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Watchismo Times

THE WATCHISMO TIMES WATCH BLOG A reliquary of obscure timepieces from bygone eras as well as the cutting-edge watch designs of today.

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Ain't nothin like your first Time - Vintage Kids Watches

HAPPYTIME - 1970's Sears mechanical jump hour with bouncing eyes
1980's Kronoform Robot Watches
"The robot time-machine that can transform, each time, you tell time."


1983 Pac Man Video Game Watch --> Link
(rare version made with a mini joystick)

1966 G.I. Joe Military Watch by Gilbert
Swiss mechanical watch with compass

1965 James Bond 007 Spy Watch by GilbertPreviously featured --> Link


1934 Ingersoll Three Little Pigs & Big Bad Wolf Pocket Watch & Clock
Brick packaging display was genius!
Clock - Rotating Wolf arms grasp for piggies


Related story --> Homemade Pong Watch

Wristwatches of War - Trench Grilles and Hunter Guards


Pocket watches were a pain in the ass to fumble around for during battle, something needed to be done to keep soldiers hands on their guns as well as synchronize combat.

"When German Emperor Wilhelm I visited the Berlin Trade Fair and saw some experimental wristwatches made by Girard-Perregaux of La Chaux de Fonds in Switzerland. He gave an order for 1,000 of these for the German Imperial Navy, and as many as 2,000 such wristwatches were delivered in 1880. This began to change in the nineteenth century when watches were first used to coordinate military operations. Pocket watches were awkward to use in combat situations; under a great-coat, on horseback, or under fire, and so military men began fitting pocket watches into cups on specially made leather straps or asking manufacturers to fit them with chains or straps so that they could be worn on the wrist."


Many military watches had a special feature for those "in the shit". A Trench Guard, grid or grille covered and protected the dial with medieval-style armor. Those not intended for war were classified as Hunter cased, often more decorative than protective.

1880 Girard Perregaux for German Imperial Navy

1930 Elgin w/ Trench Guard & Enamel Dial

Eberhard & Co. 14k Hunter w/ porcelain dial

Waltham Trench

Cimier Grille

Movado 18k Decorative Trench


WWI British Air Force Military

Related posts;
Vacheron & Constantin Shutter Watches --> Link
Automobile Radiator Grille Watches --> Link

First Swiss Electro-Mechanical Watch, the 1960 Landeron 4750


Before quartz battery powered watches nearly destroyed mechanical innovation in the seventies, there existed a brief period of transition, an electro-mechanical era. The first battery-powered watches were, of course, the famed Hamilton Electric series of the late fifties and early sixties. There were other technological hybrids including the first electronic diode watch by the French company Lip and the transistorized Bulova Accutron with their tuning fork mechanisms.

This is the 1960 Landeron 4750, the first Swiss-electric movement. As you can see by the component diagram below, these were not simple watches like the inanimate battery powered Quartz of today. I'm featuring one of the more unique versions of this watch, the 'Montre à Couilles', as detailed in Pieter Doensen's book, built as a demonstration model with two externally cased battery compartments.













Landeron 4750 movement diagram (via electric-watches.co.uk)


1975 Bulova Accutron 'Spaceview'


1974 Lip Electric


Vintage Enicar Watches - Reversing Time in the Sixties & Seventies

Enicar was created when Artiste Racine (Racine Watch Co.) spelled his name backward and created a hearty brand that many people are unfamiliar over 90 years later. A special time existed for Enicar in the sixties and seventies when they developed their own automatic movements & focused on sport watches in addition to the rare odd vintage-modern designs featured here. Holding a special place in my collection, some of these Enicar was the very first vintage watches I ever owned. The Sherpa models are named for the 1956 Swiss Himalayan expedition that relied on Enicar timepieces.

Two crater-shaped models including the faceted space-age 70's Sherpa Star 

And the bark-textured volcano 70's Sherpa Star
1970 Asymmetrical Sherpa 350 & 356 Automatic

1970's Sherpa 320 Automatic
1970s Enicar Automatic Digital Jump Hour
1970's Enicar Automatic Mechanical Digital Jump Hour
1972 Enicar Sherpa Star Rotorwind Automatic
1970's asymmetric Enicar Mantagraph
1970's Enicar Chrono
1965 Enicar Sherpa 'Jet Graph' Chronograph
1970 Enicar Superdive
1950's Enicar Triple Date Moonphase Chronograph

1960's Minimal 'CircleSquare'

MATH WATCHES - Protractor and Slide Ruler Timepieces


Fifties geek-chic with this vintage 1958 Juvenia 'Architecture' watch featuring protractor and ruler hands. Featured in the Brunner/Pfeiffer-Belli book 'Wristwatches'

Their earlier 1945 Juvenia 'Arithmo' Slide Rule Watch


And with the door open to slide-rule watches, the testosterone-fueled leader of the math geeks is the 1973 Heuer 'Calculator.'

