close

Old Melodies ... | category: Country

home

Old Melodies ...

Beat, Garage,Psychedelic... and much more in one place.

allmusic-wingsofdream.blogspot.com

Ian & Sylvia - Full Circle (1968 Canada)

Ian & Sylvia - Full Circle (1968 Canada)


Ian & Sylvia - Full Circle (1968 Canada)

Ian & Sylvia were a Canadian folk and country music duo which consisted of Ian and Sylvia Tyson, nee Fricker. They began performing together in 1959, married in 1964, and divorced and stopped performing together in 1975.
The two started performing together in Toronto in 1959. By 1962, they were living in New York City where they caught the attention of manager Albert Grossman, who managed Peter, Paul and Mary and would soon become Bob Dylan's manager. Grossman secured them a contract with Vanguard Records and they released their first album late in the year.
Their first album, self-titled Ian & Sylvia, on Vanguard Records consists mainly of traditional songs. There were British and Canadian folk songs, spiritual music, and a few blues songs thrown into the mix. The album was moderately successful and they made the list of performers for the 1963 Newport Folk Festival.
Four Strong Winds, their second album, was similar to the first, with the exception of the inclusion of the early Dylan composition, "Tomorrow is a Long Time", and the title song "Four Strong Winds", which was written by Ian Tyson. "Four Strong Winds" was a major hit in Canada and ensured their stardom.
The two married in June 1964; they also released their third album, Northern Journey, that year. It included a blues song written by her, "You Were on My Mind", which was subsequently recorded by both the California group We Five (a 1965 #1 on the Cashbox chart, #3 on the Billboard Hot 100) and British folk rock singer Crispian St. Peters (#36 in 1967).A recording of "Four Strong Winds" by Bobby Bare made it to #3 on the country charts around that time.
On the Northern Journey album was the song "Someday Soon", a composition by him that would rival "Four Strong Winds" in its popularity. (Both songs would eventually be recorded by dozens of singers.)
Their fourth album, Early Morning Rain, consisted in large part of new songs. They introduced the work of the couple's fellow Canadian songwriter and performer Gordon Lightfoot through the title song and "(That's What You Get) For Lovin' Me". They also recorded songs "Darcy Farrow" by Steve Gillette and Tom Campbell, being the first artists to record these three songs. Additionally, they recorded a number of their own compositions.
They performed at the 1965 Newport Folk Festival. Play One More, their offering of 1965, showed a move toward the electrified folk-like music that was becoming popular with groups like the Byrds and the Lovin' Spoonful. The title tune used horns to evoke the mariachi style.
In 1967, they released two albums, one recorded for Vanguard, the other for MGM. These two efforts, So Much For Dreaming and Lovin' Sound, were far less dynamic presentations. At this time they were doing a weekly TV program for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
They relocated to Nashville, Tennessee, where they recorded two albums; one to fulfill the terms of their Vanguard contract, the other to supply MGM with a second (and last) album for that label. The albums can be defined as early country rock music; Nashville for Vanguard was cut in February 1968, one month before The Byrds' Sweetheart of the Rodeo, widely considered the first collaboration of rock and Nashville players. Three of Bob Dylan's "Basement Tapes" songs are included on these albums; most of the rest were written by Ian or Sylvia.
In 1969, Ian & Sylvia formed the country rock group "Great Speckled Bird". In addition to participating in the cross-Canada rock-and-roll rail tour Festival Express, they recorded a self-titled album for the short-lived Ampex label. Produced by Todd Rundgren, the record failed when Ampex was unable to establish widespread distribution. Thousands of copies never left the warehouse, and it has become a much sought-after collector's item. Initially, the album artist was given as Great Speckled Bird but later copies had a sticker saying that it featured the duo.


