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The Association - Renaissance (1966)

The Association -  Renaissance (1966)

The Association - 1967 

Renaissance was a difficult album for the Association to record. Coming in the wake of a serious hit album (And Then...Along Comes the Association) and two huge hit singles ("Along Comes Mary," "Cherish") and at a time when the group was experiencing more bookings than its members had ever dreamed possible, Renaissance was rushed out under pressure from the band's label. Alas, Renaissance bore little resemblance to its predecessor. For starters, the Association had lost the services of producer Curt Boettcher, who was the architect of the earlier album's extraordinary sound. Additionally, Renaissance was comprised entirely of original material, much of which had been written while the group was touring. These songs were competent and showed some flashes of inspiration but, apart from "Come to Me," nothing here offered anything even remotely as catchy as either of the band's two previous singles. With Association rhythm guitarist Jim Yester's brother Jerry Yester producing, Renaissance has a more stripped-down, conventional folk-rock feel. Apart from lead guitarist Gary Alexander and wind player Terry Kirkman, none of the other members played on this album, but Alexander is a delight, mixing melodic folk-rock picking and strumming, throwing in a few high-energy licks on one or two numbers, and even using a koto for the album's single, "Pandora's Golden Heebie Jeebies." The latter, despite having a grotesque title when following up a single like "Cherish," is a prize piece of pop psychedelia, all gorgeous harmonies and spaced-out sensibilities backed by a bracing beat. Renaissance wasn't a bad album, but was a more routine, predictable recording than its predecessor and, without a hit single to help push sales, it never reached audiences in remotely the same numbers.

The Association -  Renaissance (1966)


The Association -  Renaissance (1966)





The Association - French '60s EP Collection (2002)

The Association - French '60s EP Collection (2002)



The Association was one of the more underrated groups to come out of the mid- to late '60s. Creators of an enviable string of hits from 1966 through 1969, they got caught in a shift in popular culture and the unwritten criteria for significance in that field and never recovered. The group's smooth harmonies and pop-oriented sound (which occasionally moved into psychedelia and, much more rarely, into a harder, almost garage-punk vein) made them regular occupants of the highest reaches of the pop charts for two years -- their biggest hits, including "Along Comes Mary," "Cherish," "Windy," and "Never My Love," became instant staples of AM play lists, which was a respectable achievement for most musicians at the time. That same sound, along with their AM radio popularity, however, proved a liability as the music environment around them changed at the end of the decade. Additionally, their ensemble singing, essential to the group's sound and appeal, all but ensured that the individual members never emerged as personalities in their own right. The Association was as anonymous an outfit as their contemporaries the Grass Roots, in terms of any individual names or attributes, despite the fact that both groups generated immensely popular hits that millions of listeners embraced on a deeply personal level.

The group's roots go back to a meeting in 1964 between Terry Kirkman, a Kansas-born, California-raised music major, proficient on upwards of two dozen instruments, and Jules Alexander, a Tennessee-born high school drop-out with an interest in R&B who was a budding guitar virtuoso. Alexander was in the U.S. Navy at the time, serving out his hitch, and they agreed to link up professionally once he was out. That happened at the beginning of 1965, and they at once pursued a shared goal, to put together a large-scale ensemble that would be more ambitious than such existing big-band folk outfits as the New Christy Minstrels and the Serendipity Singers. The result was the Men, a 13-member band that played folk, rock, and jazz, who earned a spot as the house band at the L.A. Troubadour. The group's promising future was cut short, however, when the group's lineup split in two after just a few weeks with seven members exiting. The remaining six formed The Association, the name coming at the suggestion of Kirkman's wife Judy.

Ted Bluechel, Jr. was their drummer, Brian Cole played bass, Russ Giguere was on percussion, and Jim Yester, brother of Easy Riders/Modern Folk Quartet alumnus Jerry Yester, played rhythm guitar behind Alexander. Each member was also a singer -- indeed, their vocal abilities were far more important than their skills on any specific instruments -- and several were multi-instrumentalists, able to free others up to play more exotic instruments on stage. The group rehearsed for six months before they began performing, developing an extremely polished, sophisticated, and complex sound.

The Association shopped itself around Los Angeles but couldn't do any better initially than a single release on the Jubilee label -- their debut, "Babe, I'm Gonna Leave You," wasn't a success, nor was their subsequent 1965 recording of Bob Dylan's "One Too Many Mornings" on Valiant Records, which was an early folk-rock effort that was probably a little too complex for national exposure -- though it got decent local radio play in Los Angeles. The group came completely into its own, however, with the recording of the singles "Along Comes Mary" and "Cherish."

The recording of those songs was to set a new standard in the treatment of rock music in America. As Ted Bluechel recalled in a 1984 Goldmine article by Marty Natchez, the voices were recorded at Columbia studios, while the instruments -- played by Terry Kirkman and Jules Alexander, plus a group of studio musicians -- were cut in an improvised four-track studio owned by Gary Paxton. Those two songs, and the entire album that followed, revealed a level of craftsmanship that was unknown in rock recordings up to that time. Producer Curt Boettcher showed incredible skill in putting together the stereo sound on that album, which was among the finest sounding rock records of the period. The fact that most of the members didn't play on their records was not advertised, but it was a common decision in recording in those days -- Los Angeles, in particular, was home to some of the best musicians in the country; they worked affordably and there was no reason to make less-than-perfect records. Even the Byrds, apart from Roger McGuinn, had stood on the sidelines when it was time to do the instrumental tracks on their earliest records, although this sense that The Association's music was a "production" rather than the work of an actual band probably helped contribute to their anonymity as a group.


