close

Seekerville: The Journey Continues | category: Erica Vetsch

home

Seekerville: The Journey Continues

seekerville.blogspot.com

Yay for a Second Printing!

Erica Here: 

Jane sitting on a case of reprinted
copies of The Debutant's Code in the
Kregel Warehouse. Jane is my little mascot and
traveling buddy. :)



I’m thrilled to announce that The Debutante’s Code has gone into its second printing! Why am I so excited? Because reprints mean a few fun things for a writer.

1. Your book is selling well. Both the buy in and the sell through. What are those, you ask?

Buy in – Initial orders, including pre-orders of your book. Bookstores and book buyers look through your publisher’s catalog and place orders of new releases. They buy the book into their store. Over the initial period of about three months, your goal is to sell those copies bought in and not have the store return them as unsold.

Sell through – This is when the books that have been bought in have sold, and the bookstore orders again. This takes place 3-9 months out from the release date. Publishers track these numbers closely. Sell through means your book is doing well.

2. Good sales numbers result in happy publishers and happy authors. It can mean a bit of extra marketing money allocated to your book, and it can also help the author land that next contract with the publisher.


3. It means you are reaching readers. This often means in uptick in review numbers, visibility, and buzz about your books. More interactions with readers online, emails, etc. Requests for interviews, guest blog posts, articles, etc. And it means readers will suggest your book to others, in online groups, and in person, which then can mean more books purchased.



All those things are pretty universal for traditionally published authors. For me, there were a couple of other bonuses for me this time around.

1. Due to a printer error, the cover of The Debutante’s Code came out much darker than we anticipated. While we wanted a mysterious cover, the first printing’s cover was soooo black. For the reprint, the publisher was able to stipulated that the cover be much brighter. I love round two, because Juliette’s hair doesn’t disappear into blackness in the corner, and you can actually see what’s in the painting.


 
First printing on the left, second on the right.



2. There was an error on the back cover copy, too, in round one! Our hero, Daniel Swann, was incorrectly called Daniel Thorndike! Yikes! I was so bummed when I saw that. However, in the vein of making lemonade with lemons, I had a little award designed for those eagle-eyed readers who noticed and contacted me. I replied with the graphic, and the words “You would make a great Regency Spy. As one of the few who have found the typo, you are the winner of The Spyglass Award.” Readers got to feel clever, and one lady even said she was going to display the award on her blog.

Can you see the typo?






I was blessed to be able to visit my publisher in Grand Rapids, MI about 10 days ago, and to get to speak to the owner, the publisher, editorial, and marketing. That face-time is invaluable! We talked about Millstone of Doubt, coming out this September, and Children of the Shadows, which will release in 2023, as well as some new projects! I’m thrilled!

Yay for a Second Printing!



Jane Austen meets Sherlock Holmes in this new Regency mystery series

Newly returned from finishing school, Lady Juliette Thorndike is ready to debut in London society. Due to her years away, she hasn't spent much time with her parents, and sees them only as the flighty, dilettante couple the other nobles love. But when they disappear, she discovers she never really knew them at all. They've been living double lives as government spies--and they're only the latest in a long history of espionage that is the family's legacy.

Now Lady Juliette is determined to continue their work. Mentored by her uncle, she plunges into the dangerous world of spy craft. From the glittering ballrooms of London to the fox hunts, regattas, and soirees of country high society, she must chase down hidden clues, solve the mysterious code her parents left behind, and stay out of danger. All the while, she has to keep her endeavors a secret from her best friend and her suitors--not to mention nosy, irritatingly handsome Bow Street runner Daniel Swann, who suspects her of a daring theft.

Can Lady Juliette outwit her enemies and complete her parents' last mission? Or will it lead her to a terrible end?


Yay for a Second Printing!Best-selling, award-winning author Erica Vetsch loves Jesus, history, romance, and sports. She’s a transplanted Kansan now living in Minnesota, and she is married to her total opposite and soul mate! When she’s not writing fiction, she’s planning her next trip to a history museum and cheering on her Kansas Jayhawks and New Zealand All Blacks. You can connect with her at her website, www.ericavetsch.com where you can read about her books and sign up for her newsletter, and you can find her online at https://www.facebook.com/EricaVetschAuthor/ where she spends way too much time!

Ten Things I've Learned in Seventeen Years

Erica here. 

Seventeen Years! That’s how long it’s been since I first sat down to write a story with the aim of publication. There have been some ups and downs, with far more ups than downs. I’ve learned so many things, and met so many wonderful people in Seventeen Years! I thought I’d give a list of a few of the ‘learnings’ I’ve gathered.

Ten Things I've Learned in Seventeen Years

 



1. One person’s success is not necessarily my loss. Knowing that God is in control of who gets what published means I can celebrate another writer’s success, whether it’s a contract, a glowing review, a contest win, or a best-seller list, without feeling as if I’ve somehow missed out. That doesn’t mean I don’t want to achieve these things, but it does mean I don’t have to be jealous or pining that I missed my shot.

2. When you sign with an agent who belongs to a multi-agent firm, you’re really signing with the AGENCY rather than the agent. If your agent decides to decamp to another firm, you are still signed with the AGENCY and must go through the proper severance if you wish to follow your agent, or be assigned to another agent within the AGENCY.

3. The writing community is quite helpful. If you’re looking for an answer to a research question, or for information about a particular contest, or need some grammar help, there is a writer out there who will help you out.

4. Writing is a solitary pursuit, but nobody does it alone. If you are traditionally published, you have a team of people helping you get your story into the hands of readers. Editors, Marketers, Publicists, Sales Team, and so many more.

5. Edits aren’t personal. Every manuscript benefits from editing. Your editor is on your team, and you have the same goal: to create the best product possible.

6. You do what you can, but ultimately, sales are in God’s control. Be willing to put yourself out there in blog posts, social media, radio interviews, etc. but it does little good to obsess over book sales.

7. Cross-marketing makes life easier. Doing everything yourself is hard. Joining with other authors to blog (Hello, Seekerville!) run a FB Group (Like the Inspirational Regency Reader Group) or have a contest/giveaway (Like the Fall Fiction Scavenger Hunt) means you can reach readers beyond your own circle and introduce your readers to the work of some fabulous authors!
Mary, Ruthy, Debby, and yours truly at the
Christian Fiction Readers Retreat in 2019.

