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The Baskerville Hounds - Featuring Space Rock, Part 2 (1967)

The Baskerville Hounds - Featuring Space Rock, Part 2 (1967)


The Baskerville Hounds - Featuring Space Rock, Part 2 (1967)
- William Emery - vocals, bass
- Michael Macron - vocals, drums
- Lawrence Meese - vocals, guitar, harmonica
- Dante Rossi - vocals, guitar
- Jack Topper - vocals, keyboards, vibes, accordion 

Based in Cleveland, Ohio, bassist William Emery, drummer Michael Macron, guitarists Lawrence Meese and Dante Rossi and keyboardist Jack Topper originally came together as The Talula Babies (see separate entry). Signed to James M. Testas local Tema label, the group released a pair of little heard 1967 singles "The Hurtin' Kind" b/w "Mine Forever" and "Debbie" b/w "". While the singles did little outside of Cleveland, under Testa's management the quintet underwent a radical image change, complete with ugly double breasted brown suits and a new name.

Signed with AVCO Embassy, as The Baskerville Hounds, they released the 1967 single "Hold Me" b/w "Here I Come Miami". A top-100 single, the effort was followed by "Caroline" b/w "Last Night On the Back Porch" on Buddah. Unable to find a major label for their next single, "Space Rock, Part. 2" b/w "" was released on Testa's own Tema label. A rollicking, organ-propelled slice of garage rock, the single was quickly picked up and reissued by Dot Records.

As was standard marketing procedure, on the heels of the single's unexpected success the band was rushed into the studio to record a support album. Cleverly released as 1967's "The Baskerville Hounds Featuring Space Rock, Part 2", the collection offered up a then-typical mix of popular covers and originals. Produced by Testa, the set wasn't particularly impressive. While all five member were credited as singers, the absence of a distinctive vocalist was a major distraction. Similarly, covers such as The Beatles "Penny Lane" and Neil Diamond's' "I'm a Believer" weren't particularly impressive. On the other hand, original numbers such as the fuzz guitar-propelled "Sad Eyed Lady", "Please Say" and the title track instrumental were all worth hearing. Hardly one of rock's "pretty boy" combos (the liner notes described Rossi as having a "comic appearance"), the doubled breasted brown suits sure didn't help their appearance - they looked like an exhausted burial party. A commercial failure, one last Christmas single ("Christmas Is Here" b/w "Make Me Your Man") and they were a musical footnote.
 "The Baskerville Hounds Featuring Space Rock, Part 2"


1.) Space Rock, Part. 2 (instrumental) (D.J. Kohler) - 3:40
2.) Make Me Your Man (D.J. Kohler) - 2:12
3.) Penny Lane (John Lennon - Paul McCartney) - 2:10
4.) Can't Take It (Larry Meese) - 2:20
5.) Although I Was to Blame (Larry Meese) - 2:30
6.) Sad Eyed Lady M. McGutcheon) - 2:05


1.) Never on Sunday (instrumental) (Hadjidakis - Towne) - 2:30
2.) Jackie's Theme (instrumental) (Jack Topper - D.J. Kohler) - 2:40
3.) I'm a Believer (Neil Diamond) - 2:18
4.) Baby Am I Losing (D.J. Kohler) - 2:10
5.) Please Say (Larry Meese) - 2:


The Preachers - Nod, Shake & Stomp

The Preachers - Nod, Shake & Stomp

'The Preachers are one of the seminal obscure bands of the mid-'60s British rock/pop scene, with links to the family trees of the Rolling Stones, Bill Wyman and the Herd. However, they are also one of the last-heard, with only a solitary 1965 single having previously gained a release. Nod, Shake & Stomp finally changes all that, unearthing two previously unreleased studio demos from 1964 plus no less than fourteen live tracks that were recorded in the same year. The result is an album of vintage, swaggering British teenage beat/R&B. Nothing less than the full history of the Preachers, this release features two original members of the Herd in former Rolling Stones drummer Tony Chapman and singer Terry Clark, as well as the astonishing young guitarist Steve Carroll, recorded just weeks before his tragically early death in a car crash (he was replaced by Peter Frampton). The album includes an insert featuring lengthy liner notes from Bill Wyman that document his journey from pre-Preachers outfit the Cliftons to the Stones, with the aid of some great, previously unpublished photos and gig posters from Bill's personal collection of memorabilia. This important slice of British beat/R&B history is a vinyl-only release of 1000 numbered copies on 190gm vinyl.
                              Vinyl, LP, Album, Limited Edition, Numbered
                                         Tenth Planet ‎– TP053

