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Keith Powell ‎– The Keith Powell Story

Keith Powell  ‎– The Keith Powell Story


A blue-eyed soul singer from Birmingham, Keith Powell released almost a dozen British singles in the mid-'60s without making the charts. Judged against other British soul (as opposed to rock) vocalists of the time, he wasn't bad, with a deep voice and expressive delivery, but unlike Chris Farlowe and John Baldry -- two peers who, at least from the recorded evidence, were not as talented -- he couldn't find hit material. His first three singles (in 1963 and 1964) were recorded for Columbia with his backing group, the Valets, a combo featuring brass and organ, somewhat in the style of a muted Georgie Fame. After moving to Pye in late 1964, the Valets would no longer play on his records; producer John Schroeder steered him toward melodramatic soul ballads with strings, produced in a fashion that recalled Jerry Butler's mid-'60s material. With Pye, Powell released eight singles in 1965-1966, three of which were male-female duets with Billie Davis (who had made the British Top Ten with a cover of the Exciters' "Tell Him"). The results weren't bad, if a bit lugubrious, but were not rewarded by commercial success.

Keith Powell  ‎– The Keith Powell Story
 

Both sides of his eleven 1963-66 singles (including his duets with Billie Davis), as well as a couple of unreleased tracks. There isn't much similarity between this stuff and the classic British Invasion sound; it has much more of a horn-organ-string feel, with production that is trying to emulate (with pale results) early-'60s American soul and R&B records. Powell was an okay singer, and his records weren't bad, but he wasn't exceptional, and there's little that makes you wonder why he didn't get a hit. "I Should Know Better," athough, is a lost gem of sorts with its swirling organ, pleading vocal, and memorable tune; "Beyond the Hill," a haunting number with a Latin-Euro feel (co-written by Powell), is pretty good too.

THANKS El mas frio for..

Keith Powell & The Valets - Singles

Keith Powell & The Valets - Singles


Keith Powell lead singer (left 1965)
John Allsebrook bass guitar (left in 1965)
Mal Ford organ, piano
Phil Gaynor saxophone
Mal Ritter drums
Colin Wood guitar (left in 1966)
Steve Horton bass guitar (joined in 1965)
Dave Spencer guitar (joined in 1966)
Keith Powell came from Bordesley Green and being brought up in a showbusiness family, was performing regularly as a singer by the age of 14. His first real group was called "The Ramrods" who started making appearances around Birmingham by about 1960. Keith Powell was a talented singer and performer while also having the good looks to attract a large female following.


With his father Jim as manager, Keith Powell was soon fronting his own group called 'The Jaymen'. Jim Powell was also a well known promoter and head of JCS Productions which brought well known acts from all over the country to play in Birmingham.


Keith Powell saw musical limitations within The Jaymen and left to join another Birmingham group called "The Vikings" to become their lead singer (see Carl Wayne and The Vikings). By 1961, Keith Powell and The Vikings were getting bookings all across the country and the pace was such that Keith Powell, feeling exhaustion, decided to take a few weeks off to rest.

It was during this time that local singer Carl Wayne was brought in as a temporary replacement but ended up staying permanently and with manager Jim's approval the group became known as "Keith Powell, Carl Wayne and The Vikings". Inevitably this arrangement didn't last and because of rivalry, Keith Powell left The Vikings who continued without him.

During the interlude, Keith Powell experimented with songwriting but before long he was fronting a new group named "The Valets" - so called because they had originally assembled to back local singer Bobby Valentine as "Bobby Valentine and The Valettes". Promoters usually ended up misspelling the name to "Valets" so to avoid confusion, the name was abbreviated to "Keith Powell and The Valets".