Considering their lightweight image in the later 1960s, The Association made a controversial entry into the music market with "Along Comes Mary" -- apart from its virtues as a record, with great hooks and a catchy chorus, it was propelled to the number seven spot nationally with help from rumors that the song was about marijuana. No one is quite certain of what songwriter Tandyn Almer had in mind, and one wonders how seriously any of this was taken at the time, in view of the fact that the song became an unofficial sports anthem for Catholic schools named St. Mary's. "Cherish," a Kirkman original (which was intended for a proposed single by Mike Whelan of the New Christy Minstrels), was their next success, riding to number one on the charts. Among the most beautiful rock records ever made, the song has been a perennial favorite of romantic couples for decades since. The group's debut album And Then...Along Comes the Association reached number five late in 1966.

It was just at this point that the exhaustion that came with success and the avarice of their record label, along with a couple of artistic and commercial misjudgments, combined to interrupt the group's progress. Their next single, "Pandora's Golden Heebie Jeebies," was not an ideal choice as a follow-up to one of the prettiest and most accessible rock records of the decade, reaching only number 35, and "No Fair at All," the next single, also fared poorly. Equally important, the group was forced to rush out a second album, Renaissance (produced by Jim Yester's brother Jerry Yester), while they were honoring the burgeoning tour commitments attendant to a pair of huge national hits. It was also during this time that Valiant Records, including The Association's contract, was absorbed by Warner Bros. Records.

A major personnel problem also arose as Jules Alexander, one of the core players in the group, decided to leave. He headed off to India, where he spent most of the next year. He returned in 1967, intending to form his own group, which never got off the ground. In the meantime, the Association recruited multi-instrumentalist Larry Ramos of the New Christy Minstrels to replace Alexander. The group's lineup change coincided with their getting access to a song by Ruthann Friedman called "Windy." Another number one single, it was tougher to realize as a finished work, cut over a period of 14 hours with Friedman and Yester's wife, arranger Cliff Burroughs, and his wife, along with numerous others, all singing with them.


Insight Out, their third album, was a tough one to record as well. Initially to have been produced by Jerry Yester, it fell apart after it was half done when the group became unhappy with the sound and shape he was giving it. Instead, they turned to Bones Howe, an engineer and producer (most noted for his work with the Fifth Dimension, among many other popular acts), who finished the album with them. Insight Out was a better album than Renaissance, with pop, folk-rock, and hard rock elements that hold together reasonably well, although its audio textures lacked the delicacy of the group's debut long-player. The album's two hits, "Windy" and "Never My Love," were among their most popular and enduring records and helped drive sales of the 12" platter. The final track, "Requiem for the Masses," which featured a Gregorian chant opening, was a strange song mixing psychedelia and social commentary -- its lyrics were a searing social indictment, originally dealing with the death of boxer Davy Moore (Bob Dylan had written a song, very little known at the time, on the same subject four years earlier).

Immediately prior to the release of Insight Out, the group played the most visible live gig in their history, opening the Monterey International Pop Festival. The group didn't seem absurdly out of place, in the context of the times, on a bill with Simon & Garfunkel, the Who, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Eric Burdon and the Animals, and the Mamas & The Papas. It was an ideal showcase, and as the tapes of the festival reveal, the group was tight and hard that night, their vocals spot-on and their playing a match for any folk-rock band of the era -- Ted Bluechel's drumming, in particular, and Larry Ramos's and Jim Yester's guitars are perfect, and even Kirkland's flute came out well on stage.


Had any part of their Monterey set been released, it might've helped correct the image that The Association were rapidly acquiring of being a soft, pop/rock group. Instead, their performance took some 20 years to see the light of day and longer than that for a pair of songs to show up on CD. The group's next album, Birthday, was a departure from its three predecessors, their attempt at creating a heavier sound. It was around this same time that they cut the single "Six Man Band," a very nasty critique of the music business written by Kirkman. The measures that the group took to change its image came too late -- Birthday fell largely on deaf ears when it was issued in 1968, and the singles "Six Man Band" and "Enter the Young," the latter a re-recording of a song that highlighted their debut album, charted only moderately well.

Warner Brothers' release of a greatest hits album in 1969 boosted the group's album sales and consolidated the audience that they had, but did nothing to stop the rot that had set in. By 1969, the sensibilities of the rock audience had hardened, even as that audience splintered. Suddenly, groups that specialized in more popular, lighter fare, usually aimed at audiences outside the 17-25 age group, and especially those with a big AM radio following, such as Paul Revere & the Raiders and the Grass Roots, and The Association were considered terminally out of fashion and uncool by the new rock intelligentsia. If they got mentioned or reviewed in the pages of Rolling Stone, Crawdaddy, or Circus magazine, it was usually for a lark rather than in a fully serious context. They were usually lumped together with bubblegum acts such as the 1910 Fruitgum Company and the Ohio Express and represented the kind of music you left behind (especially if you were a guy) once you got out of ninth grade, if you had any intentions of being considered cool.


One positive development was the return of Jules Alexander to the lineup in 1969, which turned the group into a septet and gave them the services of three talented guitarists. The group's Goodbye Columbus soundtrack album, which included incidental music from the film of that name composed by Charles Fox, was the kiss of death for the group's credibility, regardless of the musical merits of their work. It was one thing for movies like Easy Rider to make use of music by the likes of the Byrds -- that was part of a new wave of filmmaking -- but as a film, Goodbye Columbus was a piece of Hollywood product. Coming out in the same year that Woodstock took place, it spoke volumes about where The Association was in relation to music and audiences.