The Preachers - Nod, Shake & Stomp


Jimmy Smith & Dave"Baby"Cortez - Happy Organs... 2 in1

Jimmy Smith & Dave


Jimmy Smith wasn't the first organ player in jazz, but no one had a greater influence with the instrument than he did; Smith coaxed a rich, grooving tone from the Hammond B-3, and his sound and style made him a top instrumentalist in the 1950s and '60s, while a number of rock and R&B keyboardists would learn valuable lessons from Smith's example.

James Oscar Smith was born in Norristown, Pennsylvania on December 8, 1928 (some sources cite his birth year as 1925). Smith's father was a musician and entertainer, and young Jimmy joined his song-and-dance act when he was six years old. By the time he was 12, Smith was an accomplished stride piano player who won local talent contests, but when his father began having problems with his knee and gave up performing to work as a plasterer, Jimmy quit school after eighth grade and began working odd jobs to help support the family. At 15, Smith joined the Navy, and when he returned home, he attended music school on the GI Bill, studying at the Hamilton School of Music and the Ornstein School, both based in Philadelphia.

The Incredible Jimmy Smith at Club Baby Grand, Vol. 1 In 1951, Smith began playing with several R&B acts in Philadelphia while working with his father during the day, but after hearing pioneering organ player Wild Bill Davis, Smith was inspired to switch instruments. Smith bought a Hammond B-3 organ and set up a practice space in a warehouse where he and his father were working; Smith refined the rudiments of his style over the next year (informed more closely by horn players than other keyboard artists, and employing innovative use of the bass pedals and drawbars), and he began playing Philadelphia clubs in 1955. In early 1956, Smith made his New York debut at the legendary Harlem nightspot Small's Paradise, and Smith was soon spotted by Alfred Lion, who ran the well-respected jazz label Blue Note Records. Lion signed Smith to a record deal, and between popular early albums such as The Incredible Jimmy Smith at Club Baby Grand and The Champ and legendary appearances at New York's Birdland and the Newport Jazz Festival, Smith became the hottest new name in jazz.
Bashin': The Unpredictable Jimmy Smith A prolific recording artist, Smith recorded more than 30 albums for Blue Note between 1956 and 1963, collaborating with the likes of Kenny Burrell, Stanley Turrentine, and Jackie McLean, and in 1963, Smith signed a new record deal with Verve. Smith's first album for Verve, Bashin': The Unpredictable Jimmy Smith, was a critical and commercial success, and the track "Walk on the Wild Side" became a minor hit. Smith maintained his busy performing and recording schedule throughout the 1960s, and in 1966 he cut a pair of celebrated album with guitarist Wes Montgomery. In 1972, Smith's contract with Verve expired, and tired of his demanding tour schedule, he and his wife opened a supper club in California's San Fernando Valley. Smith performed regularly at the club, but it went out of business after only a few years. While Smith continued to record regularly for a variety of labels, his days as a star appeared to be over.
Bad However, in the late '80s, Smith began recording for the Milestone label, cutting several well-reviewed albums that reminded jazz fans Smith was still a master at his instrument, as did a number of live performances with fellow organ virtuoso Joey DeFrancesco. In 1987, producer Quincy Jones invited Smith to play on the sessions for Michael Jackson's album Bad. And Smith found a new generation of fans when hip-hop DJs began sampling Smith's funky organ grooves; the Beastie Boys famously used Smith's "Root Down (And Get It)" for their song "Root Down," and other Smith performances became the basis for tracks by Nas, Gang Starr, Kool G Rap, and DJ Shadow.
Damn! In 1995, Smith returned to Verve Records for the album Damn!, and on 2001's Dot Com Blues, Smith teamed up with a variety of blues and R&B stars, including Etta James, B.B. King, Keb' Mo', and Dr. John. In 2004, Smith was honored as a Jazz Master by the National Endowment for the Arts; that same year, Smith relocated from Los Angeles to Scottsdale, Arizona. Several months after settling in Scottsdale, Smith's wife succumbed to cancer, and while he continued to perform and record, Jimmy Smith was found dead in his home less than a year later, on February 8, 2005. His final album, Legacy, was released several months after his passing.
***
David Cortez Clowney known by the stage name Dave "Baby" Cortez (born August 13, 1938), is an American pop and R&B organist and pianist, best known for his 1959 hit, "The Happy Organ". David  played the organ "...with the same aggression as a pro football linebacker: he was theatrical, dressed loud, and loved playing exaggerated scales..."...
Though hardly a soulful, bluesy master like Jimmy Smith or dashing experimentalist like Larry Young, organist Dave "Baby" Cortez made his mark in the '50s,'60s, and '70s as a capable, often clever soloist and pop instrumentalist. His flair for catchy melodies, riffs, and hooks resulted in a number one pop and number five R&B hit with "The Happy Organ" in 1959. Cortez had another double winner in 1962 with "Rinky Dink," this one peaking at number nine R&B and number ten pop. Before his instrumental success, Cortez recorded for Ember as David Clowney in 1956, and was in the Pearls from 1955 to 1957. He landed one other song on the R&B Top 50, "Someone Has Taken Your Place," in 1973 for All Platinum. His other songs were recorded for Clock and Chess. There has been no domestic reissue of Cortez's songs, but there are import anthologies available.

