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The Pleazers -Definitely Definitive (1965-1966)

The Pleazers -Definitely Definitive (1965-1966)


The Pleazers were an originally Australian-based rhythm & blues musical group that was popular in New Zealand in the mid-1960s.
The band began in Brisbane as the G-Men, before moving to Sydney, changing their name and going professional. In Sydney, they were noticed by Eldred Stebbing of Zodiac Records, who brought them to New Zealand in 1964, where they soon appeared on the Let's Go show. The initial release, "Last Night"/"Poor Girl", did poorly but the followup release, a cover of Them's "Gloria" broke into the national charts. The band eventually released seven singles, one EP and one album, called Definitely Pleazers. The band went through several personnel changes and in March 1965 moved back to Australia, only to break up six months later.

The Pleazers -Definitely Definitive (1965-1966)

In the mid-'60s, the Pleazers were one of the only New Zealand groups competently playing tough, British Invasion/R&B-styled rock & roll; they were probably only second to the La-De-Da's in their homeland in this regard. They managed to record about half a dozen singles, an LP, and an EP, gaining a few hits in New Zealand and playing some stints in Australia during their brief life. Mixing typical covers of the time with fairly strong original material, the Pleazers were not an extraordinary band; in the United States or Britain, they would have been just another decent regional act. Tough rock bands were still a rarity in New Zealand, though, and so the Pleazers are still remembered there as trailblazers of sorts. Originally an Australian band from Brisbane, known as 'Johnny Gray and The G Men'. They were hired to as a backing band for 'The London Brothers', Billy Bacon and Bob Cooper back in 1964. At that time the band cosisted of, Jimmy Cerezo, lead guitar, Peter Newing, rhythm guitar, Bruce Robinson, bass guitar and me on drums.They were joined by Bob Cooper and decided to change their name to the Pleazers. They then went professional and at this point Vince Lipton decided to leave and was replaced by Bruce Robinson (Bass). The band moved to Sydney, losing Jim Cerezo on the way, so Robinson moved to lead guitar and Ronnie Peel joined on bass.It was while playing in Sydney that they were noticed by Zodiac owner, Eldred Stebbing, who brought them to New Zealand in 1964, with a promise of guaranteed work and unlimited studio time. They started playing at the Shiralee and also appeared on the TV show Let's Go. They looked to be set to take the nation by storm, but fell out with TV producers and were subsequently banned from the airwaves. They started looking scruffier and seemed more comfortable with this image.Their first single, 'Last Night'/'Poor Girl', got minor response. It wasn't until they released their follow-up song, a cover of Them's 'Gloria', with 'That Lonely Feeling' on the reverse, in February 1965, that saw them get any action on the charts. Seven singles, one EP called 'Midnight Rave', and one album called 'Definitely Pleazers' were released on the Zodiac label. The other singles were 'Like Columbus Did', 'Sometimes', 'Is It Over Baby', 'Hurtin' All Over', 'Guilty', 'Can't Pretend', 'Here Today', 'La La Lies' and 'Three Cool Cats', 'Security'.Eldred Stebbing took over the Shiralee in 1966 and renamed it the Galaxie. He installed as resident bands, two of the raunchiest R&B groups around, The La De Da's and the Pleazers. The La De Da's fitted in well with the image of the club, but the Pleazers wanted to continue their rough looking image and Bob Cooper was soon replaced by Shane Hales. Cooper showed up with Hubb Kapp and the Wheels. 
Ronnie Peel left the group in 1966 and was replaced by Gus Fenwick from the Layabouts. The Pleazers went back to Australia in June 1966, but returned in March 1967, without Peter Newing, only to split up 6 months later.They were one of the premier groups on the New Zealand scene, but their behaviour was far from acceptable in a staid New Zealand society. Peel spent a brief period with The La De Da's before moving to the UK and a stint with Thunderclap Newman. He later changed his name to Rockwell T James and performed well in Australia. Gus Fenwick also continued his career in Australia, before joining Shane Hales in the Shane Group, which evolved into the Apple. In Australia Gus was a member of the Bootleg Family Band, Healing Force, Nightflyer and Swanee.Shane Hales had a short stint with Jamestown Union, before forming the Shane Group, and after that had a very successful solo career, while Bruce Robinson went on to join Troubled Mind, then Flinders and Rockinghorse.In 1988 Raven released an album that was named and looked the same as the 1966 EP, but contained tracks made up of singles, the EP and album tracks.