Keith Powell & The Valets - Singles

Keith Powell & The Valets - Singles


Keith Powell & The Valets - Singles

 1. Keith Powell & The Valets - Come And Join The Party
 2. Keith Powell & The Valets - The Answer Is No!
 3. Keith Powell & The Valets - Tore Up
 4. Keith Powell & The Valets - You Better Let Him Go
 5. Keith Powell & The Valets - I Should Know Better
 6. Keith Powell & The Valets - Too Much Monkey Business
 7. Keith Powell & The Valets - Walking And Crying
 8. Keith Powell & The Valets - New Orleans





The Talismens - The Talismen's style

The Talismens - The Talismen's style

The Talismens - The Talismen's style


Trevor Cook drums
Clive Devine bass guitar, vocals
Steve Outhwaite guitar, vocals
George Rainsford guitar, vocals
Alan "Digger" Dike guitar, vocals (joined in 1965)
Laurie Jeffs guitar, vocals (joined in 1966)


The Talismen won top spot in the first Midland Beat magazine popularity poll that was held in 1964. The poll was meant to highlight the most popular performing groups in the West Midlands so a high placing would benefit a band considerably in terms of publicity and the extra bookings that would result from it. Funnily enough though, The Talismen were not from Birmingham but were based in Cheltenham - quite some distance south of the Midlands area!


The Talismens - The Talismen's style


The Renegades - Complete

The Renegades - Complete


The Renegades was formed in Birmingham, England in the early 1960s. In the beginning the group's primary influence was The Shadows, but they were soon to change their style into straightforward rock & roll and rhythm & blues. Around 1963, besides hardening their music, they also embraced themselves a harder look, when they started wearing cavalry uniforms of the time of American civil war as their stage outfit.

In February 1964, The Renegades' version of Liszt's 'Hungarian Rhapsody' appeared on a compilation titled 'Brum Beat', which introduced Birmingham's rock groups. Excepting that and an acetate single for Morden-based Oak Records and a budget priced album for Fidelio/Summit Records (produced by Delta Record Company of London), The Renegades did most of their 1964-66 recordings for the Finnish Scandia Records and after that for the Italian Ariston and Columbia Records (which leased the material forward to English, American and Middle-European labels). In Holland it was Artone records that released the records. They changed the track listing of 'Cadillac' a little to make it more attractive for the Dutch market.

Kim Brown, Denys Gibson, Ian Mallet and Graham Johnson conquered Finland in October 1964, when they did a one-off gig at a model show in Helsinki, and then started a constant seven weeks' tour, playing at multifarious dance floors around the Finnish country side (the originally planned three-week stint was extended because of a massive success and demand). The first visit also included two tv-appearances ('Nuorten Tanssihetki' & 'Uudet Tuulet' shows), and signing the record deal with Scandia Records. Since 1967, The Renegades had visited in Finland altogether seven times. Besides them, they also appeared in late 1965 in Germany, Holland, Switzerland and Italy, where they returned in 1966 to took part in song contest with 'Un Giorno Tu Mi Cercherai' at the San Remo music festival.

Although they were treated here as the '2nd Beatles', The Renegades wasn't actually a beat group in the literal sense of the word. Of course they sounded rougher than fifties or early sixties groups, but a notable part of their repertoire was still straight rock & roll, and they were obviously affected by black blues music as well. These influences were heard also in their own compositions, but ironically, their biggest Scandinavian hit 'Cadillac', which was credited to be written by themselves, was actually a simplified remake of rock & roll classic 'Brand New Cadillac', penned and recorded by Vince Taylor. In Sweden, The Renegades version was covered by The Hep Stars, while in Finland, Eero ja Jussi & The Boys remade it as a humorous Finnish translation 'Mosse' (which is a synonym for the popular Russian automobile brand, although the lyrics are talking about a horse of the same name).

This collektion from Jancy

***********

Renegades part 1

The Renegades - Complete

1 - Cadillac
2 - Do The Shake
3 - Seven Daffodils
4 - Hold Me Close
5 - What'd I Say
6 - I'm A Hog For You
7 - Lucille
8 - Bad Bad Baby
9 - If I Had Someone To Dream Of
10 - Talahassie Lassie
11 - More Than Peggy Sue
12 - Don't Make A Fool Out Of Me
13 - Look At Me
14 - Iv'e Been Unkind
15 - Everybody
16 - One Day
17 - Casting My Spell
18 - My Heart Must Do The Crying
19 - Walk Out On You
20 - Unchain My Heart
21 - You Love Me Too
22 - Will You Love Me Tomorrow
23 - White, Brown And Black
24 - Matelot
25 - Comin' Home Baby
26 - The World Is My Home



