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Watchismo Times

THE WATCHISMO TIMES WATCH BLOG A reliquary of obscure timepieces from bygone eras as well as the cutting-edge watch designs of today.

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I Totally Forgot! The Memoire1 Mechanical Memory Watch Was Unveiled

I Totally Forgot!  The Memoire1 Mechanical Memory Watch Was UnveiledA new achievement in chronograph watchmaking -- The mechanical memory of the Maurice Lacroix "Memoire1".

via Timezone & Horomundi (much more information about the complications)

See also;
All Maurice Lacroix Posts

Check out my $100-$100,000 holiday gift guide!-->LINK


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Watchismo's Timewarp - Max Büsser's 19th Century Steel & Gunmetal Pocket Watch Collection

Watchismo's Timewarp - Max Büsser's 19th Century Steel & Gunmetal Pocket Watch CollectionAfter many opportunities to address my proclivities in my Timewarp column in QP Magazine, I wanted to turn the loupe on people who never fail to impress me, to explore what makes them tick. First on my list was modern pioneer, Maximilian Büsser and his rare & unusual 19th century unsigned laminated iron, gunmetal and steel pocket watches.

Click here to read article-->LINK

Ian Skellern's amazing photos of the collection;

Watchismo's Timewarp - Max Büsser's 19th Century Steel & Gunmetal Pocket Watch CollectionGreen enamel Jumping Hour

Watchismo's Timewarp - Max Büsser's 19th Century Steel & Gunmetal Pocket Watch CollectionBlackened steel with full triple calendar on back

Watchismo's Timewarp - Max Büsser's 19th Century Steel & Gunmetal Pocket Watch CollectionBlackened seven day power reserve

Watchismo's Timewarp - Max Büsser's 19th Century Steel & Gunmetal Pocket Watch CollectionSt. Imiers 1100 year anniversary one-handed pocket watch

Watchismo's Timewarp - Max Büsser's 19th Century Steel & Gunmetal Pocket Watch CollectionArticle available in issue 27 of QP Magazine

And of course, Max has just unveiled his remarkable HM2 (Horological Machine No.2) here-->LINK

An interview with Max at PuristsPro-->link

Related posts;
All Horological Machine Stories
Previous Timewarps



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Horological Peephole! First Peek of the HM2 by Maximilian Busser & Friends

Horological Peephole!  First Peek of the HM2 by Maximilian Busser & FriendsSure, I feel guilty looking at the HM2 in a very private moment. But I just can't help myself, it's a damn nice looking watch!

Within a week of being publicly exposed in full-frontal glory, the MB&F "Horological Machine N°2" can only be seen with these advance elemental photographs. Showing the crown (with the iconic HM2 "battle axe" rotor design on it), a portion of one display and at least two indications, and what appears to be some sort of bad-ass futuristic motorcycle engine! We shall see...stay tuned.

The case alone is made up of 102 different coponents, setting itself as one of the most, if not THE most complex watch cases ever made. Max mentioned to me that the case construction is inspired by a game he used to play as a kid… called Meccano, where parts are bolted together (similar to Erector sets).


Horological Peephole!  First Peek of the HM2 by Maximilian Busser & FriendsPerhaps a grip for your thumb to adjust the crown?

Horological Peephole!  First Peek of the HM2 by Maximilian Busser & FriendsCrown with HM1 "Battle Axe" Rotor Design

Horological Peephole!  First Peek of the HM2 by Maximilian Busser & FriendsThe entire sneak preview - Next week!

All Related MB&F Post Links;
MB&F HM2 Friends Photo
MB&F HM2 Movement
Max Busser Interview
Early Designs & Sketches of the HM1
Horological Machine No 1



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10....9....8....7....6....5....4....3.....HM2!

10....9....8....7....6....5....4....3.....HM2!It's just about blast-off time for the next Horological Machine of Maximilian Büsser & Friends. Max has just sent me the official team portrait (a new crew is assembled for each machine) and as many of you know, this is the second landing for the the MB&F brand and we're all less than a two weeks away from seeing their craft!

