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Jon & Robin - The Soul Of A Boy And Girl (1967 2017 USA)

Jon & Robin - The Soul Of A Boy And Girl (1967 2017 USA)


Jon & Robin - The Soul Of A Boy And Girl (1967 2017 USA)

Jon & Robin - The Soul Of A Boy And Girl (1967 2017 USA)

Jon & Robin - The Soul Of A Boy And Girl (1967 2017 USA)

Jon & Robin - real names: Jon Abdnor, Javonne Braga. Mid-1960s duo who recorded for Dallas-based Abnak Records (founded by the namesake father of Jon Abdnor). Jon Abdnor (who also doubled as a company point man) released several regional hit singles in 1963-64 but didn't really hit it big nationally until hs father suggested he get a duet partner. 
Abdnor was paired with singer Robin Beavers, but she quit before the recording sessions were to begin. She was replaced with Javonne Braga, who took on "Robin" as her stage name. The pair hit the Top 20 with "Do It Again A Little Bit Slower" in the spring of 1967. After a spate of follow-up singles that barely made the Billboard Hot 100 (but were regional best-sellers in Texas and the Southwest), the duo released solo singles before breaking up for good in 1969. Braga married Five Americans drummer Jimmy Wright in 1970 while Jon, defeated by various legal and personal issues, quit the music business.


Gale Garnett - My Kind of Folk Songs (1964)

 Gale Garnett - My Kind of Folk Songs (1964)

Gale Garnett - My Kind of Folk Songs (1964)

From Beatman:
Gale Garnett - My Kind of Folk Songs (1964)
Continuing the theme 'Private Collection - Overview Albums'...
Gale Zoe Garnett is a New Zealand-born Canadian singer best known in the United States for her Grammy-winning folk hit 'We'll Sing In The Sunshine'. Garnett has since carved out a career as a writer and actress. She made her public singing debut in 1960, while at the same time pursuing an acting career, making guest appearances on television shows. She made her New York nightclub debut in 1963, was signed by RCA Victor Records, and recorded her debut album, 'My Kind of Folk Songs' (1964)...
All selected tracks are restored and remastered for a good modern sound...



The Au Go-Go Singers - They Call Us Au Go-Go Singers (1964 1999 USA)

The Au Go-Go Singers - They Call Us Au Go-Go Singers (1964 1999 USA)

The Au Go-Go Singers - They Call Us Au Go-Go Singers (1964 1999 USA)

The Au Go Go Singers were a nine-member folk group formed in New York City in 1964, and best remembered for featuring Stephen Stills and Richie Furay, two years before they formed Buffalo Springfield. 
Stills and Furay met while performing in folk clubs in Greenwich Village, alongside Stills' former college classmates Bob Harmelink and Nels Gustafson. They were seen by songwriter Ed E. Miller, the credited co-writer of the Serendipity Singers' hit "Don't Let the Rain Come Down". In early 1964, Miller was preparing a revue, America Sings, which chronicled the history of folk music in America, and suggested that the four, together with an existing group, the Bay Singers - Roy Michaels, Mike Scott, Fred Geiger and Jean Gurney – and Michaels' girlfriend Kathy King, provide the music in the show. Although the show only ran for two weeks, Miller secured a contract with Roulette Records for the nine-strong group to record an album, which they did with producers Hugo Peretti and Luigi Creatore. After seeing the show, club owner Howard Solomon signed the group for a residency at his Cafe au Go Go nightclub on Bleecker Street. By the time the LP was released in late 1964, the ensemble had become known as the Au Go Go Singers. As well as appearing at the club, they also made TV appearances, and performed at other venues. Their album, They Call Us Au Go-Go Singers, featured Stills' lead vocals on Billy Edd Wheeler's song "High Flying Bird", and Furay singing Tom Paxton's "Where I'm Bound". The album overall is described at Allmusic as "predictably bland, professional and well executed group hootenanny folk music". The album also included songs by Jesse Fuller, John Stewart, and Lee Hays. Members listed on back cover of LP are Richie Furay, Kathy King, Steven Stills, Jean Gurney, Fred Geiger, Bob Harmelink, Roy Michaels, Mike Scott, and Nels Gustafson. Following a dispute with Solomon, the group's management was taken over by Jim Friedman and they continued to perform, but found that their contract with Morris Levy at Roulette meant that some venues were unwilling to book them, and they also found that, after the British Invasion, their style of music was rapidly becoming unfashionable. A second album never appeared; some members received draft notices; and Kathy King, who suffered from stage fright, decided to leave. In 1965, the group disbanded. Stills then joined the four members of the Bay Singers – Michaels, Scott, Geiger, and Gurney – and, renamed The Company, toured in Ontario. During the tour, Stills met Neil Young, when the Company were on the same bill as Young's band, the Squires. The following year, Stills, Young and Furay formed Buffalo Springfield in Los Angeles. Of the other members of the Au Go Go Singers, Roy Michaels later formed Cat Mother & the All Night Newsboys, whose first album was produced by Jimi Hendrix.
The album They Call Us Au Go-Go Singers was issued on CD by Rhino Records in 1999.


