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King Size Taylor & The Dominoes - EARLY RECORDING

King Size Taylor & The Dominoes - EARLY RECORDING


King Size Taylor & The Dominoes - EARLY RECORDING

LAMBDA RECORD, RECORDED. AT 18 CAMBRIDGE ROAD; CROSBY 

The quality is not the best standard, but I think it's a milestone in British Rock 'n' Roll history from Liverpool's first Rock 'n' Roll Band. It's very rare material and we must work with damaged records and tapes.


1957 - 33 RPM - LP
01 - Whole Lotta Shaking Going On - (Vocals by Arthur)
02 - Baby - (Vocals by Charlie; this was his own composition)
03 - Great Balls Of Fire - (Vocals by Arthur)
04 - Guitar Boogie - (Instrumental performed by Charlie)
05 - Roll Over Beethoven - (Vocals by Arthur)
06 - So Long - (Vocals by Arthur)
07 - I Want You To Know - (Vocals by Arthur)
08 - Mean Woman Blues - (Vocals by Arthur)
09 - Autumn Leaves - (Instrumental performed by Charlie and George)

1958 - 33 RPM - LP
10 - Lend Me Your Comb - (Vocals by Teddy)
11 - Matchbox - (Vocals by Teddy)
12 - Good Golly Miss Molly - (Vocals by Teddy)
13 - Whole Lotta Shaking Going On - (Vocals by Charlie)
14 - Guitar Boogie - (Instrumental performed by Teddy)
15 - Shortnin' Bread Rock - (Vocals by Charlie)
16 - Roll Over Beethoven - (Vocals by Teddy)
17 - Hey-Hey-Hey-Hey - (Vocals by Teddy)
18 - Your True Love - (Vocals by Teddy)
19 - Guitar Boogie - (Instrumental performed by Charlie)

1958 - 78 RPM - EP
20 - Saw My Baby With Another Guy - (Vocals and written by Teddy)
21 - Instrumental -  (written and played by Teddy)
22 - Instrumental -  (written and played by Sam)

1958 - 78 RPM - EP
23 - Oh, My Soul - (Vocals by Sam)
24 - Baby - (written by Charlie, vocals by Bobby)
25 - Sad And Blue -  (written by Sam, vocals by Teddy)

Live London BBC  1963
101 - Intro Memphis (with Juck Berry)
102 - It's Late
103 - Sweet Little Sixteen (with Juck Berry)
104 - Interview - Nadine (with Juck Berry)
105 - My Blue Heaven
106 - Herman The Hermit
107 - Shake Baby Shake
108 - Jump Back

201 - Interview with King Size Taylor Febr. 1987


1957 - 1958 The Dominoes
Cliff Roberts - drs
Georg Watson - gtr
Charlie Flynn - gtr
Sam Hardie - piano
Arthur Baker - voc

1958
Cliff Roberts - drs
Georg Watson - gtr
Charlie Flynn - gtr
Sam Hardie - piano
Arthur Baker - voc
Ted (King Size) - Taylor
Robby Thompson - bs

King Size Taylor &The Dominoes


King Size Taylor &The Dominoes



Edward 'Ted' Taylor, called 'King Size' in a not-too-subtle allusion to his formidable appearance, was already a highly experienced member of the first music generation from Liverpool when he made his first trip to Hamburg. He and the Dominoes claimed, probably justifiably, that they were one of the very first rock bands in their hometown. It's a fact that they were the first Merseyside group to go on air at Radio Luxembourg. As was so often the case, the Dominoes reached back to the end of the Skiffle era. Both, Ted Taylor and Bobby Thompson were members of the James Boys Skiffle Group as early as 1957. The first real Dominoes group existed by the end of 1957, but only as a pure Rock'n'Roll band. Charlie Flynn and Sam Hardie belonged to the group, two names that would remain constant in the band's ever changing genealogical tree. The name King Size Taylor And The Dominoes is mentioned for the first time in 1960.

