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Guest Blog by Max Gladstone - Place as character in the Craft Sequence - July 22, 2014


Please welcome Max Gladstone to The Qwillery. Full Fathom Five, the 3rd novel in the Craft Sequence, was published by Tor on July 15, 2014.



Guest Blog by Max Gladstone - Place as character in the Craft Sequence - July 22, 2014




Place as character in the Craft Sequence

A dragon lived in the woods near the school where I grew up.

A tall thin tree, maybe a cedar, had grown somehow bent into a V: its trunk curved down sharp ten feet above the ground and descended. Then it died, but stayed standing. Insects and rain chewed most of the down-angled slope to a thin rail. Above, where mandibles had not yet reached, the rail seemed to protrude from a long smiling mouth. A thick red knot above the mouth formed an eye. So: dragon.

I paid the dragon respects each time I passed on my way to the bluff. He seemed to appreciate it.

The magic of my adolescence was the magic of middle Tennessee, which is to say of trees and stone and hidden pools without obvious source. Every quarry had a body in it somewhere. Having moved south from Ohio, I could only remember the magic I'd left, of horizon-spanning Lakes and strange coolant towers, of freezing wind and freshwater hurricanes that tore the roofs off local high schools. Tennessee magic was softer and subtler, magic of shadows and green smells, of living things and unrestrained wild, of copses beyond which you'd find only deeper woods. In middle Tennessee, as in much of America, the door through the hedge leads to more hedge. The plateaus of my youth crossed state lines. Below them stretched horizons of patchwork farm country. Local magic was deep and squirrely, by turns vicious or oppressive as the heat, or liberating, terrifying: an orb weaver with a body the size of my fist suspended in the center of a clearing on a jeweled web anchored to trees ten yards apart.

All magic has its place, I guess is what I'm trying to say, and every place has its magic. Each person's relationship to and sense of that magic may differ, but the magic remains.

Writing fantasy, I try to understand the contours of a place's magic. If I don't, no system I create, no strange creatures I invite into a story, will feel at home within. Ted Chiang describes a magical worldview as one that supposes the world's in relationship with you—and in that sense place-magic absolutely exists, even if we don't want to give my experience of a place's magic any more reality than a sort of Feuerbachian projection of my own feelings about the place's feelings about me. But the sensation's real, and if we want to investigate definitions and layers of reality we'll be here through a philosophy thesis and into next year, so let's just assume that Achilles eventually crosses the finish line and magic—or a sort of it—exists.

When I create a setting, though—or knock a real setting over the back of the head and drag it off into fantasyland—I need to think carefully about the kind of magic the place I'm writing would possess. Dresediel Lex, the setting of my book TWO SERPENTS RISE, was a kind of LA / Beijing hybrid city, dry and dusty and hot and crystal, defined by its lack of water. It was afraid of fire and poison and moving earth. It loved the sun, and color, and dancing, and the ocean. It glanced hastily over its shoulder toward the seat of government. That shaped the magic—and the perspective appropriate to the book. Basically, my main character needed to be someone more at the mercy of his place's magic than in control of it.

In FULL FATHOM FIVE, my new book, I needed new magic—less desert and more island. I was lucky enough to be able to travel, and draw on old kayaking experience and a few years of working near a port, so beaches and forest and sea air were fresh to my memory. My island of Kavekana is a sort of financial services hub for the global magical economy, and does a brisk tourist trade to boot, which leaves the society sharply stratified and torn away from itself—and also shapes the magic of the place and characters' responses to it.

For more inspiration I studied millennialist "cargo cults," which make more sense the more you learn about them—as far as an observant Pacific Islander in the 19th century could tell, colonists received finished goods from their ancestors over the sea. Missionaries certainly weren't making those rifles themselves! (If we read "established capital" for "ancestors," which there's no reason we shouldn't because they're basically the same thing, the locals were 100% correct in their interpretation of observed phenomena!) Why weren't locals receiving cargo from their ancestors? Because their ancestors' shipments were being blocked, or even stolen! Perfectly logical. Not precisely right for the political situation on Kavekana, or the metaphysical background of the Craft Sequence in general, but a good reminder that local beliefs which seem silly to folks from an imperial culture often aren't silly at all. Also the history suggested a number of symbolic parallels with offshore banking, a subject I wanted to investigate anyway

So we have Kai, a freelance priestess whose job is to build lifeless idols that mimic the effects of gods, and Izza, a storyteller and leader of a band of kids who have built their own street mythology outside the supervision and control of the island's sanctioned priesthood. Local horrors are built of freedom and control, and the illusion of each in which the other hides. Characters' anxieties revolve around telling the truth or having their true face seen, accepting lies told and identities provided or rejecting both, around telling and hearing stories. The nation hovers on the blade of a knife, trying to chart an independent existence in a complicated and dangerous world.

