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A blog about books and other things speculative

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Interview with Steven H Silver - April 16, 2015


Please welcome Steven H Silver to The Qwillery. “Well of Tranquility” will be published in GENIUS LOCI: Tales of the Spirit of Place from Ragnarok Publications.

This is the twenty-seventh in a series of interviews with many of the authors and the artists involved in GENIUS LOCI. I hope you enjoy meeting them here at The Qwillery as much as I am!

Interview with Steven H Silver - April 16, 2015

While you may have missed the Genius Loci Kickstarter (I'm a backer), you will be able to get the anthology via BackerKit and if you miss the BackerKit, from Ragnarok Publications later this year.



TQ:  Welcome to The Qwillery. What is the most challenging thing for you about writing? Are you a plotter or a pantser?

Steven:  I tend to make it up as I go along, but I need to know what my target it. If I don’t know how the story ends before I begin, I usually find that it peters out without actually achieving anything.



TQ:  You are an editor and a fiction prize judge, among other things. How does this affect (or not) your writing?

Steven:  I don’t think being a judge particularly impacts my writing (although it does cut into my time to write). It would be nice to think that working as an editor means that my own work tends to be better than it otherwise would be, but the truth is, that as an author, I’m too close to what I write to be my own editor.



TQ:  Which question about your writing do you wish someone would ask? Ask it and answer it!

Steven:  Well, the major question would be “Can I publish your novel and give you piles of money?” and the answer would be an emphatic “Yes!”



TQ:  Describe “Well of Tranquility”, which will be published in Genius Loci, in 140 characters or less.

Steven:  In an ancient monastery in Armenia, a monk discovers an ancient force that may be the peace of God or may be something older.



TQ:  Tell us something about “Well of Tranquility” that will not give away the story.

Steven:  Since I was writing about two different cultures to which I don’t belong, I needed to make sure I was showing respect and honestly depicting those cultures. Fortunately, I had friends who had grown up in those cultures and could vet the writing and research I was doing.



TQ:  What was your inspiration for “Well of Tranquility”? Have you ever encountered a Genius loci?

Steven:  “Well of Tranquility” began with the idea of a peaceful holy place that in reality was a place with a Lovecraftian Elder God was once worshipped. It changed quite a bit when I began to do research into Armenia, where I decided to set the story.

The first time I really felt like I had encountered a Genius loci was in 1984 while walking around the ruins of Kenilworth Castle in Warwickshire. I don’t believe in the supernatural, but it was one of the few times in my life that I felt like I could possibly run into a ghost when I turned a corner.



TQ:  Give us one of your favorite non-spoilery lines from “Well of Tranquility”.

Steven:

“Father Mesrop tells me that a supernatural calm falls upon those who enter the cell, allowing their thoughts to bring them closer to Him in a way that he has never felt in any other place in the world. But, he also warns that the feeling of serenity can be dangerous, for it is a…how did he describe it…an enticing calmness, as much to be feared as revel in.”



TQ:  In which genre or genres does “Well of Tranquility” fit? In your opinion, are genre classifications still useful?

Steven:  It definitely falls into the fantasy genre, although it is sort of fantasy light. Although there is a fantastic explanation for what happens to Brother Sevak, it is also quite possible that there is nothing supernatural occurring and just a matter of the power of suggestion.



TQ:  What's next?

Steven:  In addition to being an editor, writer, and judge, I also run conventions. In 2015, I’ll be chairing the 50th Annual Nebula Awards Weekend for SFWA in Chicago from June 4-7 and I’ll also be chairing Windycon 42 in the Chicago area the weekend of November 13-15. https://www.sfwa.org/nebula-awards/nebula-weekend and http://www.windycon.org



TQ:  Thank you for joining us at The Qwillery.





More About Steven H Silver

Website  ~  ISFDB

Interview with Gemma Files - April 11, 2015


Please welcome Gemma Files to The Qwillery. “Twilight State” will be published in GENIUS LOCI: Tales of the Spirit of Place from Ragnarok Publications.

This is the twenty-seventh in a series of interviews with many of the authors and the artists involved in GENIUS LOCI. I hope you enjoy meeting them here at The Qwillery as much as I am!

Interview with Gemma Files - April 11, 2015

While you may have missed the Genius Loci Kickstarter (I'm a backer), you will be able to get the anthology via BackerKit and if you miss the BackerKit, from Ragnarok Publications later this year.



TQ:  Welcome to The Qwillery. What are the challenges in writing in the short form as opposed to the novel length? Are you a plotter or a pantser?

Gemma:  Whenever I teach, I tell people that the main challenge of writing short stories is always that in order to keep things beneath a certain length, you basically have to sacrifice either plot for character/mood or character/mood for plot. For me, this is always where “Character’s Name” becomes “So There’s This [Guy, Girl, Person of Some Sort, Whatever].” And with horror this can be difficult, because much like action comes from character, fear also often comes from character...but then again, the sheer mechanics of fear, the existential certainties that fear arises from, are truly universal, so it balances out more often than not.

Though I do like having a whole novel to develop people in, that process comes with its own inherent annoyances as well, including the fact that when you have enough room to, you feel like you have to use it—explore every thought, every motivation, every relationship dynamic and emotional beat, in sometimes excruciating detail. Near the end of every book, I have a few moments where I’m like: “Jesus, this would move so much quicker if there weren’t so many people in this scene! Maybe I should kill half of them.” (And the good part about horror is, you can!)

Re plotter vs. pantser, meanwhile—plotter, overall; I write detailed notes at every point on the curve, and have a very specific idea where things are going, to the extent that you could say I enter each new project knowing exactly how the story ends, as well as how it begins. But it’s always in the middle passage, the getting from here to there—the discovery of not what happens, so much, but why, and how—where things inevitably change alchemically.



TQ:  Which question about your writing do you wish someone would ask? Ask it and answer it!

Gemma:  I’m always interested by what people come up with, that’s for sure, but I’m not sure there’s anything I’ve been waiting with bated breath to be asked. Sorry.



TQ:  Describe “Twilight State”, which will be published in Genius Loci.

Gemma:  “Twilight State” is definitely a character/mood over plot kind of tale. In the wake of a bad divorce, Briony has retreated to a family cabin near Gravenhurst, Ontario, where she’s receiving lightbox therapy for insomnia and seasonal affective disorder which involves being put into “twilight sleep,” a hypnotic, highly-suggestible state of almost-unconsciousness. This, in turn, brings up increasingly frightening childhood memories, causing her to loose hold of her sense of self.