****


King Size Taylor &The Dominoes


King Size Taylor &The Dominoes

Ariola 71765 - one side Liverpool Beat
1 - Heebie Jeebies
2 - Oo Poo Pa Doo
3 - Wa Watussi
4 - Let's Dance
5 - Broken Arrow
6 - Lipstick, Powder And Paint = Live

Ariola 70953 - one side Twist Time im Star-Club Hamburg 2
7 - All Around The World
8 - Stupidity
9 - Slippin' And Slidin'
10 - Unchain My Heart
11 - Bad Boy
12 - Short On Love
13 - Hello Josephine
14 - You Can't Sit Down

Ariola 71431 Star-Club Time mit
15 - I've Been Watching You
16 - I'm Late
17 - Down In The Valley
18 - She Said Yeah
19 - You Make Me Happy
20 - Sherry Baby
21 - Shake, Shake, Shake
22 - Sky Boat Song
23 - Golly Golly What
24 - Clarabella


***

David & Jonathan - You've Got Your Troubles & The Greatest Hits

David & Jonathan - You've Got Your Troubles & The Greatest Hits


You've Got Your Troubles 


The Greatest Hits 

David & Jonathan - You've Got Your Troubles & The Greatest Hits


Most famous for their hit cover of the Beatles' "Michelle" in early 1966, David & Jonathan were a harmonizing duo from Bristol, England, with more ties to the MOR vocal sound than the British Invasion. Actually named Roger Greenaway and Roger Cook, the pair were primarily songwriters rather than performers, penning "This Golden Ring" and "You've Got Your Troubles" for another British vocal group, the Fortunes. Beatles producer George Martin worked with the renamed David & Jonathan in the mid-'60s, and their soft ballad treatment of "Michelle" made the Top 20 in both the UK and US. Their smooth dual leads were in the vein of Chad & Jeremy, but even more pop-oriented.

David & Jonathan - You've Got Your Troubles & The Greatest Hits

David & Jonathan had another big hit in Britain in 1966, "Lovers of the World Unite." But Greenaway in particular would experience his greatest success as a composer. Sometimes in collaboration with Cook, and sometimes not, his songs were a fixture of the British pop scene in the 1960s and 1970s. The quality of these hits was variable indeed, ranging from the excellent (the Hollies' "Long Cool Woman" and Gene Pitney's "Something Gotten Hold of My Heart") to the banal (the Pipkins' "Gimme Dat Ding" and Whistling Jack Smith's "I Was Kaiser Bill's Batman"), as well as smashes for Blue Mink, Engelbert Humperdinck, White Plains, and others.

Jan & Dean - Filet Of Soul 1966

Jan & Dean - Filet Of Soul 1966


Review by Bruce Eder
Filet of Soul is a good example of a successful "fake" -- oh, it's real enough as a Jan & Dean album, and the recordings here are all the real article and enjoyable, even if most of them are hardly representative of the duo at its best. Mostly the album works because it slots into the parody element that always played a role in the duo's presentation -- though Jan & Dean were meticulous in their productions, and Jan Berry a very serious personality in terms of his work, there was always a strong component of laughter in their music, and they never took themselves (or rock & roll) too seriously. And it's entirely possible that, had events worked out differently, the Beatles' Rubber Soul album (itself a parody title) might have inspired the pair to devise an "answer" record. But Filet of Soul was actually the creation of Liberty Records, in the wake of Jan Berry's disastrous April 1966 car accident, to keep some Jan & Dean product out there and sell it while the notoriously fickle teen audience still remembered who they were. By scouring the unused portions of the concert tape that had yielded the pair's live Command Performance album, plus a few studio tracks that had already been heard on other albums, a coherent Jan & Dean album was devised, complete with three John Lennon/Paul McCartney songs. None of the latter, most especially the utterly improbable "Norwegian Wood," are exactly groundbreaking, nor is the album a landmark of any kind, but like almost every other record that Jan & Dean ever issued, it is lots of fun (though the "fun" is stretched just about to the breaking point with their rendition of "Everybody Loves a Clown," which is saved for last, for obvious reasons). With a live audience ambience behind their deliberately adenoidal harmonies on "You've Got to Hide Your Love Away," you know that this is no more a serious effort to "interpret" the song than, say, the Beach Boys' version from Beach Boys' Party! (recorded the previous year with Dean Torrence on hand). Jan & Dean are obviously more straight-faced on "Let's Hang On," "Honolulu Lulu," and "1-2-3," and the 1964-vintage "Dead Man's Curve," with its elaborate production, stands apart from everything else here, showcasing the offhanded nature of most of the material on this album. 