I don't mean by all this to suggest that one must start with place first—I don't even mean that I always, or even ever, start with place alone. An idea or a character or a setting or a cool turn of phrase or whatever gets me writing is just the first stone on a multidimensional Go board, and as I continue the game (against who? I don't know her name exactly, but my adversary's patient and always grinning…) the walls and structures build and reinforce one another. But place-magic is an important corner of the board, and if I don't understand how it connects to everything else, I've at best lost myself territory, at worst created a group doomed to strangling death.

And on top of that, it's fun. Because when you ask places about their magic, you get to meet their dragons.





Full Fathom Five
Craft Sequence 3
Tor Books, July 15, 2014
Hardcover and eBook, 384 pages

Guest Blog by Max Gladstone - Place as character in the Craft Sequence - July 22, 2014
On the island of Kavekana, Kai builds gods to order, then hands them to others to maintain. Her creations aren’t conscious and lack their own wills and voices, but they accept sacrifices, and protect their worshippers from other gods—perfect vehicles for Craftsmen and Craftswomen operating in the divinely controlled Old World. When Kai sees one of her creations dying and tries to save her, she’s grievously injured—then sidelined from the business entirely, her near-suicidal rescue attempt offered up as proof of her instability. But when Kai gets tired of hearing her boss, her coworkers, and her ex-boyfriend call her crazy, and starts digging into the reasons her creations die, she uncovers a conspiracy of silence and fear—which will crush her, if Kai can't stop it first.

Full Fathom Five is the third novel set in Max Gladstone's addictive and compelling fantasy world of Three Parts Dead.




Previously in the Craft Sequence

Two Serpents Rise
Craft Sequence 2
Tor Books, April 29, 2014
Trade Paperback, 352 pages
Previously released in Hardcover and eBook, October 29, 2013

Guest Blog by Max Gladstone - Place as character in the Craft Sequence - July 22, 2014
In Two Serpents Rise by Max Gladstone, shadow demons plague the city reservoir, and Red King Consolidated has sent in Caleb Altemoc—casual gambler and professional risk manager—to cleanse the water for the sixteen million people of Dresediel Lex. At the scene of the crime, Caleb finds an alluring and clever cliff runner, Crazy Mal, who easily outpaces him.

But Caleb has more than the demon infestation, Mal, or job security to worry about when he discovers that his father—the last priest of the old gods and leader of the True Quechal terrorists—has broken into his home and is wanted in connection to the attacks on the water supply.

From the beginning, Caleb and Mal are bound by lust, Craft, and chance, as both play a dangerous game where gods and people are pawns. They sleep on water, they dance in fire...and all the while the Twin Serpents slumbering beneath the earth are stirring, and they are hungry.



Three Parts Dead
Craft Sequence 1
Tor Books, 336 pages
Trade Paperback, July 23, 2013
Previously released in Hardcover and eBook, October 2, 2012

Guest Blog by Max Gladstone - Place as character in the Craft Sequence - July 22, 2014
A god has died, and it’s up to Tara, first-year associate in the international necromantic firm of Kelethres, Albrecht, and Ao, to bring Him back to life before His city falls apart.

Her client is Kos, recently deceased fire god of the city of Alt Coulumb. Without Him, the metropolis’s steam generators will shut down, its trains will cease running, and its four million citizens will riot.

Tara’s job: resurrect Kos before chaos sets in. Her only help: Abelard, a chain-smoking priest of the dead god, who’s having an understandable crisis of faith.

When Tara and Abelard discover that Kos was murdered, they have to make a case in Alt Coulumb’s courts—and their quest for the truth endangers their partnership, their lives, and Alt Coulumb’s slim hope of survival.

Set in a phenomenally built world in which justice is a collective force bestowed on a few, craftsmen fly on lightning bolts, and gargoyles can rule cities, MAX GLADSTONE's Three Parts Dead introduces readers to an ethical landscape in which the line between right and wrong blurs.





About Max

Guest Blog by Max Gladstone - Place as character in the Craft Sequence - July 22, 2014
MAX GLADSTONE went to Yale, where he wrote a short story that became a finalist in the Writers of the Future competition. He lives in Boston, Massachusetts. Full Fathom Five is his third novel.