Jimmy Smith - Hoochie Cooche Man

Jimmy Smith & Dave


Dave Baby Cortez  - Happy Organs,Wild Guitars And Piano Shuffles

Jimmy Smith & Dave

Don Fardon - I'm Alive 68/69 Hip Pop and Swinging Beat

Don Fardon - I'm Alive  68/69 Hip Pop and Swinging Beat

Donald Maughn, 19 August 1943, Coventry, West Midlands, England. As the vocalist with the Sorrows, Maughn was featured on this cult act’s most durable release, the pulsating ‘Take A Heart’. A number 21 hit in September 1965, its hypnotic, throbbing beat was maintained on subsequent releases, several of which the singer co-composed. Here, however, he preferred to use an alternative surname, Fardon, which was then retained for the artist’s solo career. His cover version of John D. Loudermilk’ s ‘(The Lament Of The Cherokee) Indian Reservation’ gave him his first and only US hit single in 1968, reaching the Top 20. He broke into the UK Top 40 in 1970 with ‘Belfast Boy’, a homage to the talented, but troubled Northern Irish footballer, George Best. This success paved the way for the re-issue of ‘Indian Reservation’ which, when resurrected, climbed to a respectable number 3 and became one of that year’s most distinctive chart entries. Yet despite several further releases in the early 70s, some of which were remakes of former Sorrows material, Fardon was unable to secure consistent success. He went into the licensing trade, running pubs in Coventry and Eathorpe, while continuing to work on the cabaret and country circuits. He later helped run a security firm looking after pop stars. Fardon re-released ‘Belfast Boy’ in December 2005 in honour of the recently deceased Best.



[2:38] 01. Don Fardon - I Get So Excited
[2:40] 02. Don Fardon - Back In The Ussr
[2:19] 03. Don Fardon - Coming On Strong
[3:37] 04. Don Fardon - I Need Somebody
[2:29] 05. Don Fardon - On The Beach
[2:58] 06. Don Fardon - Ruby's Picture On My Wall
[2:14] 07. Don Fardon - Keep On Loving Me
[3:05] 08. Don Fardon - It's Been Nice Loving You
[2:34] 09. Don Fardon - I'm Alive
[3:01] 10. Don Fardon - Riverboat
[3:08] 11. Don Fardon - We Can Make It Together
[2:46] 12. Don Fardon - Do You Know What I Mean
[2:34] 13. Don Fardon - Baby Let Me Take You Home
[2:46] 14. Don Fardon - Mr Sation Master
[2:55] 15. Don Fardon - 6.10 Phoenix Gone
[2:04] 16. Don Fardon - Let The Live Live
[4:14] 17. Don Fardon - Captain Man
[1:59] 18. Don Fardon - The Dreaming Room