8. Publishing changes quickly and moves slowly. In a nanosecond we saw an ebook explosion, and genres come and go in a flash. My first ACFW Conference, every editor and agent said “Don’t send me historical fiction. It’s dead. I want Chick-lit.” Fast forward twelve months, those same agents and editors said, “Lit is gone. Send me all your historical fiction.” And yet, it can take forever to get through the publishing process. It’s not unusual to sign a contract for a book that won’t release for 18-24 months.

9. Reviews are for readers not writers. Reviews do not exist to stroke the egos of writers…or demolish those same egos, though both can happen. Reviews are for readers, to tell other readers whether or not they may like a book. Some of my author friends refuse to read reviews, because they either soar with the eagles or crawl with the worms afterwards. If reviews knock you off balance as an author, just skip them altogether.

10. You will make lifelong friends. Just like the Seeker Ladies, where we all know about each other’s struggles, triumphs, prayer requests, inside jokes, sorrows, joys, and more. We share those things because writing brought us together. I have made dear friends, been supported in hard things by them, been lifted up in joy when something great happens, and the whole writing experience is better because of these writers in my life.

 

Me and Mary back in the day, with Mary holding her
Carol Award and me with my Genesis Award.



11. Bonus: I thought once I finally got a peek behind that curtain called “Publication” that my life would change dramatically. In one sense, it did. That tremendous accomplishment of “There. I did it. I worked hard and my dream came true.” However, most of my life didn’t change a bit. Except that I now had to work harder at things I never imagined, like marketing. The dishes are still there, the kids still needed to be homeschooled, laundry didn’t magically do itself…and there was no paparazzi lingering outside my house to see the famous author. I am grateful for the books I’ve been able to write, and that they found homes with publishers, but at my core, I’m the same Erica that I’ve always been…just busier!


Ten Things I've Learned in Seventeen Years


 

Questions for you:

How long have you been seriously writing with a goal of publication?

What is one thing that surprised you along the way?

If you’re published, what changed for you once you held your book in your hands?

If you’re not yet published, did any of the items on my list particularly resonate with you, or was anything on the list startlingly new?


Ten Things I've Learned in Seventeen Years
Jane Austen meets Sherlock Holmes in this new Regency mystery series

Newly returned from finishing school, Lady Juliette Thorndike is ready to debut in London society. Due to her years away, she hasn't spent much time with her parents, and sees them only as the flighty, dilettante couple the other nobles love. But when they disappear, she discovers she never really knew them at all. They've been living double lives as government spies--and they're only the latest in a long history of espionage that is the family's legacy.

Now Lady Juliette is determined to continue their work. Mentored by her uncle, she plunges into the dangerous world of spy craft. From the glittering ballrooms of London to the fox hunts, regattas, and soirees of country high society, she must chase down hidden clues, solve the mysterious code her parents left behind, and stay out of danger. All the while, she has to keep her endeavors a secret from her best friend and her suitors--not to mention nosy, irritatingly handsome Bow Street runner Daniel Swann, who suspects her of a daring theft.

Can Lady Juliette outwit her enemies and complete her parents' last mission? Or will it lead her to a terrible end?

The Debutante's Code is now out in the world! You can get your copy HERE: https://amzn.to/3GQnoZt Or wherever you buy your fiction! 

Ten Things I've Learned in Seventeen Years


Best-selling, award-winning author Erica Vetsch loves Jesus, history, romance, and sports. She’s a transplanted Kansan now living in Minnesota, and she is married to her total opposite and soul mate! When she’s not writing fiction, she’s planning her next trip to a history museum and cheering on her Kansas Jayhawks and New Zealand All Blacks. You can connect with her at her website, www.ericavetsch.com where you can read about her books and sign up for her newsletter, and you can find her online at https://www.facebook.com/EricaVetschAuthor/ where she spends way too much time!




Ten Writing Tips from a Legend to Strengthen your Contest Entry

 


Erica Vetsch here with you today. (No, I'm not the LEGEND mentioned in the title of this blog.)

It's Writing Contest Season, and I am a Writing Contest Judge. Every year, I judge in several writing contests, specializing in the area of pre-published/unpublished fiction. I enjoy this work, helping newer authors strengthen their writing, pointing them to great resources for learning, encouraging them in their journey to publication.

But I do find myself making the same comments on many entries. Pointing out the same writing weaknesses that need some attention. 

An entry without these common mistakes stands out, shines, and is rewarded with HIGH MARKS!

If you would like your entry to be among these rare few, I encourage you to consider Ten Writing Rules of that literary TITAN, Elmore Leonard.




“Elmore Leonard's Ten Rules of Writing” With Erica Vetsch’s comments in red. 


1. Never open a book with weather. (Just don’t. It’s the epitome of cliché)

2. Avoid prologues. (Most of the time, using a prologue means you’re starting the story in the wrong place, you fear your opening isn’t compelling enough to stand alone, or you’re trying to dump information on the reader that you think they should know, but you aren’t certain how to trickle in later.)

3. Never use a verb other than "said" to carry dialogue. (It’s too distracting to have people cackling, chortling, growling, squeaking, etc.)

4. Never use an adverb to modify the verb "said”…he admonished gravely. (Let the dialogue and the mood you’ve created indicate the tone and tenor of the words being said. Use visceral and visual reactions rather than adverbs to show rather than tell the reader what’s going on.)

5. Keep your exclamation points under control. You are allowed no more than two or three per 100,000 words of prose. ( SO. MANY. EXCLAMATION. POINTS!!!!! I would venture to say that 95% of the contest entries I judge have a scattering of random exclamation points used with even the mildest dialogue. Fictional dialogue isn’t written like your text messages! Stop! Shouting! At! The! Reader! Because that’s what an exclamation point means in fiction. Someone actually screaming.)

6. Never use the words "suddenly" or "all hell broke loose." (Lazy, clichéd writing. If the reader can finish a sentence with a familiar phrase…dead as a __________ or quiet as a ____________ your writing is cliché. Freshen it up with a twist, or take that cliché up a notch. An illustration from author James Scott Bell: Instead of writing “She looked like a million bucks.” Write “She looked like a million bucks, tax-free.”)

7. Use regional dialect, patois, sparingly. (Dialects are exhausting to read. Sprinkle in enough for the reader to catch the flavor, but don’t belabor the point by dropping every g in -ing words or dropping all the ‘haitches’ in a British accent.)

8. Avoid detailed descriptions of characters. (Allow the reader to fill in some of the details. It invests the reader in the character as they imagine them. A few key descriptors will do. Don’t make a catalog list of features, mannerisms, dress, etc.)

