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Dave Pike - Manhattan Latin (1964 2004 USA)

Dave Pike - Manhattan Latin (1964 2004 USA)


Dave Pike - Manhattan Latin (1964 2004 USA)

Dave Pike - Manhattan Latin (1964 2004 USA)

Dave Pike - real name: David Samuel Pike. American vibraphonist and marimba player, born on March 23, 1938 in Detroit, Michigan, died on October 3, 2015, Del Mar, California. From 1968 until 1973 he worked in The Netherlands, Belgium and Germany, living in Loosdrecht, The Netherlands.


VA & Anita Kerr Quartet - We Dig Anita The Oohs and Aahs of the Nashville Sound


In the 1950s and '60s, the Anita Kerr Singers were one of the most popular group of backup vocalists in all of country music, appearing on countless recordings by renowned Nashville artists. Kerr was the group's leader, but was joined by alto Dottie Dillard, tenor Gil Wright, and baritone Louis Nunley, as the quartet initially gained attention by performing on the NBC radio program Sunday Down South in the early '50s, which led to a contract with Decca Records. In 1956, the Anita Kerr Singers landed a spot on the New York-based Arthur Godfrey Talent Scouts TV show, which led to further broadcast appearances (although the group never let their session work for others subside). Around the same time, Chet Atkins (then the head of RCA Records' country division) took the group under his wing, which led to the quartet appearing on countless recordings by renowned artists. The Singers continued to record and tour straight through the '60s, even managing to issue several of their own albums, including Anita Kerr Singers Reflect on the Hits of Burt Bacharach & Hal David, Velvet Voices and Bold Brass, and Simon & Garfunkel Songbook, among others.





Members:
Anita Kerr, B.J. Baker, Bob Tebow, Dottie Dillard, Gene Merlino, Gil Wright, Jackie Ward, Louis Nunley, Mitch Gordon, Stan Beard, William Guilford Wright, Jr.


In 1956, Anita Kerr's singers won a contest on the Arthur Godfrey's Talent Scouts national television program. Now, cut down to a quartet at Godfrey's suggestion, the group travelled to New York City two weeks out of every six to appear with Godfrey on his daily television and radio broadcasts. A few years later, Kerr and her singers performed five times a week with Jim Reeves on his national radio program at WSM. The quartet's roster at this time featured tenor Gil Wright, baritone Louis Nunley, alto Dottie Dillard, and Kerr herself as both soprano and arranger. Singers and arranger soon began contributing to between twelve and eighteen recording sessions weekly.[1] Having previously backed Faron Young, Chet Atkins, and Webb Pierce on SESAC radio transcription sessions, the Anita Kerr Singers were invited to record their own songs for SESAC. Between 1959 and 1963, the group waxed sixty SESAC tracks. In 1960, as "The Little Dippers," the group recorded a hit single, "Forever", for the University label. Crediting herself as "Anita & Th' So-And-So's," Kerr multi-tracked her own voice to record the song Joey Baby, in 1961.[citation needed]

The Anita Kerr Singers signed with RCA Victor in 1961. Their first album for the label was From Nashville...The Hit Sound. Subsequent RCA Victor LPs extended the quartet's repertoire as they explored the soul songs of Ray Charles and the compositions of Henry Mancini.

The group's 1965 album We Dig Mancini won a Grammy Award for Best Performance by a Vocal Group. In addition to recording as themselves, the Singers continued to perform as backup singers in Nashville. Using Kerr's arrangements, they can be heard on songs by Hank Snow, Brenda Lee, Perry Como, Pat Boone, Rosemary Clooney, Bobby Vinton, Roy Orbison, Willie Nelson, Floyd Cramer, Al Hirt, Ann-Margret, and many other artists. Under her RCA contract, Kerr also arranged and produced a series of albums for The Living Voices on the RCA Camden budget label. These Living Voices recordings included the Anita Kerr Quartet, with the addition of 4 other vocalists to form an octet. In 1964, together with Chet Atkins and Jim Reeves, the Anita Kerr Singers toured Europe.