Ian & Sylvia - Full Circle (1968 Canada)

Ian & Sylvia - Full Circle (1968 Canada)


Ian & Sylvia - Full Circle (1968 Canada)

Ian & Sylvia were a Canadian folk and country music duo which consisted of Ian and Sylvia Tyson, nee Fricker. They began performing together in 1959, married in 1964, and divorced and stopped performing together in 1975.
The two started performing together in Toronto in 1959. By 1962, they were living in New York City where they caught the attention of manager Albert Grossman, who managed Peter, Paul and Mary and would soon become Bob Dylan's manager. Grossman secured them a contract with Vanguard Records and they released their first album late in the year.
Their first album, self-titled Ian & Sylvia, on Vanguard Records consists mainly of traditional songs. There were British and Canadian folk songs, spiritual music, and a few blues songs thrown into the mix. The album was moderately successful and they made the list of performers for the 1963 Newport Folk Festival.
Four Strong Winds, their second album, was similar to the first, with the exception of the inclusion of the early Dylan composition, "Tomorrow is a Long Time", and the title song "Four Strong Winds", which was written by Ian Tyson. "Four Strong Winds" was a major hit in Canada and ensured their stardom.
The two married in June 1964; they also released their third album, Northern Journey, that year. It included a blues song written by her, "You Were on My Mind", which was subsequently recorded by both the California group We Five (a 1965 #1 on the Cashbox chart, #3 on the Billboard Hot 100) and British folk rock singer Crispian St. Peters (#36 in 1967).A recording of "Four Strong Winds" by Bobby Bare made it to #3 on the country charts around that time.
On the Northern Journey album was the song "Someday Soon", a composition by him that would rival "Four Strong Winds" in its popularity. (Both songs would eventually be recorded by dozens of singers.)
Their fourth album, Early Morning Rain, consisted in large part of new songs. They introduced the work of the couple's fellow Canadian songwriter and performer Gordon Lightfoot through the title song and "(That's What You Get) For Lovin' Me". They also recorded songs "Darcy Farrow" by Steve Gillette and Tom Campbell, being the first artists to record these three songs. Additionally, they recorded a number of their own compositions.
They performed at the 1965 Newport Folk Festival. Play One More, their offering of 1965, showed a move toward the electrified folk-like music that was becoming popular with groups like the Byrds and the Lovin' Spoonful. The title tune used horns to evoke the mariachi style.
In 1967, they released two albums, one recorded for Vanguard, the other for MGM. These two efforts, So Much For Dreaming and Lovin' Sound, were far less dynamic presentations. At this time they were doing a weekly TV program for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
They relocated to Nashville, Tennessee, where they recorded two albums; one to fulfill the terms of their Vanguard contract, the other to supply MGM with a second (and last) album for that label. The albums can be defined as early country rock music; Nashville for Vanguard was cut in February 1968, one month before The Byrds' Sweetheart of the Rodeo, widely considered the first collaboration of rock and Nashville players. Three of Bob Dylan's "Basement Tapes" songs are included on these albums; most of the rest were written by Ian or Sylvia.
In 1969, Ian & Sylvia formed the country rock group "Great Speckled Bird". In addition to participating in the cross-Canada rock-and-roll rail tour Festival Express, they recorded a self-titled album for the short-lived Ampex label. Produced by Todd Rundgren, the record failed when Ampex was unable to establish widespread distribution. Thousands of copies never left the warehouse, and it has become a much sought-after collector's item. Initially, the album artist was given as Great Speckled Bird but later copies had a sticker saying that it featured the duo.