TQ:  Tell us something about “Twilight State” that will not give away the story.

Gemma:  I first came across mention of the mrak—the Serbian fairytale creature Briony’s obsessive first love tells her about—in one particular British reference book, and have had an amazingly difficult time discovering information about it anywhere else. So while my interpretation of it may not be strictly accurate, I’m still pretty happy with the result.



TQ:  What was your inspiration for “Twilight State”? Have you ever encountered a Genius loci?

Gemma:  “Twilight State” directly references my own memories of visiting my grandparents’ cabin up Gravenhurst way, and the physicality of that very particular atmosphere: overcast skies, lapping lake-water, silt and muck and wood-loam, the lichen-covered rocks, the rotting pine-needle carpeting. That peculiar green darkness under deep tree-cover, full of tiny swarming, biting flies. So yeah, if there was any place that seemed haunted to me, as well as essentially Canadian, that was it. I also referenced a lot of this same detail in my most recent book, We Will All Go Down Together: Stories of the Five-Family Coven (ChiZine Publications), which is partially set in a made-up area of Northern Ontario called the Lake of the North District.



TQ:  Give us one of your favorite non-spoilery lines from “Twilight State”.

Gemma

To arrive here, always, is to step back into a dream I was born dreaming.



TQ:  In which genre or genres does “Twilight State” fit? In your opinion, are genre classifications still useful?

Gemma:  I always thought of “Twilight State” as a bit of a Canadian noir, because it not only revolves around a rich woman and the femmes fatales she feels like she’s doomed to do stupid shit over, but also because Briony is a bit of a femme fatale herself, one of those depressed yet charismatic people who sucks others into her orbit like a decaying star. But everything I write is horror, to one degree or another; I’ve had people tell me that something I’ve produced “finally” feels more lit than dark lit, and thought: “But what’s that supposed to get me, exactly?” I mean, I can certainly forsee a world where all books end up in the general fiction section, but I don’t see that as a victory, necessarily—for one thing, it’ll make finding exactly what you want a good deal harder than it needs to be. Genre labels can be very useful things, if done right.



TQ:  What's next?

Gemma:  I literally just finished and filed the manuscript for my next novel, Experimental Film, which should be coming out from CZP by this November. It’s essentially a ghost story about a lost Ontario silent filmmaker from the silver nitrate era and how one of their movies, in particular, is really not meant to be watched, but the main character is very explicitly based on myself, so it’s also about frustrated creativity, Canadian film culture and the challenges of having a child with special needs. One way or the other, I was aiming for something halfway between Alice Munro and David Cronenberg, so I guess I’ll have to wait ‘til the reviews start coming in to find out if I hit the mark.



TQ:  Thank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

Gemma:  Thank you for having me.





About Gemma Files

Interview with Gemma Files - April 11, 2015
Former film critic and teacher turned horror author Gemma Files is best-known for her Weird Western Hexslinger series (A Book of Tongues, A Rope of Thorns and A Tree of Bones, all from CZP). In 1999, her story “The Emperor’s Old Bones” won the International Horror Guild’s Best Short Fiction award, and five of her tales have been adapted into episodes for the erotic horror TV show The Hunger, produced by Ridley and Tony Scott. She has also published two chapbooks of speculative poetry, two collections (Kissing Carrion and The Worm in Every Heart) and a story cycle (We Will All Go Down Together: Stories of the Five-Family Coven). She lives in Toronto, Canada.

Website  ~   Twitter @gemmafiles

Interview with Sonya Taaffe - April 10, 2015


Please welcome Sonya Taaffe to The Qwillery. “Imperator Noster” will be published in GENIUS LOCI: Tales of the Spirit of Place from Ragnarok Publications.

This is the twenty-seventh in a series of interviews with many of the authors and the artists involved in GENIUS LOCI. I hope you enjoy meeting them here at The Qwillery as much as I am!

Interview with Sonya Taaffe - April 10, 2015

While you may have missed the Genius Loci Kickstarter (I'm a backer), you will be able to get the anthology via BackerKit and if you miss the BackerKit, from Ragnarok Publications later this year.



TQ:  Welcome to The Qwillery. What are the challenges in writing in the short form as opposed to the novel length? Are you a plotter or a pantser?

Sonya:  I can't answer the first question, because I've never written a novel, but as to the second, I think I might be a mix of the two. All of my stories start by the seat of the pants—I have a handful of words and I start building around them. Usually they're a scene, a sketch of a character, an image I'm trying to render accurately; sometimes they're just the rhythms of a character's voice. I may know the premise, but I don't necessarily know how events will work out. Or I know a hinge-point in the story, but I don't know where it falls. I do generally have some idea of direction, at least to start out with. The farther I get into the story, the better idea I have of what will happen in it, until—if I'm lucky—the right ending is the only one left to write to. What I can't do is outline in advance, in the same way that I can't talk too much about a story in progress, unless I want my brain to decide that it's already told the story and shut the narrative drive down. So it's not as though I am writing completely blind, but it might as well look like it from the outside: I have to hold it all in my head until it's done, with fragments from anywhere along the way as placeholders, although I won't know they're the right ones for certain until I reach them and see whether they fit or not. Even that makes the process sound more linear than it is. Inside my head, everything feels a lot more three-dimensional than point-to-point. Last lines are always written last, but first lines are very often not the first ones that occur to me.



TQ:  You are a poet. How does writing poetry affect (or not) your prose writing?

Sonya:  I never know how to answer this question. I think it makes me very attentive to rhythm and density of images, but someone else might say it just makes my sentences go on forever.



TQ:  Which question about your writing do you wish someone would ask? Ask it and answer it!

Sonya:  Yikes. I would love for someone to ask if I wanted a great deal of money to write regularly about film (to which my answer would be YES THANK YOU MONEY PLEASE NOW), but if we're talking about process rather than payoff . . . I write often about the sea; it is one of my oldest influences and touchstones. I have written very little about other similarly intense early imprints. I don't write about cats, for example. I don't write about trees. My first poem about foxes [http://throughthegate.net/issue6-mar2015/taaffe-foxstory.html] was published this year. I would like someone to ask me for a story or a poem about forests, because I might as well learn how to write about other things I love.



TQ:  Describe “Imperator Noster”, which will be published in Genius Loci, in 140 characters or less.

Sonya:  A secret history of Rome's dealings with the sea, told by rumors, dreams, and the dead.



TQ:  Tell us something about “Imperator Noster” that will not give away the story.