By 1970, the group's biggest hits, dating from 1966 through 1968, were safely ensconced as oldies. The very fact that the Fifth Dimension and David Cassidy were to soon enjoy fresh chart success with re-recordings of "Never My Love" and "Cherish," respectively, didn't help their image among rock tastemakers. The Association Live might've redeemed them as a concert act, but for a major miscalculation, recalled by Terry Kirkman in the Goldmine article -- the recording, done in Salt Lake City, UT, without allowing time for the members to adjust to the city's mile-high altitude, resulted in a lot of flat and raw singing (and playing by Kirkland on his recorder and other wind instruments) and, coupled with the inevitable leakages involved in most live rock recording, yielded a very poor body of songs, some which were redone in the studio after the fact. Regardless of the tinkering, this couldn't make a good album and The Association Live wasn't.


Warner Bros. released one more album, Stop Your Motor, which reached number 158 on the charts. At around that time, relations between the label and the group's manager deteriorated, and both sides parted company in 1971. Clive Davis, the president of Columbia Records, signed the group to his label. The resulting LP, Waterbeds in Trinidad issued in 1972, peaked at number 194. The group soldiered on, availing themselves of their lingering fame for their early hits, working into the following year.

The death on August 2, 1973, of bassist Brian Cole, as a result of a worsening drug habit, portended the breakup of the original core membership of The Association. Kirkman stepped back from the music business, while Jules Alexander formed a group called Bijou that got one promising single out through A&M Records. Ted Bluechel kept the group going with Jim Yester and Larry Ramos, adding other players like Ric Ulskey. After running out their string on stage, Bluechel, the last original member, began leasing the group name out, thus allowing oldies tour packagers to send out a version of "the Association" without any of the original members to play shows. That ultimately came to haunt the group as those rights proved somewhat hard to withdraw for a time, and bogus versions of "the Association" turned up on and off into the 1980s. The legitimate, original group members, including Kirkman, Alexander, and Bluechel, resumed working together in various combinations on the oldies circuit in the 1980s. In 1981 and 1982, the group even briefly hooked up again with their first producer, Curt Boettcher, to record a pair of singles for Elektra Records. Their work since the early 1980s centered largely on re-creating their classic recordings on stage and in the studio.

The Association's history on CD, at least in America, is virtually non-existent. Warner Bros., which has seen fit to do enhanced digital remasterings of Harpers Bizarre, the Everly Brothers, and Ry Cooder, has only ever issued a poorly mastered domestic CD transfer of the Association's greatest hits album. In Japan, however, all of their Warner Bros. albums (including a much-expanded version of the greatest hits collection) have been released in state-of-the-art high-resolution digital sound, with bonus tracks included, and packaging that recreates the original art and reprints the lyrics.

The Association - French '60s EP Collection (2002)

The Association - Stop Your Motor (1971)


 Although their chart hits had long since dried up, Stop Your Motor (1971) became the Association's penultimate long-player and second to last attempt at garnering any degree of hipness. Sadly, the sextet could not have been more out of step with the concurrent popular music trends, which must have been doubly frustrating as this effort actually includes a fair share of decent tunes that would have fit nicely into the burgeoning singer/songwriter genre. When Stop Your Motor was issued in the summer of 1971, it heralded the end of a two-year absence of new material. In the interim there had also been marked change behind the scenes. Most notable was the slightly ersatz production style of Ray Pohlman, a longtime session musician and member of Hal Blaine's infamous "Wrecking Crew." Yet another L.A. studio stalwart, Don Randi, had taken the reigns of one of the Association's most vital assets -- scoring the band's trademark vocal harmonies. Randi's handiwork is at its best on the midtempo opener, "Bring Yourself Home," or the decidedly laid-back lilt of "It's Got to Be Real." While the disc primarily consists of originals from within the combo's own ranks, "P.F. Sloan" is not only one of the record's best tracks, it was penned by singer/songwriter Jimmy Webb as a paean to the West Coast balladeer and composer of the same name. Among Sloan's best-known works are "Eve of Destruction," "Sins of a Family," and "Lollipop Train (You Never Had It So Good)." In fact, the Association covered Sloan's "On a Quiet Night" some four years earlier for the Insight Out (1967) album. Other standouts include Terry Kirkman's (percussion/woodwind) "That's Racin'," which is a whimsical precursor to the burgeoning stock car competitions that would evolve into the NASCAR craze over the ensuing decades. Perhaps the track that most accurately recaptures the Association of old is Gary "Jules" Alexander's (guitar/vocals) familiar mixture of trippy-tinged folk-rock on "Funny Kind of Song," which recalls his earlier contributions "Pandora's Golden Heebie Jeebies" and "Remember." Stop Your Motor was essentially stillborn upon release, stalling out at number 158 and driving a final nail in the band's relationship with Warner Bros., with whom they had been associated for five years. They would return with the equally dismissed Waterbeds in Trinidad

The Association - Stop Your Motor (1971)

The Association - Waterbeds In Trinidad! (1972)

The Association - Waterbeds In Trinidad! (1972)


After their long stay at Warner Brothers, the Association's new home at Columbia seemed to be the right move to make at the time. However, by 1972, the hits had all but dried up, and there wasn't that much to celebrate with the release of Waterbeds in Trinidad! While much of the material here comes from top-rate writers and craftsmen, such tunes as "Darling Be Home Soon," "Snow Queen" (a single), and "Little Road and a Stone to Roll" didn't advance the band's career much. the Association was one band that never quite got the hang of releasing good to great albums instead of a hit single surrounded by mediocrity. From Waterbeds in Trinidad! onward, it proved to be a downhill trend the Association would never recover from. 

