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Watchismo Times | category: digital | (page 6 of 6)

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Watchismo Times

THE WATCHISMO TIMES WATCH BLOG A reliquary of obscure timepieces from bygone eras as well as the cutting-edge watch designs of today.

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Jumpin Jack Flash, it's a 1970's Sheffield Jump Hour

Jumpin Jack Flash, it's a 1970's Sheffield Jump Hour
A style of many names, Jump Hour, Direct Read, Mechanical Digital. Either way, watches like this tremendously bizarre automatic Sheffield have always been my favorite kind to collect.

Born from competition with the new LED/LCD digital technologies, Swiss companies had to do something. The idea had been done before, many decades prior. But it was re-imagined during the early seventies for a marketplace that wanted to see numbers instead of hands. Ultimately doomed because most people were just tired of winding their watches. The Quartz revolution was born.

But the fact was, so many of these rarities were jam-packed with originality and space-age styling.

Many many more to come...

Super-Duper-Uber-Rare 1978 Heuer Ford Chronosplit RS Motorsport

Super-Duper-Uber-Rare 1978 Heuer Ford Chronosplit RS MotorsportDid I make my point about how rare this watch is? Well, multiply that by 100. It's just unheard of, they never appear on the vintage market. And Graham has one in new-old stock condition, fully functioning with original box/paperwork. It's so uncommon to see working that I had no idea it had an LCD logo of the Ford company. He also offers the original tool for opening the spark plug pod battery pods. All I can say is wow.

Part of the holy grail collection of Heuer Chronosplit.

Chronosplit (LED/LCD)
Ford RS Motorsport
The Manhattan
The Senator

Super-Duper-Uber-Rare 1978 Heuer Ford Chronosplit RS Motorsport

THE CABESTAN - Polygraph Watch? Richter Scale Watch? Please tell me this does more than tell the time...

THE CABESTAN - Polygraph Watch?  Richter Scale Watch?  Please tell me this does more than tell the time...This is just sickening. When something is so damn cool it makes you sick to your stomach, you should pay attention. Is it admiration? Jealousy? Bad Mexican food? Hell, it's all of the above.

Thanks to CoolHunting for first bringing my attention to this Sexy Beast!

The Cabestan is a collaboration between two of horology's bad boys, Vianney Halter and Jean-François Ruchonnet's DMC Group (who also designed the Heuer Monaco V4).

Inspired by old Curta calculators, this watchmaking marvel has a vertical tourbillon and an unusual fusée-and-chain movement. Time is shown on the barrels; no dial and no hands. You wind the watch by attaching a "wrench" to the two top cabestans (the knobs on the side).

135 of these beauties will be made in gold or platinum. Oh, and start saving now. They cost around $220,000 and are available from Vianney Halter.

Yeah, but a Richter scale-polygraph detector watch will come out for Basel 2007, you mark my word.

Europastar article

THE CABESTAN - Polygraph Watch?  Richter Scale Watch?  Please tell me this does more than tell the time...

Digitrendy - Amida Digitrend Prism Jump Hour


"Hmm...How can I make a sideview LED style digital watch and still be mechanical? I got it! Make two dials for hour and minutes, print the numbers backwards and have a prism reflect the corrected mirror image through the side crystal."

- Likely thoughts of Swiss mechanical digital inventor Joseph Bamat when creating the 1970's Amida Digitrend mirrored prism jump hour digital mechanical watch. (also made by Crehor & Hudson)

Patent information describes it in further detail;


DIGITAL WATCH (filed November 1970)
Abstract
A timepiece includes a pair of rotatable discs carrying respectively hour and minute indicia on one surface adjacent their peripheries. The indicia are arranged to pass, on rotation of the discs, adjacent the geometric central axis of the case of the timepiece. A window is formed at a position corresponding to the geometric central axis of the case, in a cover of the case, for viewing the indica.
More photos here

Jump hour disks with backwards digit printing


Clockwise 02 - Longines Nixie Tube Clock

Clockwise 02 - Longines Nixie Tube ClockNixie Tubes were state of the art in electronic numeric displays in early digital voltmeters, multimeters, frequency counters and many other types of technical equipment. They also appeared in costly digital time displays used in research and military establishments, and in many early electronic desktop calculators, including the first: the vacuum tube-based Sumlock-Comptometer Anita Mk VII of 1961. Later alphanumeric versions in fourteen segment display format found use in airport arrival/departure signs and stock ticker displays. Some elevators and pinball machines also used nixies for displays.

By the 1970’s they were almost completely supplanted by the cheap, long lived, low power-consuming seven segment LED’s. The nixie is a neon tube, typically with 10 stacked cathodes, one for each arabic digit.


Clockwise 02 - Longines Nixie Tube Clock
Many folks are building their own clocks and wristwatches with vintage old stock tubes (watch examples #1, #2, #3), mostly uninspired designs but a few select people are creating interesting one-offs (Finkbuilt) and limited edition do-it-yourself kits (Klok).

Clock above was built by Longines, another amazing find Pieter Doensen showed me and wouldn't sell...

Totally Tubular!

Clockwise 02 - Longines Nixie Tube Clock

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