Website  ~  Twitter @maxgladstone  ~  Goodreads



The View From Monday - July 22, 2013


Happy Monday! Hope that everyone has a terrifically good week with time to read. 



The View From Monday - July 22, 2013



This is a relatively light release week. There is one debut:

The Age of Ice by J. M. Sidorova.  There is a free eBook, The Colors of Cold: A New Story from the Age of Ice (Scribner, 6/27/13) that includes an excerpt from the novel. Get the eBook at Amazon, Amazon UK, Amazon Canada, B&N, iTunes, and Kobo.


And out from a previously featured DAC author:

Three Parts Dead by Max Gladstone will be available in Trade Paperback.




July 22, 2013
TITLEAUTHORSERIES
Never Deal with Dragons (e) Lorenda Christensen PNR
Kiss of Venom (e) Jennifer Estep UF - Elemental Assassin Novella



July 23, 2013
TITLEAUTHORSERIES
Agenda 21 Glenn Beck
Harriet Parke
PA/Th
Carniepunk Rachel Caine
Jennifer Estep
Kevin Hearne
Seanan McGuire
Rob Thurman and more
UF - Anthology
Interrupt Jeff Carlson SF/Th
The Year's Best Science Fiction: Thirtieth Annual Collection  Gardner Dozois (ed) SF - Anthology
Three Parts Dead (h2tp) Max Gladstone F - Craft Sequence 1
The Beast House (Kindle e) (ri) Richard Laymon H - Beast House Chronicles 2
King Arthur Daniel Mersey Myths and Legends
Forged in Fire (h2tp) J. A. Pitts UF - Sarah Jane Beauhall 3
The Other Place, and Other Stories of the Same Sort (ri) J. B. Priestley Su/Weird - Collection
The Age of Ice (D) J. M. Sidorova F
The Waterlord (ri / Kindle e) Dawn Thompson PHR
Coup d'Etat (h2tp) Harry Turtledove AH - War That Came Early 4
Two Fronts Harry Turtledove AH - War That Came Early 5
The Black Prism (ri) Brent Weeks F - Lightbringer 1
Chimera David Wellington SF/Th - Jim Chapel Mission 1
Dead Winter (mm2tp) Clint Werner F - Time of Legends: Black Plague Trilogy 1
Blighted Empire Clint Lee Werner F - Time of Legends: Black Plague Trilogy 2


D - Debut
e - eBook
h2tp - Hardcover to Trade Paperback
mm2tp - Mass Market to Trade Paperback
ri - reissue or reprint

AH - Alternate History
F - Fantasy
H - Horror
PA - Post Apocalyptic
PHR - Paranormal Historical Romance
PNR - Paranormal Romance
SF - Science Fiction
Su - Supernatural
Th - Thriller
UF - Urban Fantasy

Interview with Max Gladstone, author of Three Parts Dead - October 5, 2012

Please welcome Max Gladstone to The Qwillery as part of the 2012 Debut Author Challenge Interviews. Three Parts Dead was published on October 2, 2012.  You may read Max's Guest Blog - The Agony and Ecstasy of Send - here.



Interview with Max Gladstone, author of Three Parts Dead - October 5, 2012


TQ:  Welcome to The Qwillery!

Max:  Thanks! Happy to be here.


TQ:  What would you say is your most interesting writing quirk?

Max:  My lawyer friends encourage me not to mention the human sacrifice, so I'll go with "writing on the move." I'm busy—day job, fencing, travel, active social life—so I had to get used to writing whenever and wherever I could find time. I wrote Three Parts Dead on an AlphaSmart Neo (sort of like a graphing calculator with a keyboard attached, 800 hours of battery life), on subways, during coffee breaks, in bars, early morning at cheap hotels—wherever I could scrape a few minutes together.


TQ:  Who are some of your favorite writers? Who do you feel has influenced your writing?

Max:  Roger Zelazny is a huge influence. Lord of Light was one of the first sci-fi books I fell in love with. I must have read it 14 times as I was growing up. I snatch up every Zelazny book I can find, and by now I have a long bookshelf full of his work, including the excellent NESFA 6-volume set of short stories. Robin McKinley's Hero and the Crown was another pivot around which my young reading life revolved. I read that book so many times in fifth and sixth grade that when I left for middle school, the librarian gave me her copy. I also love and regularly return to Ursula K LeGuin's Earthsea books. (Haven't re-read those in a few years, though—time to dive back in!) I can't praise Dorothy Dunnett's Lymond Chronicles enough, either. Vivid, crystalline writing, page-turner plots, complex characters who reveal themselves layer by layer as the series progresses, and enough research to make a team of Cambridge grad students go blind. Her books were the first I ever read that demanded I slow down enough to appreciate the writing. I owe her an immense debt for that.

