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THE WATCHISMO TIMES WATCH BLOG A reliquary of obscure timepieces from bygone eras as well as the cutting-edge watch designs of today.

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Ikepod Carbon Nanoball Hourglass designed by Marc Newson - Baselworld 2010 Unveiling

The Ikepod Hourglass is 60 minute counter made up of high-grade glass with “sand” that composed of carbon or nickel-plated nanoballs. A gold-plated nanoball version is also available.

The container measures 265mm x 300mm x 3mm.



Ikepod Website




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Ikepod Cannonballs Watch by Artist Jeff Koons Introduced at Art Basel Miami

Ikepod Cannonballs Watch by Artist Jeff Koons Introduced at Art Basel MiamiIkepod has just introduced the Horizon "Cannonballs" designed by artist Jeff Koons & introduced this week at Art Basel Miami. Still with the unmistakable ellipse case by Marc Newson, this proves to be a new direction for the major art collector and Ikepod owner Adam Lindemann.

Priced at around $15,000 (USD) and made of Titanium.

Ikepod Cannonballs Watch by Artist Jeff Koons Introduced at Art Basel Miami
Ikepod Cannonballs Watch by Artist Jeff Koons Introduced at Art Basel Miami
Ikepod Cannonballs Watch by Artist Jeff Koons Introduced at Art Basel Miamiartist Jeff Koons

Ikepod website

Jeff Koons website


Related Ikepod Posts at The Watchismo Times



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Ikepod Solaris Collection by Marc Newson + Interview

Solaris by Ikepod & Marc Newson

Showcasing a new dimension from his Ikepod brand, Australian designer Marc Newson introduces the Solaris. Having designed watches since 1986, the expert watchmaker takes a unique approach with his latest creation. Named after an Andrei Tarkovsky film, the Solaris features a duality factor rarely seen on timepieces. Following the concept of an symmetrical two-faced object, this new Ikepod watch combines sleek hand crafted design with two fully reversible faces and German metal-mesh bracelets. Another neat feature is the ability to display two different time zones recto-verso with each face comprised of separate independent movements.

via Hypebeast

“With the Solaris, however, I wanted to design a very simple, elegant dress watch” - Marc Newson

Ikepod Solaris Collection by Marc Newson + Interview


Interview via The Watch Quote & Louise Neri


Louise Neri: When did you make your first watch?

Marc Newson: At the age of twelve, in my grandfather’s garage in Sydney. I found a piece of blue Plexiglas, carved it into a funny, massive rectangular shape and bored a big, perfect, cylindrical hole through it with a power tool. Then I inserted a movement that my uncle had given me; or rather he had given me a watch that I promptly took to pieces! I screwed the thick Plexiglas face down with four big woodscrews. They were unique technical experiments, but I remained interested in watches, clipping pages from magazines, learning about all the Swiss brands, and so on.

Louise Neri: What was it about them that interested you so much?

Marc Newson: I was always fascinated by the idea of the watch as a little universe, a container, a time machine that held an enormously complex mechanism with many moving parts, each one perfectly made. It was practically impossible to see what was really going on inside, so they seemed like wonderful, mysterious objects to me.

Louise Neri: Are all watches analog?

Marc Newson: Yes, to some degree. My watches are very handmade and there are very few of them, which is partly why they are inherently valuable. There is no other way to make them, especially not with robots. Watches illustrate a skill set that has neither significantly evolved nor significantly atrophied over the last century, unlike most other artisanal practices.

What I also love is the idea that a clock could be miniaturized to the point where it could be put on the wrist…

Louise Neri: When did that happen?

Marc Newson: Pocket watches appeared in the 16th century, and then wristwatches were invented around the turn of the 20th century. Clocks were being miniaturized to the point where they could not get much smaller. Although many other things are being reduced to nano-dimensions, watches reached their limits, having to remain robust, useable and able to be read.

Louise Neri: What else is there for you beyond the practical concerns?

Marc Newson: The idea that you can have time with you wherever you are—that you can literally “take your time”! For me it always seemed like a sort of alchemy, like traveling with a bit of fire in prehistoric times!

Louise Neri: How, over the years, have you chosen which mechanisms to use, given all the available options?