Renegades part 2

The Renegades - Complete

The Renegades - Complete

1 - Thirteen Woman
2 - Hey Look Over Here
3 - That Kind Of Girl
4 - Blue Eyes
5 - Take A Heart
6 - Rockin Pneumonia & Boogie Woogie Flu
7 - Love Love Love
8 - Nobody's Child
9 - Every Minute Of The Day
10 - The Girl Can't Help It
11 - I Was There
12 - Far From It
13 - Don't Run To Me
14 - The Alamo
15 - Un Giorno Tu Mi Cercherai
16 - Stai Con Noi
17 - I Discorsi Che Mi Fai
18 - You're Gonna Lose Her Loving
19 - This Little Girl
20 - Big Star
21 - That Song Really Knocks Me
22 - Toys
23 - John Fitzgerald Kennedy
24 - Il Piu' Grande Amico
25 - Se Sarai La Ragazza Del Cuore
26 - Il Momento Giusto

Renegades part 3

The Renegades - Complete

The Renegades - Complete



1 - And I Need You
2 - Things Will Turn Out Right
3 - Brocken Heart Collector
4 - If It Get's Lonesome
5 - Walking Down The Street
6 - When I Dream
7 - Right Now
8 - Take A Message
9 - Can't You See
10 - Sun Arise
11 - Cadillac (ital)
12 - Lola (ital)
13 - Se Morisse Il Sole
14 - Uomo Solo
15 - Era Settembre
16 - Hungarian Mod


The Exception ‎– The Exceptional Exception (1969)

The Exception ‎– The Exceptional Exception (1969)

The Exception ‎– The Exceptional Exception (1969)


Alan "Bugsy" Eastwood lead vocal, drums, vibes, harmonica, guitar
Roger Hill lead guitar, drums, vocal
Dave Pegg bass guitar, vocal (left in 1967)
John Rowlands bass guitar, vocal (joined 1967, left 1968)
Malcolm Garner bass guitar, vocal (joined in 1968)
Steve Yetson saxophone, piano (joined in 1968)

While The Exception were well-known locally, toured Europe, and recorded an album along with several innovative singles, they were unable to attain the level of success worthy of the collective talents within the band. The core of the group consisted of drummer Alan "Bugsy" Eastwood and guitarist Roger Hill who were both former members of The Brumbeats.
A blues-based line-up known as 'The Hooties' were formed in Birmingham during the summer of 1966 with guitarist Roger Hill, Alan "Bugsy" Eastwood on drums, and Tony Clarkson on bass guitar. Alan and Roger had previously played together in The Brumbeats with Roger later joining Steve Gibbons in The Uglys. Dave Pegg (also from The Uglys) was recruited to replace Tony Clarkson who left later that year and went on to join World Of Oz. The idea at the time was to create a trio along the same lines as Eric Clapton's 'Cream'. Rehearsals at Bugsy's house near Spaghetti Junction soon resulted in a very tight-sounding line-up.
The Hooties played many of the well-known local venues including Old Hill Plaza, The Ritz (King's Heath), and The Belfry (Sutton Coldfield). They exploited their instrumental skills on-stage by sometimes swapping instruments in addition to Alan also playing harmonica or vibes as well as playing drums and singing lead vocals at the same time!
In addition to performing blues standards and radio hits, Alan Eastwood began composing original material for the band. One of Dave Pegg's friends was future Led Zeppelin star Robert Plant who at the time was contracted to CBS Records. Robert recommended The Hooties to well-known music publisher Eddie Kassner which gained the band a recording contract with CBS.
Re-naming themselves 'The Exceptions' their first single release was recorded at Regent Sound studios in London. Robert Plant actually played tambourine on the A-side titled 'The Eagle Flies On Friday' which was a powerful drums and vibes driven track. This, along with the B-side 'Girl Trouble' were both original compositions by Alan Eastwood.
Dave Pegg recalled when interviewed by Laurie Hornsby for his excellent book 'Brum Rocked On!' that; "Bobby Hill (Roger's brother) had a brainwave to 'buy' the record into the charts so he toured the shops buying our record by the box full." Unfortunately, the New Music Express and Melody Maker had just been alerted about this type of activity so the retail figures for that week were ignored! The record did however attract interest in Germany where the band performed it live on the popular TV show 'Beat Club'. For whatever reason, The Exceptions' popularity in that country seemed to always exceed the support they had in the U.K.

