in that MJ:12 Inception has a distinct and utterly different flavor than his previous series. Although I only know about organizations like the CIA from books, movies and literature, his portrayal of the inner workings of government programs seems authentic. I enjoyed reading the confidential reports written from the perspective of top officials in the CIA. Martinez, a master at genre blending, has created an exciting new series by mixing a pinch of James Bond to a dash of the X-Men and then combining that with a dose of politics and old-fashioned cloak and dagger espionage.

With MJ-12 Inception, Martinez weaves an intense tale of patriotism, Cold War politics, the U.S. spy network, and the nuances of human relationships which I simply couldn't put down.





About Michael

Guest Blog by Michael J. Martinez and Review of MJ-12: Inception
Photo by Anna Martinez
I’m a husband, father and writer living the dream in the Garden State. I’ve spent nearly 20 years as a professional writer and journalist, including stints at The Associated Press and ABCNEWS.com. After telling other people’s stories for the bulk of my career, I’m happy that I can now be telling a few of my own creation. I’m a member of the Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America and International Thriller Writers.

When not being a husband, parent or writer, I enjoy beer and homebrewing, cooking and eating, the outdoors and travel. If you’re curious about our travels,  my wife does a far better job of describing our adventures, so check out her blog at katrinawoznicki.com.

Website  ~  Twitter @mikemartinez72


Interview with Nick Mamatas


Please welcome Nick Mamatas to The Qwillery. I Am Providence was published on August 9th by Night Shade Books.



Interview with Nick Mamatas




TQ:  Welcome to The Qwillery. When and why did you start writing?

Nick:  I’d daydreamed about becoming a writer since I was a kid and read Sport by Louise Fitzhugh. The book wasn’t great, but Sport’s father was a writer who, though he struggled, got royalty checks more or less at random in the mail. That sounded pretty good to me, but of course I knew nobody who was a writer, and the only people I knew who had even attended college were my teachers at school. It was longshore, construction, or food service in my family.

I did go to college thanks to New York having an inexpensive and very good state university system at the time, and worked as a gaffer (electrician) in film and video production. I also got involved in the early pre-Web Internet, and in the mid-1990s wrote a couple of pieces for people I met in the underground film/video world about TinyMUDs, which I was very into. Then the mid-1990s “jobless recovery” hit and a lot of work dried up, so I turned to writing. At first, I mostly wrote term papers for a living, but soon began placing small pieces on digital culture and fringe politics on various websites like Disinfo.com. From there I landed freelance gigs for the Village Voice and dot.com 1.0 business magazines, and started editing political work for Soft Skull Press on a freelance basis. At around the same time, I started writing short stories, and chose science fiction, fantasy, and horror, as that is what I’d liked to read as a kid, and because short fiction in that field pays more than contributor copies. It took a couple years before my first story was published, and another year after that to get stories three and four, but then things started going more smoothly.

I basically turned to writing because I enjoy staying home all day and didn’t have any other skills except for the ability to lug heavy stuff and not electrocute myself, though now I have a full-time editorial job and have to go in to an office. I do treat myself to a nice lunch every day, at least.



TQ: Are you a plotter, a pantser or a hybrid?

Nick:  I am totally a pantser. I do often have some idea of the end of a story or novel, but by the time I get to it I realize that it is insufficient and push ahead past one more reversal of fortune. I am, however, a formalist, so generally have a good idea of a structure before I start. I’ll know that a book has eighty chapters of one thousand words each before I know what happens in it, for example.



TQ:  What is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

Nick:  Since the birth of my child, getting the time to finish longer projects has been a great challenge, but in general the greatest challenge has just been locating an audience. My influences are widely varied, and so my work tends to be non-commercial commercial fiction. People who enjoy literary/transgressive/underground work rarely hear of my stuff because it isn’t reviewed in the right places, and people who enjoy science fiction/fantasy/horror read my stuff and often respond, “What the hell is this crazy shit? It’s like he’s mocking everything I love!” (which I am).



TQ:  You are an author, editor and anthologist. How does being an editor affect your own writing?

Nick:  The most important thing is that editing provides a steady paycheck and health benefits. For years I was “starving better”, hustling for every possible small check I could get my hands on. So if I wrote a term paper, or edited resumes, or quickly dashed off some copy for an educational website, and then had to write a dozen emails to make sure the check was going to go in the mail by Friday, and by that I meant Friday morning not Friday afternoon and by mail I mean a mailbox not just the office’s mailroom where an envelope might age like fine cheese over the weekend...

