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An Interview with Ian Doescher


Tracey / Trinitytwo caught up with Ian Doescher at New York Comic Con last year. Ian is the author of the William Shakespeare's Star Wars® series, which number six volumes. In honor of the Bard, we give you an interview with Ian Doescher.








William Shakespeare's Star Wars®
Quirk Books, July 2, 2013
Hardcover and eBook, 176 pages

Return once more to a galaxy far, far away with this sublime retelling of George Lucas’s epic Star Wars in the style of the immortal Bard of Avon. The saga of a wise (Jedi) knight and an evil (Sith) lord, of a beautiful princess held captive and a young hero coming of age, Star Wars abounds with all the valor and villainy of Shakespeare’s greatest plays. ’Tis a tale told by fretful droids, full of faithful Wookiees and fearstome stormtroopers, signifying...pretty much everything.

Reimagined in glorious iambic pentameter—and complete with twenty gorgeous Elizabethan illustrations--William Shakespeare’s Star Wars will astound and edify Rebels and Imperials alike. Zounds! This is the book you’re looking for.









William Shakespeare's The Empire Striketh Back
     Star Wars® Part the Fifth
Quirk Books, March 18, 2014
Hardcover and eBook, 176 pages

The saga that began with the interstellar best seller William Shakespeare’s Star Wars continues with this merry reimagining of George Lucas's enduring classic The Empire Strikes Back.

Many a fortnight have passed since the destruction of the Death Star. Young Luke Skywalker and his friends have taken refuge on the ice planet of Hoth, where the evil Darth Vader has hatched a cold-blooded plan to capture them. Only with the help of a little green Jedi Master—and a swaggering rascal named Lando Calrissian—can our heroes escape the Empire's wrath. And only then will Lord Vader learn how sharper than a tauntaun's tooth it is to have a Jedi child.

What light through Yoda's window breaks? Methinks you'll find out in the pages of The Empire Striketh Back!





William Shakespeare's The Jedi Doth Return
     Star Wars® Part the Sixth
Quirk Books, July 1, 2014
Hardcover and eBook, 176 pages

Hot on the heels of the New York Times best seller William Shakespeare’s Star Wars comes the next two installments of the original trilogy: William Shakespeare’s The Empire Striketh Back and William Shakespeare’s The Jed Doth Return. Return to the star-crossed galaxy far, far away as the brooding young hero, a power-mad emperor, and their jesting droids match wits, struggle for power, and soliloquize in elegant and impeccable iambic pentameter.

Illustrated with beautiful black-and-white Elizabethan-style artwork, these two plays offer essential reading for all ages. Something Wookiee this way comes!








William Shakespeare's The Phantom of Menace
     Star Wars® Part the First
Quirk Books, April 7, 2015
Hardcover and eBook, 176 pages

Join us, good gentles, for a merry reimagining of Star Wars: episode 1 as only Shakespeare could have written it. The entire saga starts here, with a thrilling tale featuring a disguised queen, a young hero, and two fearless knights facing a hidden, vengeful enemy.

’Tis a true Shakespearean drama, filled with sword fights, soliloquies, and doomed romance . . . all in glorious iambic pentameter and coupled with twenty gorgeous Elizabethan illustrations. Hold on to your midi-chlorians:
 The play’s the thing, wherein you’ll catch the rise of Anakin!












William Shakespeare’s The Clone Army Attacketh
     Star Wars® Part the Second
Quirk Books, July 7, 2015
Hardcover and eBook, 176 pages

In time so long ago begins our play,
In clash-strewn galaxy far, far away.

To Shmi or not to Shmi? Torn between duty to the Jedi, attraction to Padmé, and concern for his beloved mother, yeoman Jedi Anakin Skywalker struggles to be master of his fate. The path he chooses will determine not just his own destiny, but that of the entire Republic. And thereby hangs a tale.

Alack the day! A noble lady in danger. A knight and squire in battle. And a forbidden love that’s written in the stars. Once again, the quill of William Shakespeare meets the galaxy of George Lucas in an insightful reimagining that sets the Star Wars saga on the Elizabethan stage. The characters are familiar, but the masterful meter, insightful soliloquies, and period illustrations will convince you that the Bard himself penned this epic adventure.