9. Don't go into great detail describing places and things. (The days of the ten-page description of a sunset died with Nathaniel Hawthorne. Today’s readers won’t sit still for lengthy descriptions like this. Instead, have your character interact with the setting with a few tiny hints. If you say your heroine walked to the window and pulled aside the calico curtain, the reader will fill in the surroundings of what they think a room with calico curtains looks like. Likewise, you could have your heroine walk to the window and pull aside the velvet drape, and an entirely different image of a room appears. Either way, you've allowed the reader to invest in the scene, creating the setting from a few choice words.)

10. Try to leave out the part that readers tend to skip. (If you’re bored, so will the reader be. Make sure every sentence, every paragraph, every scene is advancing the story and ratcheting up the tension/conflict. Keep the reader turning pages.)



Leonard’s most important rule is one that sums up the 10.



"If it sounds like writing, I rewrite it.” (Enough said.)

― Elmore Leonard



Are you entering any writing contests this year? Have you been given a pithy piece of advice that has made your writing better? I’d love to hear it!


Ten Writing Tips from a Legend to Strengthen your Contest Entry
Jane Austen meets Sherlock Holmes in this new Regency mystery series

Newly returned from finishing school, Lady Juliette Thorndike is ready to debut in London society. Due to her years away, she hasn't spent much time with her parents, and sees them only as the flighty, dilettante couple the other nobles love. But when they disappear, she discovers she never really knew them at all. They've been living double lives as government spies--and they're only the latest in a long history of espionage that is the family's legacy.

Now Lady Juliette is determined to continue their work. Mentored by her uncle, she plunges into the dangerous world of spy craft. From the glittering ballrooms of London to the fox hunts, regattas, and soirees of country high society, she must chase down hidden clues, solve the mysterious code her parents left behind, and stay out of danger. All the while, she has to keep her endeavors a secret from her best friend and her suitors--not to mention nosy, irritatingly handsome Bow Street runner Daniel Swann, who suspects her of a daring theft.

Can Lady Juliette outwit her enemies and complete her parents' last mission? Or will it lead her to a terrible end?

The Debutante's Code is now out in the world! You can get your copy HERE: https://amzn.to/3GQnoZt Or wherever you buy your fiction! 

Ten Writing Tips from a Legend to Strengthen your Contest Entry


Best-selling, award-winning author Erica Vetsch loves Jesus, history, romance, and sports. She’s a transplanted Kansan now living in Minnesota, and she is married to her total opposite and soul mate! When she’s not writing fiction, she’s planning her next trip to a history museum and cheering on her Kansas Jayhawks and New Zealand All Blacks. You can connect with her at her website, www.ericavetsch.com where you can read about her books and sign up for her newsletter, and you can find her online at https://www.facebook.com/EricaVetschAuthor/ where she spends way too much time!


The In-Between Times

Erica here. I hope you had a wonderful Christmas with family and friends!

The In-Between Times



Here we are, on the Monday between Christmas and New Years. It’s a bit of a limbo time. The big rush of Christmas Day has passed, the gift giving, the caroling, the feasting is mostly done. And we’re days away from New Year’s.

But the kids are still home from school, there are still some family gatherings to navigate, and the need to start thinking about removing decorations begins in the back of your mind. You're stuck in the 'in-between' time.

In the writing life, there are lots of ‘in-between’ times, too.

  • The time between when you decide to write a novel and when that novel is completed.
  • The time between when you submit a novel to an agent or editor and when you hear back.
  • The time between when you hear from your agent that she is submitting your work to a publisher and when you hear a verdict on the submission.
  • The time between when you get the call from your agent that a publisher is offering a contract and when that contract arrives and you can FINALLY share about it.
  • The time between when you sign the contract and when you get your first edits, second edits, third edits, cover art, a release date, a marketing plan, and FINALLY hold the book in your hot little hands.
  • The time between when book one and book two release.
  • The time between your first contract and when you might get another one.

As you can see, there are lots of ‘between’ times, and these are only a few you may encounter. So what is a writer to do in those ‘between’ times?

This may sound boring, but the number one thing a writer should do is…WRITE. If you’ve submitted a novel to an agent, don’t sit by the inbox waiting. Write the next book. If you’re waiting to hear from a publisher, write the next book. If you’re waiting on edits from your publisher, write the next book.

With so much ‘between’ time factored into the writing life, it can be easy to fritter away the days, waiting, thinking, doing all the things that aren’t writing. But writers write. That’s all there is to it. Write a novella as a lead magnet for your newsletter. If you don’t have a contract currently, write the next book. Start a new series, target a specific publisher, and write the book!

Perhaps you won’t write at the same fever-pitch as when you have a solid deadline, but don’t waste time either.

The In-Between Times

 

Why, you ask?

1. Writer’s write, and your writing muscles will atrophy if you don’t use them.

2. More than one agent has gone to a client and said, “A publisher needs X in a hurry. Do you have anything that will fit?” If you’ve been resting on your laurels instead of writing, your answer will always be, ‘Um, nope.’ (Sad face emoji.)

3. If a publisher is interested in  you, they may very well ask, “What else do you have?” And believe me, you want to have lots of completed things to show them.

Those are just some of the reasons you don’t want to squander the in-between times. Rather than sit and be frustrated at not getting any news, get your fingers on that keyboard and create something new! Be a good steward of your writing time and opportunities, and don't waste the 'between times!'

The In-Between Times
Jane Austen meets Sherlock Holmes in this new Regency mystery series

Newly returned from finishing school, Lady Juliette Thorndike is ready to debut in London society. Due to her years away, she hasn't spent much time with her parents, and sees them only as the flighty, dilettante couple the other nobles love. But when they disappear, she discovers she never really knew them at all. They've been living double lives as government spies--and they're only the latest in a long history of espionage that is the family's legacy.

Now Lady Juliette is determined to continue their work. Mentored by her uncle, she plunges into the dangerous world of spy craft. From the glittering ballrooms of London to the fox hunts, regattas, and soirees of country high society, she must chase down hidden clues, solve the mysterious code her parents left behind, and stay out of danger. All the while, she has to keep her endeavors a secret from her best friend and her suitors--not to mention nosy, irritatingly handsome Bow Street runner Daniel Swann, who suspects her of a daring theft.

Can Lady Juliette outwit her enemies and complete her parents' last mission? Or will it lead her to a terrible end?

The Debutante's Code is now out in the world! You can get your copy HERE: https://amzn.to/3GQnoZt Or wherever you buy your fiction! 