Yeah, way too many space travel references, I know. But you gotta admit, the HM2 does look other-worldly, based solely on the advance viewing of the movement a while back. Still, nobody really understands where this might be going. (see the HM2 movement below) One thing is certain, the HM2 is likely to wear you, not the other way around.

And nobody really knew who he was working with on this latest project...until now. Max described it as "A truly incredible adventure with a wonderful team. Few of these great artisans-creators have had any media limelight at all, even Jean-Marc Wiederrecht who is probably the most prolific movement creator of the last fifteen years, but who is so shy of publicity that the biggest problem was to convince him to appear openly on this project, has rarely been seen at all!"

10....9....8....7....6....5....4....3.....HM2!Watchmaker Jean-Marc Wiederrecht, Designer Eric Giroud, and Captain Max

10....9....8....7....6....5....4....3.....HM2!HM2 Movement

Read more about the reclusive watchmaker Jean-Marc Wiederrecht here-->Link
Maximilian Busser & Friends website-->Link

Related Posts;
HM2 Movement
All other MB&F posts



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The Earliest Designs of MB&F's HM1 - Birth of the Horological Machine

The Earliest Designs of MB&F's HM1 - Birth of the Horological MachineOffering rare insight to the design process, Ian Skellern of Horomundi has just shared the feature "From Sketch to Machine", showcasing the drawings and evolution of the phenomenal Horological Machine N˚1 --> Link

See the development from Maximilian Büsser's first sketch (above left) on an airplane to the varied concepts (with designer Eric Giroud) for the design, function, and display.

The Earliest Designs of MB&F's HM1 - Birth of the Horological Machine
The Earliest Designs of MB&F's HM1 - Birth of the Horological MachineThe Earliest Designs of MB&F's HM1 - Birth of the Horological Machine
The Earliest Designs of MB&F's HM1 - Birth of the Horological Machine
Related Posts;
Maximilian Büsser

Ian Skellern's Article->Link



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New Photos of the Breguet Tradition 7047 Fusee Tourbillon

I've been waiting to see more invasive photographs of the fusee and chain mechanism of the Breguet Tradition 7047 Tourbillon and am happy to direct you to Watching Horology where that feat has been captured in great detail-->Link

"The second of this year's remarkable tourbillons from Breguet is the La Tradition Tourbillon, which extends the tourbillon as an art form both forwards into the future and which also reaches backwards in time, incorporating one of the rarest horological complications of them all- the fusee and chain."

"Fusees in clocks and pocket watches were not great rarities but in the wristwatch they are virtually unheard of, and a combination of the fusee and tourbillon is almost unknown. Lange & Sohne has presented fusee and chain wristwatches with the tourbillon, and more recently there is the Vianney Halter Cabestan, but the Breguet La Tradition Tourbillon is a totally unique experience aesthetically."

From the very informative article by Jack Forster of Horomundi-->Link


Related Posts;
Production Cabestan-->Link
Prototype Cabestan-->Link
All Tourbillon-->Link
All Breguet Related-->Link

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The FREAK(s) of Ulysse Nardin

There is no dial, there are no hands, there is no crown, and the movement itself rotates to tell the time. One of the more important developments in the history of watchmaking, the Ulysse Nardin Freak is definitely a new mechanical breed. It's as if the watchmakers lived on The Island of Doctor Moreau. One of the earlier mustations (2003's No.339) is being offered at auction next week-->Link

As explained by HH, "The concept was a technical tour de force, requiring the combined efforts of three of watchmaking’s most renowned engineers. The arrangement of parts was inconceivably unorthodox - it has essentially no true case! The crystal and the bezel are actually part of the movement; the Freak has no crown, no hands and the movement pivoted to indicate time."

No. 339 Freak

And most recently, Ulysse Nardin developed the 'InnoVision' Freak (below). Improving breakthroughs with more extensive use of the light flexible material silicium throughout the movement and 96 non-lubricated ball bearings guide the barrel both vertically and laterally, in fact, the entire watch is now oil/coating/lubrication free.


