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British Invasion (History of British Rock) Vol 1 + Scans

British Invasion  (History of British Rock) Vol 1 + Scans



British Invasion  (History of British Rock) Vol 1 + Scans

Rhino's nine-volume British Invasion: The History of British Rock is the most exhaustive and essential overview of '60s British pop/rock available. Although the collection doesn't include tracks from the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, the Who, Herman's Hermits, the Dave Clark Five, and the early Animals, their absence doesn't hurt the series, since it spotlights several artists who never had more than a handful of hits, plus many forgotten gems. And there are plenty of major acts here, as well: The Kinks, the Small Faces, the Yardbirds, Donovan, the Hollies, the Zombies, the Spencer Davis Group, the Searchers, Manfred Mann, and Them are all represented by their best-known tracks. The collection runs from the beginnings of Merseybeat to the aftermath of psychedelia, meaning that it chronicles the evolution of British pop/rock quite effectively. But The History of British Rock shouldn't be thought of as simply an educational overview of one of the most vital eras of pop; each volume is fun and exciting, and sounds more like a good time than a history lesson. The series is one of the cornerstones of any comprehensive pop/rock collection.

Enjoy.



The 5 Liverpools ‎– Tokio International (1965)

The 5 Liverpools ‎– Tokio International (1965)


The 5 Liverpools ‎– Tokio International (1965)

The Liverpool Five is one 1960s band that is ripe for rediscovery. The fact that they've slipped through a few cracks may have to do with their odd history -- after starting out in England, the quintet spent most of a year in Germany and touring the Far East and effectively became an American group just as their recording history began in a serious way. Formed in Liverpool, England, in 1963, the original Liverpool Five lineup was Steve Laine on vocals, Ken Cox on guitar, Ron Henley on keyboards, Dave Burgess on bass, and Jimmy May on drums and vocals. They cut one single, "Lum D' Lum D' High" b/w "Good Golly Miss Molly," for the Pye Records budget Piccadilly label that was released in England, but their main base of activity in 1964 and 1965 appears to have been Germany and Asia, where their German-based manager kept them touring. They managed to release a single of their own on German CBS in 1964 under the name of the 5 Liverpools, but otherwise were largely invisible as a recording act. After an extended tour of Asia, the group made their way to Los Angeles in 1965 and eventually ended up in Spokane, Washington. Ironically, it was on the far coast of the United States, far from their home, that they were finally signed to a major label in 1965 and got a contract with RCA-Victor Records. The Liverpool Five released a half-a-dozen singles over the next two years and a pair of LPs, all of which displayed an extraordinary degree of musical dexterity -- they could sound as American as the Remains or the Standells in their approach to playing, -- a solid garage punk sound with some unusual melodic touches -- and then turn around and cut cockney novelties like "What a Crazy World (We're Living In)" or romantic rock ballads like their version of Curtis Mayfield's "That's What Love Will Do," where they sound like the Roulettes, and follow that with a shouter like "Just a Little Bit." Dave Burgess exited the group to get married in 1967 and was replaced by future Kingsmen member Freddie Dennis; Ron Henley left and was replaced first by Mark Gage and then by Gary Milkie, but the group soldiered on, scarcely skipping a beat. The band charted nationally only once, with a version of Chip Taylor's "Any Way That You Want Me," and left behind some other superb white soul sides that managed to embrace both American punk and British beat elements, before they finally called it a day in 1970. The Liverpool Five Arrive is one of the best garage punk albums of 1966, with a startlingly honest and vivid, soulful edge (highlighted by a beautiful handful of Curtis Mayfield covers) amid the fuzztone guitars and pounding, roaring rhythm section. Its follow-up, Out of Sight, is even better, with harder playing and better singing, laced with some unexpected lyricism.