Sonya:  It's one of my few successful pieces of historical fiction, other recent examples of which include "In Winter" [http://lackingtons.com/2014/08/18/in-winter-by-sonya-taaffe/] and "ζῆ καὶ βασιλεύει" [http://www.ideomancer.com/?p=2999]. I have a lot of difficulty not falling down endless black holes of research, so it's not that historical settings don't occur to me, it's that I have to wrestle my tendency to write a dissertation instead of a short story and/or let myself be daunted by the extent of everyday detail I don't know off the top of my head—it is very easy for me to lose a story if I don't feel confident about its accuracy, even if that's more of a manifestation of my anxiety than a reflection of my actual knowledge. "Imperator Noster" started with an advantage, being set in a period I've been familiar with for decades and a mythscape I've loved since I was a toddler who jumped into the high tides of the winter sea, and it doesn't hurt that it turned out flash-length instead of a novella. I'm still proud of it.



TQ:  What was your inspiration for “Imperator Noster”? Have you ever encountered a Genius loci?

Sonya:  In January 2014, C.S.E. Cooney left an enigmatic summary of her New Year's Eve on Facebook: "On parties. And seaweed. And Roman Emperors." The parties didn't make it into "Imperator Noster," but the other two items were the direct spark; I stayed up the rest of that night writing. The substrate is a background in classical studies and an affinity for the sea. I did not set out to work it into fiction, but I also suspect a passage from Robert Macfarlane's The Old Ways of playing a part:

The existence of the ancient seaways, and their crucial role in shaping prehistory, were only recognized in the early twentieth century. Until then, pre-historians and historical geographers had demonstrated a 'land bias'; a perceptive error brought about by an over-reliance on Roman sources that tended to concentrate on the movement of troops, goods and ideas on foot and across countries. Certainly, the Roman Empire's road network transformed internal mobility in Europe and, unmistakably, Roman roads were the key to uniting the empire's dispersed territories, as well as generating its military and economic power. 'The sea divides and the land unites,' ran the Roman truism. But for millennia prior to the rise of Rome's empire, the reverse had been true. The classical sources misled subsequent historians—allied with the fact that the sea erases all records of its traverses, whereas the land preserves them.



TQ:  Give us one of your favorite non-spoilery lines from “Imperator Noster”.

Sonya:

"The survivors clung to their splinters and prayed to the gods of sea-swell, of seventh waves, of fisherman's mercy for the catch too small to keep."



TQ:  In which genre or genres does “Imperator Noster” fit? In your opinion, are genre classifications still useful?

Sonya:  It's historical fiction with a numen of the sea. Whether that's fantasy depends on your perspective and your belief. Phyllis Gotlieb's A Judgment of Dragons (1980) is one of my favorite novels in any genre, in great part because its opening novella, "Son of the Morning," is a science fiction story when viewed from the perspective of one set of characters and from the other a classic story of the Yiddish fantastic. There are aliens in it, time travel, telepathy; or there is the demon-king Ashmedai, his minions and golems, the influence of the evil eye. Eventually, it's simply both. I recommend the novel no matter what, because its protagonists are the best telepathic alien cats I've ever read, but I read it as a very small child and I think it left a permanent effect. I find genre classifications useful in certain conversations, like where to find a book in the library or how its use of a given trope might be read against its predecessors in the tradition, but I don't think about them a lot when I'm writing.



TQ:  What's next? [talk about what else is upcoming for you]

Sonya:  I have a new collection, Ghost Signs [http://www.aqueductpress.com/books/978-1-61976-071-4.php], just out from Aqueduct Press, and recent reprints in How to Live on Other Planets: A Handbook for Aspiring Aliens (ed. Joanne Merriam, Upper Rubber Boot Books) and Lightspeed Magazine. As far as upcoming work, I will have short stories and poems in The Humanity of Monsters (ed. Michael Matheson, ChiZine Publications), Dreams from the Witch House: Female Voices of Lovecraftian Horror (ed. Lynne Jamneck, Dark Regions Press), and An Alphabet of Embers and Spelling the Hours (ed. Rose Lemberg, Stone Bird Press), as well as in assorted magazines including Not One of Us, Goblin Fruit, Mythic Delirium, and inkscrawl. I hope not to kill any stories in progress by talking about them.



TQ:  Thank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

Sonya:  Thank you very much for having me!





About Sonya Taaffe

Interview with Sonya Taaffe - April 10, 2015
Sonya Taaffe’s short fiction and poetry can be found in the collections Ghost Signs (Aqueduct Press), A Mayse-Bikhl (Papaveria Press), Postcards from the Province of Hyphens (Prime Books), and Singing Innocence and Experience (Prime Books), and in anthologies including How to Live on Other Planets: A Handbook for Aspiring Aliens, Aliens: Recent Encounters, Beyond Binary: Genderqueer and Sexually Fluid Speculative Fiction, The Moment of Change: An Anthology of Feminist Speculative Poetry, People of the Book: A Decade of Jewish Science Fiction & Fantasy, The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror, The Alchemy of Stars: Rhysling Award Winners Showcase, and The Best of Not One of Us. She is currently senior poetry editor at Strange Horizons; she holds master’s degrees in Classics from Brandeis and Yale and once named a Kuiper belt object. She lives in Somerville with her husband and two cats.

LiveJournal

Interview with Andy Duncan - April 1, 2015


Please welcome Andy Duncan to The Qwillery. “Santa Cruz” will be published in GENIUS LOCI: Tales of the Spirit of Place from Ragnarok Publications.

This is the twenty-sixth in a series of interviews with many of the authors and the artists involved in GENIUS LOCI. I hope you enjoy meeting them here at The Qwillery as much as I am!

Interview with Andy Duncan - April 1, 2015

I am a backer of GENIUS LOCI which is edited by Jaym Gates. You may check out the Kickstarter here. GENIUS LOCI has been funded and reached the Deluxe format printed edition stretch goal! There are additional stretch goals! The Kickstarter ends tomorrow (April 2, 2015 at 11:00 AM EDT)!



TQ:  Welcome to The Qwillery. What are the challenges in writing in the short form as opposed to the novel length? Are you a plotter or a pantser?

AD:  Having never written a novel, only short fiction, I can’t compare the experiences.
I always have a plot, a premise, a structure in mind, and I always violate them whenever I need to, depending on the discoveries I make while writing. I urge my writing students to avoid simplistic “either/or” categories; a good writer has to be both plotter and pantser – or (another way of putting it) neither plotter nor pantser.



