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Covers Revealed - Upcoming Works By DAC Authors


Here are some of the upcoming July 2020 works by formerly featured Debut Author Challenge (DAC) Authors! The year in parentheses is the year the author was featured in the DAC.


Ian Doescher (2013)

William Shakespeare's The Merry Rise of Skywalker
Star Wars Part the Ninth
Quirk Books, July 28, 2020
Hardcover and eBook, 176 pages

Covers Revealed - Upcoming Works By DAC Authors
Complete your collection of the William Shakespeare’s Star Wars® series and experience the blockbuster finale to the Star Wars® saga in a brand-new way, here reimagined as though it had been penned by the Bard of Avon.

As our story opens, a sea of troubles threatens the valiant Resistance, who are pursued by the sound and fury of the vile First Order. Can Rey, Poe, Finn, Rose, BB-8, Chewbacca, and their allies overcome such toil and trouble? Shall Kylo Ren be proven fortune’s fool or master of his fate? What will become of the House of Skywalker? And is all well that ends well?

Authentic meter, stage directions, reimagined movie scenes and dialogue, and hidden Easter eggs will entertain and impress fans of Star Wars® and Shakespeare alike. Every scene and character from the film appears in the book, along with twenty woodcut-style illustrations that depict an Elizabethan version of the Star Wars® galaxy.

Covers Revealed - Upcoming Works By DAC Authors Covers Revealed - Upcoming Works By DAC Authors
Covers Revealed - Upcoming Works By DAC Authors Covers Revealed - Upcoming Works By DAC Authors
Covers Revealed - Upcoming Works By DAC Authors Covers Revealed - Upcoming Works By DAC Authors
Covers Revealed - Upcoming Works By DAC Authors Covers Revealed - Upcoming Works By DAC Authors





Michael R. Underwood (2012)

Annihilation Aria
The Space Operas 1
Parvus Press, July 21, 2020
Trade Paperback and eBook, 400 pages

Covers Revealed - Upcoming Works By DAC Authors
Max is cheery xeno-archeologist from Earth, stranded and trying to find a way home. Lahra is a stern warrior of a nearly extinct race searching for her people’s heir. Wheel is the couple’s cybernetic pilot running from her past and toward an unknown future.

On Wheel’s ship, the Kettle, the trio traverses the galaxy, dodging Imperial patrols and searching ancient ruins for anything they can sell. The crew of the Kettle are deeply in debt to their home base’s most powerful gangster, and she wants her money back.  

So when a dangerous, but promising job comes their way, Max, Lahra, and Wheel have little choice but to take it. However, the crew of the Kettle gets more than they bargained for when they find themselves in possession of a powerful artifact, one that puts them in the crosshairs of the Vsenk, the galaxy’s ruthless and oppressive imperial overlords. 

Max, Lahra, and Wheel are pulled into a web of galactic subterfuge, ancient alien weaponry, a secret resistance force, lost civilizations, and giant space turtles.  The Vsenk will stop at nothing to recover what the crew of the Kettle has found and Max’s brains, Lahra’s muscle, and Wheel’s skills may be all that stands between entire planets and annihilation.  

Can they evade space fascists, kick-start a rebellion, and save the galaxy all while they each try to find their own way home?





Alex White (2016)

The Worst of All Possible Worlds
The Salvagers 3
Orbit, July 28, 2020
Trade Paperback and eBook, 432 pages

Covers Revealed - Upcoming Works By DAC Authors
The rag-tag crew of the Capricious is hunting down rogue AI, ancient colony ships, and the biggest treasure the universe has ever seen in the final book of this pulse-pounding space adventure series for fans of Firefly and The Expanse.

The crew of the Capricious seems to leave a trail of devastation wherever they go. But with powerful enemies in pursuit and family and friends under attack planetside, there’s no time to worry about all that. Ensnared by the legend of Origin, humanity’s birthplace, and a long-dead form of magic, the Capricious takes off on a journey to find the first colony ship…and magic that could bring down gods.