The Exception 1960s Record Releases
Singles:

The Eagle Flies On Friday/Girl Trouble (CBS 202632) 1967 issued as 'The Exceptions'
Garberdine Saturday Night Street Walker/Sunday Night At The Prince Rupert (CBS 2830) 1967
Rub It Down/It's Snowing In The Desert (President PT 181) 1968
Helicopter/Back Room (President PT 205) 1968
Tailor Made Babe/Turn Over The Soil (President PT 218) 1968
Jack Rabbit/Keep The Motor Running (President PT 236) 1969
Pendulum/Don't Torture Your Mind (President PT 271) 1969

Album:

The Exceptional Exception (President PTLS 1026) 1969

The Exception ‎– The Exceptional Exception (1969)

The Rockin' Berries - They're in Town: The Pye Anthology

The Rockin' Berries - They're in Town: The Pye Anthology



BIRMINGHAM

Chuck Botfield lead guitar
Terry Bond drums
Clive Lea lead vocal (left 1967)
Geoff Turton lead vocal, guitar
Roy Austin bass guitar (left 1965)
Bobby Thompson bass guitar (joined 1965)
Rod Clarke bass guitar (joined 1967)
***
Despite a couple of British Top Ten hits in 1964-65, the Rockin' Berries made no dent in the U.S. market at the height of the British Invasion. Much of the Berries' output reflected the lighter pop-rock face of the British beat boom, emphasizing catchy, carefully constructed tunes supplied by British and American songwriters, with high harmonies indebted to the Four Seasons and the Beach Boys. The Berries wrote little of their own material, and this, combined with the wimpiness of some of their recordings, doomed them to little recognition, and little critical respect, even among British Invasion aficionados. For what they were, however, their best pop-rock outings were pretty respectable. A career strategy that put an eye on the "all-around entertainer" niche, ... Read More...
and

The Rockin' Berries - They're in Town: The Pye Anthology (2006)

The Rockin' Berries - They're in Town: The Pye Anthology


The Rockin' Berries - They're in Town: The Pye Anthology

Disc: 1 1. I Didn't Mean to Hurt You
2. You'd Better Come Home
3. He's in Town
4. Flashback
5. What in the World's Come Over You
6. You Don't Know What You Do
7. Let's Try Again
8. Ich Liebe Dich [Ecstasy]
9. Brother Bill (The Last Clean Shirt)
10. Without Your Love
11. All of Me
12. Crazy Country Hop
13. All I Want Is My Baby
14. Lonely Avenue
15. Shades of Blue
16. Follow Me
17. Ain't That Lovin' You Baby
18. Funny How Love Can Be
19. Poor Man's Son
20. You're My Girl
21. If You Find Somebody to Love
22. From One Who Knows
23. What Can I Do
24. Across the Street
25. Water Is Over My Head
26. Doesn't Time Fly
27. Take a Giant Step
28. Barterers and Their Wives
29. Without the One [Backing Track]
30. That Lucky Old Sun
Disc: 2 
1. Everything I Do Is for You
2. Harvest of Love
3. Way You Look Tonight
4. I Know an Old Lady
5. Happy to Blue
6. Iko Iko
7. When I'm Cleaning Windows
8. I Need You
9. Laughing Policeman
10. My Little Red Book
11. I Could Make You Fall in Love
12. Land of Love
13. Midnight Mary
14. Money Grows on Trees
15. Sometimes
16. Needs to Be
17. Smile
18. Breakfast at Sam's
19. Dawn (Go Away)
20. She's Not Like Any Girl
21. When I Reach the Top
22. Pain
23. Mr. Blue
24. Yellow Rainbow
25. Miss Fortune [Backing Track]
26. Oh Gosh
27. Joe Barla
28. Goodnight

VA - Brumbeat - The Story of the 60s Midlands Sound

VA - Brumbeat - The Story of the 60s Midlands Sound


Brumbeat, which originated in the British manufacturing capitol of Birmingham, was never remotely as well-known or recognized (at least, outside of Birmngham) as the Liverpool sound called Merseybeat or, for that matter, as familiar as the so-called "Tottenham Sound" embodied by the Dave Clark Five. Brumbeat, such as it was -- the term derived from the local slang term for Birmingham -- was also never as unified a sound as Merseybeat, possibly because it followed in its wake, and also because Birmingham was a bigger city with more hands involved in making music, from more different angles; and there was no one managerial figure, such as Brian Epstein, who dominated the field with his taste and perceptions in quite the same way in the early years; by the time "Brumbeat" was perceived -- though it could be argued that the term was really a creation of the music press looking for a story circa 1964-1965 -- British rock & roll music was already being perceived as a goldmine on an international scale. 