TQ:  You are a teacher and a journalist. How does this affect (or not) your fiction writing?

AD:  Much of what I know about fiction writing was learned during my 12 years of full-time journalism: characterization, dialogue, description, pacing, scene-setting, exposition – not to mention cutting, proofreading, working with editors, and meeting deadlines. My students challenge me and inspire me every day. If I have grown at all, as a writer and a person, since I started teaching in 1993, my students deserve much of the credit.



TQ:  Which question about your writing do you wish someone would ask? Ask it and answer it!

AD

Question: “May I write you a seven-figure check for Hollywood rights to one of your stories?”

Answer: “Yes.”



TQ:  Describe "Santa Cruz", which will be published in Genius Loci, in 140 characters or less.

AD:  “Santa Cruz” accurately recounts one of the strangest nights of my life.



TQ:  Tell us something about "Santa Cruz" that will not give away the story.

AD:  I told Chris McKitterick what happened to me that night, and he said, “You really should write that down.”



TQ:  What was your inspiration for "Santa Cruz"? Have you ever encountered a Genius loci?

AD:  See answer above.



TQ:  Give us one of your favorite non-spoilery lines from "Santa Cruz".

AD:  “That is probably impossible, but it happened.”



TQ:  In which genre or genres does "Santa Cruz" fit? In your opinion, are genre classifications still useful?

AD:  Like every text, it fits multiple genres. It’s non-fiction; it’s also an anecdote and a short memoir. It counts as Forteana; it’s also a Jungian text, because it’s about apparently meaningful coincidence. It’s an example of what Roz Kaveney and John Clute (in The Encyclopedia of Fantasy) call the Night Journey story. And, because it’s being published in the middle of a fiction anthology, it’s also a short story – and, because it’s a fantasy anthology, also a fantasy story. Much of what we call genre, after all, is merely context. Genre classifications are most useful as finding aids and as tools for comparison, but they occasionally can be inspirational. I helped an undergraduate student with his story manuscript by saying, “There’s a name for this genre; it’s a Locked-Room Mystery, and here are some models for you.”



TQ:  What's next?

AD:  In summer 2015, I’ll teach the first week of the Clarion West writers’ workshop in Seattle.
My third collection, An Agent of Utopia: New and Selected Stories, is upcoming from Small Beer Press.



TQ:  Thank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

AD:  You’re welcome.





About Andy Duncan

Interview with Andy Duncan - April 1, 2015
Andy Duncan has won a Nebula Award, a Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award, and three World Fantasy Awards, most recently for the Tor.com novella “Wakulla Springs,” written with Ellen Klages. Upcoming is An Angel of Utopia: New and Selected Stories, from Small Beer Press. He’s a tenured associate professor of English at Frostburg State University in Maryland, where he coordinates the journalism minor and advises the student newspaper.







Blog  ~   Twitter @beluthahatchie


Interview with Evan Jensen April 1, 2015


Please welcome Evan Jensen to The Qwillery. Evan is one of two artists for GENIUS LOCI: Tales of the Spirit of Place from Ragnarok Publications.

This is the twenty-fifth in a series of interviews with many of the authors and the artists involved in GENIUS LOCI. I hope you enjoy meeting them here at The Qwillery as much as I am!

Interview with Evan Jensen April 1, 2015

I am a backer of GENIUS LOCI which is edited by Jaym Gates. You may check out the Kickstarter here. GENIUS LOCI has been funded and reached the Deluxe format printed edition stretch goal! There are additional stretch goals!



TQ:  Welcome to The Qwillery. How did you get your start in illustration?

Evan:  Hey, howdy. Thanks for the questions! As to this one, I've always been drawing. One of *those* kids you hear about, messing with markers and pencils since early days. I didn't quite realize you could do it FER SRS until I was about 14, though. At that point I aimed at art college, and after university (which whatever your feeling on the ROI of art school, is at least a years-long span of dedicated practice time), I've been sort of stumbling through life at various freelance work. From illustration to design to mural work. It's worked out so far!



TQ:  How do decide what to illustrate for a particular work?

Evan:  Generally I like to read the story end to end, then pick and choose interesting seeming visuals from the narrative. Sometimes there's just a sheer volume of book and you rely a bit on the Art Director or Editor to highlight passages/imagery they would like to see come to life. Such may be the case with Genius Loci, in that this book is awesomely long and if we read it all it would be a while until we were able to sketch up the best parts!



TQ:  What is your process for creating your art?

Evan:  When I read I tend to visualize the tale that's coming through the words (maybe most people do), so if something exciting leaps out I'll proceed to thumbnail sketches. Lots of small pencil doodles to get the awesome imagery out of my head into a physical shape that keeps the awesome feeling it had in my head. This is a lot of minor refining of composition and layout, shapes and sizes, poses and expressions. After that, maybe a big sketch and then a final drawing; or if it's feeling right, I go straight to final drawing and paint. Generally I work in watercolor over pencil with acrylic gouache or colored pencil to bring out final details. Also, walnut ink is a super fun medium to paint in for monochrome stuff.



TQ:  Please tell us about what you are creating for Genius Loci?

Evan:  It's the interior art, so it will be in greyscale, varying from spot/quarter page illustrations to a couple full-page artings. Lisa Grabenstetter & I were each going to do 6 illustrations originally. But then there's the More Art! Stretch goal we hit, so...



TQ:  What are some of your own favorite works prior to Genius Loci?

Evan:  I particularly like the cover work I did for Crossed Genres Magazine 22: Bildungsroman (http://fathomlessbox.com/folio/CG_Bildungsroman_800.jpg), as well as the non-commissioned painting Plucking the Night Orchard (http://fathomlessbox.com/folio/tailspinning1.jpg). In the vein of that walnut ink I mentioned, I have a whole steampunky series about a hedgehog adventurer (http://fathomlessbox.com/folio/hedgie8.jpg) on his exploits. I feel really good about the illustrations I did for 826DC's (826dc.org) Museum of Unnatural History, as well, though that was a while ago now. They led to some fun changes in style and working method for me.



TQ:  Are there any artists/art that inspire you?

One of my favorite illustrators when I was younger was Tony DiTerlizzi. His art for RPG titles are one of the big things that got me into fantasy work. He has a great way with line, color, and character. Likewise, John Jude Palencar's sense of mystique is very appealing to me, if a bit lonely sometimes. I love looking at work very different from my own, too; Ivan Bilibin, sculptor Beth Cavener Stichter, Wylie Beckert, Julie Dillon, printmaker Shane Chick... dang, so many others. It's hard to choose just a few, and you don't want me to list a book's worth I'm sure. : )



TQ:  Where can we find your work online?