Read the incredible space-fantasy series that V. E. Schwab calls “A total blast!”

Covers Revealed - Upcoming Works By DAC AuthorsCovers Revealed - Upcoming Works By DAC Authors

Review: William Shakespeare’s The Clone Army Attacketh and William Shakespeare’s Tragedy of the Sith’s Revenge by Ian Doescher


William Shakespeare’s The Clone Army Attacketh
     Star Wars Part the Second
Author:  Ian Doescher
Publisher:  Quirk Books, July 7, 2015
Format:  Hardcover and eBook, 176 pages
List Price:  $14.95 (print and eBook)
ISBN:  9781594748073 (print); 9781594748202 (eBook)
Review Copy: Provided by the Publisher

Review: William Shakespeare’s The Clone Army Attacketh and William Shakespeare’s Tragedy of the Sith’s Revenge by Ian Doescher
In time so long ago begins our play,
In clash-strewn galaxy far, far away.

To Shmi or not to Shmi? Torn between duty to the Jedi, attraction to Padmé, and concern for his beloved mother, yeoman Jedi Anakin Skywalker struggles to be master of his fate. The path he chooses will determine not just his own destiny, but that of the entire Republic. And thereby hangs a tale.

Alack the day! A noble lady in danger. A knight and squire in battle. And a forbidden love that’s written in the stars. Once again, the quill of William Shakespeare meets the galaxy of George Lucas in an insightful reimagining that sets the Star Wars saga on the Elizabethan stage. The characters are familiar, but the masterful meter, insightful soliloquies, and period illustrations will convince you that the Bard himself penned this epic adventure.


Trinitytwo's Point of View

Prerequisite reading: William Shakespeare's The Phantom of Menace (review)

In a galaxy far, far away, Padawan learner, Anakin Skywalker plays the part of Romeo to the fair Senator Padmé Amidala's Juliet. Their forbidden love slowly blossoms amid assassination attempts and ill-fated rescue missions. Obi-Wan Kenobi is sent to the mysterious planet of Kamino where he discovers an army of clones commissioned by the Jedi and encounters Jango and Boba Fett. William Shakespeare's The Clone Army Attacketh is the second installment in the Star Wars prequel trilogy.

At this point in my review, I think I should insert a personal disclaimer: I love all things Star Wars with the exception of the prequels. However, author Ian Doescher does a fantastic job of making me rethink my stance. I have never been a fan of the romance between Anakin and Padmé and that hasn't changed. Yet, I did enjoy Doescher's spin; painting the tragic couple as Romeo and Juliet actually gave their love scenes a sense of grandeur and sacrifice that I felt was missing from the film version. Doescher adds new material in the form of asides and soliloquies that readers should pay special attention to as they never fail to delight. In my opinion, the coolest part of the book was Yoda's kick ass battle scene with Count Dooku. Although the results are the same, it adds so much to the sequence to be allowed the insight of both combatants' thoughts.

With still a few months left in 2015, I am voting The Clone Army Attacketh's cover as my favorite of the year. Nicholas Delort's delightful artwork featuring the nefarious Jango Fett is absolutely stunning.



Review: William Shakespeare’s The Clone Army Attacketh and William Shakespeare’s Tragedy of the Sith’s Revenge by Ian Doescher



William Shakespeare’s Tragedy of the Sith’s Revenge
     Star Wars Part the Third
Author:  Ian Doescher
Publisher:  Quirk Books, September 8, 2015
Format:  Hardcover and eBook, 168 pages
List Price:  $14.95 (print and eBook)
ISBN:  9781594748080 (print); 9781594748219 (eBook)
Review Copy: Provided by the Publisher

Review: William Shakespeare’s The Clone Army Attacketh and William Shakespeare’s Tragedy of the Sith’s Revenge by Ian Doescher
The curtain rises once again on that star-crossed galaxy far, faraway—this time, to chronicle a once-heroic knight’s transformation into the darkest of villains. William Shakespeare’s Tragedy of the Sith’s Revenge is the climactic conclusion to the fall of the house of Skywalker, a collaboration between William Shakespeare and George Lucas that’s filled with masterful meter, stirring soliloquies, inside jokes, and intricate Elizabethan illustrations. You’ll fall in love with Star Wars—and Shakespeare—all over again. At the same time!