Jan & Dean - Filet Of Soul 1966



The Shakers aka King Size Taylor & The Dominoes

The Shakers aka King Size Taylor & The Dominoes



The Shakers aka King Size Taylor & The Dominoes

1 - Twist And Shout
2 - Hippy Hippy Shake
3 - Money
4 - Hello Josephine
5 - Memphis Tennessee
6 - Whole Lot Of Lovin'
7 - Domino Twist
8 - I Can tell
9 - Mashed Potatoes And Hot Pastrami
10 - Ruby Ann
11 - Long Tall Sally
12 - Dr. Feelgood
13 - Sweet Little Sixteen
14 - Country Music
15 - Dizzy Miss Lizzy
16 - Green Onions

Bonus 45'
17 - Fortune Teller
18 - Never In A Hundred Years
19 - Slow Down
20 - Somebody's Always Trying
21 - Looking For My Baby
22 - Thinkin' 


Bobby Day - Rockin' Robin /The Very Best Of (With Bob & Earl)

Bobby Day - Rockin' Robin /The Very Best Of (With Bob & Earl)


An important cog in Los Angeles' doo wop community during the '50s, Bobby Day wrote three often-covered early rock classics in 1957-1958. Day was part of the Hollywood Flames, one of the area's top R&B vocal groups, and briefly part of Bob & Earl, later to hit without Day on "Harlem Shuffle." Day formed his own group, the Satellites, in 1957, cutting the original "Little Bitty Pretty One" for Class Records. A nearly identical cover by Thurston Harris beat the original out, so Day countered with the driving "Rockin' Robin" in 1958, an R&B chart-topper. Its flip, "Over and Over," was a hit in its own right, although the Dave Clark Five's 1965 revival is better remembered today. Day waxed a few more hits for Class in 1959, including "That's All I Want" and a derivative "The Bluebird, the Buzzard & the Oriole," flitting from label to label during the '60s.

***

Bobby Day - Rockin' Robin /The Very Best Of (With Bob & Earl)

***
Is this the ultimate Bobby Day compilation? With 28 songs from the late '50s and early '60s, including half a dozen that he did as part of Bob & Earl and detailed track by track liner notes, you would think so. Even admitting that he was a fine early rock & roll singer, 28 songs by Day might be too much, though. The fact is that a good number of the singles collected here sounded similar to each other, and sometimes seemed like strained attempts to make derivative knockoffs of his best-known hits, the great "Rockin' Robin," "Over and Over," and the original version of "Little Bitty Pretty One" (which are the first three cuts on the CD). Still, it has its interest as a document of five years or so in the career of a guy who was not so much an R&B performer adapting to trends, as many in the early Los Angeles rock scene were, as someone who made records that were rock & roll, not R&B in the transition to rock & roll. For standouts in the track lineup, you might want to hear Bob & Earl's original 1958 version of the ballad "Gee Whiz," which would be a Top Thirty hit in 1961 for the Innocents. There are a few other ballads throughout the set, but Day's forte was actually up-tempo rock & roll, even though his likable, oh so slightly raw-edged vocals were more interesting than the (save for the three hits) often generic material. The 1962 obscurity "Oop-I-Du-Pers-Ball" has to rate as one of the more eccentric twist records of the early '60s, Day's all-out raucous vocals transcending to some degree the trivial novelty that the song actually was. Three of the songs are previously unissued alternate takes.


Billy J. Kramer with The Dakotas - Little Children & I'll Keep You Satisfied (1964)

Billy J. Kramer with The Dakotas - Little Children & I'll Keep You Satisfied (1964)



This Collectables reissue features two albums released in 1964 on the Imperial label by British invasion band Billy J. Kramer and the Dakotas. Although their reign on the pop charts would be extremely short, they managed to score a few memorable hits. The albums Little Children (also the title of their first hit single in the U.S.) and I'll Keep You Satisfied include several Lennon/McCartney-penned songs: "Bad to Me" (another hit), "Do You Want to Know a Secret," and "I Call Your Name," along with cover versions of "Da Doo Ron Ron," "Great Balls of Fire," and "The Twelfth of Never." While this is a fine reissue, The Best of Billy J. Kramer on EMI would probably be a better purchase for anyone but the most ardent Merseybeat fan.