VA & Anita Kerr Quartet - We Dig Anita The Oohs and Aahs of the Nashville Sound


In the 1950s and '60s, the Anita Kerr Singers were one of the most popular group of backup vocalists in all of country music, appearing on countless recordings by renowned Nashville artists. Kerr was the group's leader, but was joined by alto Dottie Dillard, tenor Gil Wright, and baritone Louis Nunley, as the quartet initially gained attention by performing on the NBC radio program Sunday Down South in the early '50s, which led to a contract with Decca Records. In 1956, the Anita Kerr Singers landed a spot on the New York-based Arthur Godfrey Talent Scouts TV show, which led to further broadcast appearances (although the group never let their session work for others subside). Around the same time, Chet Atkins (then the head of RCA Records' country division) took the group under his wing, which led to the quartet appearing on countless recordings by renowned artists. The Singers continued to record and tour straight through the '60s, even managing to issue several of their own albums, including Anita Kerr Singers Reflect on the Hits of Burt Bacharach & Hal David, Velvet Voices and Bold Brass, and Simon & Garfunkel Songbook, among others.





Members:
Anita Kerr, B.J. Baker, Bob Tebow, Dottie Dillard, Gene Merlino, Gil Wright, Jackie Ward, Louis Nunley, Mitch Gordon, Stan Beard, William Guilford Wright, Jr.


In 1956, Anita Kerr's singers won a contest on the Arthur Godfrey's Talent Scouts national television program. Now, cut down to a quartet at Godfrey's suggestion, the group travelled to New York City two weeks out of every six to appear with Godfrey on his daily television and radio broadcasts. A few years later, Kerr and her singers performed five times a week with Jim Reeves on his national radio program at WSM. The quartet's roster at this time featured tenor Gil Wright, baritone Louis Nunley, alto Dottie Dillard, and Kerr herself as both soprano and arranger. Singers and arranger soon began contributing to between twelve and eighteen recording sessions weekly.[1] Having previously backed Faron Young, Chet Atkins, and Webb Pierce on SESAC radio transcription sessions, the Anita Kerr Singers were invited to record their own songs for SESAC. Between 1959 and 1963, the group waxed sixty SESAC tracks. In 1960, as "The Little Dippers," the group recorded a hit single, "Forever", for the University label. Crediting herself as "Anita & Th' So-And-So's," Kerr multi-tracked her own voice to record the song Joey Baby, in 1961.[citation needed]

The Anita Kerr Singers signed with RCA Victor in 1961. Their first album for the label was From Nashville...The Hit Sound. Subsequent RCA Victor LPs extended the quartet's repertoire as they explored the soul songs of Ray Charles and the compositions of Henry Mancini.

The group's 1965 album We Dig Mancini won a Grammy Award for Best Performance by a Vocal Group. In addition to recording as themselves, the Singers continued to perform as backup singers in Nashville. Using Kerr's arrangements, they can be heard on songs by Hank Snow, Brenda Lee, Perry Como, Pat Boone, Rosemary Clooney, Bobby Vinton, Roy Orbison, Willie Nelson, Floyd Cramer, Al Hirt, Ann-Margret, and many other artists. Under her RCA contract, Kerr also arranged and produced a series of albums for The Living Voices on the RCA Camden budget label. These Living Voices recordings included the Anita Kerr Quartet, with the addition of 4 other vocalists to form an octet. In 1964, together with Chet Atkins and Jim Reeves, the Anita Kerr Singers toured Europe.








[2:03] 1. Chet Atkins - Come Softly to Me
[2:19] 2. Roy Orbison - Pretty One
[2:27] 3. Roy Orbison - Only the Lonely (Know the Way I Feel)
[2:45] 4. Roy Orbison - Here Comes That Song Again
[2:19] 5. Roy Orbison - Lana
[2:30] 6. Patsy Cline - Just out of Reach (Of My Two Empty Arms)
[2:32] 7. Patsy Cline - Cry Not for Me
[2:22] 8. Jim Reeves - He'll Have to Go
[2:09] 9. Jim Reeves - Margie
[2:15] 10. Jim Reeves - Linda
[2:43] 11. Jim Reeves - Maria Elena
[2:42] 12. Brenda Lee - I'm Sorry
[3:06] 13. Brenda Lee - I Want to Be Wanted
[2:12] 14. Brenda Lee - Here Comes That Feeling Again
[1:54] 15. Johnny Cash - The Rebel Johnny Yuma
[2:49] 16. Johnny Cash - Remember the Alamo
[2:40] 17. Johnny Cash - Ballad of Boot Hill
[1:55] 18. Johnny Cash - Lorena
[2:08] 19. Ann-Margret - Slowly
[2:01] 20. Roger Miller - (In the Summertime) You Don't Want My Love
[2:15] 21. The Anita Kerr Quartet - When Two Worlds Collide
[2:09] 22. The Anita Kerr Quartet - Fair Swiss Maiden
[1:54] 23. Don Gibson - Cute Little Girls
[3:08] 24. Don Gibson - The Next Voice You Hear
[1:51] 25. Don Gibson - Fireball Mail
[2:52] 26. The Browns - The Three Bells (Les Trios Cloches)
[2:13] 27. The Browns - Blue Christmas
[2:35] 28. Eddy Arnold - What a Fool I Was (To Ever Let You Go)
[2:39] 29. Eddy Arnold - Don't Rob Another Man's Castle
[2:47] 30. Bobby Bare - Shame on Me
[2:05] 31. Burl Ives - A Little Bitty Tear
[2:23] 32. Floyd Cramer - San Antonio Rose
[2:37] 33. Skeeter Davis - The End of the World