Trinitytwo's Point of View

Grab a cold glass of blue bantha milk and snuggle up with your favorite Wookie for the thrilling conclusion to Ian Doescher's delightful, must-read series, William Shakespeare's Tragedy of the Sith's Revenge. True to its source material, it's the tale of an impressionable young Jedi corrupted by the diabolical machinations of a master Sith. Anakin Skywalker's spiral to the Dark Side of the Force by the malevolent orchestrations of the diabolical Chancellor Palpatine is heartrending. Doescher's version serves to emphasize the Sith's corrupt and violence-ridden brand of evil more than the movie ever could. Another key element to this tragic tale is that Doescher was able to poignantly articulate Padmé's and Obi-Wan's despair and loss at Anakin's transformation.

What's so great about this book and its predecessors is that the reader is allowed insight into situations and characters that can actually change perceptions, or deepen emotional attachments. Doescher's pairing of Shakespeare and Lucas continues to captivate and entertain. Tragedy of the Sith's Revenge, along with the rest of the series is seriously clever, and truly a bright star in the galaxy of mash-ups. I recommend it wholeheartedly to Star Wars fans, Shakespeare fans, educators looking for a way to hook their students, and also art lovers. Art lovers? Yes, because Nicolas Delort's illustrations and covers are amazing.

Honestly, I'm hoping that someone makes these into actual plays because I'll be the first in line screaming "Take my money!"

Review: William Shakespeare's The Phantom of Menace by Ian Doescher


William Shakespeare's The Phantom of Menace
Author:  Ian Doescher
Publisher:  Quirk Books, April 7, 2015
Format:  Hardcover and eBook, 176 pages
List Price:  $14.95 (print)
ISBN:  9781594748066 (print)
Review Copy:  Provided by the Publisher

Review: William Shakespeare's The Phantom of Menace by Ian Doescher
Join us, good gentles, for a merry reimagining of Star Wars: episode 1 as only Shakespeare could have written it. The entire saga starts here, with a thrilling tale featuring a disguised queen, a young hero, and two fearless knights facing a hidden, vengeful enemy.

’Tis a true Shakespearean drama, filled with sword fights, soliloquies, and doomed romance . . . all in glorious iambic pentameter and coupled with twenty gorgeous Elizabethan illustrations. Hold on to your midi-chlorians:
 The play’s the thing, wherein you’ll catch the rise of Anakin!


Trinitytwo's Point of View

Unless you’ve been living in a Wampa’s ice cave on the remote planet of Hoth, I’d wager you’re familiar with the Star Wars universe. You also probably know a thing or two about William Shakespeare as it's required reading in most high school English classes. In The Phantom of Menace, Ian Doescher retells George Lucas’s original story through the iambic pentameter of William Shakespeare, and it's absolutely brilliant.

As a slightly obsessed fan of the original Star Wars movie trilogy, I have to confide that I’m less a fan of the prequels. Admittedly, The Phantom Menace introduced some very cool characters like Darth Maul and Qui-Gon Jinn but nothing could redeem the introduction of the most reviled character in Star Wars history, Jar Jar Binks. Dare I confess that I enjoyed William Shakespeare’s The Phantom of Menace more than the film? I did, mainly because this version throws a new spin on Jar Jar that I thoroughly enjoyed. Another character I connected to in this volume that I didn’t in the movie was Anakin Skywalker. Doescher‘s writing instills in him a level of heartwarming depth that I felt was sorely missing in the film. The Phantom of Menace is packed with action, humor, and unexpected emotion. Complimenting the story are many gorgeous illustrations by the talented Nicolas Delort. I also really enjoy the play format with its asides and soliloquies. They offer increased insight and information that brings an exciting added dimension to many characters. Another part of the fun for me is picking up on the author's many homages to the classics.