Patsy Ann Noble - Hits & Rarities


Patsy Ann Noble enjoyed performing careers in Australia and England before turning to acting in the late '60s. She was born into a family of performers in Australia: her father Buster Noble was a popular comic, singer and dancer while her mother, the former Helen de Paul, was a choreographer and stage producer. As a child, she appeared in various productions of her parents, and became a performer in her own right on a popular radio program in 1950. Noble studied singing and dancing, and was qualified to teach ballet at the age of 14. She subsequently became the lead singer and featured dancer in her parents' production of a revue called International Follies. Noble's television debut followed in 1960, and was signed as regular performer on Bandstand, a weekly Australian musical showcase. A recording contract with the Australian division of HMV Records -- a unit of the EMI group -- led to the release of her first single, "I Love You So Much It Hurts," in late 1960. "Good Looking Boy," released a year later, charted in both Sydney and Melbourne (Australia didn't have an established national record chart in those days), and led to the release of Noble's first album, Just For You, which was given the first Logie Award ever granted for Best Female Singer. Her success as a singer didn't distract Noble from her acting, and she appeared in serious theatrical productions during this period.


Having gone about as far as music could take her in Australia, Noble headed for England in 1963, and started at the top when she ended up making her BBC debut alongside the Beatles; Noble and the band ended up making several televised appearances together, and she seemed poised for a major singing career, issuing a fine girl group-type record in 1963 with "Don't You Ever Change Your Mind" b/w "Sour Grapes." She was a regular panelist on Juke Box Jury and also appeared in the jukebox musical Just for Fun, and got a singing spot in one episode of Secret Agent/Danger Man. Somehow, the success never came to Noble as a singer, despite appearances at the London Palladium and the Paris Olympia Theater, and by 1966 she'd begun to emphasize her acting once again, though she continued to record sides for Polydor until late in the decade. It was as Trisha Noble, with her hair dyed blonde, that she enjoyed considerably more success, both in England and America, on television series such as Executive Suite and Strike Force, and in feature films, including Star Wars Episode 1: The Phantom Menace  





So You Wanna Be A Rock 'N' Roll Star (The Scream Years Of Australian Rock 1964-1966)


So You  Wanna Be A Rock 'N' Roll Star (The Scream Years Of Australian Rock 1964-1966)



So You  Wanna Be A Rock 'N' Roll Star (The Scream Years Of Australian Rock 1964-1966)


So You  Wanna Be A Rock 'N' Roll Star (The Scream Years Of Australian Rock 1964-1966)

So You  Wanna Be A Rock 'N' Roll Star (The Scream Years Of Australian Rock 1964-1966)

So You  Wanna Be A Rock 'N' Roll Star (The Scream Years Of Australian Rock 1964-1966)

So You  Wanna Be A Rock 'N' Roll Star (The Scream Years Of Australian Rock 1964-1966)

So You  Wanna Be A Rock 'N' Roll Star (The Scream Years Of Australian Rock 1964-1966)

So You  Wanna Be A Rock 'N' Roll Star (The Scream Years Of Australian Rock 1964-1966)

So You  Wanna Be A Rock 'N' Roll Star (The Scream Years Of Australian Rock 1964-1966)

So You  Wanna Be A Rock 'N' Roll Star (The Scream Years Of Australian Rock 1964-1966)