Chet Atkins - Picks On The Beatles (1966 2008 USA)

Chet Atkins - Picks On The Beatles (1966 2008 USA)

Chet Atkins - Picks On The Beatles (1966 2008 USA)

Chester Burton "Chet" Atkins (June 20, 1924 - June 30, 2001), known as "Mr. Guitar" and "The Country Gentleman", was an American musician, occasional vocalist, songwriter, and record producer, who along with Owen Bradley and Bob Ferguson, among others, created the country music style that came to be known as the Nashville sound, which expanded country music's appeal to adult pop music fans. He was primarily known as a guitarist. His guitar of choice was the Gretsch Country Gentleman. He also played the mandolin, fiddle, banjo, and ukulele. Atkins's signature picking style was inspired by Merle Travis. Other major guitar influences were Django Reinhardt, George Barnes, Les Paul, and, later, Jerry Reed. His distinctive picking style and musicianship brought him admirers inside and outside the country scene, both in the United States and abroad. Atkins spent most of his career at RCA Victor and produced records for the Browns, Hank Snow, Porter Wagoner, Norma Jean, Dolly Parton, Dottie West, Perry Como, Floyd Cramer, Elvis Presley, the Everly Brothers, Eddy Arnold, Don Gibson, Jim Reeves, Jerry Reed, Skeeter Davis, Waylon Jennings, and many others. Rolling Stone credited Atkins with inventing the "popwise 'Nashville sound' that rescued country music from a commercial slump," and ranked him number 21 on their list of "The 100 Greatest Guitarists Of All Time." Among many other honors, Atkins received 14 Grammy Awards and the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. He also received nine Country Music Association awards for Instrumentalist of the Year. He was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum, and the Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum.
"Chet Atkins Picks on the Beatles" is the title of a 1966 RCA Victor LP. Atkins interprets a selection of songs by The Beatles on this album.


Patsy Cline - Showcase (1961 USA)

Patsy Cline - Showcase (1961 USA)

Patsy Cline - Showcase (1961 USA)

Patsy Cline - real name: Virginia Patterson Hensley (born on September 8, 1932, Winchester, Virginia, USA - died on March 5, 1963 near Camden, Tennessee, USA) was an American country-pop singer and part of the Nashville sound during the late 1950s and early 1960s. She successfully "crossed over" to pop music and was one of the most influential, successful, and acclaimed vocalists of the 20th century. She died at age 30 in the crash of a private airplane. Cline was known for her rich tone, emotionally expressive and bold contralto voice, and her role as a country music pioneer. She, along with Kitty Wells, helped to pave the way for women as headline performers in the genre. She began recording in the mid-1950's, but wasn't very successful until "Walking after Midnight" put her in the spotlight, both in the Country and Pop charts. The following singles tightened her position on the top: "Crazy" written by Willie Nelson, "Three Cigarettes In An Ashtray" written by Eddie Miller and W.S. Stevenson and "I Fall To Pieces" written by Hank Cochran. At the peak of her fame, she was tragically killed in an airplane crash in 1963. Years later her distinctive voice and interpretation was recognized by many and was of great influence of later singers, like Brenda Lee, Linda Ronstadt and k.d. lang, amongst others.
"Patsy Cline Showcase" is a studio album recorded with The Jordanaires and released November 27, 1961 by Decca Records. The album produced two singles that became hits on both the Billboard country and pop charts, "I Fall to Pieces" and the follow-up single "Crazy". 
Patsy Cline became the first female solo artist inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1973, ten years after her death. In 1999, she was voted number 11 on VH1's special The 100 Greatest Women in Rock and Roll. In 2002, she was voted Number One on Country Music Television's The 40 Greatest Women of Country Music, and she was ranked 46th in the "100 Greatest Singers of All Time" issue of Rolling Stone magazine. Her 1973 Country Music Hall of Fame plaque reads: "Her heritage of timeless recordings is testimony to her artistic capacity."


