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Watchismo Times

THE WATCHISMO TIMES WATCH BLOG A reliquary of obscure timepieces from bygone eras as well as the cutting-edge watch designs of today.

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LIP Watch Exhibition New York City July 2008

Video-->Link

Vintage LIP watches (1900-1976)

Vintage LIP collection

Vintage & Modern LIP Display


From the recent NYC show;

"The 141 year old French watch brand LIP is reintroducing some of the most important wristwatches - a series from the early 1970s that remains as visionary today as when first unveiled almost four decades ago. These timepieces were created from a melting pot of Pan European industrial, architectural, interior and graphic designers, all given carte blanche by LIP to create some of the most original watches ever produced.

Of the seven original designers between 1969 and 1976, Roger Tallon has made the most lasting impact. A true renaissance man of the mid-century. Tallon's contributions to the Modern era include the Teleavia, the earliest portable television, the world's first Helicoid staircase (part of the Museum of Modern Art collection), and the ultra modern French high speed TGV trains. His asymmetric Mach 2000 series has since become an icon for LIP with their unmistakable primary colored spherical pushers and crowns.

The legacy of LIP evolves today in the hands of talented new designers like Prisca Briquet who are writing the next chapter of watch design in horological history".

For the first time ever, LIP watches are available in the United States - offered at Barneys, Moss, Takashimaya, Museum of Modern Art Design Stores, Canvas, and online at Watchismo.com

Below are some brand new images of the collection by the talented product photographer Michael Kraus.

If you'd like to see some of the soon to be released images of the Fall/Winter 2008/2009 Lips-->contact me to be added to the first sneak peek email.


Lip Mythic Jump Hour by Prisca Briquet

Lip Darkmaster Chronograph by Roger Tallon

Lip Diode by Roger Tallon

Lip Mach 2000 Marge by Roger Tallon

Lip Fridge by Roger Tallon

LIP Watches-->Link

Related Posts;
LIP article in International Watch Magazine
LIP in Surface and Mens Vogue
International Herald Tribue
USA debut of LIP at Barneys New York
LIP Diode in GQ
Vintage LIP LED 1975-76



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The Secret Life of Machines

A great episode of the late eighties BBC series "The Secret Life of Machines". This particular episode (featured in three parts below) focuses on the development and technology leading up to quartz watches but there is much much more in this show. Everything from sundials, water clocks, church clocks, mechanical pocket watches, the first wristwatches, vintage watch commercials, electric, tuning fork, solid state, LCD, LED, and the modern analog Quartz.




Part 1 --> Link (or click play above)



Part 2 --> Link (or click play above)



Part 3 --> Link (or click play above)

See Also;
All Watch & Clock History Posts-->Link

via WatchesCorner


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1980's Alienating Seiko Speedmaster by Giorgetto Giugiaro

1980's Alienating Seiko Speedmaster by Giorgetto GiugiaroIf you're asking yourself, what was that cool-ass watch Lieutenant Ripley wore in the 1986 movie Aliens, I have the answer for you. It was a Giugiaro designed Seiko Speedmaster Chronograph. Entirely unique by its vertical stopwatch pushers placed inside the asymmetrical case extension. Many of Giugiaro's other designs for Seiko between 1983-86 had asymmetric qualities and are shown below.

1980's Alienating Seiko Speedmaster by Giorgetto GiugiaroAnd for those of you who don't know Giorgio Giugiaro, he was one of the most important car designers of the 20th century. Credited with the "folded paper" car designs of the 1970s and 80s, he was responsible for such classics as the Lotus Esprit, De Lorean DMC 12, Maserati Merak, Bora, Quattroporte, BMW M1, and most interesting to learn, my first car, the Volkswagen Scirocco. See the rest of his resume here-->Link

Personally, I think he may have been influenced by the design of this watch that came out 12 years earlier-
->Link

1980's Alienating Seiko Speedmaster by Giorgetto GiugiaroAn appropriate future-from-the-eighties choice by James Cameron

1980's Alienating Seiko Speedmaster by Giorgetto GiugiaroIt took me a while to dig these up!

1980's Alienating Seiko Speedmaster by Giorgetto GiugiaroProof!

1980's Alienating Seiko Speedmaster by Giorgetto GiugiaroWhat bothers me the most is that I had one of these chronos and sold it prior to learning of its claim to fame.