I've already gone on for a while, but the full list would have to include Dan Simmons, John Crowley, Frank Herbert, and John Steinbeck, who I've been reading a lot of recently.


TQ:   Are you a plotter or a pantser?

Max:  I'm more pantser than a plotter, but I don't feel wedded to either camp. I start working with a few images fresh in my mind: scraps of character, setting, line, dramatic moments and turning points that the rest of the story drives toward. Is that a plot? Not really. More like the spine of one. Then I write desperately & expansively for about 30,000 words or so—or the first third of the target length, if I'm working on a short story. Then I step back, examine what I've done so far, and determine how various threads connect. The rest of the book is the weaving, knotting, and tying. At key stages, I'll reconsider, maybe scrap elements of the outline I'm working on, change terms, figure out what needs to happen next.

I can't believe I'm saying this, but it's sort of like Agile development methodology applied to a one-person project: you know your goals, you work toward them, and you keep checking back in with yourself to see how the project's developed and changed since the last meeting. Allows for more flexibility and creativity. But, then, everyone's different.


TQ:  What is the most challenging thing for you about writing?

Max:  I love writing, but every book I write, about 2/3 of the way through, like clockwork I have that hour of the wolf, when I'm convinced nothing I've written works. I'm wrong, but that doesn't help. So, that's a challenge. The other big challenge is changing from writing mode to editing mode: the shift from development to obsessive detail-mongering.


TQ:  Describe Three Parts Dead in 140 characters or less.

Max:  A god has died, and Tara, first year associate in an international necromancy firm, must bring Him back to life before His city falls apart. (A three-word longer version of this pitch actually got me my agent.)


TQ:  What inspired you to write Three Parts Dead?

Max:  In 2008, after two years teaching in rural China, I moved back to the States just as the economy stumbled into a meat grinder. My girlfriend (now my wife) was in law school, and I was looking for work; the collapse was a cold welcome back to urban American society, and I watched it evolve as I handed out resumes.

The sun shone, birds flew, the breeze smelled sweet, but you could see fear in the news anchors’ eyes. AIG failed. My wife’s professors started taking leaves of absence to help stem the crisis. An invisible war was being fought on a realm most of us could barely comprehend, fought by ostensibly immortal ‘persons’ without physical form, in whom hundreds of thousands of human beings had invested their lives and dreams.

These are gods, I thought, after a fashion. Pagan gods. And they’re dying.

So I decided to write a book about that.


TQ:  What sort of research did you do for Three Parts Dead?

Max:  I was lucky enough to be living with law students, and close to some of the great centers of legal learning in America. I talked with people about their lives and work; I attended lectures on the crisis, and about possible remedies. I paid more attention to what my friends who worked in Manhattan said about their jobs. I read broadly about the economy and its last hundred years or so of development. And once I had a pretty good picture of how everything worked, I threw most of it out and wrote a book.


TQ:   What is the oddest bit of information that you came across in your research?

Max:  The more I came to learn about bankruptcy, the more I realized it worked like necromancy: you take a dead thing, protect it with magic circles, chop it up, rewire it according to your dread purpose, and then, when your work is done, you hook up the lightning rods and tell Igor to get cranking. That image was the seed around which the rest of the book crystallized.


TQ:  Tell us something about Three Parts Dead that is not in the book description.

Max:  Tara's boss, Ms. Kevarian is one of my favorite characters. Tara's taking the first steps of her journey to become a master Craftswoman; Ms. Kevarian has walked that road, and been transformed in the process. She's a window into the power, and the loss, that comes from a career of working with Powers Humankind Was Not Meant To Comprehend.


TQ:  Who was the easiest character to write and why? Hardest and why?

Max:  Tara was probably the easiest character to write. I know a ton of people in that stage of their life: ambitious folks starting the careers for which they've spent years preparing, and wondering whether they've chosen the right path. No character was particularly difficult to write, though I had a harder time getting into the heads of characters who were older, and those who were convinced of their position's rightness.


TQ:  Without giving anything away, what is/are your favorite scene(s) in Three Parts Dead?