The In-Between Times


Best-selling, award-winning author Erica Vetsch loves Jesus, history, romance, and sports. She’s a transplanted Kansan now living in Minnesota, and she is married to her total opposite and soul mate! When she’s not writing fiction, she’s planning her next trip to a history museum and cheering on her Kansas Jayhawks and New Zealand All Blacks. You can connect with her at her website, www.ericavetsch.com where you can read about her books and sign up for her newsletter, and you can find her online at https://www.facebook.com/EricaVetschAuthor/ where she spends way too much time!




 

 






Writing is a Team Sport

 

Writing is a Team Sport


Howdy! Erica Vetsch here! I hope you’re having a splendiferous day!

This last weekend, I turned in the content edits for my 2022 release, Millstone of Doubt, book two in the Thorndike & Swann Regency Mysteries.

I spent hours in my library/office, reading, revising, tweaking, fixing. The door was closed, a little instrumental piano music going in the background, tea mug nearby. I was alone with my work.


 

This is the point where you hear authors say writing is very solitary. You. The Words. Nobody else. And this is true. There are great swaths of my day where I am by myself, at my computer, pulling words from my head and arranging them on the screen.

And yet, while authors write their books in isolation, writing is really a team sport. And the broader writing life even more so.

Examples just from this past week:

1. I edited Millstone of Doubt based upon the editorial letter I got from my editor at the publishing house. We are a team, trying to produce the best product possible. We shared ideas, collaborated on sticky bits, and hopefully succeeded in making the manuscript better. The book will now go to the line editor, who will polish, align, and generally improve the story in most every way possible because she’s awesome like that. Yay for an editorial team!




2. I spoke with my publicist on the phone, and she did some cooperative marketing for a project I was involved with. Very soon, she’ll be sending me Q&As for my upcoming release, creating graphics, and checking up on all the people who have signed up to read and review the story in the coming days. She works with the marketing and publicity teams at my publisher to get the word out about my books. Yay for a publicity team!

 



3. Last week, I took part in the Christian Fiction Scavenger Hunt with 25 other authors. We each promoted the hunt through our social media, newsletters, and pretty much everywhere we could, and as a result, word about my upcoming release reached WAY more people than I could have on my own. Yay for a collaborative effort by a team of author friends.




4. Last Thursday, I did a zoom meeting with a delightful group of west coast librarians where we talked about the road to publication, books, our favorite reads, and more. But on Tuesday, I couldn’t think of a single topic that would sound interesting. I was up to my eyeballs in edits, had several other projects going, and my mind was blank…so…I threw myself on the mercy of the Seekers. Dashing off a quick email plea for help, I was thrilled that so many ideas and answers poured into my inbox. I knew they would, because the SeekerLadies are awesome like that. In the end, I think I hit on almost every proposed topic in my presentation, and the librarian ladies seemed to enjoy it and had lots of fun questions afterwards. Yay for a writing buddy team!





5. This past week, I also got together with writing friends, Julie Klassen and Michelle Griep, to film a fun video we hope to air in the Inspirational Regency Readers Group in December. They drove to my place, brought props, and basically joined in on my hare-brained schemes. J They were great, and I could not (and would not) have done the video without them. My daughter took the day off from work to be our videographer, and she rocked it! Yay for the friend and film crew team!

Writing is a Team Sport



6. I also met on Friday with a book club two hours from my home. We got together to fellowship and to make some crafts and of course to talk about books. This group of ladies has supported Christian fiction as a book club for more than 15 years, and they’re still going strong. I just love them. They encourage me every time we get together. Yay for a reader team!

 



7. Last night (I’m writing this on Saturday for a Monday post, so that tells you how busy my week has been) I got a reminder from our own Mindy Obenhaus about getting my updates into the Weekend Edition post. Mindy does this every week, reminding those who posted before and those who are due to post to get their blurbs in and pick winners, etc. Audra Harders creates the lovely Seekerville calendars each month, Seekers cover for each other if someone cannot post on their day, Ruthy sorta stage-manages us all, Debby produces the lovely Sunday Prayer posts, and…you would not believe the fervent and faithful prayers that surround any Seeker in need. Yay for a tight team of Seekers!




As you can see, my writing life has been a wee bit on the busy side, but it hasn’t all been sitting alone in my office staring at that judgmental blinking cursor all day. I have teams of people who have helped me accomplish every aspect of my writing life. I haven’t even mentioned my husband who has spent several evenings in sole possession of the remote control as I worked on edits into the late hours, nor how next week, Heather will be helping me plot my next novel so I can dive into writing it, or my church family who lent prayer and care while my husband and I were sick with the current virus du jour.

Do you have a team? Are you part of someone else’s team?

Writing is a Team SportBest-selling, award-winning author Erica Vetsch loves Jesus, history, romance, and sports. She’s a transplanted Kansan now living in Minnesota, and she is married to her total opposite and soul mate! When she’s not writing fiction, she’s planning her next trip to a history museum and cheering on her Kansas Jayhawks and New Zealand All Blacks. You can connect with her at her website, www.ericavetsch.com where you can read about her books and sign up for her newsletter, and you can find her online at https://www.facebook.com/EricaVetschAuthor/ where she spends way too much time!





Writing is a Team Sport



Jane Austen meets Sherlock Holmes in this new Regency mystery series

Newly returned from finishing school, Lady Juliette Thorndike is ready to debut in London society. Due to her years away, she hasn't spent much time with her parents, and sees them only as the flighty, dilettante couple the other nobles love. But when they disappear, she discovers she never really knew them at all. They've been living double lives as government spies--and they're only the latest in a long history of espionage that is the family's legacy.

Now Lady Juliette is determined to continue their work. Mentored by her uncle, she plunges into the dangerous world of spy craft. From the glittering ballrooms of London to the fox hunts, regattas, and soirees of country high society, she must chase down hidden clues, solve the mysterious code her parents left behind, and stay out of danger. All the while, she has to keep her endeavors a secret from her best friend and her suitors--not to mention nosy, irritatingly handsome Bow Street runner Daniel Swann, who suspects her of a daring theft.

Can Lady Juliette outwit her enemies and complete her parents' last mission? Or will it lead her to a terrible end?

You can pre-order HERE

Favorite book-ish memes!

 Erica here. I am up to my eyeballs in a deadline right now, and I could use a bit of levity. If you are part of the Inspirational Regency Readers group on Facebook, you know I love a good book-ish meme. I thought I would post some of my favorites here today.


Favorite book-ish memes!

Favorite book-ish memes!

Favorite book-ish memes!

Favorite book-ish memes!

Favorite book-ish memes!

Favorite book-ish memes!

Favorite book-ish memes!

Favorite book-ish memes!

Favorite book-ish memes!