1980's Alienating Seiko Speedmaster by Giorgetto GiugiaroAnother fantastic Seiko Speedmaster design by Giugiaro.

1980's Alienating Seiko Speedmaster by Giorgetto GiugiaroI must find one!

1980's Alienating Seiko Speedmaster by Giorgetto GiugiaroCheck out those four quadrant crown/pushers


1980's Alienating Seiko Speedmaster by Giorgetto GiugiaroAnother from the Speedmaster series
With the dial off-kilter rotated towards the wearer

1980's Alienating Seiko Speedmaster by Giorgetto GiugiaroAn asymmetric Giugiaro Speedmaster Diver

1980's Alienating Seiko Speedmaster by Giorgetto GiugiaroAn interesting digital design

Giorgetto Giugiaro Wikipedia Page-->Link
Giugiaro Design Website-->Link
ItalDesign Website-->Link

See Also;
John De Lorean's ill-fated wristwatch-->Link
Dashboard Clock History-->Link
Radiator Grille Watches
Audemars Piguet Maserati Millenary MC12
Kienzle Life 2002 Jump Hour
Azimuth Chrono Gauge Mecha
Paul Smith Dashboard Watch
Heuer Silverstone
Heuer Ford Chronosplit
Tag Heuer Monaco V4 Belt Drive Watch
Delorean Time DMC2 Wristwatch
Formex Shock Absorber Watch
Gerald Genta Arena Chrono Quattro Retro
Parmigiani Bugatti Engine Block Watch
Manometro
Dunhill Petrolhead
Richard Arbib
B.R.M. Birotor
Driver Watches

1980's Alienating Seiko Speedmaster by Giorgetto GiugiaroAnd speaking of Alien, the designer H.R. Giger had his part in a watch design for Swatch in the early nineties, see a sketch of his Crosswatch above. Watch blogger Ariel Adams of Ablogtoread details more from the 1993 exhibition here-->Link


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The Jaeger LeCoultre Wrist Discotheque of 1975

The Jaeger LeCoultre Wrist Discotheque of 1975As quickly as the time is displayed on an LED watch is about the same length of time high end Swiss brands produced them in the early seventies. Companies like Omega produced their gold brick of a watch called the "Time Computer" and Jaeger LeCoultre got their groove on in the same way The Rolling Stones toyed with Disco in songs like "Miss You" in 1978.

The Jaeger LeCoultre Wrist Discotheque of 1975This 1975 Jaeger LeCoultre Master Quartz Digital features a pretty cool asymmetric red crystal and light emitting diodes displayed on command by button and the original bands were a perfectly pretentious golden mesh.

The Jaeger LeCoultre Wrist Discotheque of 1975Jaeger LeCoultre Master Quartz Digital-->Link


See also;
History of LED Calculator Watches
History of Dynamic Scattering LCD
History of Solar LED Watches
LED-LCD Watch Combos
Zenith Analog/Digital Hybrid
Other Analog-Digital Posts
All LED Watch Related Posts

Check out my $100-$100,000 holiday gift guide!-->LINK


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The Rarest Digital Watches - 1972 Dynamic Scattering LCD

The Rarest Digital Watches - 1972 Dynamic Scattering LCD
The Dynamic Scattering Liquid Crystal Display, the precursor to the common gray 'Field Effect' LCD displays of today. Only produced for two years, they are rarer than most other vintage digital LED watches of the seventies. Digits were low contrast silver and only really visible when looking directly at the watch. Pulling and twisting the crown in either direction sets the watch but you must hold it as it advances just one minute at a time.

Relatively obscure to most collectors, the Dynamic Scattering LCDs were difficult to read, housed in giant cases and frustrating to set time. That's exactly why they're so damn cool.


The Rarest Digital Watches - 1972 Dynamic Scattering LCDMathey Tissot (Left)
Roamer MicroQuartz (Right)

Some LCD history (via Smithsonian)
(kinda boring so feel free to skip down to the watch photos below)

Liquid crystals are organic substances that reflect light when voltage is applied.