 01 - 12  LP Tokio International CBS62460 Germany

01 - Rip It Up
02 - Tokio
03 - Memphis Tennessee
04 - Skinny Minny
05 - Needles And Pins
05 - Good Golly Miss Molly
07 - Boom Boom
08 - Can I Get A Witness
09 - Let The Sunshine In
10 - Mickeys Monkey
11 - Everything's Allright
12 - Poison Ivy

The 5 Liverpools ‎– Tokio International (1965)

 
 13  45' stereo
13 - Tokio

 14 - 18 Bonus Liverpool Five 45' RCA
14 - Everything's Allright
15 - That's What I Want
16 - If You Gotta Go Go Now 
17 - Too Far Out
18 - New Direction

The 5 Liverpools ‎– Tokio International (1965)


Marianne Faithfull ‎– Loveinamist by Marianne Faithfull ‎ (1967)

Marianne Faithfull ‎– Loveinamist by Marianne Faithfull ‎ (1967)

Marianne Faithfull ‎– Love In A Mist

Faithfull's final album of the 1960s (she would do one more single, in 1969) was a confused, patchy effort that seemed indicative of musical directionless. There was overblown, orchestrated straight pop (the cover of the Beatles' "Yesterday"), numbers where she seemed to be attempting to be a British Edith Piaf of sorts, and covers of contemporary folk-rock tunes by Donovan and Tim Hardin. Also, a couple of the better songs ("This Little Bird" and "Counting") had long been available on singles, from 1965 and 1966, respectively. This would have been categorized as "eclectic" rather than "directionless" if the material had been better, the arrangements more inspired, and the singing more commanding, but that wasn't the case on any of those counts. There are still some enjoyable bits, like the cover of "Young Girl Blues," and particularly the version of Jackie DeShannon's moody "With You in Mind." At the time, it was likely seen as something to fill in the gaps in the absence of better material. No one suspected, probably, that Faithfull would be diverted by other professional activities and personal calamities, and really wouldn't return to high visibility as a recording artist for a dozen years. The 1988 CD reissue on London U.K. has a couple of worthwhile bonus tracks in previously unreleased covers of Tim Hardin's "Hang Onto a Dream" and the Kinks' "Rosie, Rosie" (titled "Rosy Won't You Please Come Home" when it appeared on the Kinks' Face to Face album), both of which were recorded in September 1966.

Marianne Faithfull ‎– Loveinamist by Marianne Faithfull ‎ (1967)

Freddie & The Dreamers - You Were Mad For Me (1964)

Freddie & The Dreamers - You Were Mad For Me (1964)


Freddie & the Dreamers' second U.K. LP, in the British Invasion tradition, was not issued as-was in the U.S., its tracks subsequently scattered across numerous American releases. Nor did it feature any hit singles; though at a glance you might think the album's title is "You Were Made for Me," one of their biggest hits on both sides of the Atlantic, it's actually "You Were Mad for Me," and doesn't include the actual track called "You Were Made for Me." Nor does it contain any original material, instead being split between oldies covers and efforts by writers from the British equivalent of Tin Pan Alley and the Brill Building like Peter Stirling, Geoff Stephens, John Carter, and Ken Lewis. Now, while no one would make great claims for Freddie & the Dreamers as top talents of the British Invasion, they did make some fun tracks, especially on their singles. But even in the context of their modest achievements, this disc amounts to something like an entire LP of filler, none of the songs measuring up to their best. The oldies covers are uniformly mediocre, and though the recently penned compositions by other British songwriters included a couple that other U.K. groups had made into hits into early 1964 ("I Think of You" and "Tell Me When," popularized by the Merseybeats and the Applejacks respectively), they're emblematic of the British Invasion at its most lightweight and sappy. You do have the novelty of a lead vocal by someone other than Freddie Garrity when bassist Pete Birrell takes over for "Cut Across Shorty." But really, this LP isn't worth trifling with by any but the most completist of British Invasion collectors.

Freddie & The Dreamers - You Were Mad For Me (1964)


DAVE SHARRATT looking for  
R&B - Freddie & The Dreamers ‎– 
You Were Mad For Me  King Freddie & His Dreaming Knights

Freddie & The Dreamers - You Were Mad For Me (1964)


Can someone help? We say - thanks ...

The Cops 'n Robbers - The Cops 'n Robbers (1964-65)

The Cops 'n Robbers -  The Cops 'n Robbers (1964-65)

A little-known but quality group from the R&B wing of the British Invasion, the Cops 'n Robbers (named after a Bo Diddley song) issued just three singles in the mid-'60s, as well as a French-only EP. Their chief claim to fame is recording (and writing) the original version of "You'll Never Do It Baby," a cool, nasty R&B-rock raver that was covered by the Pretty Things on their second album. Cops 'n Robbers were indeed rather similar to the Pretty Things in their punky R&B-rock approach, yet even punkier than the Pretty Things (but not as sloppy as another sub-Pretties act, the Downliners Sect). Singer Brian "Smudger" Smith had an unrefined, sullen leer in his delivery, and the band was picked up by the same management team that signed Donovan (a friend of Cops 'n Robbers). They issued a good version of "St. James Infirmary" on Decca in late 1964, but after its failure moved to Pye for the rest of their meager recorded output, which included a bizarre, ill-chosen cover of the My Fair Lady standard "I Could Have Danced All Night." Drummer Henry Harrison joined the New Vaudeville Band ("Winchester Cathedral"), an act which could have been hardly any more of a polar opposite from his previous group.