Favorite book-ish memes!

Favorite book-ish memes!

Which one resonated with/is your favorite? Comment, and I'll pick a winner to receive an e-copy of The Lost Lieutenant! 

Favorite book-ish memes!

He's doing what he can to save the Prince Regent's life . . . but can he save his new marriage as well?


Evan Eldridge never meant to be a war hero--he just wanted to fight Napoleon for the future of his country. And he certainly didn't think that saving the life of a peer would mean being made the Earl of Whitelock. But when the life you save is dear to the Prince Regent, things can change in a hurry.

Now Evan has a new title, a manor house in shambles, and a stranger for a bride, all thrust upon him by a grateful ruler. What he doesn't have are all his memories. Traumatized as a result of his wounds and bravery on the battlefield, Evan knows there's something he can't quite remember. It's important, dangerous--and if he doesn't recall it in time, will jeopardize not only his marriage but someone's very life.




Favorite book-ish memes!


Best-selling, award-winning author Erica Vetsch loves Jesus, history, romance, and sports. She’s a transplanted Kansan now living in Minnesota, and she is married to her total opposite and soul mate! When she’s not writing fiction, she’s planning her next trip to a history museum and cheering on her Kansas Jayhawks and New Zealand All Blacks. You can connect with her at her website, 
www.ericavetsch.com where you can read about her books and sign up for her newsletter, and you can find her online at https://www.facebook.com/EricaVetschAuthor/ where she spends way too much time!

How Pre-orders benefit your favorite authors.


How Pre-orders benefit your favorite authors.

Did you know that pre-ordering a book is one of the most helpful things you can do for an author? Here are a few of the benefits, in case you wondered:



  • The publisher is watching to see if there is any pre-publication buzz...and if there is, they are more likely to put even more marketing effort/dollars behind a book to build even more buzz.

  • With so many books coming out all the time, hopping into your local bookstore and asking them to pre-order a book sends them a signal that something good is coming out. They often order two or three in addition to your pre-order to have it in the store on release day. 

  • Pre-order sales are added into the first week sales when the book is published, and all of those pre-orders can be just what is needed to get a book on a bestseller list. That "Bestseller" cache is a big one for authors. Whether it's the NYT, USA Today, ECPA, or Publisher's Weekly, hitting a bestseller list garners attention for the book, which can generate even more sales.

  • Whatever weird math makes up the Internet, when there are pre-orders and buzz about a book, the mystery algorithms pick up on that buzz and spread it farther. Online retailers pick up on those mystery algorithms and promote the book on their sites.  

  • Asking your library to pre-order a book is HUGE! Authors love libraries. Libraries get authors' books into the hands of so many readers, and many true book lovers will investigate a new author via the library, and if they like the stories, will go out and purchase the author's whole backlist.  

  • Pre-ordering has a couple upsides for readers, too. You often get the book before the publication date if you order a print copy. Amazon often ships before the pub date. Also, pre-ordering means you order now, pay when the book ships. And, if you pre-order, you won't miss the release!

As authors, we thank all of you who read our books, whether you pre-order, get it through the library, share books with friends, print, ebook, or audio. We're just glad you're reading our stories and enjoying the bookish life!



How Pre-orders benefit your favorite authors.

Best-selling, award-winning author Erica Vetsch loves Jesus, history, romance, and sports. She’s a transplanted Kansan now living in Minnesota, and she is married to her total opposite and soul mate! When she’s not writing fiction, she’s planning her next trip to a history museum and cheering on her Kansas Jayhawks and New Zealand All Blacks. You can connect with her at her website, www.ericavetsch.com where you can read about her books and sign up for her newsletter, and you can find her online at https://www.facebook.com/EricaVetschAuthor/ where she spends way too much time!




How Pre-orders benefit your favorite authors.


Jane Austen meets Sherlock Holmes in this new Regency mystery series

Newly returned from finishing school, Lady Juliette Thorndike is ready to debut in London society. Due to her years away, she hasn't spent much time with her parents, and sees them only as the flighty, dilettante couple the other nobles love. But when they're lost at sea, she discovers she never really knew them at all. They've been living double lives as government spies--and they're only the latest in a long history of espionage that is the family's legacy.

Now Lady Juliette is determined to continue their work. Mentored by her uncle, she plunges into the dangerous world of spy craft. From the glittering ballrooms of London to the fox hunts, regattas, and soirees of country high society, she must chase down hidden clues, solve the mysterious code her parents left behind, and stay out of danger. All the while, she has to keep her endeavors a secret from her best friend and her suitors--not to mention nosy, irritatingly handsome Bow Street runner Daniel Swann, who suspects her of a daring theft.

Can Lady Juliette outwit her enemies and complete her parents' last mission? Or will it lead her to a terrible end?

Best-selling author Erica Vetsch is back with a rollicking, exciting new series destined to be a hit with Regency readers who enjoy a touch of mystery in their love stories. Fans of Julie Klassen, Sarah Ladd, and Anne Perry will love the wit, action, and romance.

Pre-order your copy here: https://smile.amazon.com/Debutantes-Thorndike-Swann-Regency-Mysteries/dp/0825447135


Avoiding the Summer Slump

 

Avoiding the Summer Slump

Last month I was invited to speak at the Minnesota Christian Writers Guild, a great organization that holds monthly meetings in the Twin Cities to help writers along their writing journey.

I addressed the topic of Avoiding the Summer Slump, mostly because I needed to preach a little truth to myself. If you, too, need a bit of a pep talk, you've come to the right place.

So, how can a writer avoid that summer slump?

1. Set Goals:

  • Be realistic. You cannot possibly write 5 million words in one week. (Well, Ruthy can, but she's not human.)
  • Make goals quantifiable. Set goals specific enough that you can tell whether you've attained them or not.
  • Separate 'writing adjacent' things from actual writing. Writing adjacent things like research, marketing, emails, etc. take lots of time, but they won't add words to your work in progress.
2. Identify what Motivates You:

  • Remember why it is you write. Remind yourself...often if necessary
  • Set small victory rewards. Chocolate? A new coffee mug? Dinner out?
  • Identify what you want to have accomplished at the end of the summer when you look back. Keep it in the forefront of your mind during writing sessions.
  • Set a big victory reward. When you reach your big-picture goal, reward yourself with something cool. A vacation? A conference? A writing retreat? A laptop? Whatever. Save for it and work toward it.
3. Set your Strategies:

  • Are you going to get up earlier? Stay up later?
  • One weekend a month devoted to your writing?
  • Turn off social media or the tv?
  • Get your family involved.
                    a. Let them know how important this is to you.
                    b. Give them tangible ways to help. Dishes? Cooking? Quiet time?
                    c. Give them updates so they know how helpful they're being.