Max:   There's one scene early in the book, where Tara encounters an obstacle, and she almost shrugs, leaves, and goes on with her work and life—a decision that would have drastically changed the direction of the story. I like that scene because it's such a character moment. There's no need for her to press on. She does because she wants to, because someone's tried to stop her and she won't let them, and for a host of other internal reasons.


TQ:  What's next?

Max:   I've already written another book in the Craft sequence—Two Serpents Rise is due out next summer. That book expands the world, introduces new characters, and develops a number of the themes of Three Parts Dead. I'm about to start another book in the sequence, which will connect characters from the first two books; in my spare time, I'm working with a good friend on a webcomic project I hope will debut sometime around the new year, and writing a short story for an anthology. Life's the kind of busy I love: lots of creative projects, and freedom to pursue them all.


TQ:  Thank you for joining us at The Qwillery.

Max:  My pleasure!




Three Parts Dead

Three Parts Dead
Craft 1
Tom Doherty Associates / Tor Books, October 2, 2012
Hardcover and eBook, 336 pages

Interview with Max Gladstone, author of Three Parts Dead - October 5, 2012
A god has died, and it’s up to Tara, first-year associate in the international necromantic firm of Kelethres, Albrecht, and Ao, to bring Him back to life before His city falls apart.

Her client is Kos, recently deceased fire god of the city of Alt Coulumb. Without Him, the metropolis’s steam generators will shut down, its trains will cease running, and its four million citizens will riot.

Tara’s job: resurrect Kos before chaos sets in. Her only help: Abelard, a chain-smoking priest of the dead god, who’s having an understandable crisis of faith.

When Tara and Abelard discover that Kos was murdered, they have to make a case in Alt Coulumb’s courts—and their quest for the truth endangers their partnership, their lives, and Alt Coulumb’s slim hope of survival.

Set in a phenomenally built world in which justice is a collective force bestowed on a few, craftsmen fly on lightning bolts, and gargoyles can rule cities, Three Parts Dead introduces readers to an ethical landscape in which the line between right and wrong blurs.




About Max

Max’s novel Three Parts Dead will be published by Tor Books in October.

Max has taught in southern Anhui, wrecked a bicycle in Angkor Wat, and been thrown from a horse in Mongolia. Max graduated from Yale University, where he studied Chinese.

Website : Twitter : Goodreads

Guest Blog by Max Gladstone - The Agony and Ecstasy of Send

Please welcome Max Gladstone to The Qwillery as part of the 2012 Debut Author Challenge Guest Blogs. Three Parts Dead will be published on October 2, 2012.


Guest Blog by Max Gladstone - The Agony and Ecstasy of Send


The Agony and Ecstasy of Send

Stop me if you've heard this one before: Our Hero wakes up in a white room—maybe a room in only the loosest sense, a featureless white expanse without floor, ceiling, or walls, or else an According-to-Hoyle room, complete with white bed, white tables, white chairs, white curtains. Perhaps Our Hero is confined to a hospital against her will. Maybe she's stuck in an insane asylum, or an extra-dimensional prison. Specifics come later. The room is the point, and the room is white.

The joke, of course, is that Our Hero is in exactly the same position as her author: staring at a featureless white space, defined at best by faint suggestions of detail. The empty page that confronts the author becomes the space the character must navigate.

I first read this joke years ago, in the Turkey City Lexicon; Bruce Sterling summed it up by wondering what would become of the venerable white room now that a writer starting a story is more likely to stare at a monitor than a sheet of blank paper.

The white room is alive and well, and will remain so until Skynet wakes up and word processor programs open with a pre-written page. But the white room has a new friend, a comrade in arms: the Terrifying Button.

You know the Terrifying Button. It's the button at the end of Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol, the one Tom Cruise pounds to stop the world from ending. It's the button the hero presses to stop the bomb, or blow the bridge. Jeff Goldblum's magic PowerBook in Independence Day is one of the great Terrifying Buttons of cinema. The entire last act of Joss Whedon's Serenity is one big quest for the Terrifying Button. Bonus points if, after pushing the Button (with their last ounce of strength), our heroes, and even sometimes the villains, stand back, hold their breath, and wait, and hope.

To qualify, the Button must be the pivotal moment of the plot: if the Button works, the heroes win, and if it fails, they lose. There's a Button in Alien—the self-destruct sequence—but it's not Terrifying. Pressing that Button doesn't save the world; it's one more failed attempt by the Nostromo's crew to stop their adversary. For a Button to be truly Terrifying, its activation must contain the possibility of success or failure.