Having a full-time job actually made me more prolific, not less, as bills were paid and I was able to see a doctor and take some time to exercise, greatly improving my health. I had time to reflect, and write more, and plan out larger projects. My novels still tend to be short, but that’s an aesthetic choice I make, not an aspect of a time crunch.

You probably mean to ask if editing has improved my writing though, and yes, it has. I know how to cut out the boring stuff, or when to settle in for a long, slow, burn. A lot of the implicit forms and structures have become clear to me thanks to reading slush. It’s like finally understanding abstract paintings after closely looking at 10,000 of them. I have X-ray vision for form now.



TQ:  What has influenced / influences your writing?

Nick:  The short stories I read in Omni Magazine as a child, which I was way too young for. Marvel and later indie comics from the 1980s. Non-narrative underground cinema, which I’d read about before ever seeing, so had to imagine what they’d look like. Zine culture and conspiracy kooks. Mid-20th century romantic realism of various sorts (Fante, the Beats, etc.). Nineteenth and early twentieth century ghost stories. Ratty paperbacks about Marxism and postmodernism and existentialism purchased from street people off dirty blankets in Washington Square Park. Bizarrely, hard SF, though I don’t write it.



TQ:  Describe I Am Providence in 140 characters or less.

Nick:  A murder mystery at a Lovecraftian convention, with a deceased narrator and an amateur sleuth alternating chapters, with satirical elements.



TQ:  Tell us something about I Am Providence that is not found in the book description.

Nick:  I give a shout-out to my favorite thing on the Internet--ASMR whisper videos on YouTube.



TQ:  What inspired you to write I Am Providence? What appeals to you about writing Horror?

Nick:  I was actually asked to write it by Jeremy Lassen, an editor at Skyhorse. He pitched me an idea he called “Bimbos of the Death Sun meets True Detective.” We’re in a golden moment of public interest in Lovecraft and of critiques of Lovecraft, so it made a lot of sense for me to do it. Other than that one sentence pitch, the book was up to me, and generally speaking it came spilling out once I figured out the structure.

I write dark fiction of various sorts, and horror is as good a name as any. One reason to write horror qua horror is that as a commercial endeavor, it is utterly marginal and thus one can really do whatever one wants with the themes and the tropes without being stopped by profit-minded publishers or angry legions of fans and tastemakers.



TQ:  What sort of research did you do for I Am Providence?

Nick:  I’ve been working in the Lovecraftian idiom since 2002, so at this point all my opinions and junk are pretty solid, so I can’t say I did any real research. I’ve also visited Providence several times, and the like, and as I was dealing with an amateur sleuth, I didn’t need to know a lot about police procedure or forensics. I can’t say I did much research at all.



TQ:  H.P. Lovecraft is an author who comes with a lot of baggage for a lot of people. What appeals to you about his Mythos?

Nick:  I presume you mean his racism, which was disgusting, pathological, and extreme even for his time. Anyone for whom that isn’t baggage I find extremely suspicious, which is one of the themes of I Am Providence. This is made even worse, though, by the fact that one cannot extract the racism from Lovecraft’s stories and have much left. Even when not really about human beings, Lovecraft’s great theme is deep history and the fear of degeneration, both personal and social.

At the same time, deep history is very compelling, as is a vision of an amoral (at best!) universe. Plus, there is a fair amount of unintentional camp in Lovecraft’s work, and some sly purposeful humor, so that is interesting. His work is open to all, but is still so closely tied to him as an originator thanks to the fact that most of his epigones, historically, have been writing slavish pastiche. Imagine if vampire fiction was called Stokerism, and most vampire novels were still about a handful of humans writing letters to one another about their vampiric troubles. We’re on the cusp of breaking out of that and creating a more generalized “mythos”, so I am keen to be a part of that project.



TQ:  Do you have any favorite Lovecraft works?

Nick:  My favorite is “The Whisperer in Darkness”, which to this day can be used as a narrative map for getting around Brattleboro, Vermont, where I used to live. It also combines horror and science fiction, plus integrates folklore into the events of the narrative, do I find it very compelling, even if it doesn’t make a ton of sense.