In a watch display, the liquid crystal material is sandwiched in between two layers of glass. A transparent electrode pattern has been applied on the inner surfaces of the glass in the shape of the digital bars used in the time display. The integrated circuit applies voltage to the appropriate segments of the display, which reflect the ambient light to display the time. These molecules are affected by the voltage in such a way that they contrast sharply with the molecules in the rest of the display that do not receive current. Because LCDs reflect, rather than emit, light, the voltage requirements are quite low.

Scientists have known about liquid crystals since the 1880s.

Scientists have known about liquid crystals since the end of the 19th century, but applications appeared only in the 1960s. Friedrich Reinitzer and Otto Lehmann first noted their behavior and named them in the 1880s. European laboratory scientists came to understand the physics and chemistry of liquid crystals during the 1930s, but it wasn't until the 1960s that investigations began in the United States in both basic research and practical uses for liquid crystals.

LCD watches first appeared in 1970, but the display required improvement.

The first liquid crystal displays were developed in 1968 by a research group at RCA's David Sarnoff Research Center, headed by George Heilmeier. This display was based on the dynamic scattering mode. In 1970 Nunzio Luce, Louis Zanoni, George Graham, and Joel Goldmacher left RCA and joined Optel Corporation, where they developed the first LCD display for commercial purposes, including the digital watch display.

Because the DSM LCDs suffered from relatively high power consumption, limited life, and poor contrast, the search continued for a workable LCD. James Fergason at Kent State invented an improved display based on the twisted nematic field effect in 1969. Fergason left Kent State and formed ILIXCO Corporation to manufacture his display. The first LCD watch with an ILIXCO display was marketed by Gruen. The field effect display is the kind most frequently found in today's LCD products.

Much more can be found in the Pieter Doensen book, "Watch - History of the Modern Wristwatch" -->Link

A visual history of some Dynamic Scattering LCD watches 1972-1974;


The Rarest Digital Watches - 1972 Dynamic Scattering LCDUnknown Sideview DS LCD

The Rarest Digital Watches - 1972 Dynamic Scattering LCDVery rare Spacesonic (Spaceman Audacieuse)


The Rarest Digital Watches - 1972 Dynamic Scattering LCD1972 BWC (from extensive digital collection at Magic Digitals)


The Rarest Digital Watches - 1972 Dynamic Scattering LCDDS LCD Quartz Module

The Rarest Digital Watches - 1972 Dynamic Scattering LCDBWC, Milus, Wyler, Glycine, Ditronic

Other brands that produced DS LCD;
Microma, Optel, Elgin, Nepro, Texas Instruments,
Silvania, Rodania, Titus, Helvetia, Computime,
Richard, Pallas, Sandoz and Zodiac

The Rarest Digital Watches - 1972 Dynamic Scattering LCDJules Jurgensen OPTCOM 1
Top photo shows the low contrast silver display

The Rarest Digital Watches - 1972 Dynamic Scattering LCD
The Rarest Digital Watches - 1972 Dynamic Scattering LCDLongines / Swissonic 2000

The Rarest Digital Watches - 1972 Dynamic Scattering LCDWestclox Quartzmatic





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Paul Smith Dashboard Watch

Paul Smith Dashboard WatchPaul Smith has reissued the dashboard style watch, a somewhat tamer variation of the previous model from their fun collection of the late-nineties. Called the PS20, it features what appears to be a retrograde style display (when hands reach the right, they flyback in the blink of an eye), but it's actually just a double handed display. Once one end of a hand is out of view, the opposite end appears. Time is told much like that of many other retrograde watches (seen here-->link) and the casing appears to be brushed steel with a block link bracelet. The date is viewed through a porthole in the bottom half of the watch. £375 (quartz) Paul Smith Watches-->Link

Paul Smith Dashboard WatchAvailable in olive, light/dark blue and red

Paul Smith Dashboard WatchThe original model from the late nineties
Polished steel, sport link bracelet, expanding digits

Paul Smith Dashboard WatchMost of the original collection

Some had mechanical movements, most were Quartz. Many inspirations from the vintage LIP, Christian Dior and Pierre Cardin watches of the seventies. Most of the current collection is pretty drab otherwise.