And More

Tracks:

The Stars

01. Billy Thorpe & The Aztecs - Poison Ivy (1964) (Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller) - 3:04
02. Ray Brown & The Whispers - Pride (1965) (John Madara, David White) - 2:12
03. Normie Rowe & The Playboys - Tell Him I'm Not Home (1965) (Tony Bruno, Brenda Bruno, Sanford Bellini) - 2:13
04. Tony Worsley & The Blue Jays - A Little Bit (1965) (Del Gordon) - 2:44
05. Mike Furber & The Bowery Boys - You Stole My Love (1964) (Graham Gouldman) - 2:41
06. Johnny Young & Kompany - Step Back (1966) (Stevie Wright, George Young) - 1:51
07. Jeff St. John & The Id - Lindy Lou (1966) (Ray Sharpe) - 2:56
08. Ray Hoff & The Off Beats - Let's Go, Let's Go, Let's Go (1966) (Hank Ballard) - 2:40
09. Chris Hall & The Torquays - Don't Ask Me Why (1966) (Chris Hall) - 2:03
10. Marty Rhone & The Soul Agents - Thirteen Woman (1966) (Dickie Thompson) - 2:54
11. Glen Ingram & The Hi Five - Skye Boat Song (1966) (trad., arr.by Harold Boulton, Malcolm Lawson) - 2:43
12. The Vince Maloney Sect - She's A Yum Yum (1966) (Dallas Frazier) - 2:10
13. Steve & The Board - The Giggle-Eyed Goo! (1965) (Nat Kipner) - 2:16
14. The Purple Hearts - Early In The Morning (1966) (trad., arr.by The Purple Hearts) - 2:07
15. The Delltones - Hey Girl, Don't Bother Me (1964) (Ray Whitley) - 2:43
16. The Executives - Wander Boy (1966) (Ron Smith) - 2:07
The Punks
17. The Amazons - Ain't That Lovin' You Baby (1966) (Jimmy Reed) - 2:30
18. The Sunsets - When I Found You (1966) (Lindsay Bjerre) - 2:16
19. The Rajahs - Kiss Me Now (1964) (Bill Martin) - 1:48
20. The Black Diamonds - See The Way (1966) (Alan Oloman) - 2:29
21. The Blue Beats - She's Coming Home (1965) (Wayne Poll) - 2:24
22. The Pogs - The Pogs' Theme (1966) (Peter Best) - 2:25
23. The Morloch - Every Night (1965) (Noel Neates) - 2:22
24. The Mystrys - Witch Girl (1966) (Bob King Crawford) - 2:04
25. The Showmen - Don't Deceive (1965) (Baden Hutchins, Ian Thomas) - 2:39
26. The Librettos - Kicks (1966) (Barry Mann, Cynthia Weil) - 2:25
27. The Lost Souls - This Life Of Mine (1966) (The Lost Souls) - 2:41
28. The Five - Bright Lights, Big City (1966) (Jimmy Reed) - 3:00
29. The "A" Sound - Tomorrow I Meet You (1966) (Sid Barnes, Helen Barnes, David Lee, Doug Parkinson) - 2:07
30. Kevin Bible & The Book - Rockin' Pneumonia & The Boogie Woogie Flu (1966) (Huey Smith, John Vincent) - 2:01
31. Jimmy Crockett & The Shanes - Lovin' Touch (1965) (Nat Kipner) - 2:06
32. Blues Rags 'N' Hollers - Just Want To Make Love To You (1966) (Willie Dixon, Marie Dixon) - 2:14

Enjoy

Ty To Original Sharer

"I hope for nothing, I fear nothing, I am free"

The Birds - Clarion Singles Collection (Australia)

The Birds - Clarion Singles Collection  (Australia)


The story is, two British musicians, guitarist Terry Clarkeand bassist Brian Curtis, emigrated down under in 1969 and laying claim to being members of (Ronnie Wood's) Birds, signed to Clarion Records, they even cut the real Birds' 'No Good Without You' fo  ...