The Association - Waterbeds In Trinidad! (1972)

Angel Pavement - Maybe Tomorrow (1969)

Angel Pavement - Maybe Tomorrow (1969)


Recorded in 1969 but unreleased at the time, the sole album by baroque harmony pop-psych group Angel Pavement finally emerged in vinyl-only format in 2003. This CD release adds a further eight tracks, including five superb West Coast-leaning demos recorded locally in 1967 before they came down south to London to release two singles, all four sides of which are included herein. A rare treat for lovers of Honeybus/Zombies-style late '60s British pop.




Anyone unfamiliar with Angel Pavement shouldn't feel too bad. After all, the band was hardly a household name in its heyday, and its peak of exposure consisted of a pair of failed singles at the very tail-end of the 1960s in England. But they were a seriously wonderful sunshine pop outfit from late 1960s, hailing from York, with a sound that was equal parts psychedelia and pop/rock in the best Hollies/Zombies/Beatles manner. The band, which took its name from a 1930 novel by J.B. Priestley (himself a Yorkshireman, natch), was assembled by guitarist/songwriter Alfie Shepherd out of the remnants of a soul-based outfit, Wesley Hardin's Shotgun Package, with Paul Smith (lead vocals), Dave Smith (guitar), Graham Harris (bass), and Alan Reeve (drums) (later replaced by Mike "Candy" Candler). They quickly developed an effective pop-oriented psychedelic sound, similar to what the Hollies were doing on Evolution and Butterfly, and the Zombies generated on Odessey & Oracle, with lush harmonies, glittering instrumental textures, horns and brass in the right places on the pop numbers. They managed to build a large following in their native York and also cut some early sides that heavily reflected all of those influences. 

The group's attempt to crack the London club scene coincided with their starting work on a debut album at Morgan Studios, but those efforts were interrupted by an offer to play a series of gigs for a few days in Mexico City in early 1969. Instead, they stayed for five months, and returned to London to pick up work on the album, a process interrupted by Dave Smith's departure (and his replacement by John Cartwright, who played guitar and trumpet). A pair of singles, "Baby You've Gotta Stay" and "Tell Me What I've Got to Do," issued through Fontana Records, failed to elicit any serious chart action in late 1969 and early 1970; a third single and their announcement of a forthcoming LP all ended up missing in action because of disputes between Shepherd and the studio's publishing arm. Their producer apparently put the final nail in the coffin, and they broke up at the end of 1970. Candler went on to join Decameron and the John Coppin and his band, and Shepherd wrote songs and attempted to do a musical adaptation of The Wind in the Willows, while the others exited the business altogether. In 2005, Wooden Hill Records issued Maybe Tomorrow, the first-ever release of nearly two-dozen songs from those long-ago Morgan sessions by Angel Pavement -- they lived up to all of the stories about the group's sound and potential. The 1969 Wind in the Willows project was finally released on CD in 2009, digitally remastered with extra demo songs, on the Wooden Hill label.

Angel Pavement - Maybe Tomorrow (1969)

The American Breed - Pumpkin Powder Scarlet And Green (1968)

The American Breed - Pumpkin Powder Scarlet And Green (1968)

Personnel:
Gary Loizzo (vcls, gtr)
Al Ciner (gtr)
Chuck Colbert (bs)
Lee Graziano (dr)
[Kevin Murphy] (keyb'ds)

Band origin:
Chicago (Illinois/US)

Discographie:
Albums:
1. American Breed (Acta (Dot) 38002) 1967
2. American Breed II "Bend Me Shape Me" 
   (Acta (Dot) 38003) 1968
3. Pumpkin, Powder, Scarlet And Green 
   (Acta (Dot) 38006) 1968
4. Lonely Side Of The City (Acta (Dot) 38008) 1968

45's:
 1. I Don't Think You Know Me/
    Give Two Young Lovers A Chance (Acta 802) 1967
 2. Step Out Of Your Mind/Same Old Thing (Acta 804) 1967
 3. Don't Forget About Me/Short Skirts (Acta 808) 1967
 4. Bend Me, Shape Me/Mindrocker (Acta 811) 1967
 5. Green Light/Don't It Make You Cry (Acta 821) 1968
 6. Ready, Willing And Able/Take Me If You Want Me 
    (Acta 824) 1968
 7. Any Way That You Want Me/Master Of My Fate 
    (Acta 827) 1968
 8. Keep The Faith/Private Zoo (Acta 830) 1969
 9. Hunky Funky/Enter The Master (Acta 833) 1969
10. Room At The Top/Walls (Acta 836) 1969
11. Cool It (We're Not Alone)/The Brain (Acta 837) 1969
12. Can't Make It Without You/When I'm With You 
    (Paramount 0040) 1971

The American Breed - Pumpkin Powder Scarlet And Green (1968)

The American Breed - Lonely Side Of The City (1968)

The American Breed - Lonely Side Of The City (1968)

The American Breed were a '60s rock quartet from Cicero, IL, led by Gary Loizzo. They scored a gold Top Ten hit in early 1968 with "Bend Me, Shape Me." Later, drummer Andre Fischer and keyboard player Kevin Murphy were members of Rufus.



The American Breed was an American interracial rock band, that was formed in 1966 and disbanded in 1969.
The group was formed in Cicero, Illinois as Gary & The Nite Lites. The group's greatest success was the single, "Bend Me, Shape Me," which reached number five on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1968. The song, written by Scott English ((born 10. Jan 1943 in Brooklyn, New York) and Larry Weiss, was a remake of a recording by The Outsiders that had been released the year before. The group also appeared on the 16 December 1967 episode of the television show "American Bandstand," along with Pink Floyd.