Marianne Faithfull ‎– Loveinamist by Marianne Faithfull ‎ (1967)

Marianne Faithfull ‎– Loveinamist by Marianne Faithfull ‎ (1967)

Marianne Faithfull ‎– Love In A Mist

Faithfull's final album of the 1960s (she would do one more single, in 1969) was a confused, patchy effort that seemed indicative of musical directionless. There was overblown, orchestrated straight pop (the cover of the Beatles' "Yesterday"), numbers where she seemed to be attempting to be a British Edith Piaf of sorts, and covers of contemporary folk-rock tunes by Donovan and Tim Hardin. Also, a couple of the better songs ("This Little Bird" and "Counting") had long been available on singles, from 1965 and 1966, respectively. This would have been categorized as "eclectic" rather than "directionless" if the material had been better, the arrangements more inspired, and the singing more commanding, but that wasn't the case on any of those counts. There are still some enjoyable bits, like the cover of "Young Girl Blues," and particularly the version of Jackie DeShannon's moody "With You in Mind." At the time, it was likely seen as something to fill in the gaps in the absence of better material. No one suspected, probably, that Faithfull would be diverted by other professional activities and personal calamities, and really wouldn't return to high visibility as a recording artist for a dozen years. The 1988 CD reissue on London U.K. has a couple of worthwhile bonus tracks in previously unreleased covers of Tim Hardin's "Hang Onto a Dream" and the Kinks' "Rosie, Rosie" (titled "Rosy Won't You Please Come Home" when it appeared on the Kinks' Face to Face album), both of which were recorded in September 1966.

Marianne Faithfull ‎– Loveinamist by Marianne Faithfull ‎ (1967)

VA - If You're Ready! The Best of Dunwich Records, Vol. 2

VA - If You're Ready! The Best of Dunwich Records, Vol. 2

This second volume investigating the history of Chicago's best -- and most influential -- teen band label of the mid-'60s comes up with 28 tracks of classic Windy City garage band genius with more emphasis on rarities and unissued material than its initial volume, Oh Yeah! Dunwich was a small concern, run by three jazz heads, who nonetheless managed to tap into Chicago's fertile teen scene of the mid-'60s and get the very best groups down on tape at the city's best studio, Universal. Although "Gloria" by the Shadows of Knight was their only major national hit, they were one of the few labels that steadily catered to this kind of teenage racket; the quality of their releases was very high and many of them have reached legendary status. The Pride and Joy (actually the Del-Vetts) kick things off with the title track and rare Dunwich 45s from the Shadows of Knight ("I'm Gonna Make You Mine," which starts out with a four-chord guitar blast dripping with reverb, distortion, and rock & roll), Things to Come, the Luv'd Ones, Saturday's Children ("You Don't Know Better"), the Rovin' Kind (great covers of "Girl" and John Sebastian's "Didn't Want to Have to Do It"), and the Wanderin' Kind all keeping the disc stuck in high gear. Seven of the tracks here are previously unissued masters, and these, along with radio spots by H.P. Lovecraft and the American Breed -- one of them for Ban deodorant! -- and a rare alternate session take of the Shadows of Knight creaming "I Got My Mojo Working" (originally released on a vinyl album of Dunwich outtakes in the '70s called Early Chicago) make this fine collection a worthwhile addition to anyone's '60s garage band collection. This one literally screams of teen clubs, Rickenbacker guitars, and fake IDs.

VA - If You're Ready! The Best of Dunwich Records, Vol. 2


VA - Oh Yeah:Best of Dunwich Records, Vol. 1

VA - Oh Yeah:Best of Dunwich Records, Vol. 1

The Chicago-based Dunwich Records was the leading Midwestern garage-rock label, turning out countless great singles from the likes of Shadows of Knight, American Breed, the Rovin' Kind, and H.P. Lovecraft. Oh Yeah! The Best of Dunwich Records is an excellent 31-track collection that contains the label's best-known hits, plus several fine unreleased cuts, radio commercials, and interviews. Anyone interested in delving into garage rock any deeper than the Nuggets compilations should start here -- it gives a good idea of both the treasures and the mediocrities to be found in the multitudes of compilations, and few other collections are quite as consistently listenable as this one.