I'm no social scientist or computational literary scholar; I've conducted no extensive surveys or interviews. But it seems to me that the Terrifying Button springs from the same font as the Mysterious White Room. The writer escorts her characters through adventure, heartbreak, mystery, pain, redemption, despair, and all the other million ills flesh and fiction are heir to, and at the end, everything—lives, futures, destinies, love—depends on the press of a button. And that button has the word 'send' in the middle. Off goes the manuscript, leaving the writer to pour herself a couple fingers of scotch and pace her room and watch her inbox and wonder: was the subject line eye-catching enough? Did I remember to fix that typo my friend caught on page 274? (Yes, I did.) Did the attachment attach? Does the (choose one or more: agent/editor/assistant/publicist/reviewer/gatekeeper)'s email strip attachments? What if they decided, in the 12 hours since I last checked submission guidelines, that Courier is an affront to typefaces everywhere and they now only accept manuscripts in Zapf Dingbats or ten-foot-high Braille? And, of course, the big one: what if everyone I know has been lying to me this entire time, and my book, my screenplay, my story, my memoir, isn't any good? Or, every bit as insidious: what if it is? What then?

That's the Terrifying Button: 'send' itself, and the heady mix of anticipation and fear it entails. If you live on the internet, you've encountered the Terrifying Button, when sending a love letter or sales email, a job or college application, a final paper or an OK Cupid message. Pressing the button is a mystical moment. By pressing it, you will discover something about yourself, and your work.

Which is why, I think, Terrifying Button moments can be so effective, even though they're patently ridiculous as story devices. Think about it: pressing the Button takes success or failure completely out of the hands of our main characters, and puts it in the hands of some anonymous IT department. The question of whether the Button works is outside the bounds of the story, unless the story has been about corporate IT at some nameless internet service provider and Tom Cruise was a last-minute arrival on the scenes.

But that's the point. The story is told, the writer presses the Button, off the story goes, and soon the writer learns whether the story works the way she hoped. The Button is the fundamental truth of storytelling: in the end, you let your story go, and see what the audience does with it.

Some Buttons make you wait longer than others. I pushed the Button for my debut novel Three Parts Dead about six months back—the biggest Button of my career so far, a Button that's the sum of either a few years or a lifetime of effort depending on how you look at it. On October 2, the book hits shelves, and over the next few weeks I learn the results of the fateful press. Forces are working behind the scenes, beneath the surface, and while I have the tiniest shred of influence over what happens next, for the most part it's out of my hands. The book belongs to the audience now. The button is pressed, and time will tell what happens next. All I can do is wait, and hope.

And take heart in the fact that I'm not alone. These days, we all live in the world of the Button.



Three Parts Dead

Three Parts Dead
Tom Doherty Associates / Tor Books, October 2, 2012
Hardcover and eBook, 336 pages

Guest Blog by Max Gladstone - The Agony and Ecstasy of Send
A god has died, and it’s up to Tara, first-year associate in the international necromantic firm of Kelethres, Albrecht, and Ao, to bring Him back to life before His city falls apart.

Her client is Kos, recently deceased fire god of the city of Alt Coulumb. Without Him, the metropolis’s steam generators will shut down, its trains will cease running, and its four million citizens will riot.

Tara’s job: resurrect Kos before chaos sets in. Her only help: Abelard, a chain-smoking priest of the dead god, who’s having an understandable crisis of faith.

When Tara and Abelard discover that Kos was murdered, they have to make a case in Alt Coulumb’s courts—and their quest for the truth endangers their partnership, their lives, and Alt Coulumb’s slim hope of survival.

Set in a phenomenally built world in which justice is a collective force bestowed on a few, craftsmen fly on lightning bolts, and gargoyles can rule cities, Three Parts Dead introduces readers to an ethical landscape in which the line between right and wrong blurs.




About Max

Max’s novel Three Parts Dead will be published by Tor Books in October.

Max has taught in southern Anhui, wrecked a bicycle in Angkor Wat, and been thrown from a horse in Mongolia. Max graduated from Yale University, where he studied Chinese.

Website : Twitter : Goodreads
Guest Blog by Max Gladstone - Place as character in the Craft Sequence - July 22, 2014The View From Monday - July 22, 2013Interview with Max Gladstone, author of Three Parts Dead - October 5, 2012Guest Blog by Max Gladstone - The Agony and Ecstasy of Send

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