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Witness Inc-The Singles





Members:Allen Ayers,Bob Ego, Craig Kaleal, Dave Tupper, Dennis Tremeer, Ed Clynton,Kenny Shields, Les Bateman

The Witness Inc. came out of Saskatoon in the central Canadian province of Saskatchewan and immediately became a touring sensation in the western provinces. They released a series of 45s which became increasingly pop after the second. The band finally caught on in Ontario after several years and many personnel changes.The original band consisted of Kenny Shields vocals, Ed Clynton guitar, Dennis Tremeer bass, Les Bateman organ and piano, and Craig Kaleal on drums. I was surprised to learn that the band traveled to New Mexico to record their first 45, probably at Norman Petty’s studio in Clovis.
“I’ll Forget Her Tomorrow”, is a fine pop song, backed with “Girl Before You Go”, an original by Dennis Tremeer (listed as Doug Tremeer in the BMI database). The picture sleeve features a different band lineup than the group on the recording, with new members Dave Tupper on drums and Allen Ayers on bass.The Witness Inc. (Witnesses) and the Guess Who at the ManhattanThe A-side of their second record, “Jezebel”, is a cover of the old Frankie Laine standard. As good as the Teddy Boys version, it was probably their biggest hit, reaching #1 on CKXL in Calgary in February, 1968.Younger fans like myself generally prefer the flip side, “Not You Girl”, an original by Ed Clynton and Les Bateman, which speeds by in a hasty 1:46 with a great scream from Shields and an nifty organ solo by Bateman.The January 13, 1969 issue of RPM Weekly announces that the band had dropped the ‘Inc.’ from their name for their fifth single, “So Come With Me”, recorded at Sound Canada studios in Toronto. Surprisingly the article says this was their first Canadian session!
                   (https://www.garagehangover.com/witnessinc/)

 






 


The Du-Cats ‎– The Du-Cats (1965)

The Du-Cats ‎– The Du-Cats (1965)




Members:
Bob Battiste, Claude Caines, Cyril Brown, Eddie Eastman, Edward Rowsell, Jim Crewe, Joe Boulos, Lewis Skinner, Roger Skinner , Winston Blackmore

The Du-Cats ‎– The Du-Cats (1965)




The Du-Cats (aka "The Orange Marmalade Referendum" when they played USA gigs) released the first rock and roll 45 by a Newfoundlander. They travelled down to Boston and recorded "Hey Woman b/w Stay Awhile" on Rock It Records. It was recorded in December, 1964. At about the same time, another Newfie rock 'n' roll band, The Ravens, recorded 2 tracks in Montreal on "Frank's Bandstand" "Sincerely b/w Young Blood" in conjunction with Sparkle Records, but the deal fell through and it was instead released on Arc Records A99. Both 45's are extremely rare and, being the first rock recordings of Newfoundlanders (the most musically gifted Canadian province per capita), will cost a pretty penny.

The Ducats formed in 1959 in Port-Aux-Basques, Newfoundland. They first performed together at a benefit concert for victim's families of the Springhill Mining Disaster; they liked what they heard so they played together for many years.

They almost became the first all Canadian band to ever get signed to Motown Records.

In 1965, The Du-Cats recorded the second rock and roll album by a Newfoundlander (first were The Keatniks: http://mocm.ca/Music/Title.aspx?TitleId=285606). Nicknamed "The Tartan Album" (the band members wore the Newfoundland Tartan blazers), the album had two different pressings, with two different covers. The first pressing was a mono pressing on RCA PC-1018. It had ""Hey Woman" and "Stay Awhile", are included in this album" written on the back (although the album did not have these tracks on it). The second pressing was stereo and was released on RCA PCS 1018. Although they both shared the same photo, the second pressing was zoomed in a bit further. It is not known how many of these were pressed, probably 500 of each. A Near Mint copy sells for $300-400.

The Du-Cats consisted of Lewis "Butch" Skinner on lead guitar; Jim Crewe on rhythm guitar; Bob Battiste on bass guitar; and Joe Boulos on drums; and Winston Blackmore as vocalist. This is a different Winston Blackmore than the polygamist Winston Blackmore who fathered over one hundred children with 25 different wives. It is not known how many children the Newfie Winston fathered.