As this compilation doesn't have either of Don Fardon's chart hits ("Indian Reservation" and "Belfast Boy"), it can't be considered a best-of, though its 18 tracks do span the 1967-1969 period during which he made his most notable solo recordings. Combining seven tracks from his rare 1968 German LP Love Story of Don Fardon, a few late-'60s singles, and a few previously unissued songs, the intention seems to be to emphasize the singer's most credible work (the two absent chart singles are referred to as "novelty pop hits" on the back cover). If this is his best stuff, it certainly doesn't make a very compelling argument for Fardon as an artist worthy of much attention. It has that odd blend of brassy pop, soul, and showbizzy belting found in many British late-'60s pop recordings that have largely escaped critical respect or scrutinization, though they're not as well-produced or full of commercial hooks as, say, what Tom Jones was doing. Fardon was a good singer, but the material is simply not that memorable, and the arrangements on much of the up-tempo soul stuff are burdened with stiff rhythms falling somewhere twixt ska and oompah, layered with enough fuzz guitar and burbling organ to sound trendy. There are some fair songs here and there, like "I'm Alive," where Fardon sounds like he's reaching for something more authentic, and the waltzing "Dreaming Room," which could have fit onto the soundtrack of a late-'60s spy flick. For the best work of both Fardon and his producer (and occasional songwriter) Miki Dallon, however, his prior recordings with British Invasion band the Sorrows tower over this motley lot.

                                                         ***

A-Cads - Hungry For Love (1966)

A-Cads - Hungry For Love (1966)

A-Cads - Hungry For Love (1966)
A-Cads - Hungry For Love (1966)

South Africa had relatively few rock bands in the mid-'60s who were playing energetic rock & roll in the British Invasion style. The A-Cads were one of them, sounding and looking like some of the rawer R&B-based British bands of the time. That's the good news. The bad news is that virtually everything on their sole LP, 1966's Hungry for Love, is a cover, usually of the kind of R&B and soul covered by British bands like the Rolling Stones in their early days. The A-Cads do play these both tough and well -- unlike many U.S. garage bands or Continental European bands playing in the style from a geographical and cultural remove, these sound like they pretty much could have fit in as filler on a British Invasion band LP of the time by a decent (yet not great) group. But, to be heartless, almost none of their interpretations match the originals or the best covers of these songs, making this pretty inessential for those collecting on the basis of quality rather than rarity. The exception, perhaps, is "Hungry for Love," done with more raunch than the U.K. hit version by Johnny Kidd & the Pirates (or the version by the Searchers). The 1999 CD reissue adds four similar, if not as well produced, cuts from the acetate of an unreleased EP, as well as three tracks from a solo album (This Strange Effect) done by guitarist Hank Squires shortly before the A-Cads formed. Note that this CD includes most but not all of the A-Cads' recorded output, missing a few tracks that appeared on mid-'60s singles.

A-Cads - Hungry For Love (1966)



Johnny & The G-Men-Johnny & The G-Men (1962)

Johnny & The G-Men-Johnny & The G-Men (1962)



John Kongos had been the leader behind Johnny Kongos & the G-Men, a prolific beat group from Johannesburg, South Africa that frequently appeared on that country's charts during the first half of the '60s. In 1966, Kongos and a number of his associates relocated to London and cut a 1967 single as Floribunda Rose for Piccadilly. Floribunda Rose eventually morphed into Scrugg, a psychedelic pop band that released a trio of singles for Pye prior to their 1969 breakup. "I Wish I Was Five," a 1968 B-side, gained the most attention. Upon Scrugg's split, Kongos went solo and released a handful of records, including the albums Confusions About a Goldfish, John Kongos, and Tokoloshe Man. The 1971 single "He's Gonna Step on You Again" registered on the charts in the U.K. and the U.S. Sporadic reissues of Kongos' work appeared during the '90s, and in 2002, Castle released Lavender Popcorn: 1966-1969, which combined Scrugg and Floribunda Rose material (both familiar and previously unreleased) with Confusions About a Goldfish.