VA - Oh Yeah:Best of Dunwich Records, Vol. 1


Don McLean - American Pie (1971)

Don McLean - American Pie (1971)


"American Pie" is a song by American singer and songwriter Don McLean. Recorded and released on the American Pie album in 1971, the single was the number-one US hit for four weeks in 1972 and also topped the charts in Australia, Canada, and New Zealand. In the UK, the single reached number 2, where it stayed for 3 weeks, on its original 1972 release while a reissue in 1991 reached No. 12. The song was listed as the No. 5 song on the RIAA project Songs of the Century. A truncated version of the song was covered by Madonna in 2000 and reached No. 1 in several countries, including the United Kingdom, Canada and Australia. McLean's combined version is the fourth longest song to enter the Billboard Hot 100, at the time of release it was the longest, in addition to being the longest song to reach number one.

The repeatedly mentioned phrase "the day the music died" refers to the plane crash in 1959 which killed early rock and roll performers Buddy Holly, The Big Bopper, and Ritchie Valens. (The crash was not known by that name until after McLean's song became a hit.) The meaning of the other lyrics has long been debated, and for decades, McLean declined to explain the symbolism behind the many characters and events mentioned. However, the overall theme of the song is the loss of innocence of the early rock and roll generation as symbolized by the plane crash which claimed the lives of three of its heroes.

In 2017, McLean's original recording was selected for preservation in the National Recording Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or artistically significant"



«American Pie» — фолк-роковая песня, написанная американским автором-исполнителем Доном Маклином для одноимённого альбома в 1971 году. Год спустя эта композиция поднялась на вершину американского хит-парада, где пробыла в течение четырёх недель. Композиция была переиздана в 1991 году, она не попала в американские чарты, но добралась до 12-й строчки в британском хит-параде. В песне поётся о «Дне, когда умерла музыка» — авиакатастрофе 1959 года, в которой погибли Бадди Холли, Ричи Валенс и Биг Боппер. Важность «American Pie» для музыкального и культурного наследия Америки была подтверждена проектом «Песни века», в котором композиция заняла пятое место. Некоторые радиостанции, ориентированные на песни из Top-40, изначально играли только вторую сторону сингла, но популярность песни в конце концов вынудила диджеев ставить её в эфир целиком. «American Pie» является визитной карточкой Дона Маклина.

На 15-й церемонии «Грэмми» песня была выдвинута на соискание награды в категории «Лучшее мужское вокальное поп-исполнение», но проиграла композиции «Without You» Гарри Нилссона. В 2017 году запись была отмечена как «культурно, исторически, и эстетически значимая» и внесена в Национальный Реестр Библиотеки Конгресса США.

Don McLean - American Pie (1971)

Don McLean's second album, American Pie, which was his first to gain recognition after the negligible initial sales of 1970's Tapestry, is necessarily dominated by its title track, a lengthy, allegorical history of rock & roll, because it became an unlikely hit, topping the singles chart and putting the LP at number one as well. "American Pie" has remained as much a cultural touchstone as a song, sung by everyone from Garth Brooks to Madonna, its title borrowed for a pair of smutty teen comedies, while the record itself has earned a registered three-million plays on U.S. radio stations. There may not be much more to note about it, then, except perhaps that even without a crib sheet to identify who's who, the song can still be enjoyed for its engaging melody and singable chorus, which may have more to do with its success than anything else. Of course, the album also included "Vincent," McLean's paean to Van Gogh, which has been played two-million times. Nothing else on the album is as effective as the hits, but the other eight original songs range from sensitive fare like "Till Tomorrow" to the sarcastic, uptempo "Everybody Loves Me, Baby." American Pie -- the album -- is very much a record of its time; it is imbued with the vague depression of the early '70s that infected the population and found expression in the works of singer/songwriters. "American Pie" -- the song -- is really a criticism of what happened in popular music in the '60s, and "Vincent" sympathizes with Van Gogh's suicide as a sane comment on an insane world. "Crossroads" and "Empty Chairs" are personal reflections full of regret and despondency, with the love song "Winterwood" providing the only respite. In the album's second half, the songs get more portentous, tracing society's ills into war and spiritual troubles in "The Grave" and "Sister Fatima." The songs are made all the more poignant by the stately folk-pop arrangements and McLean's clear, direct tenor. It was that voice, equally effective on remakes of pop oldies, that was his salvation when he proved unable to match the songwriting standard set on Tapestry and this collection. But then, the album has an overall elegiac quality that makes it sound like a final statement. After all, if the music has died, what else is there to say?