4. Get the Tools You Need to Stay on Track:


  • Planners. Write it down and make it happen.
  • Word count trackers can provide a visual of your progress
  • Accountability partners can help you stay on track.
  • A private FB group of likeminded people. (I belong to a group on FB called 1k1hr, which stands for One Thousand Words in One Hour. You don't have to write that fast, or you can go faster if you want, but the upshot is people check in, ask if anyone is around who is also writing, and a few folks join in. Encouragement that you're not alone, seeing the productivity of others, and a place to be held accountable. Bonus, you can make friends, too!) https://www.facebook.com/groups/338770276151416

There are only two more months before school starts and leaves start changing. What do you want to have accomplished by then? How are you going to get it done?

Avoiding the Summer Slump

Best-selling, award-winning author Erica Vetsch loves Jesus, history, romance, and sports. She’s a transplanted Kansan now living in Minnesota, and she is married to her total opposite and soul mate! When she’s not writing fiction, she’s planning her next trip to a history museum and cheering on her Kansas Jayhawks and New Zealand All Blacks. You can connect with her at her website, 
www.ericavetsch.com where you can read about her books and sign up for her newsletter, and you can find her online at https://www.facebook.com/EricaVetschAuthor/ where she spends way too much time!



Super excited that The Debutante's Code is now available for pre-order! (Link Below)

Avoiding the Summer Slump


Jane Austen meets Sherlock Holmes in this new Regency mystery series

Newly returned from finishing school, Lady Juliette Thorndike is ready to debut in London society. Due to her years away, she hasn't spent much time with her parents, and sees them only as the flighty, dilettante couple the other nobles love. But when they're lost at sea, she discovers she never really knew them at all. They've been living double lives as government spies--and they're only the latest in a long history of espionage that is the family's legacy.

Now Lady Juliette is determined to continue their work. Mentored by her uncle, she plunges into the dangerous world of spy craft. From the glittering ballrooms of London to the fox hunts, regattas, and soirees of country high society, she must chase down hidden clues, solve the mysterious code her parents left behind, and stay out of danger. All the while, she has to keep her endeavors a secret from her best friend and her suitors--not to mention nosy, irritatingly handsome Bow Street runner Daniel Swann, who suspects her of a daring theft.

Can Lady Juliette outwit her enemies and complete her parents' last mission? Or will it lead her to a terrible end?

Best-selling author Erica Vetsch is back with a rollicking, exciting new series destined to be a hit with Regency readers who enjoy a touch of mystery in their love stories. Fans of Julie Klassen, Sarah Ladd, and Anne Perry will love the wit, action, and romance.

Pre-order your copy here: https://smile.amazon.com/Debutantes-Thorndike-Swann-Regency-Mysteries/dp/0825447135


All The Other Stuff

 

All The Other Stuff





Before I was published, before I even attended a writer’s contest, seminar, or read a craft book, I thought I knew how the writing life would go.

Step one: Write a story you like

Step two: Mail it off to editors

Step three: Sort through the various offers and sign a contract

Step four: Lather, rinse, repeat.

Okay, you can stop laughing now.

In the intervening years, I’ve acquired some experience, some knowledge, and a fair few bumps and bruises doled out by this writing life. I’ve learned that writing the book isn’t enough. There’s so much more to do, requirements to meet, obligations to fulfill.

So, I thought I’d talk about “The Other Stuff.” Things that a published writer has to do/should do/can do in addition to writing books. Things the publisher expects you to do to help market the book and get your name and self out there to potential readers.

These things can be broken down into categories.


All The Other Stuff

 

Communications. You must conquer the tyranny of your business email. It’s so easy to neglect your email, and suddenly it’s an avalanche ready to bury you. Prioritize your email so you don’t waste time on the less important and leave the urgent to go begging.

  • Editors and Agents first. NEVER ghost your agent or editors. Communication is key to your relationship!

  • Other professional emails, from fellow writers, agency mates, whomever, who may be looking for a reply from you. Bookstore managers, bloggers, review sites, magazine editors, etc.

  • Reader emails and messages. Don’t skip these. Sew a little kindness and attention to people who have read and enjoyed your books.
All The Other Stuff



The Writing that Isn’t Writing

  • Plotting and proposals. Working on that next idea to propose to your agent/editor. The publishing world is a fodder machine, and there is no time to rest on your laurels. You need to work on the next idea.

  • Edits. Edits of various sorts will arrive in your inbox while you are currently writing one story and marketing another. Prioritize your edits as you did your emails. Set up a calendar to ensure you finish your edits on time, and remember that Communication comes first. Communicate with your editors and your agent about editing deadline expectations.

  • Blog posts, interviews, articles. You will find yourself doing a lot of writing that isn’t actually on one of your books. You’ll write about writing, about your process, about your characters, about the history and setting of your book, about your favorite tea and movies. And while you may fell all this writing takes your focus off your book, remember that this extra writing is what helps people learn about you and your work. It can be time consuming, and it tends to cluster around when you are releasing a new book. (Hint: pre-write some of these articles and blog posts. As you write your book, take some notes on your research, write up a blog post or magazine article. You can bring it out when you need a post in a pinch.) Also, consider a group blog rather than an individual blog to lessen your load. Here at Seekerville, we each blog once a month with the occasional guest post, which is much more manageable for all of us than each writer blogging 3-5 times per week on her individual blog.

Marketing and Social Media

Beware of this one. It can be a HUGE time-suck and reason for not getting your other work done. And yet, it needs to be part of your professional life. Much like publishing, social media is a content machine. New pictures, posts, pins, tweets, grams…It can be daunting and time consuming.

Pick one or two. You cannot possibly keep up with every social media platform out there. I know, because I tried. I burned my twitter account for a couple of reasons. 1. I didn’t enjoy composing tweets. And 2. The atmosphere on twitter is so rancorous. Acidic and mean, and I had little control over what I saw in my twitter feed. But I very much enjoy Facebook and Instagram. So I decided to concentrate on those.

Narrow your focus on social media. Not just your platform, but the content you’re creating for it. At the moment, most of my efforts on social media go into a public group created with fellow Regency authors that focuses on the era we write and the lovely readers who enjoy that era. Polls, games, photos, questions. Interaction daily with people who read what I write.