A Perth-based band. They had no link or connection with the U.K. band of the same name other than the selection of No Good Without You, a cover of the U.K. Birds release, as the 'B' side to their first release. The 'A' side was a cover of Honeybus' U.K. hit I Can't Let Maggie Go. It seems the band tried to capitalise on the existence of their U.K. counterparts and a publicity handout even stated that Terry Clarke and Brian Curtis had played all over England and appeared on T.V. as the U.K. Birds.

Their second release was a cover of I See The Rain, a Marmalade single backed by Rene, which had been recorded by The Small Faces in the U.K.. Neither of these efforts was very distinguished.

Their third release was the best known - Dust In My Pants was the flip to another U.K. Birds (or Birds Birds) song (Say Those) Magic Words.

The myth of a U.K. connection continued when The Ugly Things , Vol. 2 compilation once again brought the band to the public's attention by featuring Dust In My Pants. It transpires that Terry Clarke and Brian Curtis were both from Britain and played together in a band called The Clockwork Oranges, who released one 45 on Ember in the U.K.. Clarke was also in The Herd, being replaced by a certain Peter Frampton, but Clarke did not play on the band's Parlophone releases.

Clarion was a local Perth label distributed by Festival.

(Mike Warth/Vernon Joynson)



The Birds - Clarion Singles Collection  (Australia)

Johnny O'Keefe & The Dee Jays ‎– Rockin' With Johnny O'Keefe And The Dee Jays

Johnny O'Keefe & The Dee Jays ‎– Rockin' With Johnny O'Keefe And The Dee Jays


John Michael O'Keefe

Johnny O'Keefe (born January 19 1935, Bondi Junction, New South Wales, Australia - died October 6 1978, Sydney, Australia) was an Australian Rock'n'Roll singer. Began his career in the mid to late 1950's when, together with American born entrepreneur Lee Gordon (2), he pioneered rock'n'roll in Australia. He earned the title of "The Wild One" from his frantic stage antics and his 1959 recording of "Shout" became an Australian rock'n'roll' national anthem.

Johnny O'Keefe almost single handedly established the Australian recording industry. He won over a very cynical recording company, radio stations and the Australian record buying public. During his carrer he scored 29 Top 40 hits. He fought long and hard to promote Australian talent and to ensure that Australian artists were afforded the opportunity to record.

He was the first Australian artist to ever make the Australian Top 40 charts, with "Wild One". He was the first Australian artist to be signed by and record for a major international label - the US Liberty based label. This gave him US sales in excess of 100,000 for "She's My Baby" and two No.1 hits and a No. 2 hit in Australia.

He released over 50 singles, 50 EP's and 100 albums. He wrote and produced hits for other Australian artists; managed the careers of others; compered 4 highly successful tv programs; performed to millions around Australia; toured America, performing in 36 major cities and appeared on "American Bandstand" and "The Ed Sullivan Show" - all firsts for an Australian entertainer; entertained troops in Vietnam; was a major attraction at the 3 day Sunbury Outdoor Music Festival in 1973; and played a key role in the introduction of Australia's "Mo" entertainment awards.

Johnny O'Keefe & The Dee Jays ‎– Rockin' With Johnny O'Keefe And The Dee Jays


Dinah Lee - Dinah Lee - 1964-67

Dinah Lee  - Dinah Lee - 1964-67


In 1962 The Saints split and Phil and Diane put together their own group, The Playboys, bringing in the multi-talented Brian Ringrose, the recently departed lead guitarist from Ray Columbus & The Invaders, plus Graeme Miller, the drummer from local band The Numonics, who had been recommended to them by Pat. Completing the lineup was bassist John O'Neill and rhythm guitarist Mark Graham. Dinah became co-lead singer, alternating sets with Phil Garland. After meeting Jackie Holme, owner of hip boutique in Christchurch, Dinah changed her look. Jackie gave Dinah a page-boy haircut and dressed her in wild op-art designs with white leather boots. She began modelling around this time, and her "mod" wardrobe, makeup and hairstyle soon became her trademark.