Mama Cass - Dream A Little Dream Of Me (1968 USA)

Mama Cass - Dream A Little Dream Of Me (1968 USA)

Mama Cass - Dream A Little Dream Of Me (1968 USA)

Mama Cass - Cass Elliot - real name: Ellen Naomi Cohen; USA singer, best known as part of The Mamas & The Papas. Born on September 19, 1941 in Baltimore, Maryland, USA, died on July 29, 1974 in London, England (heart attack). Cass Elliot was first a member of the folky "The Big 3" in 1963 and then "The Mugwumps" along with ex-"The Halifax Three" member Denny Doherty in 1964-65. Later in 1965 she joined former "The New Journeymen" members John Phillips, his wife Michelle Phillips and Denny Doherty (who had left "The Mugwumps" in 1965) and they formed "The Mamas & The Papas", with her taking the nickname Mama Cass. She was credited with creating the group name "The Mamas and The Papas" while watching a TV program, with the other band members, while temporarily residing in the U.S. Virgin Islands. Although some releases were still credited to Mama Cass Elliot, it was around this time that she used her original stage name, Cass Elliot. 


Skeeter Davis - Skeeter Sings Standards (1965)

Skeeter Davis - Skeeter Sings Standards (1965)


Skeeter Davis never received much critical attention, but in the '50s and '60s, she recorded some of the most accessible crossover country music, occasionally skirting rock & roll. Born Mary Penick, Davis took her last name after forming a duo with Betty Jack Davis, the Davis Sisters. Their 1953 single "I Forgot More Than You'll Ever Know" was a big country hit; its B-side, the remarkable "Rock-a-Bye Boogie," foreshadowed rockabilly. That same year, however, the duo's career was cut short by a tragic car accident in which Betty Jack was killed and Skeeter was severely injured. Skeeter did attempt to revive the Davis Sisters with Betty Jack's sister but was soon working as a solo artist.

In the early '60s, Davis followed the heels of Brenda Lee and Patsy Cline to become one of the first big-selling female country crossover acts, although her pop success was pretty short-lived. The weepy ballad "The End of the World," though, was a massive hit, reaching number two in 1963. "I Can't Stay Mad at You," a Top Ten hit the same year, was downright rock & roll; penned by Gerry Goffin and Carole King, it sounded like (and was) an authentic Brill Building girl group-styled classic. Goffin and King also wrote another successful girl group knockoff for her, "Let Me Get Close to You," although such efforts were the exception rather than the rule. Usually she sang sentimental, country-oriented tunes with enough pop hooks to catch the ears of a wider audience, such as "I Will."

Davis concentrated on the country market after the early '60s, although she never seemed too comfortable limiting herself to the Nashville crowd. She recorded a Buddy Holly tribute album in 1967, when Holly wasn't a hot ticket with either the country or the rock audience. But she certainly didn't reject country conventions either: She performed on the Grand Ole Opry and recorded duets with Bobby Bare, Porter Wagoner, and George Hamilton IV.
Skeeter Davis - Skeeter Sings Standards (1965)



Jon & Robin - The Soul Of A Boy And Girl (1967 2017 USA)Gale Garnett - My Kind of Folk Songs (1964)The Au Go-Go Singers - They Call Us Au Go-Go Singers (1964 1999 USA)Ian & Sylvia - Full Circle (1968 Canada)Marianne Faithfull ‎– Loveinamist by Marianne Faithfull ‎ (1967)VA - If You're Ready! The Best of Dunwich Records, Vol. 2VA - Oh Yeah:Best of Dunwich Records, Vol. 1Don McLean - American Pie (1971)Mama Cass - Dream A Little Dream Of Me (1968 USA)Skeeter Davis - Skeeter Sings Standards (1965)

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