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Old Melodies ... | category: Baroque

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Old Melodies ...

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The Beethoven Soul - The Beethoven Soul (1967)

The Beethoven Soul -  The Beethoven Soul (1967)


" Six piece brass band, who came from L.A. (according to Fuzz Acid and Flower), despite the Al Kooper’s   composition “New York's My Home”. 
The band formed round 1966 and release their sole –self titled- album in 1967, sounding close to psychedelic sunshine, baroque pop, sometimes flirting with more garage beats.
After their disbanded in 1970, Lambert, Lewis and Hale all went on to play together in Pollution, a late '60s L.A.-based rock band with jazz undertones. "

Andrea Kouratou – strings
Bill Powell — guitar
John Lambert – bass
Dick Lewis – brass, keyboards
Otis Hale — woodwind instruments
Terry Nu – drums, percussion

"Kind of garage-ish stuff mixed with classical elements like flute, violin and lots of harpsichord. At times the singer has a little Roger Daltry in his voice, raspy and cool."

The Beethoven Soul -  The Beethoven Soul (1967)

If you have more info on this group let know,please ...

The Association - Birthday (1968)

The Association - Birthday (1968)


The Association - Birthday (1968)

Birthday is a strong record. Vocally, the intricate harmonies shine, and there is a lyrical depth on some songs that challenge the Association's reputation as a mere pop group. Granted, there are some light moments, such as the opening cut, "Come On In" (though the vocals do stand out on this cut). And "Toymaker" and "Hear in Here" show the vocal limitations of the lead singers. But "Like Always" does an excellent job of wryly commenting on the loss of a relationship, with the usual fine vocal interplay. "The Time It Is Today" mixes the political and personal in an effective way. And "Everything That Touches You" (their final Top Ten ) is one of their finest love songs, if not one of their best songs, period. The vocals are as intricate as the arrangement, and the sincerity of the lyrics is very apparent. 

The Association - Birthday (1968)

Chad & Jeremy - Distant Shores (1966)

Chad & Jeremy - Distant Shores (1966)

Musical styles were changing and threatening to leave Chad & Jeremy's light, pleasant folk-rock-cum-British beat pop style behind. Amazingly, in the midst of this tectonic shift in the musical landscape, they managed to put together the strongest of their Columbia albums, which isn't saying too much, but for those who care to start with their best effort, this is it. Distant Shores catches the duo belatedly evolving out of their old folk-style and light pop sound, with denser production and some better songs to work with. It wasn't an abrupt break from their past, however, as evidenced by the title track, a beautiful and more complex sequel to "A Summer Song," authored by producer James William Guercio (and sporting a string, horn, and reed accompaniment that sounds like it was lifted straight from the embellishment to Gerry & the Pacemakers' "Don't Let the Sun Catch You Crying"); it might not have stood out on a Beatles album of the era, but for these two, the overall sound was a step forward, at least in ambition (and it was their final Top 40 hit). And with Guercio calling the production shots, they manage to turn Bobby Goldsboro's "When Your Love Has Gone" into a faux Burt Bacharach number that adds up to slightly more than the sum of its parts, as does the album closer, "Don't Make Me Do It," the latter one of three originals by the duo on this record. Their version of Jonathan King's "Everyone's Gone to the Moon" benefits from the pair's harmonies, but otherwise adds little significant beyond a very busy percussion part behind them. Of the other two originals, "You Are She" stands out as a glittering piece of Baroque pop, with enough use of the harpsichord to rival the Left Banke. On the other hand, "The Way You Look Tonight," "Early Mornin' Rain," and "Homeward Bound" (done in an arrangement identical to Simon & Garfunkel's) didn't depart at all from the duo's prior sound, suggesting that even Guercio found his limits in extending their range. Despite these caveats, and the fact that they still had their feet in several different musical camps, there are more high points to this record than anything else that Chad & Jeremy issued in their waning two years. Distant Shores had "transitional" written all over it, although it wasn't clear what Chad & Jeremy were making a transition to.

Chad & Jeremy - Distant Shores (1966)

Chad & Jeremy - Distant Shores (1966)

The Beethoven Soul -  The Beethoven Soul (1967)The Association - Birthday (1968)Chad & Jeremy - Distant Shores (1966)

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