Billy J. Kramer with The Dakotas - Little Children & I'll Keep You Satisfied (1964)
Billy J. Kramer with The Dakotas - Little Children & I'll Keep You Satisfied (1964)

Billy J. Kramer with The Dakotas - Little Children & I'll Keep You Satisfied (1964)

Billy J. Kramer with The Dakotas- Do You Want To Know A Secret \The EMI Years 1963-1983\ 4 CD Box

Billy J. Kramer with The Dakotas- Do You Want To Know A Secret \The EMI Years 1963-1983\  4 CD Box




2009 four CD set from one of the most popular bands to emerge from the '60s British Invasion movement that the Beatles kickstarted. Early in 1963, the merging of the Liverpool vocalist, Billy J. Kramer, with the Manchester group, the Dakotas, was among Brian Epstein's most inspired moves. It led to a succession of hit records, including three #1s, and several songs that have become golden oldies and are as familiar today as there were in the 1960s. This mammoth collection of over 120 tracks features their EMI recordings in those crucial years, and includes all the singles, all the album tracks (both UK and U.S.), and many unreleased performances. The unearthed gems include an excellent version of Randy Newman's 'Bet No One Ever Hurt This Bad', which equals any of the hit singles. EMI. 
*****
Billy J. Kramer with The Dakotas- Do You Want To Know A Secret \The EMI Years 1963-1983\  4 CD Box


I Delfini - I Delfini (1965) 1st LP



Originating in Padua, the Dolphins were one of the first formations of the Italian rock scene to have in the line-up a saxophonist and a repertoire of classics translated dall'inglese.Sulla scene since the early '60s, debuted in 1965 with a single that saw Italian versions of two famous song a "wanna be your man" "i wanna be your man" of fabolous four Beatles and the other "you have to come back to me" the "tell me" the Rolling Stones published by careful CDB .Rimarrà however isolated a choice to resort to foreign songs, in fact, followed the group will affect only original songs (if you exclude the 45 del'66 with the Italian versions ("my pain" and "there is a better place for we ") of" all my sorrows "Shadows and" we've gotta getout of this place "of Animals.I Dolphins were highly successful with several tracks, but will become a classic of the period the song" you walk away "reaching first place in the "Yellow Flag" and being translated into English for export abroad, and especially in the States where it does not reach the hoped unfortunately successo.Nel 1967 after moderate consensus abandon their historic label and suspend their activities without officially announce the dissolution .Renzo Levi Minzi continue affecting three singles as a solo artist and in the name Dolphins will come out two singles in the '70s (my concert) and in 1977 (Heloise) .In the 90s by a strong push of Revival Beat are reprinted the first two albums and published in compact disc .Currently sporadically our find themselves in a reunion and perform live for their funs




VA - The Graham Dee Connection : The 60s Collection

VA - The Graham Dee Connection : The 60s Collection



He could be the king of British Northern Soul, a lost Mod icon, but Graham Dee's air of detached modesty says more about him than either soubriquet. He's just happy to finally see some of his work see the light of day when Acid Jazz release The Graham Dee Connection: The 60s Collection next month (SEPT19), rounding up just some of the hundreds of tracks he wrote, recorded and produced in that swinging decade when London was the capital of Cool and Graham rubbed shoulders with its most stellar in-crowd.

'I never thought any of this stuff would see the light of day, I didn't think anyone was interested - just shows you what I know, maybe that's why I never had a hit record!' he says, only half-joking.

These days, Graham revels in pastoral semi-retirement, although he is musically busier than he has been for years. As well as the 60s' set, Acid Jazz has an album of his 1970s' material coming out later in the year, he's writing new material and plays regularly at his Dorset village local.

This late blooming career is a triumph for natural justice. His song, Two Can Make It Together, released in 1969 by Tony and Tandy, has enjoyed cult status for years but its use on a TV advert last year rightly established it as a neglected 60s classic. Slick, sophisticated and defiantly upbeat it now opens The 60s Collection after Acid Jazz set its most tenacious musical archaeologists the task of sifting through Graham's archive of demo recordings, unreleased songs and studio out-takes for the 16 songs that make up the new album.