[2:03] 1. Chet Atkins - Come Softly to Me
[2:19] 2. Roy Orbison - Pretty One
[2:27] 3. Roy Orbison - Only the Lonely (Know the Way I Feel)
[2:45] 4. Roy Orbison - Here Comes That Song Again
[2:19] 5. Roy Orbison - Lana
[2:30] 6. Patsy Cline - Just out of Reach (Of My Two Empty Arms)
[2:32] 7. Patsy Cline - Cry Not for Me
[2:22] 8. Jim Reeves - He'll Have to Go
[2:09] 9. Jim Reeves - Margie
[2:15] 10. Jim Reeves - Linda
[2:43] 11. Jim Reeves - Maria Elena
[2:42] 12. Brenda Lee - I'm Sorry
[3:06] 13. Brenda Lee - I Want to Be Wanted
[2:12] 14. Brenda Lee - Here Comes That Feeling Again
[1:54] 15. Johnny Cash - The Rebel Johnny Yuma
[2:49] 16. Johnny Cash - Remember the Alamo
[2:40] 17. Johnny Cash - Ballad of Boot Hill
[1:55] 18. Johnny Cash - Lorena
[2:08] 19. Ann-Margret - Slowly
[2:01] 20. Roger Miller - (In the Summertime) You Don't Want My Love
[2:15] 21. The Anita Kerr Quartet - When Two Worlds Collide
[2:09] 22. The Anita Kerr Quartet - Fair Swiss Maiden
[1:54] 23. Don Gibson - Cute Little Girls
[3:08] 24. Don Gibson - The Next Voice You Hear
[1:51] 25. Don Gibson - Fireball Mail
[2:52] 26. The Browns - The Three Bells (Les Trios Cloches)
[2:13] 27. The Browns - Blue Christmas
[2:35] 28. Eddy Arnold - What a Fool I Was (To Ever Let You Go)
[2:39] 29. Eddy Arnold - Don't Rob Another Man's Castle
[2:47] 30. Bobby Bare - Shame on Me
[2:05] 31. Burl Ives - A Little Bitty Tear
[2:23] 32. Floyd Cramer - San Antonio Rose
[2:37] 33. Skeeter Davis - The End of the World



Doris Day - Love Him (1963) / Latin For Lovers (1964) /

Doris Day - Love Him (1963) / Latin For Lovers (1964) /

Doris Day - Love Him (1963) / Latin For Lovers (1964) /


Except for a single release of the title song from her film Move Over, Darling, Doris Day stayed away from the record racks for most of 1963, possibly dissatisfied with Columbia Records' efforts to record and promote her with outdated concept albums of old standards at the same time that she was the reigning queen of Hollywood. But in the winter of 1963-1964, she returned with her first new LP in more than a year, Love Him!, and it represented a whole new approach. The producer was her 21-year-old son, Terry Melcher, and he attempted to bring his mother's musical style up to date by banishing the silly concepts and carefully choosing contemporary material he thought would suit her. He got Brill Building pop songwriters Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil to pen the title song, a bolero in which a woman gives another woman advice on the man she has lost to her. And the rest of the material dated either from the last few years or had recently been revived. Thus, for example, "Since I Fell for You" might be a 1948 copyright, but it had been a hit for Lenny Welch in 1963. There were also songs associated with Elvis Presley and appropriations from the country and R&B charts. Melcher seemed to want to demonstrate that Day could sing a broader range of material than Columbia had been giving her, and she responded by throwing herself into performances of songs that had greater depth than those she usually sang. The approach didn't always work, but Day sounded much more engaged than she had on previous albums. The disc made the charts, but sales were difficult to estimate; in Billboard it just missed the Top 100, while in Cash Box it climbed into the Top 40, a significant commercial comeback.