The original members of the group were Gary Loizzo on vocals, Charles Colbert, Jr. on bass guitar, Al Ciner on guitar, and Lee Graziano on drums. All members were from the greater Chicago area. As Gary & The Nite Lites, they were somewhat successful in Chicago and put out one single. Soon afterwards, the group underwent several changes. They moved to the Acta record label and renamed themselves The American Breed. Two new members were also added by 1968: Kevin Murphy on keyboards and Andre Fischer on drums.

The band enjoyed its greatest success in 1967 and 1968. They put five singles on the charts, including "Step Out Of Your Mind", "Green Light" and "Bend Me, Shape Me". The group disbanded the following year, and Fischer went on to form Rufus (with Chaka Khan). He later married Natalie Cole. A compilation album, Bend Me, Shape Me: The Best of the American Breed, was released in 1994. "Bend Me, Shape Me" continues to receive occasional airplay on oldies radio stations.

In celebration of the 2005 baseball World Championship of the Chicago White Sox, the American Breed issued a CD single entitled "Rock with the Sox." The single was produced by Gary Loizzo.


The American Breed - Lonely Side Of The City (1968)





Ann-Margret - How Lovely To Be

Ann-Margret - How Lovely To Be





Ann-Margret - How Lovely To Be

Actress, singer, and dancer Ann-Margret excelled in two areas of entertainment during a career that was still going strong in its fifth decade: as a movie star, she appeared in more than 50 feature films and as a stage entertainer she performed as a headlining act in showrooms and theaters around the world. To a lesser extent, she found time periodically for television and recordings. Early in her career, emphasis was placed on her attractiveness and sexual appeal; she was marketed as a kind of red-haired American version of Brigitte Bardot. But her talent allowed her to outlive that image, and eventually, while working regularly, she earned Academy, Emmy, and Grammy Award nominations, as well as several Golden Globes in recognition of her film and TV roles.
Swedish-born Ann-Margret Olsson was the only child of Gustav Olsson and Anna (Aronsson) Olsson. Her father, an electrician, had lived in the U.S. for many years, and when she was a year old he moved back to America where he found work in the suburbs of Chicago and saved up to bring his wife and child over. Meanwhile, Ann-Margret began displaying an interest in singing and dancing from the age of three. She and her mother finally arrived in the U.S. in 1946, settling in Fox Lake, IL. There, Ann-Margret took singing, dancing, and piano lessons as a child; she became a naturalized American citizen in 1949. In the summer of 1957, while competing in a TV talent contest in Chicago, she was seen by Ted Mack, host of the national series The Original Amateur Hour, who put her on the show. Later that summer, she spent a month singing with the Danny Ferguson band at the Muehlebach Hotel in Kansas City. Her first recording came in January 1959. It was an amateur effort, an album made of a show put on by the Tri-Ship Club at New Trier High School and released on a limited basis, Lagniappe '59 Presents "Be My Guest"; she was heard singing Irving Berlin's "Heat Wave."
Ann-Margret graduated from high school in the spring of 1959 and entered Northwestern University that fall, majoring in speech with a minor in drama. She and two classmates joined with a Northwestern graduate to form a group called the Suttletones that appeared in clubs around Chicago on the weekends. The second recording with which she was associated was another amateur school effort, Among Friends -- Waa-Mu Show of 1960, a collector's item even though she only appeared as a dancer in the production and was not featured. After finishing her freshman year in June 1960, she and the Suttletones went to Las Vegas for a club engagement that fell through, then continued to Los Angeles, where they found bookings. At the end of the summer, she dropped out of college to pursue her career, while her fellow students returned to school. She earned her first recording contract with Warner Bros. Records, which released two singles and an album, It's the Most Happy Sound, billed to Ann-Margret & the Ja-Da Quartet. But the records didn't sell. She was appearing in a lounge at the Dunes Hotel in Las Vegas when she auditioned for comedian George Burns, who added her to his Christmas show at the Sahara. The attention she received led to a record contract with RCA Victor and a film contract with 20th Century-Fox, which promptly loaned her out to Paramount for her first movie, Pocketful of Miracles, director Frank Capra's remake of his 1934 movie Lady for a Day, starring Bette Davis.

Ann-Margret's first RCA single, "Lost Love," did not chart. She followed with "I Just Don't Understand," a bluesy, rocking number co-produced by Chet Atkins and featuring Elvis Presley's backup singers, the Jordanaires, that entered the Billboard Hot 100 in July 1961 and rose into the Top 20. Her first RCA album, And Here She Is...Ann-Margret, was released in October. A third single, "It Do Me So Good," barely reached the charts in November. The same month, Pocketful of Miracles opened, earning her good notices, and she won the Golden Globe Award for New Star of the Year -- Female. RCA had her record a variety of pop, country, and rock for her next LP, On the Way Up. The set, released in March 1962, included her versions of such differing material as the pop song "Moon River" and Presley's blues-rock standard "Heartbreak Hotel," as well as the lush ballad "What Am I Supposed to Do," which spent five weeks near the bottom of the Hot 100 and made the easy listening charts. Also in March 1962 came her second film, a remake of the musical version of State Fair, also featuring Pat Boone and Bobby Darin. Here, she got to put on film for the first time her singing and dancing abilities as well as sexy appeal, performing a revved-up version of Rodgers & Hammerstein's "Isn't It Kinda Fun?" and a duet with Boone on the newly written Rodgers ballad "Willing and Eager." The soundtrack album reached the Top 20.