'They've done an amazing job. Some of these tracks were on old studio acetates that we cut at the time that were unplayable - they were so decayed you could see the metal through the plastic. It's wonderful the technology exists that can breathe new life into them after all these years.'

Most of the material comes from Graham's time as an in-house songwriter/producer for the British arm of Atlantic, the legendary American rhythm and blues label. From 1967 to 1970 he wrote and recorded hundreds of songs for artists as diverse as white South African soul singer Sharon Tandy, actor-singer Mike Berry, British crooner Dennis Lotis and US serviceman turned singer James Patterson. Among Graham's most renowned work was with the band The Fleur de Lys.

'They were great guys, should have been much bigger, but I was writing these uptown soulful songs and the British market wanted a much harder, more direct R&B sound. Everyone said I should be working in America so in the end I upped sticks and moved to the States.'

In the early 1970s Graham lived and worked in Los Angeles, Nashville and at the home of southern soul, Muscle Shoals in Alabama. But while his erstwhile songwriting partner Brian Potter went on to enjoy chart success with hits like Keeper of the Castle by The Four Tops, Graham was distracted by his life-long search for an answer to the involuntary twitching that has dogged his life. He lives with a neuromuscular disorder that manifests itself as a series of ticks, twitches and spasms linked to a weakness in his neck. In his late-30s it was diagnosed as a physical form of Tourette's Syndrome (he still contests the hypothesis). more :


VA - The Graham Dee Connection : The 60s Collection

Graham Dee was one of those who helped make the sixties great. He was there as writer, producer and session guitarist. He had played in the final line-up of The Moments with Steve Marriott and then continued with a Marriott connection by playing rhythm guitar on the East End Fab Four's debut single What'Cha Gonna Do About It. He joined bands such as Them, The Walker Brothers, The Gass, He even filled in the the "absent" Syd Barrett on some Pink Floyd shows. However, he was primarily a writer and producer. He teamed up with Brian Potter who had co-written What'Cha Gonna Do About It with Ian Samwell. They became the staff songwriters at Polydor Records. Some of the duo's work will already be familiar to fans of The Fleurs de Lys as they wrote tracks such as Daughter of the Sun which was sung by Sharon Tandy backed by The Fleurs de Lys. They also wrote a number of other tracks specifically for Sharon Tandy. Graham Dee has an extensive archive and this is CD is the first of three planned collections.

Graham met with Frank Fenter who was the Europe head of Atlantic Records. Fenter introduced Dee to some of his acts such as Tony Rivers & the Castaways, Sharon Tandy, The Fleurs de Lys and others. However, following the departure of Fenter to America to form Capricorn Records and Potter linking up with Denis Lambert things changed. Dee became staff songwriter to April Music where the acts included The Fantastics, Mike Berry and more.

The CD starts with two very strong tracks. Tony (Head) and (Sharon) Tandy were never going to rival Marvin Gaye's duets but this powerful track shows how good they were especially with the excellent Fleurs de Lys backing. The track received extensive airplay and sold well without managing to chart. Weygood Ellis's I Like What I'm Trying To Do will be familiar to those who have already heard the song on The Fleurs De Lys' Reflections compilation. The track was written as the first single for Dee and Potter's band The Storytellers but released under the name Waygood Ellis including Gerry Temple on lead vocals and Dee on guitar.

King Size Taylor & The Dominoes - EARLY RECORDINGKing Size Taylor &The DominoesDavid & Jonathan - You've Got Your Troubles & The Greatest Hits Jan & Dean - Filet Of Soul 1966The Shakers aka King Size Taylor & The DominoesBobby Day - Rockin' Robin /The Very Best Of (With Bob & Earl)Billy J. Kramer with The Dakotas - Little Children & I'll Keep You Satisfied (1964)Billy J. Kramer with The Dakotas- Do You Want To Know A Secret \The EMI Years 1963-1983\  4 CD Box I Delfini - I Delfini (1965) 1st LPVA - The Graham Dee Connection : The 60s Collection

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