I like Shakespeare, I love Star Wars, and I am thrilled with the creative mix of the two. I would recommend this book for any fan of Star Wars, fans of the Bard but also to non-Shakespearean readers as well. It's fresh, easy to read, and delightfully entertaining. The Force is strong with Ian Doescher and The Phantom of Menace proves it.

Guest Blog by Ben H. Winters - And His Little Dog, Too - July 17, 2014


Please welcome Ben H. Winters back to The Qwillery. World of Trouble, the 3rd and final novel in the The Last Policeman Trilogy, was published on July 15, 2014.  This is a fabulous series and you should rush out and get all 3 books today! No waiting to find out what happens. You can find the other stops on the World of Trouble Blog Tour here.







AND HIS LITTLE DOG, TOO

So I have to make a confession here, and it’s one I feel kind of bad about, considering how many readers of The Last Policeman and its sequels have told me how much they love Hank’s dog, Houdini.

I never really wanted Hank to have a dog. When I imagined the character I always imagined him on his own, just the determined man and his gun, and a cute little white doggie trotting along beside him never fit that picture.

But best-laid plans, like homework, sometimes get eaten by dogs. (Is that an expression? It should be.)

What happened was, I wrote a scene, about halfway through the first book, with this little dirty scared dog in it—and the only reason was to illuminate the nature of the dog’s owner, a burly thug named JT Toussaint. I thought it would be both funny and interesting for Toussaint to have a small furry creature bouncing around in his dingy ramshackle house.

But then I wrote this speech for Toussaint, part of his long (and successful) effort to intimidate Detective Palace:

“I’m gonna have to shoot this dog,” Toussaint says, suddenly,
absently, matter-of-fact, and stands up. “At the end, I mean.”

“What?”

“He’s a little scaredy cat, this one.” Toussaint is looking down at
the dog, his head tilted, as if evaluating, trying to imagine how it’s
going to feel. “Can’t think of him dying like that, fire or cold or
drowning. Probably I’m gonna go ahead and shoot him.”


After that, it only seemed right, once Toussaint was out of the picture, for Palace—a born protector, and himself a bit of a scaredy cat—to grudgingly adopt the thing.

But then I had to write the damn dog for two more books!

I did some research. I called my brother-in-law, Mike, and asked him all about his old dog, Wiley, and it turned out that Wiley was a Bichon Frisé, and so that’s what Houdini turned out to be. I found myself plotting out the arc of their relationship, Detective Palace and his little dog, so that by the time I started World of Trouble I knew that the first line (prologue excepted) was going to be: “I’m worried about my dog.”

Well, you know how the rest of this goes: I fell in love with the thing. Just like Palace did! I ended up appreciating the authorial challenge of it, figuring out how to register the actions and attitude of an animal in text, how to portray this character who is just bursting with complicated emotions and motivations, but who can’t express them in words. (Unless it’s a dog in Animal Farm or The Phantom Tollbooth, but this isn’t that kind of book).

Here’s the dog, in one of his very last appearances in the Last Policeman trilogy.:

Houdini ducks in and out of my footsteps, snorfeling at the dirt, and I bend and scratch the white fur behind his head, and he growls low and contented.

I’m gonna miss Detective Palace, and a lot of these other characters I’ve been hanging out with for three years now. But I’ll be damned if I’m not going to miss that little dog the most.





The Last Policeman Trilogy

World of Trouble
The Last Policeman Trilogy 3
Quirk Books, July 15, 2014
Trade Paperback and eBook, 320 pages

Critically acclaimed author Ben H. Winters delivers this explosive final installment in the Edgar Award winning Last Policeman series. With the doomsday asteroid looming, Detective Hank Palace has found sanctuary in the woods of New England, secure in a well-stocked safe house with other onetime members of the Concord police force.

But with time ticking away before the asteroid makes landfall, Hank’s safety is only relative, and his only relative—his sister Nico—isn’t safe. Soon, it’s clear that there’s more than one earth-shattering revelation on the horizon, and it’s up to Hank to solve the puzzle before time runs out . . . for everyone.