The First Edition – The First Edition (1967)





Ex-members of the New Christy Minstrels (with the exception of the drummer, Mickey Jones ) run the fun gamut on The First Edition, and had they disappeared after this effort it would have been a huge collector's item. The cardinal sin of Lenny Kaye's masterpiece Nuggets collection is that "Just Dropped In (To See What Condition My Condition Was In)" did not follow the Electric Prunes as the second track on volume one of that revered collection, or show up on it at all. The psychedelicized Top Five hit from the winter of 1968 produced by Mike Post and arranged by Al Capps might have a few lyrics that would make Bob Dylan blush, but the song's fuzz guitar, attitude, and hook are unstoppable. The rest of the album is top-notch as well, sounding like the Mamas & the Papas meets early Jefferson Airplane with Signe Anderson on vocals. It's Thelma Camacho who never got the name change or the recognition she deserved, but she sounds great on "I Get a Funny Feeling" and "Hurry Up Love," and the album benefits from her presence. "Shadow in the Corner of Your Mind" may be a title that conjures up images of Bob Lind and Ted Nugent hammering out a song over the dinner table, maybe because they still look like the New Christy Minstrels on the cover, and Tom Smothers gushing on the liner notes is unique, but it was television that was instrumental in launching this group into the mainstream and the hit song does well surrounded by this musical environment. Tunes like Mike Post's co-write "Dream On" rock out much harder than "Green Green," "Saturday Night," and "Today," Christy Minstrel's hits prior to Rogers joining the group. "Home Made Lies" has that "someday I'll teach you real fine" riff from the Animals' "It's My Life," Mike Settle lifting from here and there, while "Marcia: 2 A.M. sounds like Peter, Paul & Mary jamming with Paul Kantner and "Hurry Up Love" wants desperately to be girl group. The album's one drawback is that the band and producer don't go all the way in exploring these different styles the way they did on the hit "Just Dropped In." "Just Dropped In" not only made Kenny Rogers' voice the most familiar first, it's an all-out assault on the senses, its wild abandon necessary but absent from the other aspects of this disc. "Church Without a Name" explores -- or maybe toys with -- the blues, just adding to the feel of a band looking for a sound. They eventually found that sound during their run of hits from early 1968 to late 1970. But this debut is splendid and it is fun to hear them emulating Marty Balin right off the bat with the first track, "I Found a Reason." A lost gem worth rediscovering.



The New Christy Minstrels - Hits and Highlights 1962-1968

The New Christy Minstrels - Hits and Highlights 1962-1968

The New Christy Minstrels - Hits and Highlights 1962-1968



This 30-song anthology from Australia actually complements the Collectors' Choice Definitive New Christy Minstrels just about perfectly, despite overlapping it for 13 songs. A full 17 songs here don't appear on the Collectors' Choice double CD, and while some of them are not representative of the group's best work or the most distinctive part of its history, they're almost all entertaining and, in many instances, are enlightening as well. And then there's the sound on this CD, which is very bright and clean, in keeping with Raven Records' usual standard. Where the material does overlap with The Definitive New Christy Minstrels, it's the songs one would expect: basically, the hits and the crowd-pleasers, plus obvious odd numbers such as the Burt Bacharach co-authored "Three Wheels on My Wagon." Coat Your Minds With Honey presents those songs in bright and crisp form (the stereo separation on "Green, Green" is a real treat), but mostly it's the songs unique to this set that justify the $18 list price, including some genuinely strange (for this group) numbers. Some of the later '60s recordings featured here will seem jarring heard within the folk music orientation of most of this CD. The notes by Chuck Miller present a different interpretation of the group's history than those by Tom Pickles on the Collectors' Choice set (which cuts off in 1965), also extending that history to the end of the '60s and beyond, and mentioning the contributions of latter-day members such as Kenny Rogers and Kim Carnes. (Australian import)