Doris Day - Love Him (1963) / Latin For Lovers (1964) /


In the wake of the Stan Getz albums Jazz Samba (1962) and especially Getz/Gilberto (1964), Brazilian bossa nova was all the rage with the jazz-pop set of the early and mid-'60s, and many pop singers took the opportunity to record albums full of songs by Antonio Carlos Jobim. Doris Day might not come to mind immediately as someone well-suited to the lightly rhythmic style, but she had always had a feel for mid-tempo material that provided a showcase for her warm, rich voice. Still, you might have thought of her as a bit lightweight for the easygoing, yet intricate Brazilian sound. But by her early forties, the eternally ingenuous singer finally was showing signs of maturity. She had taken a distinctly different tack on Love Him!, the 1964 album produced by her son, Terry Melcher, and here she sang the lyrics like a grown-up woman, her voice even betraying an attractive huskiness here and there. As a former band singer, she knew how to work with the beat, and so the rhythms didn't throw her at all. The result was a surprisingly satisfying change of pace for her. Unfortunately, rather than marking a new beginning in her recording career, it happened to come at the end. Latin for Lovers was the last new Doris Day album to be recorded (though it was released ahead of Doris Day's Sentimental Journey, which was actually recorded a couple of months earlier); all that followed were a few singles in 1966-1967 and a "lost" 1967 LP session, The Love Album, which languished unreleased in the Columbia vaults until Melcher found it in 

Doris Day - Love Him (1963) / Latin For Lovers (1964) /



Liz Damon's Orient Express -- Liz Damon's Orient Express (1970)

Liz Damon's Orient Express -- Liz Damon's Orient Express (1970)


Liz Damon's Orient Express was a 1970s band from Hawaii, featuring lead singer Liz Damon, two female backup singers and a rotating backup band. The name apparently derived from the original backup band being entirely Asian. Their only song to make the Billboard Hot 100 Top 40 was "1900 Yesterday", which made it to #33 on the U.S. and #15 on the Canadian charts in early 1971. Most impressively, it peaked at #4 on Billboard's Easy Listening survey.

Liz Damon's Orient Express -- Liz Damon's Orient Express (1970)

The band was the house band at the Garden Bar at the Hilton Hawaiian Village for 18 months and recorded its first album, At the Garden Bar, Hilton Hawaiian Village in 1970. Originally released on Makaha Records, it was then picked up by White Whale Records, who released it as an eponymous album and also released "1900 Yesterday" as a single.

Liz Damon's Orient Express released Burt Bacharach's "Loneliness Remembers (What Happiness Forgets)" for the Anthem label in late 1971, and it became their second and last US chart single, and the only charted version of that song, which was originally recorded by Dionne Warwick.

The group released three more albums during the 1970s consisting mostly of covers. In 1979, the group released a comedy album. During the late 1970s, the band moved to Las Vegas, Nevada where they performed until their breakup in the mid-1980s.

Only Liz Damon's Orient Express is available in print today, although "1900 Yesterday" appears on some compilations of 1970s mellow music

Currently, the band has reformed and is on the "Liz Damon and the Orient Express" Facebook page.



Liz Damon's Orient Express 1971

1.1900 Yesterday 2:57
2.Something 2:42
3.But For  Love3:38
4.You Make Me Feel Like Someone 3:13
5.Bring Me Sunshine 2:23
6.You're Falling In Love 2:52
7.Everything Is Beautiful3:30
8.That Same Old Feeling 3:35
9.Close To You 3:23
10.Let It Be 3:29


Liz Damon's Orient Express -- Liz Damon's Orient Express (1970)



Czterech - Dziwna historia (Nagrania archiwalne z lat 1967 - 1968)

Czterech - Dziwna historia (Nagrania archiwalne z lat 1967 - 1968)



                        CZTERECH - Dziwna historia 1967-1968

Czterech was the best Polish instrumental band from 60's. They played his own compositions, jazz standards and compositions of Johann Sebastian Bach in jazzy style. His leader Marek Blizinski played very similar to Robert Fripp from Giles, Giles and Fripp period....

Label:Kameleon Records
Format:CD, Compilation
Country: Poland
Released:2016

From original mastertapes.First time ever published tracks.Limited edition 300 copies only . Amazing sound...

Czterech - Dziwna historia (Nagrania archiwalne z lat 1967 - 1968)



                                                             ****


Dave Pike - Manhattan Latin (1964 2004 USA)VA & Anita Kerr Quartet  - We Dig Anita The Oohs and Aahs of the Nashville SoundDoris Day - Love Him (1963) / Latin For Lovers (1964) /Liz Damon's Orient Express -- Liz Damon's Orient Express (1970)

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