William Shakespeare’s Tragedy of the Sith’s Revenge
     Star Wars® Part the Third
Quirk Books, September 8, 2015
Hardcover and eBook, 168 pages

The curtain rises once again on that star-crossed galaxy far, faraway—this time, to chronicle a once-heroic knight’s transformation into the darkest of villains. William Shakespeare’s Tragedy of the Sith’s Revenge is the climactic conclusion to the fall of the house of Skywalker, a collaboration between William Shakespeare and George Lucas that’s filled with masterful meter, stirring soliloquies, inside jokes, and intricate Elizabethan illustrations. You’ll fall in love with Star Wars—and Shakespeare—all over again. At the same time!










Review: William Shakespeare’s The Clone Army Attacketh and William Shakespeare’s Tragedy of the Sith’s Revenge by Ian Doescher


William Shakespeare’s The Clone Army Attacketh
     Star Wars Part the Second
Author:  Ian Doescher
Publisher:  Quirk Books, July 7, 2015
Format:  Hardcover and eBook, 176 pages
List Price:  $14.95 (print and eBook)
ISBN:  9781594748073 (print); 9781594748202 (eBook)
Review Copy: Provided by the Publisher

Review: William Shakespeare’s The Clone Army Attacketh and William Shakespeare’s Tragedy of the Sith’s Revenge by Ian Doescher
In time so long ago begins our play,
In clash-strewn galaxy far, far away.

To Shmi or not to Shmi? Torn between duty to the Jedi, attraction to Padmé, and concern for his beloved mother, yeoman Jedi Anakin Skywalker struggles to be master of his fate. The path he chooses will determine not just his own destiny, but that of the entire Republic. And thereby hangs a tale.

Alack the day! A noble lady in danger. A knight and squire in battle. And a forbidden love that’s written in the stars. Once again, the quill of William Shakespeare meets the galaxy of George Lucas in an insightful reimagining that sets the Star Wars saga on the Elizabethan stage. The characters are familiar, but the masterful meter, insightful soliloquies, and period illustrations will convince you that the Bard himself penned this epic adventure.


Trinitytwo's Point of View

Prerequisite reading: William Shakespeare's The Phantom of Menace (review)

In a galaxy far, far away, Padawan learner, Anakin Skywalker plays the part of Romeo to the fair Senator Padmé Amidala's Juliet. Their forbidden love slowly blossoms amid assassination attempts and ill-fated rescue missions. Obi-Wan Kenobi is sent to the mysterious planet of Kamino where he discovers an army of clones commissioned by the Jedi and encounters Jango and Boba Fett. William Shakespeare's The Clone Army Attacketh is the second installment in the Star Wars prequel trilogy.

At this point in my review, I think I should insert a personal disclaimer: I love all things Star Wars with the exception of the prequels. However, author Ian Doescher does a fantastic job of making me rethink my stance. I have never been a fan of the romance between Anakin and Padmé and that hasn't changed. Yet, I did enjoy Doescher's spin; painting the tragic couple as Romeo and Juliet actually gave their love scenes a sense of grandeur and sacrifice that I felt was missing from the film version. Doescher adds new material in the form of asides and soliloquies that readers should pay special attention to as they never fail to delight. In my opinion, the coolest part of the book was Yoda's kick ass battle scene with Count Dooku. Although the results are the same, it adds so much to the sequence to be allowed the insight of both combatants' thoughts.

With still a few months left in 2015, I am voting The Clone Army Attacketh's cover as my favorite of the year. Nicholas Delort's delightful artwork featuring the nefarious Jango Fett is absolutely stunning.



Review: William Shakespeare’s The Clone Army Attacketh and William Shakespeare’s Tragedy of the Sith’s Revenge by Ian Doescher



William Shakespeare’s Tragedy of the Sith’s Revenge
     Star Wars Part the Third
Author:  Ian Doescher
Publisher:  Quirk Books, September 8, 2015
Format:  Hardcover and eBook, 168 pages
List Price:  $14.95 (print and eBook)
ISBN:  9781594748080 (print); 9781594748219 (eBook)
Review Copy: Provided by the Publisher

Review: William Shakespeare’s The Clone Army Attacketh and William Shakespeare’s Tragedy of the Sith’s Revenge by Ian Doescher
The curtain rises once again on that star-crossed galaxy far, faraway—this time, to chronicle a once-heroic knight’s transformation into the darkest of villains. William Shakespeare’s Tragedy of the Sith’s Revenge is the climactic conclusion to the fall of the house of Skywalker, a collaboration between William Shakespeare and George Lucas that’s filled with masterful meter, stirring soliloquies, inside jokes, and intricate Elizabethan illustrations. You’ll fall in love with Star Wars—and Shakespeare—all over again. At the same time!