Countdown City
The Last Policeman Trilogy 2
Quirk Books, July 16, 2013
Trade Paperback and eBook, 320 pages

The Last Policeman received the 2013 Edgar Award for Best Paperback Original--along with plenty of glowing reviews.

Now Detective Hank Palace returns in Countdown City, the second volume of the Last Policeman trilogy. There are just 77 days before a deadly asteroid collides with Earth, and Detective Palace is out of a job. With the Concord police force operating under the auspices of the U.S. Justice Department, Hank's days of solving crimes are over...until a woman from his past begs for help finding her missing husband.

Brett Cavatone disappeared without a trace—an easy feat in a world with no phones, no cars, and no way to tell whether someone’s gone “bucket list” or just gone. With society falling to shambles, Hank pieces together what few clues he can, on a search that leads him from a college-campus-turned-anarchist-encampment to a crumbling coastal landscape where anti-immigrant militia fend off “impact zone” refugees.

Countdown City presents another fascinating mystery set on brink of an apocalypse--and once again, Hank Palace confronts questions way beyond "whodunit." What do we as human beings owe to one another? And what does it mean to be civilized when civilization is collapsing all around you?



The Last Policeman
The Last Policeman Trilogy 1
Quirk Books, May 13, 2013 (new cover)
Trade Paperback and eBook, 336 pages
(originally published on July 10, 2012)

What’s the point in solving murders if we’re all going to die? Detective Hank Palace has asked this question ever since asteroid 2011GV1 hovered into view. Several kilometers wide, it’s on a collision course with planet Earth, with just six precious months until impact.

The Last Policeman presents a fascinating portrait of a pre-apocalyptic United States. Industry is grinding to a halt. Most people have abandoned their jobs. But not Hank Palace. As our story opens, he’s investigating the latest suicide in a city that’s full of suicides—only this one feels wrong. This one feels like homicide. And Palace is the only one who cares. What’s the point in solving murders if we’re all going to die?

The Last Policeman offers a story we’ve never read before: A police procedural set on the brink of an apocalypse. What would any of us do, what would we really do, if our days were numbered?








About Ben

Ben H. Winters is the author of eight novels, including most recently World of Trouble (Quirk). Countdown City (Quirk), an NPR Best Book of 2013 and the winner of the Philip K. Dick Award, is the sequel to The Last Policeman, which was the recipient of the 2012 Edgar Award from the Mystery Writers of America; it was also named one of the Best Books of 2012 by Amazon.com and Slate.

Ben’s other books Literally Disturbed (Price Stern Sloan), a book of scary poems for kids; the New York Times bestselling parody novel Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters (Quirk); and a novel for young readers, The Secret Life of Ms. Finkleman (HarperCollins), which was a Bank Street Best Children’s Book of 2011 as well as an Edgar Nominee in the juvenile category.

Ben has also written extensively for the theater, and was a 2009-2010 Fellow of the Dramatists Guild; his plays for young audiences include The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere, A (Tooth) Fairy Tale and Uncle Pirate and his plays for not-young audiences include the 2008 Off-Broadway musical Slut and the “jukebox musical” Breaking Up Is Hard to Do, which is produced frequently across the country and around the world. Ben’s journalism has appeared in The Chicago Reader, The Nation, In These Times, USA Today, the Huffington Post, and lots of other places.

Ben grew up in suburban Maryland, went to college at Washington University in St. Louis, and has subsequently lived in six different cities—seven if you count Brooklyn twice for two different times. Presently he lives in Indianapolis, Indiana, with his wife Diana, a law professor, and their three children.

Website  ~  Twitter @BenHWinters  ~  Facebook  ~  The Last Policeman on Facebook



Review: William Shakespeare's Star Wars®, William Shakespeare's The Empire Striketh Back and William Shakespeare's The Jedi Doth Return by Ian Doescher






Trinitytwo’s Point of View

I am forgoing my usual short synopsis of the stories I review because in this case I think I am justified with assuming that most people already know a little something about the original Star Wars trilogy.