The Du-Cats also released albums under "The Country Ducats": Vocal & Accordion Favorites on Paragon ALS 242; You Can't Take the Country from the Man on Paragon MS 2116; and a self-titled album under the pseudonym "The Ducat Showband" on Paragon ALS 242.

The Du-Cats were Canadian and Newfoundland rock pioneers and received The Stompin' Tom Award (unsung hero) at the East Coast Music Awards in 2008. They appeared at the Codroy Valley Strawberry Festival with Gord Tracey in 1991.

The Du-Cats ‎– The Du-Cats (1965)

David Clayton Thomas&The Shays - A Go-Go&Sings Like It Is (1964-1965)

David Clayton Thomas&The Shays - A Go-Go&Sings Like It Is (1964-1965)


The lead singer for Blood, Sweat & Tears' first four albums was born in Toronto in 1941. David Clayton-Thomas began his musical career at age 23 in the Shays. They became the Bossmen in 1965 and released "Brainwashed" in 1966. While singing in BS&T from 1968 to 1972, he began a solo career, releasing self-titled albums for Decca (1969), Columbia (1972) and RCA (1973). With Clayton-Thomas, a re-formed version of Blood, Sweat & Tears appeared in 1980, signed to MCA and released Nuclear Blues


David Clayton Thomas&The Shays - A Go-Go&Sings Like It Is (1964-1965)


Les Napoleons - A Go Go (1966) & Les Differents - Les Differents (1967)

Les Napoleons - A Go Go (1966) & Les Differents - Les Differents (1967)

"Les Napoleons are certainly a curious experience to be had. A cover group from Montreal, who cut a cover album of Beatles songs completely in French and considerably more garagesque lo-fi. One will undoubtedly recognize the Beatles famous guitar parts, and even be compelled to sing the lyrics in English only to be confused by the French words spouting forth in all the choruses. I shan't be so bold as to claim I uncovered this gem, I downloaded it well of a year back from Lost-in-Tyme before they had all those legal run-in and had to change everything up and I got all frustrated trying to keep up. Nevertheless, I am still entirely enamoured by these covers, and I strongly advise all fans of the Beatles, French rock, garage rock or oddities to grab this." (Spacerockmountain)

Les-Différents band from Quebec, Canada. Active from 1967-1969.

Billed as the "Quebec Rolling Stones".
Signed to Disque Monde by Ken Ayoub (who also discovered Les Sultans)


Les Napoleons - A Go Go (1966) & Les Differents - Les Differents (1967)

Pepper Tree ‎– You're My People (1971)

 Pepper Tree ‎– You're My People (1971)



The Pepper Tree was the culmination of a handful of bar bands in Nova Scotia, formed when drummer Tim Garagan left his band Friends of The Family and got together with guitarist Ritchie Richmond and Lenny Brennan on bass when those two left their previous group Lost Children in '67. They soon augmented their sound with Tony Argent as a second guitarist, ex of The Outcasts. To set themselves apart from the rest they then persuaded friend Bonnie Oulton to take on lead vocal duties.

Beginning with their first show in Hubbards, NS, they honed their chops playing the bars and continued to refine and diversify their sound when Argent was replaced by keyboardist Bob Quinn and Doug Billard, ex of Central Nervous System replaced Oulton on vocals in mid '68. Developing an acid/psychadelic meets Partridge Family sound unique to the area, they were noticed one night by a talent scout who recommended they cut a demo and send it to Capitol Records.

The basement tape impressed Capitol's Wayne Paton enough he signed them to a deal in '69 and took them to Toronto's Nimbus 9 Studios to work with Jack Richardson (Alice Cooper, Bob Seger, Guess Who). Capitol only wanted original material, and they came out with "Everywhere," backed with "Mr Pride," both written by Garagan. Next up was "Shine Light Shine" and its b-side "Hometown Girl." Though neither single was a 'smash hit', both charted and impressed label execs enough they encouraged the band to move to Toronto, closer to the studios and closer to the obviously huger potential market. But some members were unwilling to make the move, and the band was basically reinvented, as Billard, Brennan and Richmond all stayed home. Jim White, ex of Axis, who Billard had played with back home on the coast with both Central Nervous System and Five Sounds was friends with Garagan and Quinn and was now living in Toronto as well. He agreed to be the new guitarist. And after Cornerbrook, NFLD native Chris Brockway answered an ad to fill in the bass position, the next phase of the band was set.