Evan:  My (rather dated) portfolio site is www.fathomlessbox.com, but evanjensen.deviantart.com is also kept fresh, and I'm on twitter as @etchlingsart and lurk on tumblr, but haven't used it much. I'm around!



TQ:  What's next?

Evan:  Genius Loci will have my attention for a bit, but after that Lisa & I hope to move to the Pacific Northwest and find some new chances to make art out there. I have a bookplate relief commission to finish as well, which is the printmaking side of my work.



TQ:  Thank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

Evan:  Any time, thanks!





About Evan Jensen

Interview with Evan Jensen April 1, 2015
Evan makes a mean masala chai, plans to build a bamboo bicycle when he finds some long-lost free time, and lives on rain and fog. He pays the bills off art and freelance illustration. Sometimes he wears the graphic design hat.



www.fathomlessbox.com  ~  evanjensen.deviantart.com

Twitter @etchlingsart


Interview with Caroline Ratajski - April 1, 2015


Please welcome Caroline Ratajski to The Qwillery. “The Forgetting Field” will be published in GENIUS LOCI: Tales of the Spirit of Place from Ragnarok Publications.

This is the twenty-fourth in a series of interviews with many of the authors and the artists involved in GENIUS LOCI. I hope you enjoy meeting them here at The Qwillery as much as I am!

Interview with Caroline Ratajski - April 1, 2015

I am a backer of GENIUS LOCI which is edited by Jaym Gates. You may check out the Kickstarter here. GENIUS LOCI has been funded and reached the Deluxe format printed edition stretch goal! There are additional stretch goals!



TQ: Welcome to The Qwillery. What are the challenges in writing in the short form as opposed to the novel length? Are you a plotter or a pantser?

Caroline:  Thank you!

I feel like one of the biggest challenges in writing shorter stories is leaving the reader feeling satisfied. It's like the difference between a light lunch and an appetizer: one is complete in itself, one leaves you waiting for more. You want to make sure the reader doesn't walk away feeling cheated, or like you as the author have wasted their time.

I'm definitely a pantser. I've tried plotting in advance, but once I've finished the outline my brain thinks its done writing the story and it makes drafting really boring for me. I wish I were a plotter. It seems so much more organized than stumbling through a story, trying to figure out what's going on.



TQ: You're a codemonkey (software engineer). How does this affect (or not) your writing?

Caroline:  Because I write software for a living, I feel like I wind up taking a very methodical approach to my writing and editing. I set realistic, attainable goals with firm deadlines, and work to meet them. I also analyze the structure of my books the same way I analyze software systems, looking for ways that seemingly separate things can influence one another.



TQ: Which question about your writing do you wish someone would ask? Ask it and answer it!

Caroline:  I can't really think of a specific question, but lately I've been thinking a lot about figuring out your identity as a writer. What kind of stories do you want to tell? How do you want to tell them? How do you begin to figure that out? It's hard when you're so close to your own work, to pull out common themes and images. It might be tempting to think of this as your "brand," but I feel like it's a deeper question than that. I feel like a lot of my stories have themes of hurting and healing in them, especially "The Forgetting Field." So that's my answer for now. I hope in the future someone asks me this question. It would be interesting to see if my answer has changed!



TQ: Describe “The Forgetting Field”, which will be published in Genius Loci, in 140 characters or less.

Caroline:  Hidden deep in the mountains is a field of flowers. If you eat the flowers you will forget the things that haunt you. But there is a cost.



TQ: Tell us something about “The Forgetting Field” that will not give away the story.

Caroline:  I really enjoyed writing this story from the perspective of a field of flowers. That was a fun challenge!



TQ: What was your inspiration for “The Forgetting Field”? Have you ever encountered a Genius loci?

Caroline:  It's such a cliche, but the inspiration for this story actually came from a dream. The first time I tried to write it, I focused more on the person rather than the field, and it wasn't working at all. When I saw the call for this anthology, I thought of this story almost immediately. When I rewrote it focusing more on the place and less on the people, it finally came together.

The closest I feel I've come to a Genius Loci was when I was in Pompeii some years ago. I remembered learning that the people who lived there knew of the threat of the volcano, and yet they built their city anyway. I didn't understand why until I went there and stood on the green hills and walked among the ruins. Something about that place was so heartachingly tranquil that I felt like I wanted to stay there forever. It felt like the air was alive and smiling peacefully at me. I wonder if the ancient citizens of Pompeii must have felt the same.



TQ: Give us one of your favorite non-spoilery lines from “The Forgetting Field”.

Caroline:

"Once we had eaten our fill, that one’s pain was gone. All that remained was a memory of pain, like a knotted scar in treeflesh, growing over what had been clawed away."



TQ: In which genre or genres does “The Forgetting Field” fit? In your opinion, are genre classifications still useful?

Caroline:  I would say it's fantasy, but a bit dark. I don't believe it quite crosses over into horror. I think genre classifications are still useful in describing something, but I feel like they should be looked at less like rules and more like guidelines. Sometimes they can be used so rigidly, and that can be to the detriment to great works that don't necessarily fit neatly into any one genre.



TQ: What's next?

Caroline:  I'm currently editing a horror novel that I hope to have to go on submission when it's completed.



TQ: Thank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

Caroline:  Thank you so much for having me!





About Caroline Ratajski

Caroline Ratajski is a writer and software engineer currently living in Silicon Valley, California, USA. Previously published as Morgan Dempsey, her short fiction is currently available in Broken Time Blues and Danse Macabre, as well as at Redstone Science Fiction, and is forthcoming in Genius Loci. She is represented by Barry Goldblatt of Barry Goldblatt Literary, LLC.

Website  ~  Twitter @geardrops  ~  Facebook  ~  tumblr

Interview with Vivienne Pustell - April 1, 2015


Please welcome Vivienne Pustell to The Qwillery. “The City” will be published in GENIUS LOCI: Tales of the Spirit of Place from Ragnarok Publications.

This is the twenty-third in a series of interviews with many of the authors and the artists involved in GENIUS LOCI. I hope you enjoy meeting them here at The Qwillery as much as I am!

Interview with Vivienne Pustell - April 1, 2015

I am a backer of GENIUS LOCI which is edited by Jaym Gates. You may check out the Kickstarter here. GENIUS LOCI has been funded and reached the Deluxe format printed edition stretch goal! There are additional stretch goals!