Dinah's break as a solo performer came in late 1962, courtesy of Max & The Meteors, who had already left Christchurch for New Zealand's biggest city, Auckland. After an abortive first trip to Sydney in 1963 The Meteors had returned to Auckland, where they were holding down a residency at the popular Top 20 Club. Late in the year the Meteors were offered a national tour, so Max contacted The Playboys and asked them to come up and fill in while the Meteors were away. Apparently, this was a common tactic for resident bands on the cut-throat Auckland scene -- out-of-town groups from places like Christchurch and Wellington were brought in for the duration and then packed off home when the tours finished  more there :

Dinah Lee  - Dinah Lee - 1964-67


Tony Worsley & The Fabulous Blue Jays ‎– Tony Worsley & The Fabulous Blue Jays (1965)

Tony Worsley & The Fabulous Blue Jays ‎– Tony Worsley & The Fabulous Blue Jays (1965)


Tony Worsley & The Fabulous Blue Jays ‎– Tony Worsley & The Fabulous Blue Jays (1965)


Tony Worsley (vocals)
backed by
The Fabulous Blue Jays:

Original lineup (1959):
Frankie Brent (guitar, vocals) 1959-?
Bobby "Spider" Johnson (drums) 1959-60, 1964-66
Chris Lawson (guitar) 1959-?
Doug Stirling (keyboards) 1959-? 

Later members:
Laurie Allen (keyboards, guitar, vocals) 1961-63
Jimmy Cerezo (lead guitar) 1965-66
Mal "Beaky' Clarke (rhythm guitar) 1963-67
Johnny Cosgrove (guitar) 1960
Ray "Screamy" Eames (lead guitar) 1964-65
Alan Easterbrook (sax) 1959-64
Doug Flower (guitar) 1963
Malcolm Hope (bass)
Ray Houston (bass) 1960-62
Royce "Baby" Nicholls (bass) 1964-66
Paul "Bingo" Shannon (sax, keyboards) 1964-66
Graham Trottman (drums)

In the wake of the incredible success enjoyed by pioneering Aussie 'beat' acts Billy Thorpe & the Aztecs and Ray Brown & the Whispers in 1964, just about every local A&R man, artist manager and would-be talent scout in the country was on the lookout for similar acts that could tap into this lucrative market. In quick succession came Normie Rowe & the Playboys, Ronnie Burns & the Flies, Johnny Young & Kompany, Mike Furber & the Bowery Boys and many other similar outfits. The core players of these groups typically came up through the late '50s / early '60s instrumental surf-beat boom, or sometimes from a jazz background. Loathe to mess with a successful formula, impresarios with dollar signs in their eyes (or pounds, as it was then) would take such seasoned groups and team them with a fresh-faced front man with the requisite pin-up appeal for the young ladies (remember — these were the "scream years" of Aussie pop, as rock historian Glenn A Baker described the era). And so it was that Tony Worsley & The Fabulous Blue Jays, one of the most accomplished and exciting of these groups, came to be.  more :

Tony Worsley & The Fabulous Blue Jays ‎– Tony Worsley & The Fabulous Blue Jays (1965)


Thanks original uploader (RH)

***


Purple Heart - Benzedrine Beat! (1964-1970)

Purple Heart - Benzedrine Beat! (1964-1970)


From the producers of the awesome Missing Links CD reissue comes... The complete Purple Hearts on CD. Including all Sunshine label tracks from master tape and 4 early recordings reissued for the first time. As a bonus the CD also contains 7 unreleased tracks from 1964-70 by the original Colored Balls, featuring Mick Hadley and Bob Dames from the Hearts. High energy R&B all the way!