Marc Newson: I’d love to say that on a technical level I make rigorous or considered choices but in reality it’s about what is actually available. The industry has become so consolidated—most of the watch companies are now owned by a handful of big groups—it depends on what you can get your hands on. As Ikepod is one of the few remaining independent companies, it has to wait in line for movements—which is all the more reason for our company to distinguish itself via design.

Ikepod Solaris Collection by Marc Newson + Interview

The Ikepod Solaris watch in yellow gold by Marc Newson

Louise Neri: So, would you agree that Ikepod watches are design-driven?

Marc Newson: Absolutely. In fact, most watches are. It’s an interesting parallel with Apple: in the computer industry, the inherent technology is available widely but what differentiates Apple is the design. Of course Apple’s success is due to a lot more than its packaging but what you see and its related functionality is key.

Louise Neri: A lot of your earlier watch designs were more self-consciously concerned with technical function.

Marc Newson: The first Megapode, which is still in production, had an analog flight calculator. It’s my favorite because of its slightly ‘over-technical’ appearance.

Louise Neri: This kind of technical complexity was really fashionable at the time, wasn’t it?

Marc Newson: Yes, I designed the Megapode in the mid-nineties and the huge POD before it, in the mid-eighties. I think that they anticipated the trend of big watches.

In general, I like all the extra things watches can be equipped to “do,” very few of which we actually use or need. A tiny watch movement can be tricked up to the point where it can do half a dozen extra things; it’s like hotting up a car! It’s no wonder that in the industry these extra features are called “complications.” I have been progressively simplifying my watches, but I could easily and happily make them complicated once more.

With the Solaris, however, I wanted to design a very simple, elegant dress watch.

Louise Neri: Why did you call it “Solaris”?

Marc Newson: After Andrei Tarkovsky’s unforgettable film based on the novel by Stanislaw Lem. Solaris suits this watch because it’s all about duality, about being double. I loved the idea of making a symmetrical two-faced object, where one face is visible and the other hidden. It’s always simultaneously up the right way and upside-down. The connection is quite abstract; the original story concerns the relationship between reality and dreams. My Solaris contains two time zones relating to two different places…

Ikepod Solaris Collection by Marc Newson + Interview

The Ikepod Solaris watch in ceramic by Marc Newson

Louise Neri: Can the wearer choose the time zones?

Marc Newson: Yes, in fact, it’s not just a watch that displays two different time zones recto-verso; it actually comprises two separate movements that are utterly independent of each other.

Louise Neri: How difficult would be to synchronize them perfectly? Or is that part of it, that they will never be completely synchronized?

Marc Newson: Yes, somewhat. I love the idea that there is always that element of slippage.

Louise Neri: It makes me think of Felix Gonzales-Torres’ work Untitled (Perfect Lovers), 1991: Two identical, battery-driven wall clocks were initially set to the same time, but they eventually move slightly out of sync. Thus Gonzales-Torres transformed neutral, readymade timepieces into a personal and poetic meditation on human relationships, mortality, and time’s inevitable flow.

Marc Newson: In theory, the two movements in the Solaris will keep time because they are highly accurate quartz movements, rather than mechanical movements. But of course they will probably move slightly out of sync over time.

Louise Neri: But given that the watch faces have no second hand, any discrepancy will probably go unnoticed. Can they be reset at will?

Marc Newson: Absolutely, although this is probably at odds with the industry. But given that so many of our clients travel or live between two places, they might well appreciate the idea.

Louise Neri: Is the Solaris a unisex watch?

Marc Newson: Yes, I’ve never really designed for men or women but most of my watches tend to appeal to men because of their scale and weight. Perhaps this is the first of my watches that will appeal as much, if not more, to women.

Louise Neri: The size of the face also relates more to a woman’s watch, although the case is larger.

Marc Newson: However the gold and white gold watches have a masculine presence simply because gold is ultra-dense and heavy.

Louise Neri: Is the same true of the ceramic version?

Marc Newson: Not at all: ceramic is, in order of magnitude, much lighter than gold. Weight is an interesting quality to play with. The weight of a watch is a particular and esoteric thing.