TQ:  Welcome to The Qwillery. What is the most challenging thing for you about writing? Are you a plotter or a pantser?

Vivienne:  For a long time, I was just a pantser, but I've become a loose plotter. I usually have a start and an end destination in mind, but then I get terribly messed up in the middle bit. One of the hardest things for me is having a lot of characters—I tend to essentially take a magnifying glass to just one character, but I love stories with a great ensemble cast! I want to write that, but I really struggle with developing those exciting, varied groups.



TQ:  Who are some of your literary influences and favorite authors?

Vivienne:  So many! Patricia C. Wrede's Enchanted Forest Chronicles were huge for me growing up, as well as Tamora Pierce's Lioness series. They both have left such a huge mark on my writing. Likewise Marion Zimmer Bradley's Mists of Avalon and Anne McCaffrey's Pern. I would love to be able to write like Kurt Vonnegut—I feel like he has this perfect blend of absurd and funny meets painfully honest and human. His writing makes me cry-laugh, which is what I would like my writing to do. David Foster Wallace, too! I really love Lev Grossman's Magicians series—so dark, so clever, so intriguing. Arundhati Roy and Mary Rickert are two others—their stories are ostensibly set in reality, but there's something magical and otherworldly about them, and they use language with such beauty. I can sit and reread sentences of theirs over and over for the sheer pleasure of how amazing they are.



TQ:  Which question about your writing do you wish someone would ask? Ask it and answer it!

Vivienne:  Oh no! I don't know if there's a question about my writing I wish people would ask. I'm actually very scared of talking about it at all. Maybe “Can I get you another coffee and some cozy slippers so you can keep writing?” The answer would be “yes please.”



TQ:  Describe “The City”, which will be published in Genius Loci, in 140 characters or less.

Vivienne:  The city is disintegrating people--stealing memories, voices, and entire bodies. But how do you defend yourself against a city?



TQ:  Tell us something about “The City” that will not give away the story.

Vivienne:  I genuinely have no idea how the City became the way it is. I don't know what city it is, or what apocalyptic thing happened or how it got these powers. There is a lot of ambiguity and open-endedness in this story, running on the never-seeing-Grendel theory of scary—don't worry, dear reader, there is room for all of your neuroses and fears to come out and play!



TQ:  What was your inspiration for “The City”? Have you ever encountered a Genius loci?

Vivienne:  This story was actually originally a novel manuscript. The City was a dreamscape, rather than a reality, so I didn't have to figure out where it was or how it got that why or why it had powers. I still really like the idea, but I tried too hard to give it a happy ending, which is just not something I tend to write. Paring down what was going on to just a short story actually really improved it, which was quite the blow to my authorial ego. Oops! But I feel like I'm being more honest in the short version than in the novel-length one. It's more true? Something like that. The inspiration is that feeling of despondency that comes with being unsatisfied with life—the slow erosion of self, the mounting sense of loss, but not really know why or, if you do know why, not knowing how to fight it. How profoundly powerless we so often are. I was thinking a lot about friends and students and the frustration that they have expressed about having to minimize themselves to be accepted, whether its over race or gender identity or religion or any number of things. We lose so many beautiful people to the anonymous crushing of the world. And you can be angry, but how do you fight it? Kicking a building won't do anything other than hurt your foot. Finding a way to hold onto yourself is hard. As a teacher, I was constantly worrying about my kids and about myself. We were all getting eaten up. I spent a lot of time angry about what our society was doing to my kids. The City was just what was going on in my head.

I haven't had a lot of experiences with genius loci. Maybe one? I think I also could be reframing how I see places, because San Francisco is full of character. It's more that I tend to be oblivious than that they aren't there!



TQ:  In which genre or genres does “The City” fit? In your opinion, are genre classifications still useful?

Vivienne:  Oh my. I suppose it's fantasy? I'm not really sure. I don't mind genre classifications as a way to help people know what they're getting into—if I'm looking for a classic bodice ripper romance and I end up with military science fiction, I might be confused or disappointed. But outside of that, I think genres usually do more harm than good. I write in a lot of different genres, and I'd hate to be categorized as only able to publish in one because that's just how it's done. I think there are a lot of great writers out there who blend genres and cross lines, and I think that's great. I also think that too often genres are used as ranking systems, or ways of assigning value—like science fiction, by virtue of not being “literary fiction,” can't be literature. And we all know that's not true. I think genres can help people narrow down their search when they're looking for a book and just know they want a certain category or content, but I always get worried when classifying and pigeon-holding people and works. Nothing is ever as cut and dry and straightforward as we like to make it!



TQ:  What's next?

Vivienne:  Well, right now I'm pretty focused on finishing up grad school, but I'm working on a couple of other stories. I'm dabbling in military SF right now, which I've never done before, so it's been fun and interesting. Hopefully I'll have a few more pieces out and published by the end of the year!



TQ:  Thank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

Vivienne:  Thank you!





About Vivienne Pustell

Interview with Vivienne Pustell - April 1, 2015
Vivienne Pustell is a graduate student at Stanford University and a former high school English teacher. She has presented her fiction at San Francisco's Litquake and to her cat. “The City” is her first publication.







Interview with Seanan McGuire - April 1, 2015


Please welcome Seanan McGuire to The Qwillery. “Long Way Down” will be published in GENIUS LOCI: Tales of the Spirit of Place from Ragnarok Publications.

This is the twenty-second in a series of interviews with many of the authors and the artists involved in GENIUS LOCI. I hope you enjoy meeting them here at The Qwillery as much as I am!


Interview with Seanan McGuire - April 1, 2015

I am a backer of GENIUS LOCI which is edited by Jaym Gates. You may check out the Kickstarter here. GENIUS LOCI has been funded and reached the Deluxe format printed edition stretch goal! There are additional stretch goals!



TQ:  Welcome back to The Qwillery. What are the challenges in writing in the short form as opposed to the novel length?

SM:  I don't get as many words. Seriously. I get used to being able to take my time, and I can't do that when I'm working in short form. Sometimes that can be super-frustrating.



TQ:  Tell us something about “Long Way Down” that will not give away the story.

SM:  It's about the creek where I used to play as a child.



TQ:  What was your inspiration for “Long Way Down”? Have you ever encountered a Genius loci?

SM:  See previous answer! The creek is a real place, and I really feel like it has opinions on things.