Purple Heart - Benzedrine Beat! (1964-1970)



Review by Richie Unterberger
All ten songs the Purple Hearts released during their brief lifetime (on 1965-1967 singles) are on this meticulously thorough reissue. It also adds four songs they recorded on acetates in early 1965 prior to their recording deal, as well as seven tracks by the Coloured Balls, the band in which singer/harmonica player Mick Hadley and bassist Bob Dames played in the late '60s and early '70s. The Purple Hearts tracks are the ones the collectors who seek this CD out will be most interested in, as they're solid, punky R&B, very much in the mold of the British bands springing up in the wake of the Rolling Stones circa 1964-1965. The cuts are tough and hard-boiled, and will no doubt recall similar, though superior, British acts such as the Pretty Things and the Graham Bond Organisation. What makes the Purple Hearts inferior to such acts is that they recorded absolutely no original material, devoting most of their studio performances to covers of songs by the likes of Bond, Paul Butterfield, Bo Diddley, and Muddy Waters. They do, however, pull off a superbly menacing R&B/punk makeover of the spiritual "Early in the Morning," with searing fuzz guitar and voodoo-ish ensemble chanting. Too, their sole 45 to feature cover tunes that weren't well known ("Of Hopes and Dreams and Tombstones"/"I'm Gonna Try") is pretty respectable, though Mick Hadley's vocals aren't quite up to the level of belters like the Pretty Things' Phil May. The Coloured Balls tracks (in quite variable sound quality), which are much more in a hard rock/blues-rock/psychedelic/progressive rock vein, are apparently taken from "rehearsals, gigs and local TV appearances" -- the liner notes aren't wholly clear on this point. These songs aren't nearly as interesting as the Purple Hearts' material, and are likewise all covers, this time around of songs by Jethro Tull, Steve Miller, and Fleetwood Mac, as well as blues tunes by Howlin' Wolf and Willie Dixon. The 36-page booklet is exemplary, with liner notes featuring vintage photos and first-hand quotes from original bandmembers, properly honoring the Purple Hearts' status as one of the more notable Australian rock acts of the '60s.

Masters Apprentices - From Mustangs To Masters First Year Apprentices (1966)

Masters Apprentices - From Mustangs To Masters First Year Apprentices (1966)

One could easily make the case for designating the Masters Apprentices as the best Australian rock band of the '60s. Featuring singer Jim Keays and songwriter/rhythm guitarist Mick Bower, the band's earliest recordings combined the gritty R&B/rock of Brits like the Pretty Things with the minor-key melodies of the Yardbirds. The compelling "Wars or Hands of Time" and the dreamy psychedelia of "Living in a Child's Dream" were undiscovered classics, although the latter was a Top Ten hit in Australia. Bower left the group after suffering a nervous breakdown in late 1967, and the Masters grew steadily less interesting, moving from flower pop and hard rock to progressive and acoustic sounds. Plagued by instability (undergoing eight personnel changes between 1966 and 1968), the group moved to England in the early '70s, achieving some cult success with progressive rock albums before breaking up in 1972.

Masters Apprentices - From Mustangs To Masters First Year Apprentices (1966)


The Pleazers -Definitely Definitive (1965-1966)Australian pop of the 60's Patsy Ann Noble - Hits & RaritiesSo You  Wanna Be A Rock 'N' Roll Star (The Scream Years Of Australian Rock 1964-1966)The Birds - Clarion Singles Collection  (Australia)Johnny O'Keefe & The Dee Jays ‎– Rockin' With Johnny O'Keefe And The Dee JaysDinah Lee  - Dinah Lee - 1964-67Tony Worsley & The Fabulous Blue Jays ‎– Tony Worsley & The Fabulous Blue Jays (1965)Purple Heart - Benzedrine Beat! (1964-1970)Masters Apprentices - From Mustangs To Masters First Year Apprentices (1966)

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