As to Instagram, I don’t really use Insta to market my books much. I use it to follow the people I want to follow. Which will show in my follows/followed by numbers. Many more people follow my Instagram than I follow. I made the mistake on Twitter years ago of automatically following back anyone who followed me, and yowza, there turned out to be lots of people who were putting out content I didn’t want to see, but I had felt obligated to ‘return follow.’


All The Other Stuff

 



It can be daunting to think about all the non-writing obligations that can come along with that dreamed-of contract, but don’t let it overwhelm you. Prioritize, triage your projects, take things in little bites, discipline yourself when it comes to social media. And above all, keep the writing first, the non-writing obligations second.



What part of the writing journey has surprised you the most? What misconception did you have that you now know is false? How do you manage your social media time?


All The Other Stuff
Can Captain Wyvern keep his new marriage of convenience all business--or will it turn into something more?

Captain Charles Wyvern owes a great debt to the man who saved his life--especially since Major Richardson lost his own life in the process. The best way to honor that hero's dying wish is for Wyvern to escort the man’s grieving fiancée and mother safely to a new cottage home by the sea. But along the way, he learns of another obligation that has fallen on his shoulders: his uncle has died and the captain is now the Earl of Rothwell.

When he and the ladies arrive at his new manor house in Devon, they discover an estate in need of a leader and a gaggle of girls, all wards of the former earl. War the new earl knows; young ladies and properties he does not. Still wishing to provide for the bereaved Lady Sophia Haverly, Charles proposes a marriage of convenience.

Sophie is surprised to find she isn't opposed to the idea. It will help her care for her betrothed's elderly mother, and she's already fallen in love with the wayward girls on the Rothwell estate. This alliance is a chance to repay the captain who has done so much for her care, as well as divert her attention from her grief. When Wyvern returns to his sea commission, she'll stay behind to oversee his property and wards.

It sounds so simple. Until the stalwart captain is arrested on suspicion of smuggling, and Sophie realizes how much he's come to mean to her. Now she'll have to learn to fight, not only for his freedom but also for his love.


All The Other Stuff
Best-selling, award-winning author Erica Vetsch loves Jesus, history, romance, and sports. When she’s not writing fiction, she’s planning her next trip to a history museum and cheering on her Kansas Jayhawks and New Zealand All Blacks. You can connect with her at her website, www.ericavetsch.com where you can read about her books and sign up for her newsletter, and you can find her online at https://www.facebook.com/EricaVetschAuthor/ where she spends way too much time!




One Author's Relationship with Reviews

 

One Author's Relationship with Reviews

TOMORROW my newest book releases! #39!! The Indebted Earl, book three in the Serendipity & Secrets Regency series officially comes out, though review copies went out a few weeks ago and some retail places have shipped early. I’m so excited for this book to get into readers hands, and to find out what people think about it. Which got me to thinking about reviews and my relationship with them.

There are lots of things to say and think about book reviews, and I’ll try to bullet point them here for clarity. I apologize for the long post, but there are so many things to say!

One Author's Relationship with Reviews



What is a book review?

  • Simply, it’s a reader’s thoughts on a book. What they liked or didn’t like, felt, or enjoyed about a book. Would they recommend this book? Why or why not?
  • It often includes a rating…one to five stars, one being “BLECH, hated this,” five being “BEST book ever!” Amazon now allows you to rate a book without leaving a review...but the written review means more and is more helpful to both the author and the consumer than just a star rating.
  • Posted on social media, often in a variety of places. Book sellers, blogs, Instagram, Facebook, or other social platform. The wider the dispersion of reviews, the more people can be reached with word about the book!
 
One Author's Relationship with Reviews



What does a book review do for an author? (This is not an exhaustive list, but it should cover most of the basics.)

  • Increases visibility in different ways. The more written reviews a book has on retail sites like amazon, Barnes & Noble, or Christianbook, the more these platforms will spread the word about the book. It will be seen in the “Also bought” ribbon across the middle of other book listings, it will appear as suggested for you on people’s amazon home pages and it becomes a bit of a self-fulfilling prophecy. The more popular a book is, the more it will be promoted, and thus become more popular. In addition, a book that is shared on Instagram or FB is seen by thousands as it gains momentum. In one three day ‘Social Media Takeover Tour’ I participated in, my book cover was seen by nearly 90,000 people who otherwise wouldn’t have known about my story. I received word from several people that they "just had to buy the book, because they were seeing it EVERYWHERE!" Yay! Just the result for which I hoped!
  • It gives the author feedback. Reviews are a good way for an author to get feedback on their stories. When our books go to press, we have very little way to know if the story is resonating with readers other than by reviews and feedback. We can judge whether we've hit the mark with our story, is it being well received, is there anything we should change in the next one based on what readers are saying?
  • Encouragement (and discouragement upon occasion) Writing is a solitary existence. Authors are in their heads, creating story worlds, and not knowing the impact our words will have, until we hear through reviews that we’ve nailed it…or not. (More about that later.)
  • Gives a good metric to our publishers on how the books are doing. If you’re getting lots of good feedback through reviews, the publisher is more likely to sign you to another contract than if there are terrible reviews or worse…crickets.
  • The number of reviews a book has can edge it into promotional goldmine territory such as BookBub. In order to qualify for some promotions on sites like BookBub, a book needs to have already gained a certain amount of traction via reviews.
  • Positive book reviews increase sales. People are more likely to buy a book that has many positive reviews than one that has very few. People are more likely to see a book on a retail site if it has positive reviews. There are certain benchmarks that the amazon algorithm has that increases visibility for books that have 50, 100, 200 reviews.
One Author's Relationship with Reviews



What does a book review do for a reader?

  • Saves time and money. Reading reviews, especially well-crafted reviews, helps a consumer know whether they will like a product.
  • Introduces the reader to unknown-to-them authors. Through increased visibility, it’s easier for readers to find you on the retail sites.
  • Gives comparisons so readers can identify easily the style of book they're thinking of buying. Often a book review will state “Readers of _____________ will enjoy this book.
  • Word of mouth is still the best way to sell something, and by leaving reviews, it’s like word of mouth advertising that allows you to reach WAY more people than if you just stood on a street corner and talked to passers by!
One Author's Relationship with Reviews



What makes a good, well-written book review?