With Capitol confident enough in the band's ability, Garagan took on the lead vocal chores, and they made their mark on the Ontario circuit and moved to Alliston, ON in 1970. Paton convinced them to drop 'The' from their name, and they began writing material for an album and brought back Jack Richardson when they went into RCA's Toronto studios. YOU'RE MY PEOPLE was released the next summer, which ran the gamut of psychadelic and pop sounds. Garagan was the chief songwriter, contributing on or writing himself all but Quinn's "How Many Times." The album featured the nearly six-minute live favourite "Airplane" - complete with an organ solo, and the album's two singles, "Try" and the title track, with its melancholy "From A Candle" as the b-side. The album was released Stateside in the spring of '71, after White left the group. American copies actually mistakenly credited new guitarist Joel Zemel, a Halifax native, as the guitarist.

Not totally satisfied with the band, Capitol urged the band to pick up a new frontman, and Matt Minglewood, formerly of Universal Power and a fellow Maritimer was brought in on guitars and lead vocalist. But his tenure was short, and left to form Cold Duck before year's end. His replacement, Terry Hatty, also had a short stay in the band and was also gone after only a few months, putting Garagan back again as lead vocalist.

They released "Love Is A Railroad," a Quinn composition as a single, which actually featured the already departed Zemel on guitars. The band continued to find east coast'ers, as they picked up Halifax's Rick Edgett as his replacement, though he was replaced before long by Paul Butler. The band continued on the circuit, playing mostly eastern Canada dates but ventured into the US as well. They continued to try experimenting with their sound while maintaining their identity. With Paul White producing, they from left; jim white, tim garagan, joel zemel, chris brockwaycut "Midnight Lady," "Teach Me How To Fly," "Put A Smile On Your Face" and "Funky Music" as singles all by the summer of '72, none of which lived up to label execs expectations. The revolving door continued to spin, and founders Garagan and Quinn were both gone by the spring of '73. Brockway brought in Brian Too Loud Macleod as the new drummer, who'd previously played with Garrison Hill, and Ralph Parker to replace Quinn on keyboards.

Now there were not only no original members left, but the band had lost its Nova Scoitian identity entirely, as Brockway, Parker, Macleod and Butler were all Newfoundlanders. The band toiled away for the remainder of the year after being dropped by Capitol, but packed it in by the spring of '74. The lineup featuring Tim Garagan, Zemel, White and Brockway enjoyed a few shows and a few beers during a brief reunion in '91, two decades after their album's release.

Garagan and Quinn both joined Molly Oliver a couple years after originally leaving Pepper Tree and moved back to Nova Scotia. After that band's demise in the mid 70's, Quinn became a songwriter for the likes of Roger Whittaker before forming Quincepts Productions Ltd, while Garagan became a session musician, as did Richmond before becoming an ordained minister. Brockway went on to play with Rhinegold, which also featured Lawrence Gowan, Brutus for a short time, then an early version of Wrabit, Hanover Fist and Lee Aaron. White and Argent's paths would cross again shortly after the band's demise, forming Snakeye and releasing one lp in '75. Hatty formed Ram, another short-lived east coast band with only one lp under its belt. Billard went on to a moderately successful, albeit short solo career, charting with the single "I've Lost My Place" in '75 with United Artists. Zemel and Edgett still have on again, off again projects, and Macleod went on to tour with Edward Bear before playing with Chilliwack and then forming The Headpins. 