A chart of the 10 innovations of the InnoVision Freak

If you'd like to attempt a deeper understanding of this wormhole of complexity, continue reading in depth articles here-->Horomundi and-->The Purists or download the PDF's at the Ulysse Nardin's website-->Link

The Freak is the brainchild of Dr. Ludwig Oechslin, as interpreted by Ulysse Nardin's research and production team. "The Freak" is a tourbillon of 7-day duration, without hands or winding crown. In most tourbillons, the balance wheel assembly rotates once per minute in a cage. In the "Freak", the whole movement rotates once per hour, the drive wheel meshing with teeth around the whole circumference of the dial, a similar arrangement mounted below driving the hour wheel. The mainspring is located underneath the movement and spans the entire diameter of the case. The extra large size of the mainspring provides the watch with a power reserve of one week. Winding is accomplished by turning the back of the case anticlockwise. The “Dual Direct Escapement” invented by Dr. Ludwig Oechslin, astronomer, mathematician and master watchmaker. Among his many inventions for Ulysse Nardin are the "Perpetual Ludwig" and the "Trilogy" of astronomical wristwatches. The “Dual Direct Escapement” consists of 2 impulse wheels transmitting the energy directly to the balance wheel; they each rotate in the same direction and connect alternately with the balance. Using the technology of the CSEM (Centre Suisse d'Electronique et de Microtechnique), the 2 wheels at the center of the “Dual Direct Escapement” are plasma-engraved out of single-crystal silicon, the material from which computer chips are made. This technique offers the greatest hardness coupled with low weight."

Source - Antiquorum

Released earlier this year, the "The FREAK DIAMonSIL® in platinum is the first timepiece sporting a synthetic nanocrystal diamond escapement grown on a silicium raw part." (source -> HH)

Ulysse Nardin website-->Link


Be sure to enter The Watchismo Times 1st anniversary vintage chronograph giveway!-->LINK





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Fitting In and Out - Rare Expanding & Contracting Hand Watches

Fitting In and Out - Rare Expanding & Contracting Hand WatchesIn my collecting history, I always had a special place for oblong, oval, rectangular, thin, or just very wide watches. The problem they all share is the restriction of their hands being only as long as the shortest width of the dial. Once the hands reach their widest points, they often appear too dwarfed. It got me thinking, how cool would it be if hands of a watch could extend out as the width of the watch gets wider and contract back to the smallest? Well, lo and behold, I discovered nearly everything has been done before at some point in time. Expanding and contracting hand history was sporadic and only a few were ever made.

Fitting In and Out - Rare Expanding & Contracting Hand Watches
This fantastic specimen circa 1795, made by watchmaker William Anthony of London. Famous for his verge watches with many being made for the Chinese market. His watch above features hands that work like a pantograph or scissors that follow cams to expand and contract. Valued conservatively between $100,000-$250,000.

via 2007 Complete Price Guide to WatchesFitting In and Out - Rare Expanding & Contracting Hand Watches


Fitting In and Out - Rare Expanding & Contracting Hand WatchesClose-up of William Anthony 'Scissorhands'

Fitting In and Out - Rare Expanding & Contracting Hand WatchesNow, go back nearly 120 years before that and you have this watch by Henricus Jones above, circa 1678. Featuring a minute hand that expands and contracts - always pointing to the outer edge of the oval chapter ring. Also one of the earliest watches with a balance spring.