TQ:  In I Am Providence who was the easiest character to write and why? The hardest and why?

Nick:  They all came pretty easily; once I get a voice, it’s no challenge to keep at it. What was challenging was the third-person chapters focusing on Colleen Danzig, as there is always a tension between being close and subjective and thus revealing all her thoughts, and writing her as one might see her from outside for purposes of suspense. That balance--which is basically the balance between horror dread and mystery logic--was hard to strike sometimes.



TQ:  Which question about I Am Providence do you wish someone would ask? Ask it and answer it!

Nick:

“Are all these characters real people that I’d meet if I went to a Lovecraftian convention?”

“No.”



TQ:  Give us one or two of your favorite non-spoilery quotes from I Am Providence.

"One thing I didn’t think when I realized I was about to die was Oh God, why me? Honestly, I’m surprised that it took as long as it did. It’s a little late to confess one’s sins posthumously, and honestly I’m not sorry. But let’s just say I was a jerk to a lot of people."


"Not every table featured books. T-shirts abounded, many emblazoned with jokes about role-playing games that Colleen was pleased to not actually understand. Displays of pewter dragons and wizards seemed only mildly out of place, like a Seventh Day Adventist in a roomful of Mormons."


"In Lovecraft’s fiction, the outsider becomes the insider. That’s the appeal. The bookish little nerd, often with of aesthetic inclinations if not exactly artistic talent, figures out what is really going on. Ancient languages are deciphered, inexplicable phenomena examined, myths so obscure they can only be discussed in terms older than mankind are discovered to be the literal his- tory of the universe. And the texts themselves provide all sorts of insider jargon and references for the initiated."



TQ:  What's next?

Nick:  I am co-editing a special hybrid anthology with Molly Tanzer, called Mixed Up! Cool Cocktails and Hot Stories, which will pair classic cocktail recipes with flash fiction featuring the cocktail. That’ll be published in the second half of 2017 by Skyhorse, and should be fun, It’s a “gift book”, which means that the people who buy it won’t be the ones who read it. A dream come true!



TQ:  Thank you for joining us at The Qwillery.





I Am Providence
Night Shade Books, August 9, 2016
Trade Paperback and eBook, 256 pages

Interview with Nick Mamatas
The murder of an author at a horror convention uncovers an unspeakable terror beneath the printed page.

For fans of legendary pulp author H. P. Lovecraft, there is nothing bigger than the annual Providence-based convention the Summer Tentacular. Horror writer Colleen Danzig doesn’t know what to expect when she arrives, but is unsettled to find that among the hob-knobbing between scholars and literary critics are a group of real freaks: book collectors looking for volumes bound in human skin, and true believers claiming the power to summon the Elder God Cthulhu, one of their idol’s most horrific fictional creations, before the weekend is out.

Colleen’s trip spirals into a nightmare when her roommate for the weekend, an obnoxious novelist known as Panossian, turns up dead, his face neatly removed. What’s more unsettling is that, in the aftermath of the murder, there is little concern among the convention goers. The Summer Tentacular continues uninterrupted, except by a few bumbling police.

Everyone at the convention is a possible suspect, but only Colleen seems to show any interest in solving the murder. So she delves deep into the darkness, where occult truths have been lurking since the beginning of time. A darkness where Panossian is waiting, spending a lot of time thinking about Colleen, narrating a new Lovecraftian tale that could very well spell her doom.





About Nick

Nick Mamatas is an author, editor, and anthologist. His novels have been translated into German, Italian, and Greek. His work has been nominated for Bram Stoker, Hugo, World Fantasy, Shirley Jackson, International Horror Guild, and Locus awards. Mamatas lives in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Website  ~  LiveJournal  ~ Twitter @NMamatas

THEY REMAIN - New ClipsThe Best Horror of the Year, Volume 10 - Cover and Table of ContentsInterview with Tina LeCount Myers, author of The Song of AllTHEY REMAIN - New Poster and TrailerTHEY REMAIN, Based on "-30-" by Laird BarronMichael J. Martinez Interviews Paul Weimer!Spotlight on Neal Asher's TransformationReview: Reanimatrix by Pete RawlikGuest Blog by Michael J. Martinez and Review of MJ-12: InceptionInterview with Nick Mamatas

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