  • A good book review will include what you liked and didn’t like. It’s okay to say you didn’t LOVE everything about a book. Was the middle a bit slow? Did it take you some time to get into the story? Did you want to smack the heroine at the beginning? But also include what you DID like. Was the action exciting? Was the romance swoony? Did you relate to the characters’ struggles? A balanced review is more trustworthy than a hit job or a book gush.
  • Keep your review focused on the book, not the author. No personal attacks, please! If you didn’t like the book, it’s okay to say, this turned out not to be to my taste, and to say why, but don’t say something like “This author couldn’t write her way out of a wet paper bag.” That’s just mean.
  • Don’t give away the plot/spoilers. Keep the secrets of the book. You can say, “I never saw the ending coming!” or “The plot twisted more than a rattler slipping through a prickly pear patch!” but don’t give away all the secrets of the book. Knowing all the plot twists and surprises ruins the experience for the next reader and also deflates an author who worked so hard to surprise readers only to have the gaff blown by a reviewer.
  • Please don’t leave a review for something that is outside the author’s control. If the book arrived damaged in the mail, don’t give it a one-star review. The author can’t help what happens in the USPS, and your one star review will bring down the book’s rating average like a cinderblock in a lake.
  • If you received the book through a review program from the publisher, note that at the end of your review, and state that all your opinions are your own. You’re not obligated to leave a favorable review just because you were gifted the book. But you do have to let people know if you received a free copy.
One Author's Relationship with Reviews



The relationships of authors and reviews:

  • · I’ll say it up front. It can be difficult when someone says your baby is ugly. Especially the first time you hear it. You can walk in the humiliation of it all day. And for some authors, they never get over reading an unfavorable review.
  • It is LOVELY to read a review that not only is positive, but one where you KNOW the reader totally got what you were trying to say in telling your story.
  • Both the total number and the number of positive reviews can be so encouraging to an author (for the reasons stated above.)
  • There are dangers for authors reading reviews. If you are sensitive to comments about your work that are less than praiseworthy, my advice is to not read them. Let a friend read them and report back if there are any trends or common issues. A trusted friend, not a frienemy who will delight in your pain! Don’t let negative comments derail you, keep you from writing new words, or make you want to answer back…and also…NEVER answer a reviewer back. Ultimately, Reviews are for Readers! Authors can certainly use them, but reviews are for helping potential customers decide whether to buy your book. It’s a bad look if you come spitting out of the gate to contest every review you don’t like. On the flip side, don’t let your ego become inflated by positive reviews praising your work. Certainly enjoy that readers are liking what you wrote, be encouraged, but also remember, the results of your work are in God’s hands, and He deserves the praise. 
One Author's Relationship with Reviews




Tips for when you get a bad review:  
  • Stop. Take a breath. Walk away from the computer/phone/screen if necessary.
  • When you can be objective, consider if there is any truth to the review. Is there something you need to take under advisement.
  • Remember that art is subjective, and not everyone is going to respond the same way. You have likes and dislikes when it comes to fiction reading, so allow others to have the same preferences.
  • Take a peek at that person's other reviews. Do they consistently leave bad reviews and slate people? Is your book an outlier, or is this a pattern? If it's a pattern, write it off as someone else's problem, not yours.
  • Remember that there is not a single troll out there leaving mean reviews who is living a better life than you. They might be having a bad day, a bad patch, or just be a negative person, but you don't need to give them the power to turn you into the same.
  • If a review is particularly nasty, there are a couple things you can do. If it's on Goodreads, and the review violates their community guidelines, you can flag the review and Goodreads will take a look at it and see if it needs reviewed. If it's just a star rating, there isn't anything you can do about that. Readers are welcome to rate your book however they like, but they are not welcome to attack you in a written review in a way that violates the guidelines. When I checked amazon, here's what they had to say: "If a Product review is in violation of any of those outlined on the link above, simply click the 'Report Abuse' link found just below the review (near the helpful vote buttons), and report it. When it comes to product reviews, Amazon provides a bit of anonymity for buyers who wish to leave Product Reviews." Another site suggested this: "Go to the product details page of your product, find the questionable review, and click “report abuse”. Alternatively, you can send an email to community-help@amazon.com and indicate the ASIN of your product, the date and time of the review, the name/pseudonym of the reviewer, and, ideally, a link to the review." Both Goodreads and Amazon strongly suggest you not respond to the negative review yourself, as this just tends to escalate things, and you never come off looking very good.

One Author's Relationship with Reviews


So there you have it. As reviews come in for my newest release, I’m trying to take my own advice! And if you have read/are reading/will read The Indebted Earl…help a girl out! Leave a review and tell your friends!



My question for you….Do you write and post reviews? Do you read reviews before buying a book? If you’re an author, do you read your reviews?

One Author's Relationship with Reviews
Can Captain Wyvern keep his new marriage of convenience all business--or will it turn into something more?

Captain Charles Wyvern owes a great debt to the man who saved his life--especially since Major Richardson lost his own life in the process. The best way to honor that hero's dying wish is for Wyvern to escort the man’s grieving fiancée and mother safely to a new cottage home by the sea. But along the way, he learns of another obligation that has fallen on his shoulders: his uncle has died and the captain is now the Earl of Rothwell.

When he and the ladies arrive at his new manor house in Devon, they discover an estate in need of a leader and a gaggle of girls, all wards of the former earl. War the new earl knows; young ladies and properties he does not. Still wishing to provide for the bereaved Lady Sophia Haverly, Charles proposes a marriage of convenience.

Sophie is surprised to find she isn't opposed to the idea. It will help her care for her betrothed's elderly mother, and she's already fallen in love with the wayward girls on the Rothwell estate. This alliance is a chance to repay the captain who has done so much for her care, as well as divert her attention from her grief. When Wyvern returns to his sea commission, she'll stay behind to oversee his property and wards.

It sounds so simple. Until the stalwart captain is arrested on suspicion of smuggling, and Sophie realizes how much he's come to mean to her. Now she'll have to learn to fight, not only for his freedom but also for his love.

One Author's Relationship with Reviews
Best-selling, award-winning author Erica Vetsch loves Jesus, history, romance, and sports. When she’s not writing fiction, she’s planning her next trip to a history museum and cheering on her Kansas Jayhawks and New Zealand All Blacks. You can connect with her at her website, www.ericavetsch.com where you can read about her books and sign up for her newsletter, and you can find her online at https://www.facebook.com/EricaVetschAuthor/ where she spends way too much time!

 



Yay for a Second Printing!Ten Things I've Learned in Seventeen YearsTen Writing Tips from a Legend to Strengthen your Contest EntryThe In-Between TimesWriting is a Team SportFavorite book-ish memes!How Pre-orders benefit your favorite authors.Avoiding the Summer SlumpAll The Other StuffOne Author's Relationship with Reviews

Report "Seekerville: The Journey Continues"

Are you sure you want to report this post for ?

Cancel
×