The Cops 'n Robbers -  The Cops 'n Robbers (1964-65)

All 14 songs known to exist by the band -- both sides of their three singles, two tracks that only appeared on their French-only EP, and six blues-rock covers rescued from a 1964 acetate. "You'll Never Do It Baby," and with its compelling, jerky riff, is the clear highlight (although the Pretty Things cover is better); "There's Gotta Be a Reason" is also good moody early British R&B, while "St. James Infirmary," with its gloomy deep organ sound, is a worthy treatment of that covered-to-death standard. Otherwise, it's uneven sailing: an original ("Just Keep Right On") that sounds like Gerry & the Pacemakers trying to be an R&B band, the strange R&B version of "I Could Have Danced All Night," and six pretty routine covers of classics by Chuck Berry, Bo Diddley, and the like from a 1964 acetate. The album was remastered from singles and acetates, and the fidelity is often dull (though obviously there were limitations on what could be done with the acetates), yet this is still recommended to fans of bands like the Pretty Things for its appealingly grimy British R&B stance.

LP vinil. Low quality

Chad & Jeremy - Distant Shores (1966)

Chad & Jeremy - Distant Shores (1966)

Musical styles were changing and threatening to leave Chad & Jeremy's light, pleasant folk-rock-cum-British beat pop style behind. Amazingly, in the midst of this tectonic shift in the musical landscape, they managed to put together the strongest of their Columbia albums, which isn't saying too much, but for those who care to start with their best effort, this is it. Distant Shores catches the duo belatedly evolving out of their old folk-style and light pop sound, with denser production and some better songs to work with. It wasn't an abrupt break from their past, however, as evidenced by the title track, a beautiful and more complex sequel to "A Summer Song," authored by producer James William Guercio (and sporting a string, horn, and reed accompaniment that sounds like it was lifted straight from the embellishment to Gerry & the Pacemakers' "Don't Let the Sun Catch You Crying"); it might not have stood out on a Beatles album of the era, but for these two, the overall sound was a step forward, at least in ambition (and it was their final Top 40 hit). And with Guercio calling the production shots, they manage to turn Bobby Goldsboro's "When Your Love Has Gone" into a faux Burt Bacharach number that adds up to slightly more than the sum of its parts, as does the album closer, "Don't Make Me Do It," the latter one of three originals by the duo on this record. Their version of Jonathan King's "Everyone's Gone to the Moon" benefits from the pair's harmonies, but otherwise adds little significant beyond a very busy percussion part behind them. Of the other two originals, "You Are She" stands out as a glittering piece of Baroque pop, with enough use of the harpsichord to rival the Left Banke. On the other hand, "The Way You Look Tonight," "Early Mornin' Rain," and "Homeward Bound" (done in an arrangement identical to Simon & Garfunkel's) didn't depart at all from the duo's prior sound, suggesting that even Guercio found his limits in extending their range. Despite these caveats, and the fact that they still had their feet in several different musical camps, there are more high points to this record than anything else that Chad & Jeremy issued in their waning two years. Distant Shores had "transitional" written all over it, although it wasn't clear what Chad & Jeremy were making a transition to.

Chad & Jeremy - Distant Shores (1966)

Chad & Jeremy - Distant Shores (1966)

British Invasion (History of British Rock) Vol 3British Invasion (History of British Rock) Vol 2British Invasion  (History of British Rock) Vol 1 + ScansThe 5 Liverpools ‎– Tokio International (1965)Marianne Faithfull ‎– Loveinamist by Marianne Faithfull ‎ (1967)Freddie & the Dreamers - Do the Freddie (1965) +  Little Red Donkey...Freddie & The Dreamers - You Were Mad For Me (1964)Freddie & The Dreamers - King Freddie And His Dreaming Knights (1967)The Cops 'n Robbers -  The Cops 'n Robbers (1964-65) Chad & Jeremy - Distant Shores (1966)

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