Louise Neri: The flexible mesh watchstrap is also a more “feminine” touch.

Marc Newson: I also love the fact that mesh is a bit old-fashioned. Mesh is very difficult to find these days and we had to develop this particular variation to make it strong enough yet flexible.

Louise Neri: It makes me think of jewelry trends in the twenties and thirties; also of Elsa Peretti’s mesh chains for Tiffany…

Marc Newson: Sure, but in this case there are some technical limitations and real structural issues to deal with, such as the fact that the strap has to be strong enough to hold the watch in place on the wrist.

Louise Neri: How is the mesh produced?

Marc Newson: The production of metal mesh is another complex and specialized micro-industry. Much of it requires hand finishing. We work with a German company that makes mesh and chains for many different industries and a host of industrial applications, as well as for the textile industry. Companies such as this one use metals and industrial materials in such a forgiving and seductive way. So I was determined to work with them for the Solaris.

Prices: 6700 €, 16750 €, 24000 €

Ikepod website

Related Posts at The Watchismo Times

Marc Newson designs Jaeger LeCoultre Atmos Clock

Ikepod Black Hole In the Light

The Ikepod Has Landed...Again

Newson Clock & Watch Pre-Ikepod


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Big Changes in the Atmosphere - Jaeger LeCoultre's Atmos 561 by Marc Newson

Big Changes in the Atmosphere - Jaeger LeCoultre's Atmos 561 by Marc NewsonSuspended in a bubble block of Baccarat crystal and powered by temperature change, Jaeger LeCoultre's Atmos 561 mechanical clock is the work of Australian super-designer Marc Newson (known for designing the Ikepod watch and a million other sleek objects). Newson is reportedly a huge fan of the Atmos and approached the company to collaborate. The result is this eightieth anniversary Atmos.

The Atmos clocks don't need to be wound up. they get all the energy to run from small temperature changes in the encapsulated environment, and can run for years without human intervention.

Its power source is a hermetically sealed capsule containing a mixture of gas and liquid ethyl chloride, which expands into an expansion chamber as the temperature rises, compressing a spiral spring; with a fall in temperature the gas condenses and the spring slackens. This motion constantly winds the mainspring. A variation in temperature of only one degree in the range between 15 and 30 degrees Celsius is sufficient for two days' operation.

Big Changes in the Atmosphere - Jaeger LeCoultre's Atmos 561 by Marc Newson
Some cool side angles from Dje of Watchprosite

Big Changes in the Atmosphere - Jaeger LeCoultre's Atmos 561 by Marc Newson
A variety of rare antique and vintage Atmos clocks

Big Changes in the Atmosphere - Jaeger LeCoultre's Atmos 561 by Marc Newson
Big Changes in the Atmosphere - Jaeger LeCoultre's Atmos 561 by Marc Newson
Big Changes in the Atmosphere - Jaeger LeCoultre's Atmos 561 by Marc NewsonBig Changes in the Atmosphere - Jaeger LeCoultre's Atmos 561 by Marc Newson
Some vintage Atmos advertising - via Atmosdam

Big Changes in the Atmosphere - Jaeger LeCoultre's Atmos 561 by Marc Newson
Big Changes in the Atmosphere - Jaeger LeCoultre's Atmos 561 by Marc Newson
Big Changes in the Atmosphere - Jaeger LeCoultre's Atmos 561 by Marc Newson
Big Changes in the Atmosphere - Jaeger LeCoultre's Atmos 561 by Marc Newson
The Atmos clock was invented by Neuchâtel engineer Jean-Léon Reutter (1899- 1971). From his youth, he wanted to produce a clock that could be wound by atmospheric fluctuations, and in 1928 he succeeded. Reutter’s patent was first licensed to a French company who exploited it until 1935. Subsequently, it was purchased by Jaeger-LeCoultre. via Antiquorum

Related Watchismo Times Posts;

Ikepod Has Landed (Again)
Ikepod Black Hole Revealed
1980s (pre-Ikepod) Pod Watch & Clock
All Watchismo Times Clock Posts
All Jaeger LeCoultre Posts



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Ikepod Black Hole Finally Seeing the Light of Day

Ikepod Black Hole Finally Seeing the Light of DayUp until this point, the newly (re)launched Ikepod had a secret watch called the Black Hole, only being shown as a silhouette (below), and a limited edition of 66. Now, thanks to Kong at the Purists Watchprosite, who photographed the now likely sold out model at the Tempus event in Singapore, we can finally see what was just over the event horizon.