The New Christy Minstrels - Hits and Highlights 1962-1968 (Coat Your Mind in Honey)

The New Christy Minstrels - Hits and Highlights 1962-1968

'Little' Jimmy Dickens - Big Man In Country Music (1968)


'Little' Jimmy Dickens - Big Man In Country Music (1968)

'Little' Jimmy Dickens - Big Man In Country Music (1968)

From Beatman:
'Little' Jimmy Dickens - Big Man In Country Music (1968)
Continuing the theme 'Private Collection - Overview Albums'...
James Cecil Dickens, better known by his stage name 'Little' Jimmy Dickens was an American country music singer and songwriter famous for his humorous novelty songs, his small size, and his rhinestone-studded outfits. He started in 1948 and was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1983.
All selected tracks are restored and remastered for a good modern sound...



Duane Eddy - Especially for You/Girls! Girls! Girls!

Duane Eddy - Especially for You/Girls! Girls! Girls!


Guitarist with a distinctive "twangy" sound (his own description). Born in Corning, NY, on April 28, 1938, he was one of the foremost instrumental performers of the late 50s and early 60s with a string of hits on both sides of the Atlantic.


Inducted into Rock And Roll Hall of Fame in 1994 (Performer). 
 
Germany's Bear Family label released Duane Eddy's original Jamie albums as a series of two-fers in addition to compiling his complete Jamie recordings in a box set, Twangin' from Phoenix to L.A. Especially for You/Girls! Girls! Girls! is one of the two-fers, compiling two albums from 1959-1961 with the addition of one bonus track. All of Bear Family's Jamie reissues are now out of print, but they remain the definitive sources for Eddy's Jamie material, mastered in stereo from the original session tapes, with a couple of exceptions: "Tuxedo Junction" is presented in both mono and stereo versions because they have different saxophone overdubs, and "Yep!" appears in mono because the original master tape was never mixed to stereo. Especially for You is an atypical Eddy album in that it frequently eschews Eddy's trademark twangy guitar sound for a wild variety of styles, from the Les Paul homage of "Lover" to the jazzy "Quiniela." The western tune "Along the Navajo Trail" adds to the sense of rampant diversity, while the more characteristic "Peter Gunn" and "Yep!" are the album's moderate hit singles. Girls! Girls! Girls! is a thematic album of tunes with girls' names in the titles, and the album cover pictures Eddy with Brenda Lee and Annette Funicello. "Brenda" is an instrumental medley of Brenda Lee's hits, and many of the originals seem to reference current stars of song and screen, from Annette Funicello ("Annette") and Connie Francis ("Connie") to Tuesday Weld ("Tuesday"). The handful of covers, such as "Sioux City Sue" and Pérez Prado's "Patricia," fall in line with the album's formula. Unlike Especially for You, Girls! Girls! Girls! incorporates a mixed vocal chorus and sticks to Eddy's trademark sound with lots of twangy guitar and honking sax. His rendition of "Tammy" is particularly nice, exhibiting the melodic minimalism of Luther Perkins but in a pop context with strings. Girls! Girls! Girls! produced no hit singles, but is an enjoyable set that inexplicably was the lowest charting of Eddy's Jamie albums. 

Duane Eddy - Especially for You/Girls! Girls! Girls!
Ian & Sylvia - Full Circle (1968 Canada)VA & Anita Kerr Quartet  - We Dig Anita The Oohs and Aahs of the Nashville SoundChet Atkins - Picks On The Beatles (1966 2008 USA)Patsy Cline - Showcase (1961 USA)The First Edition – The First Edition  (1967)The New Christy Minstrels - Hits and Highlights 1962-1968 Ian & Sylvia - Lovin' Sound (1967)'Little' Jimmy Dickens - Big Man In Country Music (1968)Duane Eddy - Especially for You/Girls! Girls! Girls!

Report "Old Melodies ..."

Are you sure you want to report this post for ?

Cancel
×