TQ:  Give us one of your favorite non-spoilery lines from “Long Way Down”.

SM

"It was a barrier of sorts, a passageway between the world of kitchens that smelt like boiled cabbage and classrooms packed with rich kids who stared down their nose at you (starting in first grade, first grade, and how did they even learn to look down on other people in first grade? Who was standing by to make sure their kids knew that rich was rich and poor was poor, and never the twain shall meet?), and the world of green and brown and the smell of mud and water."



TQ:  In which genre or genres does “Long Way Down” fit? Having asked that, in your opinion, are genre classifications still useful?

SM:  It's dark fantasy, a little urban, but more dark. Genre classifications are useful because they give the reader a framework. I like genre classifications sliced fine, so I can arrow in on exactly what I want.



TQ:  What's next?

SM:  A nap! More seriously, ROLLING IN THE DEEP comes out April 7th from Subterranean Press, under the Mira Grant byline, and I have a lot of short fiction forthcoming.



TQ:  Thank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

SM:  Thank you for having me.





About Seanan McGuire

Seanan McGuire was born in Martinez, California, and raised in a wide variety of locations, most of which boasted some sort of dangerous native wildlife. Despite her almost magnetic attraction to anything venomous, she somehow managed to survive long enough to acquire a typewriter, a reasonable grasp of the English language, and the desire to combine the two. The fact that she wasn't killed for using her typewriter at three o'clock in the morning is probably more impressive than her lack of death by spider-bite.

Interview with Seanan McGuire - April 1, 2015
Often described as a vortex of the surreal, many of Seanan's anecdotes end with things like "and then we got the anti-venom" or "but it's okay, because it turned out the water wasn't that deep." She has yet to be defeated in a game of "Who here was bitten by the strangest thing?," and can be amused for hours by almost anything. "Almost anything" includes swamps, long walks, long walks in swamps, things that live in swamps, horror movies, strange noises, musical theater, reality TV, comic books, finding pennies on the street, and venomous reptiles. Seanan may be the only person on the planet who admits to using Kenneth Muir's Horror Films of the 1980s as a checklist.

Seanan is the author of the October Daye urban fantasies, the InCryptid urban fantasies, and several other works both stand-alone and in trilogies or duologies. In case that wasn't enough, she also writes under the pseudonym "Mira Grant." For details on her work as Mira, check out MiraGrant.com.

In her spare time, Seanan records CDs of her original filk music (see the Albums page for details). She is also a cartoonist, and draws an irregularly posted autobiographical web comic, "With Friends Like These...", as well as generating a truly ridiculous number of art cards. Surprisingly enough, she finds time to take multi-hour walks, blog regularly, watch a sickening amount of television, maintain her website, and go to pretty much any movie with the words "blood," "night," "terror," or "attack" in the title. Most people believe she doesn't sleep.

Seanan lives in a creaky old farmhouse in Northern California, which she shares with her cats, Alice and Thomas, a vast collection of creepy dolls and horror movies, and sufficient books to qualify her as a fire hazard. She has strongly-held and oft-expressed beliefs about the origins of the Black Death, the X-Men, and the need for chainsaws in daily life.

Years of writing blurbs for convention program books have fixed Seanan in the habit of writing all her bios in the third person, so as to sound marginally less dorky. Stress is on the "marginally." It probably doesn't help that she has so many hobbies.

Seanan was the winner of the 2010 John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer, and her novel Feed (as Mira Grant) was named as one of Publishers Weekly's Best Books of 2010. In 2013 she became the first person ever to appear five times on the same Hugo Ballot.

Website  ~  Twitter  ~  Blog  ~  Facebook

Interview with Sarah Goslee - April 1, 2015


Please welcome Sarah Goslee to The Qwillery. “The Transplant Specialist” will be published in GENIUS LOCI: Tales of the Spirit of Place from Ragnarok Publications.

This is the twenty-first in a series of interviews with many of the authors and the artists involved in GENIUS LOCI. I hope you enjoy meeting them here at The Qwillery as much as I am!

Interview with Sarah Goslee - April 1, 2015

I am a backer of GENIUS LOCI which is edited by Jaym Gates. You may check out the Kickstarter here. GENIUS LOCI has been funded and reached the Deluxe format printed edition stretch goal! There are additional stretch goals!




TQ:  Welcome to The Qwillery. What are the challenges in writing in the short form as opposed to the novel length? Are you a plotter or a pantser?

Sarah:  The difference between lengths for me is that I can hold the entire shape of a short story in my head. I can't do that with a novel, so I need to make some kind of attempt at outlining in advance. I have a serious problem with colored post-it notes, gel pens, and index cards, and novel outlining feeds that addiction beautifully. Even though novels are more colorful, I find short stories a whole lot easier.



TQ:  You are a scientist. How does this affect (or not) your writing?

Sarah:  It gives me a fertile source of ideas: much of my writing draws on themes or at least factoids from my research work. It also provides immense frustration: my well-practiced nonfiction skills don't transfer to fiction nearly as well as I'd like. I've been tempted to write fiction in the form of "Introduction, Methods, Results, Discussion, Conclusions" (the standard sections of a scientific journal article) just to make the process more familiar. I know how that works!



TQ:  Which question about your writing do you wish someone would ask? Ask it and answer it!

Sarah:

Q: What do you do with all those post-its and colored pens?

A: Mostly I doodle on them, then stick them to the cats. Someday the cats will rearrange them into a coherent novel for me, thus saving me a great deal of work.



TQ:  Describe “The Transplant Specialist”, which will be published in Genius Loci, in 140 characters or less.

Sarah:  I'd be rich if I weren't ethical. Beth, the protagonist is not ethical, but disturbingly good at her work.



TQ:  Tell us something about “The Transplant Specialist” that will not give away the story.

Sarah:  I was reading the last of Kim Harrison's Hollows series when I wrote "The Transplant Specialist," and it shows.



TQ:  What was your inspiration for “The Transplant Specialist”? Have you ever encountered a Genius loci?

Sarah:  I'm an ecologist, and I research the combinations of soils, topography and climate that distinguish one site from another. There are some places that I'm intimately familiar with, over long times and all seasons: I know what grows where, and why, and when. Those are the things that I think of when I ponder spirits of place.



TQ:  Give us one of your favorite non-spoilery lines from “The Transplant Specialist”.

Sarah:  "Nine out of ten of those 'best places to live'? I put them there, and the tenth I just haven't bumped off the list yet."