But it did produce more than its share of top acts and stars, as this double-CD set is a reminder. Brum Beat: The Story of the 60s Midlands starts off in very familiar territory with the Spencer Davis Group featuring Steve Winwood -- arguably the Birmingham act that most deserved international stardom -- doing "Dimples," before plunging into the real depth of the history with Nicky James and Jimmy Powell & the Dimensions, both doing very primitive but catchy, frenetic bluesy rock & roll. Along with the better-known Rockin' Berries "You'd Better Come Home," they provide the core of the early, thumping sound that came out of this city, but they were also something of a dead-end. Not so Carl Wayne & the Vikings, whose "Your Loving Ways" and "You Could Be Fun (At the End of the Party)" were fairly sophisticated pieces of beat balladry and showcased the talents not only of Wayne but also drummer Bev Bevan and bassist Ace Kefford; indeed, on listening to this double CD, it occurs that one could easily put together a better-than-decent rock & roll anthology built exclusively around the work of groups whose lineups included future members of the Move (a band also represented here). 

Their legacy is obvious, and theirs is some of the better material here, but it's not the only worthwhile music. "Daydreaming of You" by the Hellions (whose lineup included Dave Mason and Jim Capaldi) should have gotten some national attention. Ironically, the biggest international hit on this collection represents the work of a group that grew out of the sound it represented, and found much greater success -- "Go Now" by the Moody Blues, featuring Denny Laine -- too bad that the album's producer didn't also license their equally superb "From the Bottom of My Heart." Some of what's here was never going to get much beyond the ranks of local listeners; by 1964, the type of blues and R&B-based rock & roll represented by the Brand ("I'm a Lover Not a Fighter") and Jimmy Powell & the Dimensions ("Sugar Babe") was being done in a more sophisticated and challenging (and charismatic) fashion by the Rolling Stones, the Pretty Things, and other London-based outfits, but that doesn't make it irrelevant or unexciting 40 years on. 

There are a few surprises on disc one, including "People Get Ready" in a shockingly good rendition by Keith Powell, the original lead singer for the Vikings who, based on the evidence here, should have had a much bigger career than he did. The collection drifts into what could be considered folk-protest music by way of the Uglys and "Wake Up My Mind," with some further digressions into the folk revival sound to come out of the city, embodied by the Ian Campbell Group (intersecting with Bo Diddley by way of Joni Mitchell's "Doctor Junk"). Of course, long before you get to that point, any unifying sound that you might've perceived is gone, which doesn't mean the material on the second disc isn't worthwhile; it is. Past such familiar fare as "Night of Fear" by the Move, there's a ton of enjoyable material here in folk, folk-rock, folk-pop, pop-psychedelia, and other variations out of the second half of the '60s. Stuck in the middle of it all is "The Eagle Flies on Friday" by the Exceptions, which was the first group of future Fairport Convention bassist Dave Pegg (though whether he's on here is made deliberately vague) -- it's a lost hit on this CD -- but everything is worth hearing, and more than once. The producers have filled out the released material of the period with demos by relevant artists (most notably Ace Kefford) that have only surfaced much more recently, and coupled with the extensive annotation, the set is essential listening for fans of '60s British rock & roll, and will contain at least a modest revelation or two for even the most sophisticated listener, based on its thoroughness and depth.
VA - Brumbeat - The Story of the 60s Midlands Sound


Thanks  Tel for this share :
Keith Powell  ‎– The Keith Powell StoryKeith Powell & The Valets - SinglesThe Talismens - The Talismen's styleThe Renegades-Pop (1967)The Renegades ‎– Cadillac (1964)The Renegades - CompleteThe Exception ‎– The Exceptional Exception (1969)The Exception ‎– The Eagle Flies On Friday: Complete Recordings 1967 - 1969The Rockin' Berries - They're in Town: The Pye AnthologyVA - Brumbeat - The Story of the 60s Midlands Sound

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