Related Posts;
Retrograde Lip & Wittnauer Sector Futurama
Other Retrograde Watches



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DELOREAN TIME - The DMC2 Wristwatch

DELOREAN TIME - The DMC2 Wristwatch
Before John DeLorean's death in 2005, he tried to create a watch brand named 'DeLorean Time'. It was less about a timepiece and more about raising funds for his final unrealized sportscar, the DMC2. As the order form details above, a purchase of the $3495 wristwatch was an informal contract/certificate that would entitle you to the first DMC2 cars produced. Sadly, the watch design was pretty uninspired but appropriately made of metal injected/molded stainless steel just like his original iconic 1981 DeLorean DMC12. It was to be manufactured by Tech Time Ltd., a division of Seiko Epson. The watch was to be a fully automatic motion-activated quartz movement not requiring batteries. Powered by a
titanium lithium capacitor - not to be confused with the 'Flux Capacitor' that made time travel possible in a DeLorean in the Back To The Future films. No watches appear to have been produced or delivered to customers.

Too bad he couldn't develop a wristwatch based on his claim to fame Pontiac GTO's. Especially the 1968 GTO with hood mounted tachometer-->Link

DELOREAN TIME - The DMC2 WristwatchDeLorean talking about the watch concept-->Link

DELOREAN TIME - The DMC2 WristwatchSideview of DMC2 wristwatch design

DELOREAN TIME - The DMC2 WristwatchFront view with hidden dial
Anyone with a photo of the dial? Email me!

DeLorean described the DMC2 concept as a GTO inspired high performance sportscar that young people could afford. A lightweight gull-wing car made of structural composites with no metal frame, a 250-275 horsepower engine and priced under $30,000.

Short videos of DeLorean Talking about his last project;
about the car concept-->Link
the car quality-->Link
the car industry-->Link
the Dell computer of the car business-->Link
the people involved-->Link
the watch-->Link

DELOREAN TIME - The DMC2 WristwatchThe original DMC12 and commercial-->Link

DELOREAN TIME - The DMC2 WristwatchA very funny vintage commercial from Volkswagen
making fun of the DeLorean (and a fun watch prop)
-->Link


DELOREAN TIME - The DMC2 Wristwatch
Sources;
DeLorean History Media
Jack Freedman's TimeZone Article
New York Times Obituary
Tamir DeLorean Site
DeLorean Pontiac GTO History
DeLorean Pontiac Firebird

Watchismo Times Car Related Posts-->Link


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1970s Girard Perregaux Quartzwerk

1970s Girard Perregaux Quartzwerk1969, Swiss brand Girard Perregaux designed and produced a quartz movement with a frequency of 32,768 hertz, which became the universally accepted standard for all watches with quartz movements, including those made in Asia. This standard frequency was a veritable technical breakthrough.

The early 70s model shown here has a design mimicking the components of the quartz module with bright Tron-style colors for the circuits. Japanese brands like Seiko weren't the only ones nailing the coffins of the mechanical market, the Swiss helped pull the nails from inside the box and with great precision.


1970s Girard Perregaux Quartzwerk
1970s Girard Perregaux Quartzwerk

From the Beyer Collection
Girard Perregaux History



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First Swiss Electro-Mechanical Watch, the 1960 Landeron 4750


Before quartz battery powered watches nearly destroyed mechanical innovation in the seventies, there existed a brief period of transition, an electro-mechanical era. The first battery-powered watches were, of course, the famed Hamilton Electric series of the late fifties and early sixties. There were other technological hybrids including the first electronic diode watch by the French company Lip and the transistorized Bulova Accutron with their tuning fork mechanisms.

This is the 1960 Landeron 4750, the first Swiss-electric movement. As you can see by the component diagram below, these were not simple watches like the inanimate battery powered Quartz of today. I'm featuring one of the more unique versions of this watch, the 'Montre à Couilles', as detailed in Pieter Doensen's book, built as a demonstration model with two externally cased battery compartments.













Landeron 4750 movement diagram (via electric-watches.co.uk)


1975 Bulova Accutron 'Spaceview'


1974 Lip Electric


LIP Watch Exhibition New York City July 20081980's Alienating Seiko Speedmaster by Giorgetto GiugiaroThe Jaeger LeCoultre Wrist Discotheque of 1975The Rarest Digital Watches - 1972 Dynamic Scattering LCDPaul Smith Dashboard WatchDELOREAN TIME - The DMC2 Wristwatch1970s Girard Perregaux QuartzwerkFirst Swiss Electro-Mechanical Watch, the 1960 Landeron 4750

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