 Pepper Tree ‎– You're My People (1971)




Les Intrigantes - Singles 1965-1968

Les Intrigantes - Singles 1965-1968



Les Intrigantes - Singles 1965-1968

Some time in the happening year of 1964, four girls from Quebec came together (Carole, Claire, Ginette and Diane) with the goal to form a band. Adpoting the moniker of Les Intrigantes they practised hard, eventually gainging a contract in Drummonville and eventually Saint-Hyacinthe under the management of one Roger Beaudet to play at youth venues. Next came a chance to record their first record in 1965, the release "Faut Savoir/Sans Toi on the Jeunesse Franco label. Both sides were written by Beaudet. This release was the first and only time the girls were featured playing their instruments on a recording. Sadly despite the quality of the recording it sank without a trace! However come Autumn they were playing at the Hotel Club YeYe. Their next release came the following year, another Beaudet composition, "Mets Chinois" and cover of Simon and Garfunkel's "Sound of Silence" (La Seul Du Soleil) - again the record failed to garner much attention, allthough the group did get the chance to film a perfomance of the song for a Tv show. 1967 proved a fruitfull year for live perfomance,including a tour with groups and artists such as Les Lutins, Les Merseys, Chantal Pary, Karo and Oliver Despax.
 Come December not one but two singles were released by the group for the masses to enjoy. The first on the A1 label was a cover of Jefferson Airplane's White Rabbit (La Justice), adapted by member Carole, while the flip was a cover of The Mamas and Papa's "Creeque Alley", translated into French as "Nous Voci" by manager, Beaudet. It similarly tells the tale of the groups unique formation! But however for some reasons unbenownest to moi, the group did not like the finished recording and the record was subsequently withdrawn from circulation. Luckily success did emerge with their other single released that month on the Jupiter label, a fantastic rendition of the Beatle's "Hello Goodbye" along with a similarly brill version of Frankie Valli and the 4 Seasons "C'mon Marianne" (Je N'aimais Pas Marianne). The popularity of the record let to more touring and another release on Jupiter, a cover of Boyce and Heart's "Goodbye Baby" with "Les Enfants De La Plage" (a version of Peggy Lee's "Til There Was You"). The reocord acheived some success too, proving especially popular on some radio stations. Sadly despite having their most successful year to date, the group had disbanded by the end of 1968. However their legacy has not been forgotten, and I can present to you the entire recorded output of these lovely pioneering ladies from the land of Quebec! Also posted below this here text is a video, lovingly made by some I assume is known to the group, featuring live footage and photographic images of the group to their biggest hit, Hello Goodbye.

Les Intrigantes - Singles 1965-1968

Thaks for this cinnamonK

The Poppy Family - A Good Thing Lost (1968-1973)

The Poppy Family - A Good Thing Lost (1968-1973)

A Good Thing Lost: 1968-1973 is an excellent best-of collection from the Poppy Family, a great, if largely forgotten, late-'60s Canadian soft rock/psychedelic group. The meticulous songwriting, production, and arranging skills of guitarist/mastermind Terry Jacks (who later had a huge solo hit with the classic pop single "Seasons in the Sun") lift these recordings above the work of many of the group's better-known contemporaries. Singer Susan Jacks has a beautiful voice that sometimes sounds like (but predates) Karen Carpenter, but is eminently more soulful. Although characterized in the liner notes as a "soft pop" band, the Poppy Family was also capable of a somewhat tougher sound that sometimes recalled Surrealistic Pillow-era Jefferson Airplane and folkier material in the Kenny Rogers & the First Edition/Roger McGuinn vein. Throughout, Jacks frames the songs with creative, if often dated, arrangements that compare favorably to his obvious influences, the Beatles, the Beach Boys, and Phil Spector. In addition to "Which Way You Goin' Billy," the group's biggest hit (number two in 1970) and a generous helping of singles and high-quality album tracks, the disc includes an alternate, wildly psychedelic mix of "There's No Blood in Bone" and two different versions of "That's Where I Went Wrong" (the second of which features some cool country guitar leads). Overall, A Good Thing Lost: 1968-1973 is a fantastic find -- one of those hidden gems that record fanatics always hope to discover.

The Poppy Family - A Good Thing Lost (1968-1973)


Witness Inc-The SinglesThe Du-Cats ‎– The Du-Cats (1965)VA - People Of Tyme / Canadian Garage Beat '66 David Clayton Thomas&The Shays - A Go-Go&Sings Like It Is (1964-1965)Les Napoleons - A Go Go (1966) & Les Differents - Les Differents (1967) Pepper Tree ‎– You're My People (1971)VA - The Gaiety Records Story Les Intrigantes - Singles 1965-1968The Poppy Family - A Good Thing Lost (1968-1973)

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