Trinitytwo's Point of View

Grab a cold glass of blue bantha milk and snuggle up with your favorite Wookie for the thrilling conclusion to Ian Doescher's delightful, must-read series, William Shakespeare's Tragedy of the Sith's Revenge. True to its source material, it's the tale of an impressionable young Jedi corrupted by the diabolical machinations of a master Sith. Anakin Skywalker's spiral to the Dark Side of the Force by the malevolent orchestrations of the diabolical Chancellor Palpatine is heartrending. Doescher's version serves to emphasize the Sith's corrupt and violence-ridden brand of evil more than the movie ever could. Another key element to this tragic tale is that Doescher was able to poignantly articulate Padmé's and Obi-Wan's despair and loss at Anakin's transformation.

What's so great about this book and its predecessors is that the reader is allowed insight into situations and characters that can actually change perceptions, or deepen emotional attachments. Doescher's pairing of Shakespeare and Lucas continues to captivate and entertain. Tragedy of the Sith's Revenge, along with the rest of the series is seriously clever, and truly a bright star in the galaxy of mash-ups. I recommend it wholeheartedly to Star Wars fans, Shakespeare fans, educators looking for a way to hook their students, and also art lovers. Art lovers? Yes, because Nicolas Delort's illustrations and covers are amazing.

Honestly, I'm hoping that someone makes these into actual plays because I'll be the first in line screaming "Take my money!"

Melanie's Week in Review - July 21, 2013


Melanie's Week in Review - July 21, 2013


Another week has gone by in the UK's first real summer since 2008.  Yes, we have actually had consecutive days of super warm weather. I did feel a little bit like a ice cream walking to the tube last Monday. I started out with a spring in my step, nice and cool and ended up a hot, sweaty mess when I got on the train. It was sooo hot on the train I thought the heating was on which in turn made reading impossible.

Well, that is the excuse I am going to use this week for only reading 2 books. For those of you who read my Week in Review last week I had just bought The Glass God by Kate Griffin. I think I am going to be reviewing this book so I don't want to give too much away but to share a secret *whispers* go buy it quickly!

Melanie's Week in Review - July 21, 2013
I also read both of the new short stories by Michael J. Sullivan - The Crown Tower and The Rose and The Thorn.  They are billed as short stories but they are quite long. I don't really remember the rules on length of short story versus novella but suffice to say they take long enough to read for them to feel like a full fledged book. I will also be reviewing these so not even going to give a hint away.  Sorry!

I started but  not very far into All Men of Genius by Lev AC Rosen. It is a steampunk version of Twelfth Night by none other than William Shakespeare (Bill to his friends). It has started out quite interesting so I have high hopes for it.  Stay tuned until next week when I hope to have finished it.

I am in a tad of a quandry of what to read next. London Underground + 30C = not much concentration. I really need a great book to get me through the tube journey.  Any and all suggestions are gratefully appreciated.

Melanie's Week in Review - July 21, 2013In other bookish news I tweeted Stefan Petrucha to find out when the next installment of the Hessius Mann series was out.  He told me that they are waiting to hear about the movie/TV show.  HOW EXCITING!! If you haven't read either Dead Mann Walking or Dead Mann Running then rush immediately to your local book store or your computer and get buying them. Books that combine social commentary with humour so well are few and far between.  Petrucha quite cleverly mixes themes such as racism, bigotry and social exclusion with a nail biting murder mystery.  I hope that putting these stories on either the big or small screen doesn't change the message (s) that Petrucha is trying to get across.

Well enough hot weather rambling for me. I am off to go out and enjoy the sun.  Until next week Happy Reading.
An Interview with Ian DoescherReview: William Shakespeare’s The Clone Army Attacketh and William Shakespeare’s Tragedy of the Sith’s Revenge by Ian DoescherMelanie's Week in Review - July 21, 2013

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