Johnny And The G-Men, TEAL TL 1001

Johnny & The G-Men-Johnny & The G-Men (1962)

Johnny Kongos - This Is Johnny

Johnny Kongos - This Is Johnny





Having had success in South Africa in the early 1960s with his band Johnny and the G-Men, as well as a solo artist, Kongos went to UK to pursue his musical career. His first UK based group, Floribunda Rose, formed in April 1967, comprised the British musicians, Pete Clifford (guitar) (born Peter William Frederick Clifford, 10 May 1943, Whetstone, North London) and Jack Russell (bass, vocals) (born 29 April 1944, Caerleon, South Wales), who had come to South Africa in June 1965 with The 004; drummer Nick 'Doc' Dokter (born 24 July 1945, Kampen, Overijssel, Holland), a latter day member of 004; and the Cyprus born keyboard player Chris Demetriou from John E Sharpe and the Squires. After one single, "Linda Loves Linda", Clifford returned to South Africa to join The Bats and Dokter moved to Canada and worked with Five Man Cargo. Drummer Henry Spinetti joined and the remaining members recorded three singles as Scrugg.
After 18 months of gigging in Britain and Europe with his bands Floribunda Rose and Scrugg, and five singles later, he released his first solo album, Confusions About a Goldfish (1970), on the Dawn record label.
He then concentrated on songwriting, and began to have major success in Germany and other European countries (No 1 and Top 10 hits). He then moved to Fly Records with whom he had two hit singles – "He's Gonna Step On You Again" (UK No. 4, May 1971;[1] U.S. Billboard Hot 100 No. 70) and "Tokoloshe Man" (UK No. 4, November 1971).[1] His second album Kongos made the Top 30 of the UK Albums Chart, but subsequent singles, "Great White Lady" (1972), "Ride the Lightning" (1975) and "Higher than God's Hat" (1975), did not chart.[1] "Tomorrow I'll Go", which appeared on Kongos, was covered by New Zealand band The Human Instinct on their 1970 album Stoned Guitar, while "Ride The Lightning" (1975) was covered by Sylvie Vartan as "Qu'est-ce qui fait pleurer les blondes?" in France and was Number 1 on that chart for several weeks in 1976.
"He's Gonna Step On You Again" is cited in the Guinness Book of Records as being the first song to ever use a sample.
Kongos continued to work in his own London studio as a record producer, sound engineer, TV jingle and theme music composer, and songwriter, as well as handling the programming of the Fairlight CMI synthesizer on Def Leppard's 1983 album, Pyromania.
He gained notoriety with a new musical generation in 1990, when Madchester pioneers Happy Mondays reworked "He's Gonna Step On You Again" into their baggy era defining hit "Step On", which reached number 5 in the UK Singles Chart.[2] In the same year they also covered his "Tokoloshe Man", for the compilation album, Rubáiyát.


This Is Johnny, RCA Victor 31,791

Johnny Kongos - This Is Johnny



John Kongos Featuring Floribunda Rose & Scrugg - Lavender Popcorn (1966-1969)

John Kongos Featuring Floribunda Rose & Scrugg - Lavender Popcorn (1966-1969)



http://www.garagehangover.com/floribundarose/

Having had success in South Africa in the early 1960s with his band Johnny and the G-Men, as well as a solo artist, Kongos went to UK to pursue his musical career. His first UK based group, Floribunda Rose, formed in April 1967, comprised the British musicians :
Pete Clifford (guitar) (born Peter William Frederick Clifford, 10 May 1943, Whetstone, North London) and Jack Russell (bass, vocals) (born 29 April 1944, Caerleon, South Wales), who had come to South Africa in June 1965 with The 004; drummer Nick 'Doc' Dokter (born 24 July 1945, Kampen, Overijssel, Holland), a latter day member of 004; and the Cyprus born keyboard player Chris Demetriou from John E Sharpe and the Squires. After one single, "Linda Loves Linda", Clifford returned to South Africa to join The Bats and Dokter moved to Canada and worked with Five Man Cargo. Drummer Henry Spinetti joined and the remaining members recorded three singles as Scrugg.
After 18 months of gigging in Britain and Europe with his bands Floribunda Rose and Scrugg, and five singles later, he released his first solo album, Confusions About a Goldfish (1970), on the Dawn record label.
He then concentrated on songwriting, and began to have major success in Germany and other European countries (No 1 and Top 10 hits). He then moved to Fly Records with whom he had two hit singles – "He's Gonna Step On You Again" (UK No. 4, May 1971;[1] U.S. Billboard Hot 100 No. 70) and "Tokoloshe Man" (UK No. 4, November 1971).[1] His second album Kongos made the Top 30 of the UK Albums Chart, but subsequent singles, "Great White Lady" (1972), "Ride the Lightning" (1975) and "Higher than God's Hat" (1975), did not chart.[1] "Tomorrow I'll Go", which appeared on Kongos, was covered by New Zealand band The Human Instinct on their 1970 album Stoned Guitar, while "Ride The Lightning" (1975) was covered by Sylvie Vartan as "Qu'est-ce qui fait pleurer les blondes?" in France and was Number 1 on that chart for several weeks in 1976.
"He's Gonna Step On You Again" is cited in the Guinness Book of Records as being the first song to ever use a sample.
Kongos continued to work in his own London studio as a record producer, sound engineer, TV jingle and theme music composer, and songwriter, as well as handling the programming of the Fairlight CMI synthesizer on Def Leppard's 1983 album, Pyromania.
He gained notoriety with a new musical generation in 1990, when Madchester pioneers Happy Mondays reworked "He's Gonna Step On You Again" into their baggy era defining hit "Step On", which reached number 5 in the UK Singles Chart.[2] In the same year they also covered his "Tokoloshe Man", for the compilation album, Rubáiyát.