TQ:  In which genre or genres does “The Transplant Specialist” fit? In your opinion, are genre classifications still useful?

Sarah:  It's urban fantasy, as you'd guess from the Kim Harrison influence. I think genre classifications are a useful marketing tool, in the "if you like stories like this" sense, but I've written everything from zombie erotica to horror to straight science fiction.



TQ:  What's next?

Sarah:  My current major project is not dying: I've been undergoing treatment for colon cancer for the past year and some. That's cut down greatly on my time and energy for fiction, but it's been going well and I hope to be back to writing regularly this summer. I've been writing nonfiction about my experiences at http://www.sarahgoslee.com in hopes that it will help other people. It's finding its way into what fiction I've been able to write as well: I'm currently working on a story about the experience of being poisoned (chemotherapy being not all that different except in intent and outcome).



TQ:  Thank you for joining us at The Qwillery.





About Sarah Goslee

Interview with Sarah Goslee - April 1, 2015
Sarah Goslee wants to know everything, and fully intends to live long enough to learn it all. She's a scientist so that she can help figure out the things that nobody knows yet. She writes fiction and nonfiction indiscriminately, makes things out of string, and dresses as a Viking on weekends.





Website  ~  Twitter @phiala


Interview with B. Morris Allen - April 1, 2015


Please welcome B. Morris Allen to The Qwillery. “Blackthorn” will be published in GENIUS LOCI: Tales of the Spirit of Place from Ragnarok Publications.

This is the twentieth in a series of interviews with many of the authors and the artists involved in GENIUS LOCI. I hope you enjoy meeting them here at The Qwillery as much as I am!

Interview with B. Morris Allen - April 1, 2015

I am a backer of GENIUS LOCI which is edited by Jaym Gates. You may check out the Kickstarter here. GENIUS LOCI has been funded and reached the Deluxe format printed edition stretch goal! There are additional stretch goals!



TQ:  Welcome to The Qwillery. What is the most challenging thing for you about writing? Are you a plotter or a pantser?

Morris:  It took me a ridiculously long time to realize that inspiration never strikes just when you have an hour free and a pen in hand. You virtually never get desire, time, and opportunity all at once. In order to make any progress at all, I have to treat writing as a job, not an option. The first hour is always tough, but after that, I usually get into the groove, and then I can write fluidly for hours (if I have them).



TQ:  Do you think that your world travel affects how you write in any way? Does it give you a different perspective than you might not have had?

Morris:  I grew up in a lot of places, and liked it so much that I searched for a job that would let me travel just as often. I'm sure it's changed me as a person; it's edifying to see your own country from outside it, and equally edifying to see another country from within, especially when you work with people who are trying hard to change it for the better. I hope it's true that the experience leads me to make fewer assumptions about what's best, and to listen more to others. It's equally true, though, that everyone believes their part of the world is special and different and hard to understand, when in fact some problems are universal (but difficult to solve). So, that's the touchy-feely answer. As a practical matter, as a writer, I have a set of different environments to draw on. For example, I'm currently writing a science fiction novel that starts in Rwanda. I lived there for a couple of years, and I have a pretty good sense of what the country looks like. It helps me to have a very concrete picture of the environment, even if very little makes it into the actual story



TQ:  Which question about your writing do you wish someone would ask? Ask it and answer it!

Morris:  "I noticed that in your stories, no one ever seems to eat meat; is that deliberate?" Why, yes it is, and thank you for asking. I'm a long-time vegan myself, and when I'm imagining worlds, I prefer to imagine ones where I could eat whatever's on offer. I'm not using my fiction to proselytize, and food is seldom central to the plot - it just happens that when characters eat, they eat vegan.



TQ:  Describe “Blackthorn”, which will be published in Genius Loci, in 140 characters or less.

Morris:  Spring and winter incarnate walk the land, both beautiful, both unique. Their inherent differences come to a head over a humble thornbush.



TQ:  Tell us something about “Blackthorn” that will not give away the story.

Morris:  The folk tale I based it on is the one told in my wife's home village, so the story is based there as well.



TQ:  What was your inspiration for “Blackthorn”? Have you ever encountered a Genius loci?

Morris:  lived in Moldova for a little over a year. One of the traditions they have there (and in Romania and Bulgaria) is the martisor - a little red and white decoration people give each other at the beginning of March, and wear throughout the month. My (Moldovan) wife and I have maintained the tradition across several countries. "Blackthorn" is a modified version of the story they tell in my wife's village about the origin of the custom.



TQ:  Give us one of your favorite non-spoilery lines from “Blackthorn”.

Morris:  "[Winter] spent hours designing snowflakes one by one – each a miniature work of art, perfect but ephemeral." Who makes all those unique snowflakes, anyway, and why?



TQ:  In which genre or genres does “Blackthorn” fit? In your opinion, are genre classifications still useful?

Morris:  Literature sprawls where it will, but there's just too much of it to get a handle on. You have to organize it somehow, and categories are useful for that. "Blackthorn" is definitely in the SFF|Fantasy|Folk tale category.



TQ:  What's next?

Morris:  Some of what I've written is pretty dark, to the extent that some of my family have begun to feel I host an inner sociopath. Happily, there's a comedian in there keeping him company, and I just finished Stamp of Approval, a comic fantasy novella (about an epic quest involving a lot of paperwork) that I hope will come out soon. With that done, it's back to grim and forbidding science fiction in my Four Seasons Quintet series.



TQ:  Thank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

Morris:  Thanks for the invitation. It's always fun to talk about writing.





About B. Morris Allen

Interview with B. Morris Allen - April 1, 2015
I grew up in a house full of books that traveled the world. Nowadays, they’re e-books, and lighter to carry, but they’re still multiplying. I've been a biochemist, an activist, and a lawyer, and now work as a foreign aid consultant. When I'm not roaming foreign countries fighting corruption, I'm on the Oregon coast, chatting with seals. In the occasional free moment, I work on my own speculative stories of love and disaster.


Wesbite  ~  Twitter @bmorrisallen

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Interview with Steven H Silver - April 16, 2015Interview with Gemma Files - April 11, 2015Interview with Sonya Taaffe - April 10, 2015Interview with Andy Duncan - April 1, 2015Interview with Evan Jensen April 1, 2015Interview with Caroline Ratajski - April 1, 2015Interview with Vivienne Pustell - April 1, 2015Interview with Seanan McGuire - April 1, 2015Interview with Sarah Goslee - April 1, 2015Interview with B. Morris Allen - April 1, 2015

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