On April 9, 1962, Ann-Margret appeared on the Academy Awards telecast to sing one of the year's nominated songs, the title theme from Bachelor in Paradise. Her torrid song-and-dance routine stopped the show and increased her stardom exponentially. RCA tried to take advantage of that notoriety by sending her back to the studio and titling the resulting album The Vivacious One, but the record was not successful. She had more luck on the silver screen, where she was cast in the film adaptation of the stage musical Bye Bye Birdie, a send-up of Elvis Presley, in which she played a Midwestern teenager who wins the chance to bestow "one last kiss" on a Presley-like teen idol before he goes into the Army. Her part was built up considerably from what it had been on Broadway, as she opened and closed the film singing a newly written title song, had another solo on "How Lovely to Be a Woman," and joined other cast members on half a dozen other songs. "Ann-Margret...is a wow," wrote Variety, and when Bye Bye Birdie opened in April 1963, it was a hit, its soundtrack album peaking at number two and remaining in the charts over a year. She earned a Golden Globe nomination for Best Actress -- Musical or Comedy.

Ann-Margret - How Lovely To Be


Despite her success in movie musicals, Ann-Margret was not able to translate that popularity into her solo records. In the fall of 1963, RCA released Bachelors' Paradise, belatedly trying to take advantage of her Academy Awards moment a year and a half earlier, but the album failed to chart. Meanwhile, she was achieving a kind of immortality by voicing the character of Ann-Margrock on the popular prime-time animated TV series The Flintstones. In January 1964, RCA managed to get her back into the Top 100 on the LP charts by pairing her with trumpeter Al Hirt on the LP Beauty and the Beard. Having worked with an Elvis Presley imitator in Bye Bye Birdie, she next teamed up with the real thing, co-starring in the Presley film Viva Las Vegas, which opened in May 1964. She also sang several songs, soloing on Leiber & Stoller's "Appreciation" and "My Rival" and performing a duet with Presley on "C'mon Everybody," "The Lady Loves Me," and the title song, written by Doc Pomus and Mort Shuman. Another duet with Presley, "You're the Boss," was cut from the finished film. She had recorded studio versions of it, "The Lady Loves Me," and "Today, Tomorrow and Forever" (a Presley solo in the film) as duets with Presley, but those recordings were not issued at the time, and there was no soundtrack album, only an EP of Presley solo tracks. Thus, record buyers were denied the chance to buy copies of some of her most memorable musical performances.
RCA (which, of course, also had Elvis Presley under contract) seemed interested in promoting a very different Ann-Margret. The label paired her with middle-of-the-road singer John Gary on the duet album David Merrick Presents Hits from His Broadway Shows, released in October 1964 and in the charts for four weeks. And after three straight movie musicals, her film career took a false step with the poorly reviewed melodrama Kitten With a Whip, which also appeared in October 1964. Two months later, she was back in the theaters and the record stores with The Pleasure Seekers, a musical remake of Three Coins in the Fountain with a soundtrack album on which she also appeared.
As the release of three films within the calendar year of 1964 indicated, Ann-Margret was concentrating more on her film career than anything else, although she was willing to sing in her movies and fulfill the terms of her record contract. RCA didn't bother to have her make an album in 1965, restricting itself to one single, while she released three more non-musical movies, Bus Riley's Back in Town in March, Once a Thief in August, and The Cincinnati Kid in October. The next year brought four film releases. She starred in the comedy Made in Paris in February 1966 and had a featured role in the all-star remake of Stagecoach, released in May. She got to sing in The Swinger in November, leading to the release of her final RCA LP, Songs from "The Swinger" (And Other Swingin' Songs), and played opposite Dean Martin in his second Matt Helm spy spoof, Murderers' Row, in December.


By the end of 1966, Ann-Margret's career was in decline. Like some other performers, she was caught in the cultural changes of the 1960s. Still only 25 years old, she was the same age as Bob Dylan, but she had trained herself for a style of show business that seemed to be passing away. Movie studios were not much interested in making the kind of musicals at which she excelled, and she had made too many non-musicals in too short a time, too many of them failures. Meanwhile, rock had taken over popular music, dooming her recording career. And her sexy, show-business image did not appeal to a new, hip, long-haired generation. RCA released one more single in 1967 before allowing her contract to lapse. Her Hollywood film offers dried up. So, she took steps to retool her career. On May 8, 1967, she married television actor Roger Smith (77 Sunset Strip), who retired from performing to become her manager. In June 1967, she debuted as a Las Vegas headliner at the Riviera Hotel. And in December 1968, she starred in her first television special, The Ann-Margret Show. Meanwhile, film offers had continued to come in from overseas, and her next several movies were made in Europe, South America, and the Middle East. (In one, Rebus, she sang a couple of songs; a soundtrack album belatedly came out in Italy in 2001.)

Ann-Margret returned to recording in 1969 when she made The Cowboy & the Lady, a duo album with Lee Hazlewood, for LHI Records. A second television special, From Hollywood With Love, aired in December. Her first American movie role in years came with R.P.M., released in September 1970, and the following month she appeared in C.C. and Company, written and produced by her husband. (A soundtrack album was released featuring her recording of "Today," written by score composer Lenny Stack, which was also released as a single.) But the role that brought her back to prominence and brought her legitimacy as a serious actress was her featured part in director Mike Nichols' Carnal Knowledge, starring Jack Nicholson and Art Garfunkel, which opened in June 1971. It earned her her first Academy Award nomination for supporting actress and won her another Golden Globe. On November 15, 1971, she appeared in a television production of the musical Dames at Sea, resulting in a soundtrack album.