The Black Hole is actually an all black version of their Horizon series with optical illusion dial of gradating holes convexing from the ellipse case.

Ikepod Black Hole Finally Seeing the Light of Day

Ikepod Black Hole Finally Seeing the Light of Day
Ikepod Black Hole Finally Seeing the Light of Day
Related Posts;
Ikepod Has Landed (Again)
1980s (pre-Ikepod) Pod Watch & Clock

Photos by Kong (Chopard Moderator-Watchprosite)


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The Ikepod Has Landed...Again

The Ikepod Has Landed...AgainThe new Ikepod 'Black Hole' (edition of 66)
Only sold as silhouette, no images shown until the potential owners buy it

Marc Newson's iconic watches are back, this time with more expensive materials, extensive (re)designs and overall exclusivity. I met with new owner and prominent art collector Adam Lindemann (for QP Magazine) in his New York office to discuss the rebirth of the brand famously represented by flightless birds. For my full article, get QP's 2007 issue #24.

The cases have been redesigned to allow for Newson's originally intended perfect ellipse, now only made of precious metals and fit with better movements. While Ikepod was in hibernation, Newson's reputation grew considerably with record breaking sales like his famous 1980s Lockheed Lounge which recently sold at Sotheby's for nearly a million dollars - The most ever for a living designer. Newson has also been exhibited more often as an artist than a designer as with his recent show at the influential Gagosian Gallery in New York City.

The Ikepod Has Landed...AgainHemipode dual-time Chronograph
(La Joux-Perret 8206-1 movement)

The Ikepod Has Landed...Again
The Ikepod Has Landed...AgainThe Horizon (ETA 2892 'Finition Soignee')

The Ikepod Has Landed...AgainMegapode Chronograph (La Joux-Perret 8301)

The Ikepod Has Landed...AgainThe $1,000,000 Lockheed Lounge

Marc Newson Links;
Gagosian Exhibit
Marc Newson Website
Ikepod Website

Related Posts;
Marc Newson 1986 Pod Watch & Clock-->Link
Vintage Ikepod-ish Jurgentron Triple Date-->Link



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MATH WATCHES - Protractor and Slide Ruler Timepieces


Fifties geek-chic with this vintage 1958 Juvenia 'Architecture' watch featuring protractor and ruler hands. Featured in the Brunner/Pfeiffer-Belli book 'Wristwatches'

Their earlier 1945 Juvenia 'Arithmo' Slide Rule Watch


And with the door open to slide-rule watches, the testosterone-fueled leader of the math geeks is the 1973 Heuer 'Calculator.'

1990's Megapode

The Megapode, Ikepod's contribution to the hip mathematician. Is that an oxymoron?
2007 Megapode




Marc Newson 1986 Pod Watch - Pre-Ikepod Mystery Dial

Marc Newson's 1986 Pod Watch (Pre-Ike)

Considering Marc Newson's accomplishments in design, I'd have to assume he started designing out of the womb. 1986, Eight years before the birth of Ikepod, the "Pod" mystery dial watch was created. Spinning disks with dot markers lined the time similar to the Pod Clock below. Likely his first watch project, the name has a deeper meaning now as we see Marc's rich history of watch design grown from this very original Pod.


Marc Newson 1989 Pod Clock

Ikepod Carbon Nanoball Hourglass designed by Marc Newson - Baselworld 2010 UnveilingIkepod Cannonballs Watch by Artist Jeff Koons Introduced at Art Basel MiamiIkepod Solaris Collection by Marc Newson + InterviewBig Changes in the Atmosphere - Jaeger LeCoultre's Atmos 561 by Marc NewsonIkepod Black Hole Finally Seeing the Light of DayThe Ikepod Has Landed...AgainMATH WATCHES - Protractor and Slide Ruler Timepieces

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