His 1966-1969 work (including his recordings with Floribunda Rose and Scrugg, and his solo album Confusions About a Goldfish) was released on a compilation album, Lavender Popcorn (2001).

John Kongos Featuring Floribunda Rose & Scrugg ‎– Lavender Popcorn
Label: Castle Music ‎– CMRCD 395

Perhaps kicked into action due to the inclusion of Scrugg's "I Wish I Was Five" on Rhino's second Nuggets box from the year prior, the Castle label issued Lavender Popcorn: 1966-1969, which digs deep into the discography of eccentric psych-pop musician John Kongos. Prior to the period documented here, Kongos had several records under his belt as a South African artist, which were popular there but failed to translate elsewhere. Upon his 1966 relocation to England, he headed the short-lived bands Floribunda Rose (one single) and Scrugg (three singles) and then went solo. This anthology ties up everything from Floribunda Rose   and   Scrugg , while adding some unreleased material. Kongos' first solo album, 1969's Confusions About a Goldfish, is also included in its entirety. Though it doesn't include significant later singles like "Tokoloshe Man" and "He's Gonna Step on You Again," the disc is rather essential for psych-pop completists.

John Kongos Featuring Floribunda Rose & Scrugg - Lavender Popcorn (1966-1969)



1 John T. Kongos* – I Love Mary 2:57
2 John T. Kongos* – Goodtime Party Companion 2:23
3 Floribunda Rose* – Linda Loves Linda 3:28
4 Floribunda Rose* – One Way Street 2:46
5 Scrugg – Everyone Can See 2:51
6 Scrugg – I Wish I Was Five 3:19
7 Scrugg – Lavender Popcorn Written-By – Reeves, English 2:18
8 Scrugg – Sandwich Board Man 3:11
9 Scrugg – Will The Real Geraldine Please Stand Up And Be Counted 2:59
10 Scrugg – Only George 2:51
11 Scrugg – Patriotic 2:48
12 John Kongos – Confusions About A Goldfish 4:17
13 John Kongos – At This Moment 1:48
14 John Kongos – Deserts Of Mountains Of Men 3:12
15 John Kongos – Seat By The Window 3:19
16 John Kongos – Go Home 2:36
17 John Kongos – Tomorrow I'll Go 3:57
18 John Kongos – Flim, Flam Pharisee 2:50
19 John Kongos – It Was Easy 2:50
20 John Kongos – Blood 3:55
21 John Kongos – The Lady Wants More 3:18
22 John Kongos – Coming Back To YouWritten-By – Demetriou, Kongos  2:49
23 John Kongos – Amendment To Confusions About A Goldfish 2:20
24 John Kongos – Elegy To Seymour 3:05
25 John Kongos – All I'm Trying To Do 3:14
26 John Kongos – Week Day Lady 3:06


Written-By – John Kongos (tracks: 1-6, 8-26)
Track 11 previously unreleased. 
Tracks 24-26 previously unreleased demos.

****
The Baskerville Hounds - Featuring Space Rock, Part 2 (1967)VA - Elemental Instrumentals !!A-Cads - Hungry For Love (1966)Johnny & The G-Men-Johnny & The G-Men (1962)Johnny Kongos - This Is JohnnyVA - South African 60's Antology - Guitars&Beat&Garage John Kongos Featuring Floribunda Rose & Scrugg - Lavender Popcorn (1966-1969)

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