Meanwhile, Ann-Margret was continuing to perform her stage show in the Nevada showrooms. On September 10, 1972, she was severely injured when she fell from a faulty platform during her act at the Sahara Hotel in Lake Tahoe. Surgery and rehabilitation followed, but she was back to performing ten weeks later. That setback aside, she had successfully rebuilt her career by the mid-'70s, alternating film roles (in 1973, the Western The Train Robbers with John Wayne and the French crime thriller The Outside Man) with television specials and stage work. In March 1975, she returned to movie musicals in a big, and surprising, way in director Ken Russell's outrageous film treatment of the Who's concept album Tommy, playing the part of Tommy's mother. She was 33 years old; Who lead singer Roger Daltrey, who played Tommy, turned 31 just before the movie opened. She sang on more than a dozen songs in the all-singing film, including two duets with Daltrey, "Champagne" and "Mother and Son," newly written for the movie. The double-LP soundtrack album hit number two and went gold. She was nominated for her second Academy Award, this time for Best Actress, and won her third Golden Globe, for Best Actress -- Musical or Comedy.
In the second half of the 1970s, Ann-Margret continued to appear regularly on film, earning another Golden Globe nomination for Best Supporting Actress for 1977's Joseph Andrews, while also making TV specials and performing her act on-stage in Nevada and elsewhere. The rise of disco offered her another chance at the music business, however, and on October 27, 1979, her single "Love Rush," released on Ocean Records and later picked up by MCA, entered Billboard's disco/dance charts heading for a peak at number eight. MCA financed a five-track EP, released in 1980 as Ann-Margret, and from it came "Midnight Message," which entered the dance charts in March and peaked at number 12. Disco was petering out by 1980, but she managed one more chart placing, starting in October 1981 with "Everybody Needs Somebody Sometimes" on First American Records; it got to number 22.
Ann-Margret suffered a personal setback in 1980 when her husband was diagnosed with myasthenia gravis, a muscle-weakening nerve disease. She devoted more time to her family, helping to care for her husband and three stepchildren, but as the breadwinner in the family, she still had to work. She took more film roles in the early '80s, but cut down on performing her stage act, stopping completely by the end of 1983. Heretofore, she had avoided television movies, but her first one, a tearjerker called Who Will Love My Children? (about a mother of ten who contracts a fatal illness), was broadcast February 14, 1983; it earned her an Emmy nomination. In 1984, she had a more prestigious television appearance in an adaptation of Tennessee Williams' play A Streetcar Named Desire, playing the part of Blanche DuBois. The performance won her her fourth Golden Globe for Best Actress -- Mini-Series or Television Movie. She was able to return to performing on-stage in October 1988 when she began her first run at Caesar's Palace in Las Vegas in five years. She toured extensively over the next three years, culminating in her first appearance at New York's Radio City Music Hall in October 1991. In the spring of 1992, she appeared in Newsies, a movie musical for children produced by Walt Disney that didn't do much business but did have a soundtrack album that spent a week in the charts. For the rest of the 1990s, she worked steadily in feature films (e.g., Grumpy Old Men [1993] and Grumpier Old Men [1995]) and TV movies (e.g., the mini-series Scarlett, a sequel to Gone With the Wind [1994], and Life of the Party: The Pamela Harriman Story [1998], which earned her an Emmy nomination for Outstanding Actress in a Miniseries or TV Movie), while continuing to perform her stage act. She published a best-selling autobiography, Ann-Margret: My Story (written with Todd Gold) in 1994.

Ann-Margret continued to work steadily in the 21st century. For the 2000 film The Flintstones in Rock Vegas, she recalled her 1963 appearance on the TV version by singing "Viva Rock Vegas" on the soundtrack (and the soundtrack album, of course). In February 2001, she turned to musical theater for the first time (and returned to the stage for the first time in seven years), starring in a national touring company of the Broadway hit The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas and recording a cast album. Somewhat incongruously, in 2001, she released her first gospel album, God Is Love: The Gospel Sessions, accompanied by the Jordanaires (who had been on her first recordings 40 years earlier) and the Light Crust Doughboys with James Blackwood. The album earned her her first Grammy nomination for Best Southern, Country, or Bluegrass Gospel Album. After 18 months, she came off the road with The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas, but by early 2003 she had put together a new stage act and launched her first solo tour in a decade.


Ann-Margret - How Lovely To Be  [Bootleg Compilation]
2010

Ann-Margret - How Lovely To Be

Antoine Rencontre Les Problemes (1966 - 1967) + little bonus

Antoine Rencontre Les Problemes (1966 - 1967) + little bonus


Jean Sarrus (basse)
Gérard Rinaldi (chanteur)
Gérard Filippelli (guitare solo, accordéon)
Luis Régo (guitare rythmique)
Donald Rieudon (batterie)
Jean-Guy Fechner (remplace Donald Rieudon



В Штатах-Боб Дилан,в Британии-Донован,а во Франции-Antoine(Настоящее имя Pierre-Antoine Muracioli).
Певец и путешественник Антуан родился в 1944 году в Таматаве (Мадагаскар), где работал его отец, позже семья вернулась во Францию и на некоторое время осела в Марселе, где мальчик закончил начальную школу. Затем были 4 года в Камеруне и снова метрополия Тонон-ле-Бен, Аннеси, Гренобль. В 1965 году юноша записал дебютную сорокапятку для лейбла Vogue, затем и альбом «Les Elucubrations», а в мае следующего года уже выступал в столичной «Олимпии». Чуть позже приходит успех в соседней Италии, где песня «Pietre», исполненная на фестивале Сан-Ремо наделала много шума. В те годы музыкант много гастролирует, выступая с концертами по всему миру – от Греции до Бразилии, но уже тогда понимает, что одних лишь аэропортов, отелей и концертных площадок ему недостаточно и решает посвятить свою жизнь путешествиям. На борту шхуны «Ом» Антуан отправляется в кругосветное плавание, в 1977 году выходит его первая книга, а в 1980 году – пластинка традиционных полинезийских песен «La Motogodille» ( c 1978 по 1988 певец сотрудничал с фирмой грамзаписи Barclay).