1990's Megapode

The Megapode, Ikepod's contribution to the hip mathematician. Is that an oxymoron?
2007 Megapode




Vintage Bullhead Chronographs Like It On Top


Bullhead Chronographs, as they're called, feature the crown and pushers on top of the case instead of the side. Due to the rarity of the configuration, more liberties are taken in regards to the overall design, many dials are angled up for a drivers style and feature unusual dials. A long way of saying they are some of the coolest damn watches made in the sixties and seventies.


1970 Bulova Bullhead (above) with the famous Chronomatic Calibre 11, the first automatic watch with a micro-rotor. Also used in the 1969 Heuer Monaco.
Additional photos here-->Link


1969 Omega Bullhead also featuring the Chronomatic movement. A case that is much wider at the top. Very rare. Link to additional photos-->Link


1970's Seiko Speedtimer sporting a perfect seventies burnt umber fade. A more commonly found vintage Bullhead.



Enormous 70's manual wind Orator Bullhead with massive steel case and gray gradation dial. A very obscure brand and an even more rare model.


1974 Breitling Pupitre is another asymmetrical Bullhead chrono with two-tone brown dial, manual winding Valjoux 7740 movement (also came in auto Caliber 11)



The bully of the Bullheads, the 1972 60mm wide Desotos Chronograph, first featured here-->Link


Another obscure 1970's Bullhead by Fleurier, a giant chunk of metal disguised as a chronograph.


1975 Victor Chronograph, manual winding, angled case, two-tone orange/gray dial.



Two vintage 70s Sorna Chronographs with one common goal...Make you look tough as hell. Above, is the volcano cased model (similar to the Omega Speedmaster Mark III) with multi-color black, orange, green, gray dial.

Below is the even larger triangular Sorna Bullhead with world time.




Licking and Ticking - More Vintage Timex Commercials


Why don't watch companies advertise on TV anymore? So many catchphrases, so little 
time.

Black Max! It takes a real man to wear it!-->Link
Of course, the break-up wristwatch??-->Link
"I got too close, Mongo grabbed my Timex" -->Link
"Bluejeans that tell the time!" -->Link
Secret Dummy Watch Party! -->Link
"I found my Timex in a very interesting place" -->Link

And previously featured - What watch to wear when you're drowning-->Link

Astronomic Watches by Christiaan van der Klaauw


Literally out of this world, the classic-cased timepieces by Dutch watchmaker Christian van der Klauuw are astronomically complicated. Inconceivably measuring everything from the position of the planets, the constellations, worldwide sunrises, sunsets, solar and lunar eclipses. Each model is handmade by Christiaan himself resulting in a very limited edition of each. Originally an astronomical clockmaker, the watches were developed after he miniaturized his own highly complicated movements.


Self-lauded as the smallest planetarium in the world, the obviously named 'Planetarium' features a heliocentric revolution of the planets (Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn). 


His most recent invention introduced at the 2006 Basel World, the 'Venus' features a very animated dial with separately rotating Earth & Moon and Venus orbiting the Sun amidst the Constellations.


Frighteningly complex, the 'Astrolibium' measures celestial bodies and constellations. 

Astrolibium Guide


A variation of the Astrolibium, the 'Mondial CK1' is customized to where you are located on the globe and features a sunrise/sunset gauge for the rest of the planet. 



One of Christiaan van der Klaauw's original Astronomical Clocks which ultimately led to his miniaturized mechanical universe.

Vintage Plastic Explosives - Early Polymer Watchmaking

Delrin, Polyamide, Polyacette, Hostaform, Polystyrol, Lucite, Acrylic, Perspex and Bakelite were all part of a new medium of 1960's & 70's plastic watchmaking (the first all plastic watch-->link). With flexible materials came flexible designs and like animated characters in a cartoon, the creators were able to push limits of the physical world.

Some vintage polymer highlights...


70's Buler Volcano

Tekron Cube

70's Mount Royal Curvex

1960's Bullseye

60's Lucerne Cuffbuster

And just to point out, these are all mechanical (manual wind-up and automatic) watches. The Swatch revolution was still 10-15 years away.
Ain't nothin like your first Time - Vintage Kids WatchesWristwatches of War - Trench Grilles and Hunter GuardsFirst Swiss Electro-Mechanical Watch, the 1960 Landeron 4750Vintage Enicar Watches - Reversing Time in the Sixties & SeventiesMATH WATCHES - Protractor and Slide Ruler TimepiecesVintage Bullhead Chronographs Like It On TopA CLOCKWORK ORANGE Licking and Ticking - More Vintage Timex CommercialsAstronomic Watches by Christiaan van der KlaauwVintage Plastic Explosives - Early Polymer Watchmaking

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