I’ve loved Star Wars since I saw the first film in 1977. Naturally, I jumped at the chance to review these books. However, I will admit to being a bit nervous about the “Shakespearean” component. Honestly, I admire the Bard and absolutely love Shakespearean theater, but given the choice it is not the first (or even second) book I would pull from a shelf to read. If you have similar fears, let me put them to rest: Ian Doescher’s triple combination of the beloved bard, George Lucas’ classic Star Wars saga, and a few of the author’s own secret ingredients creates one of the most enchanting and delightful series imaginable. This well-loved story written in Shakespearean style made the material fresh and exciting.

Pay special attention to the asides and soliloquies: they can be funny, poignant or sad but each gives a unique insight into character personality or motivations. I really love Doescher’s books the best when he shares our cherished character’s innermost thoughts. For instance, how does C-3PO really feel about R2-D2, or vice-versa? Haven’t we all wondered what Obi Wan was really thinking when he told Luke his father was killed by Darth Vader? Speaking of Vader, what are the thoughts behind that monstrous mask? Are Stormtroopers people with ideas and hopes, or just faceless soldiers? How did Luke and Leia feel when they found out they were siblings after their infamous kiss? Is the Emperor all bad?  Doescher’s narrative resolves these mysteries and more.

I also want to take a moment to gush about the illustrations in all three volumes, drawn by the talented Nicholas Delort. They help readers to visualize their favorite characters in frilly ruffs and doublets and are absolutely brilliant.

Forget the nunnery and get thee to a bookstore to pick up all three of these delightful tomes. Each one is a “must read,” so whether you are spending your summer in the sands (Tatooine), stuck at work (Death Star) or are on some exotic jungle adventure (Endor), you need to trust your instincts because there are no Jedi mind tricks here, only great reading!




William Shakespeare's Star Wars®
Series:  William Shakespeare's Star Wars Trilogy 1
Publisher:  Quirk Books, July 2, 2013
Format:  Hardcover and eBook, 176 pages
Price:  $14.95 (print)
ISBN:  9781594746376 (print)
Review Copy:  Provided by the Publisher

Return once more to a galaxy far, far away with this sublime retelling of George Lucas’s epic Star Wars in the style of the immortal Bard of Avon. The saga of a wise (Jedi) knight and an evil (Sith) lord, of a beautiful princess held captive and a young hero coming of age, Star Wars abounds with all the valor and villainy of Shakespeare’s greatest plays. ’Tis a tale told by fretful droids, full of faithful Wookiees and fearstome stormtroopers, signifying...pretty much everything.

Reimagined in glorious iambic pentameter—and complete with twenty gorgeous Elizabethan illustrations--William Shakespeare’s Star Wars will astound and edify Rebels and Imperials alike. Zounds! This is the book you’re looking for.





William Shakespeare's The Empire Striketh Back
Series:  William Shakespeare's Star Wars Trilogy 2
Publisher:  Quirk Books, March 18, 2014
Format:  Hardcover and eBook, 176 pages
Price:  $14.95 (print)
ISBN: 9781594747151 (print)
Review Copy:  Provided by the Publisher

The saga that began with the interstellar best seller William Shakespeare’s Star Wars continues with this merry reimagining of George Lucas's enduring classic The Empire Strikes Back.

Many a fortnight have passed since the destruction of the Death Star. Young Luke Skywalker and his friends have taken refuge on the ice planet of Hoth, where the evil Darth Vader has hatched a cold-blooded plan to capture them. Only with the help of a little green Jedi Master—and a swaggering rascal named Lando Calrissian—can our heroes escape the Empire's wrath. And only then will Lord Vader learn how sharper than a tauntaun's tooth it is to have a Jedi child.

What light through Yoda's window breaks? Methinks you'll find out in the pages of The Empire Striketh Back!