В 80-е годы странствия продолжаются, на этот раз на паруснике Voyage, география их весьма обширна- Полинезия, Квебек, Бразилия, Антильские острова; выходят книги и альбомы. Сменив в конце десятилетия Voyage на катамаран Banana Split, Антуан предпринимает очередное плавание, работает над фотоальбомами и фильмами (практически ежегодно выпуская по одному - два ДВД).

Возвращение Антуана на сцену состоялось в 2002 году, когда он дал несколько концертов в Париже.

На концертах и при записи альбомов Антуан зачастую сотрудничал с бит-группой Les Problemes.Выступали они "то вместе,то поврозь,а то попеременно..."В конце 1966 года Les Problemes поменяли свое название и вошли в историю как Les Charlots (тот,кто старше 30-ти,наверное,не надо напоминать кто это...Остальным лишь скажу,что это легендарная комик-группа,снявшая 15 фильмов и записавшая несколько музыкальных альбомов,но это уже совсем другая история...)Здесь представлены как совместные их записи,так и сольные работы.Альбом 2000 года-переиздание одноименного диска 1966 года с добавленными к нему бонус-треками.



Antoine Rencontre Les Problemes (1966 - 1967) + little bonus


Les Charlots - Chauffe Marcel....(1966)







Adamo - 1966/1967


A passion for music and an emotion-tinged vocal quality has made Salvatore Adamo one of the most commercially successful singers in Europe and one of the most famous Italian immigrants living in Belgium. Since his debut album, Vous Permettez Monsieur, transformed him into an internationally recognized celebrity, Adamo has sold over 80 million copies of his albums worldwide. Adamo, who emigrated to Belgium with his parents at the age of three, was raised in Jemappes and later moved to Brussels. A bright student, Adamo was able to avoid the coal mining industry that lured many Italian immigrants to Belgium and concentrate on his academic and musical studies. Adamo's influences included the music of Victor Hugo, Jacques Prevert, and George Brassens, and the Italian canzoetta and tango. While he recorded a collection of songs from Napoli, Adamo has sung in his adopted language of French. In the mid-'60s, he reached his commercial peak, placing a number of songs at the top of the music charts including "Sans Toi Mamie" in 1963 and "Vous Permettez Monsieur," "Quand les Roses," and "Dolce Paola" in 1964. He released a string of live albums and compilations throughout the '60s and '70s, but his career trailed off in the '80s, his style being no longer fashionable.

Regards An adaptation of Adamo's composition, "Les Filles Du Bord de Mer," was recorded by Arno in 1993 and sparked a renewed interest in his work. That year, Adamo was made an honorary UNICEF ambassador and began to visit war-torn countries in this capacity. Almost certainly as a result, his 1998 comeback album, Regards, brought a sociopolitical edge to his music with songs commenting on racism and the civil war in Bosnia. In Belgium, the album was released with two songs -- "Laat Onze Kinderen Dromen (Let The Children Dream)" and "Il Zie Een Engel (I See An Angel)" -- sung in Dutch. After that, he continued to ride a wave of nostalgia-fueled success, eventually becoming at least as famous in the new millennium as he had been in his heyday. In 2001 he was knighted by King Albert II of Belgium for his services to the country's music industry. Adamo recorded several successful studio albums during the 2000s, including the obligatory duets album -- 2008's Le Bal des Gens Bien -- on which he re-recorded some of his biggest hits with a string of hot young artistes. He showed no signs of stopping as he moved into the early 2010s, with another new album, La Grande Roue, dropping in 2012. 

 01. Adamo - Une mèche de cheuveux
02. Adamo - La Complainte Des Elus
03. Adamo - Sonnet Pour Notre Amour
04. Adamo - Princesses Et Bergeres
05. Adamo - Elle était belle pourtant
06. Adamo - Tu me reviens
07. Adamo - Ton nom
08. Adamo - Du soleil, du boulot
09. Adamo - En bandoulière
10. Adamo - On N'a Plus Le Droit
11. Adamo - Tenez-Vous Bien
12. Adamo - Que Le Temps S'arrete
13. Adamo - Inch' Allah
14. Adamo - Sont-ce vos bijoux
15. Adamo - Je vous offre
16. Adamo - Ensemble
17. Adamo - On Se Bat Toujours Quelque Part
18. Adamo - Dans ma hotte

text




The Association -  Renaissance (1966)The Association - French '60s EP Collection (2002)The Association - Stop Your Motor (1971)The Association - Waterbeds In Trinidad! (1972)Angel Pavement - Maybe Tomorrow (1969)The American Breed - Pumpkin Powder Scarlet And Green (1968)The American Breed - Lonely Side Of The City (1968)Ann-Margret - How Lovely To Be Antoine Rencontre Les Problemes (1966 - 1967) + little bonusAdamo - 1966/1967

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