Via Patek Philippe Museum

Fitting In and Out - Rare Expanding & Contracting Hand WatchesOk, flash forward almost 350 years later (today) and you'll see an ingenious recurrence of this concept. The Urwerk 201 Hammerhead. One of the most cutting edge watch brands today have not only revived and modernized the wandering hour watch, but also reinventing the expanding and retracting hand by placing a telescopic pointer inside the hour cubes. As each cube rotates to the corresponding minute display, the protuberance slowly extends and retreats.
(Again, I'm always trying to find a way for the word "protuberance" to appear in my posts)

Fitting In and Out - Rare Expanding & Contracting Hand WatchesUrwerk Telescopic Pointer

Related Posts;
All Pocket Watches



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Fitting In and Out - Rare Expanding & Contracting Hand Watches

Fitting In and Out - Rare Expanding & Contracting Hand WatchesIn my collecting history, I always had a special place for oblong, oval, rectangular, thin, or just very wide watches. The problem they all share is the restriction of their hands being only as long as the shortest width of the dial. Once the hands reach their widest points, they often appear too dwarfed. It got me thinking, how cool would it be if hands of a watch could extend out as the width of the watch gets wider and contract back to the smallest? Well, lo and behold, I discovered nearly everything has been done before at some point in time. Expanding and contracting hand history was sporadic and only a few were ever made.

Fitting In and Out - Rare Expanding & Contracting Hand Watches
This fantastic specimen circa 1795, made by watchmaker William Anthony of London. Famous for his verge watches with many being made for the Chinese market. His watch above features hands that work like a pantograph or scissors that follow cams to expand and contract. Valued conservatively between $100,000-$250,000.

via 2007 Complete Price Guide to WatchesFitting In and Out - Rare Expanding & Contracting Hand Watches


Fitting In and Out - Rare Expanding & Contracting Hand WatchesClose-up of William Anthony 'Scissorhands'

Fitting In and Out - Rare Expanding & Contracting Hand WatchesNow, go back nearly 120 years before that and you have this watch by Henricus Jones above, circa 1678. Featuring a minute hand that expands and contracts - always pointing to the outer edge of the oval chapter ring. Also one of the earliest watches with a balance spring.

Via Patek Philippe Museum

Fitting In and Out - Rare Expanding & Contracting Hand WatchesOk, flash forward almost 350 years later (today) and you'll see an ingenious recurrence of this concept. The Urwerk 201 Hammerhead. One of the most cutting edge watch brands today have not only revived and modernized the wandering hour watch, but also reinventing the expanding and retracting hand by placing a telescopic pointer inside the hour cubes. As each cube rotates to the corresponding minute display, the protuberance slowly extends and retreats.
(Again, I'm always trying to find a way for the word "protuberance" to appear in my posts)

Fitting In and Out - Rare Expanding & Contracting Hand WatchesUrwerk Telescopic Pointer

Related Posts;
All Pocket Watches



Search for watches

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First Taste of Mocha - The Museum of Contemporary Horological Art

First Taste of Mocha - The Museum of Contemporary Horological Art
Harry Tan of WatchingHorology has just uploaded photos of the first exhibit at the Mocha (Museum of Contemporary Horological Art). The opening is part of the many events at the 2007 Tempus Temple of Time watch fair in Singapore this week.

See his Flckr show here-->LINK

Many modern masterpieces are represented from; Urwerk, Vianney Halter, Tag Heuer, MB&F, DeBethune, Audemars Piguet, Harry Winston, Daniel Roth, Alain Silberstein, Richard Mille, Ulysse Nardin, Panerai, Rolex, Gerald Genta, Hautlence, Breguet, Hublot, and more.

Mocha information-->Link



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I Totally Forgot!  The Memoire1 Mechanical Memory Watch Was UnveiledWatchismo's Timewarp - Max Büsser's 19th Century Steel & Gunmetal Pocket Watch CollectionHorological Peephole!  First Peek of the HM2 by Maximilian Busser & Friends10....9....8....7....6....5....4....3.....HM2!The Earliest Designs of MB&F's HM1 - Birth of the Horological MachineNew Photos of the Breguet Tradition 7047 Fusee TourbillonThe FREAK(s) of Ulysse NardinFitting In and Out - Rare Expanding & Contracting Hand WatchesFitting In and Out - Rare Expanding & Contracting Hand WatchesFirst Taste of Mocha - The Museum of Contemporary Horological Art

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