William Shakespeare's The Jedi Doth Return
Series:  William Shakespeare's Star Wars Trilogy 3
Publisher:  Quirk Books, July 1, 2014
Format:  Hardcover and eBook, 176 pages
Price:  $14.95 (print)
ISBN:  9781594747137 (print)
Review Copy:  Provided by the Publisher

Hot on the heels of the New York Times best seller William Shakespeare’s Star Wars comes the next two installments of the original trilogy: William Shakespeare’s The Empire Striketh Back and William Shakespeare’s The Jed Doth Return. Return to the star-crossed galaxy far, far away as the brooding young hero, a power-mad emperor, and their jesting droids match wits, struggle for power, and soliloquize in elegant and impeccable iambic pentameter.

 Illustrated with beautiful black-and-white Elizabethan-style artwork, these two plays offer essential reading for all ages. Something Wookiee this way comes!





2013 Philip K. Dick Award - Winner

The Philip K. Dick Award  award is sponsored by the Philadelphia Science Fiction Society. The ceremony is sponsored by the Northwest Science Fiction Society.

The nominees for the 2013 Philip K. Dick Award::


The winner was announced on April 18th at Norwescon:

Countdown City
Ben H. Winters
The Last Policeman 2
Quirk Books, July 16, 2013
Trade Paperback and eBook, 320 pages


2013 Philip K. Dick Award - Winner
The Last Policeman received the 2013 Edgar Award for Best Paperback Original--along with plenty of glowing reviews.

Now Detective Hank Palace returns in Countdown City, the second volume of the Last Policeman trilogy. There are just 77 days before a deadly asteroid collides with Earth, and Detective Palace is out of a job. With the Concord police force operating under the auspices of the U.S. Justice Department, Hank's days of solving crimes are over...until a woman from his past begs for help finding her missing husband.

Brett Cavatone disappeared without a trace—an easy feat in a world with no phones, no cars, and no way to tell whether someone’s gone “bucket list” or just gone. With society falling to shambles, Hank pieces together what few clues he can, on a search that leads him from a college-campus-turned-anarchist-encampment to a crumbling coastal landscape where anti-immigrant militia fend off “impact zone” refugees.

Countdown City presents another fascinating mystery set on brink of an apocalypse--and once again, Hank Palace confronts questions way beyond "whodunit." What do we as human beings owe to one another? And what does it mean to be civilized when civilization is collapsing all around you?



William Shakespeare's The Empire Striketh Back - The Book Trailer


Quirk Books just released the book trailer for William Shakespeare's The Empire Striketh Back by Ian Doescher. It doth delight!





William Shakespeare's The Empire Striketh Back
Quirk Books, March 18, 2014
Hardcover and eBook, 176 pages

The saga that began with the interstellar best seller William Shakespeare’s Star Wars continues with this merry reimagining of George Lucas's enduring classic The Empire Strikes Back.

Many a fortnight have passed since the destruction of the Death Star. Young Luke Skywalker and his friends have taken refuge on the ice planet of Hoth, where the evil Darth Vader has hatched a cold-blooded plan to capture them. Only with the help of a little green Jedi Master—and a swaggering rascal named Lando Calrissian—can our heroes escape the Empire's wrath. And only then will Lord Vader learn how sharper than a tauntaun's tooth it is to have a Jedi child.

What light through Yoda's window breaks? Methinks you'll find out in the pages of The Empire Striketh Back!

Covers Revealed - Upcoming Works By DAC AuthorsReview: William Shakespeare’s The Clone Army Attacketh and William Shakespeare’s Tragedy of the Sith’s Revenge by Ian DoescherReview: William Shakespeare's The Phantom of Menace by Ian DoescherGuest Blog by Ben H. Winters - And His Little Dog, Too - July 17, 2014Review: William Shakespeare's Star Wars®, William Shakespeare's The Empire Striketh Back and William Shakespeare's The Jedi Doth Return by Ian Doescher2013 Philip K. Dick Award - WinnerWilliam Shakespeare's The Empire Striketh Back  - The Book TrailerInterview with Ben H. Winters, author of The Last Policeman and Countdown City - July 12, 2013Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children - Giveaway - June 8, 2013

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