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VA - Swinging Mademoiselles (Plus)

VA - Swinging Mademoiselles (Plus)

Repost
Swinging Mademoiselles 2005

VA - Swinging Mademoiselles (Plus)


In his liner notes to Silva America's compilation of female-sung French pop songs of the 1960s, Swinging Mademoiselles: Groovy French Sounds from the 60s, Peter Compton, writing of the "yé-yé" movement that responded to American and British pop of the era, writes that "Sylvie Vartan, Françoise Hardy, Sheila, and France Gall were the biggest stars of the genre...." None of those singers appear on this collection, which instead features 18 selections by 14 lesser-known names. They are, however, uniformly winning, whether they are attempting to rock out, as Jacqueline Taieb does on the album-opening "7 Heures du Matin," when she approximates the stutter of Roger Daltrey and the nonsense syllables of Little Richard, or settling for catchy pop, as Christine Pilzer does on the 1920s-style "Cafe Creme." Rock tends to take a back seat to projections of personality and feminine verve on these tracks, notably Elizabeth's cocky and kooky "Je Suis Sublime," which recounts a sort of "My Favorite Things" list of what she considers life's joys, all of which add up to make her the sublime person she is. But there are some light rockers, such as Clothilde's "Et Moi, et Toi, et Soie" and Liz Brady's tongue-twisting "Palladium (The Hip)." The British influence is overt in two songs brought across the English Channel, "Je Suis la Tigresse," Delphine Desyeux's take on Lulu's U.K. hit "I'm a Tiger," and "Plus Tard," Katy David's French translation of "Call Me," originally recorded by Petula Clark, herself a mainstay of the French charts. But the overall enjoyment provided by the collection is somewhat dampened by the lack of real stars, as well as by the sometimes iffy sound quality. Oddly for what appears to be a legitimate licensing project, the tracks seem to have been mastered from old records, and pops and crackles are audible on several of them.

VA - Swinging Mademoiselles (Plus)


Swinging Mademoiselles 2006

VA - Swinging Mademoiselles (Plus)


Although, as its title suggests, Swinging Mademoiselles Deux is the follow-up to the earlier collection Swinging Mademoiselles: Groovy French Sounds from the 60s, it is actually a better album than its predecessor. Once again, the contents have been assembled from French pop records featuring female singers that roughly correspond to the era of Swinging London, say, 1966, hence the title. These are the equivalents to the contemporaneous British hits of Marianne Faithfull, Cilla Black, and Petula Clark. In fact, the exact French equivalent to Petula Clark is...Petula Clark herself, who was just as big a star in France singing in French as she was in Britain and America singing in English. Here, she takes on a French adaptation of the hit "Needles and Pins" with an entirely different lyric, called "La Nuit N'en Finit Plus." Her inclusion on the album points to its superiority over its predecessor. While some of the biggest stars of what was called the yé-yé movement in French pop are still missing, many of the singers here are better known than the ones on the first disc. As the subtitle puts it, the album contains "More groovy French pop from the 60s including Brigitte Bardot, Petula Clark, Jacqueline Taïeb [who actually was on the first album] and Zouzou." Bardot's selection, "Ecoute le Temps," the theme from the TV show Saint-Tropez...Vole, actually bears a 1971 copyright, but no matter. This is still music that sounds like the mid-'60s, shortly after the Beatles arrived and before psychedelia set in, an eclectic, fun time when songs had harpsichord solos (Maryene's "Cette Fille N'est Rien Pour Lui") or borrowed the sound of the Kinks' "You Really Got Me" (Pussy Cat's "Acune Fille au Monde [Power of Love]"). In France as well as England and the U.S., it was a silly, entertaining interlude in pop, captured again on this album. (A disclaimer inside the CD booklet explains the occasionally uneven sound quality as "due to unavailability of certain master recordings," resulting in the use of old records instead.) 


Swinging Mademoiselle (1999;2000;2012)


VA - Swinging Mademoiselles (Plus)VA - Swinging Mademoiselles (Plus)VA - Swinging Mademoiselles (Plus)


VA - Swinging Mademoiselles (Plus)

VA - Swinging Mademoiselles (Plus)

VA - Swinging Mademoiselles (Plus)







Filipinki – Nie Ma Go (1968)

Filipinki – Nie Ma Go (1968)

Filipinki – Nie Ma Go (1968)

The debut of the group took place in 1960 at the song contest We are looking for young talents. In 1962, the group took part in a radio competition Microphone for all, with which they gained popularity and received an offer to record for the Szczecin branch of Polish radio. These recordings were broadcast live throughout the country. Since then, the group ceased to be an amateur and began a professional career.
The peak of popularity of the Filipinas fell on the period 1963-1965. In January 1963, the group performed on a radio broadcast by Jan Svyach and Zalewski. In April, the group made its debut on television, and in May, at the editorial office of Filipinka magazine in Warsaw, it officially secured the name. The song Wala twist in honor of Valentina Tereshkova, who made her space flight, brought the group further international fame.
In the summer of the same year, in August, the group is already giving concerts abroad (East Germany, Sweden), and is recording the first album. Then he gives concerts abroad (England, Bulgaria, France, Canada, USA, USSR). He successfully performs at festivals (including the National Festival of Polish Song in Opole).

The songs for the group are mainly written by Jan Janikowski and Wlodzimierz Patuszynski.



01. Nie ma go (02:49)
02. Wlasny swiat (02:17)
03. Znam go na pamiec (02:30)
04. O dziesiatej (02:12)


Filipinki – Nie Ma Go (1968)


 

Filioinki - Nagrania Radiowe Z Lat 1963-1972 [Z Archiwum Polskiego Radia]






01. Pity Pity                                                                                                             
02. Parasolki                                                                                                             
03. Batum                                                                                                                 
04. Dzieci Pireusu                                                                                                        
05. Spacer po porcie                                                                                                      
06. I sommerous soliga                                                                                                    
07. Praczki z Portugali                                                                                                   
08. Ave Maria  no morro                                                                                                   
09. Filipinki to my                                                                                                       
10. Charleston nastolatków                                                                                                
11. Babunia z portretu                                                                                                    
12. Bal Arlekina                                                                                                          
13. Do widzenia profesorze                                                                                                
14. Piosenki twego snu                                                                                                    
15. Rozśpiewani rówieśnicy                                                                                                
16. Wala twist                                                                                                            
17. Ballada o kimś dalekim                                                                                                
18. Siedmiu chłopców                                                                                                      
19. Tarap tarap                                                                                                           
20. Znajdź sobie dziewczynę                                                                                               
21. Tłok na plaży                                                                                                         
22. Nie ma go                                                                                                             
23. Weselmy się                                                                                                           
24. Wiosna majem wróci                                                                                                    
25. Białe muszelki                                                                                                        
26. Za dużo wrażeń                                                                                                        

01. On tu jest                                                                                                            
02. Dam ci wszystko co zechcesz                                                                                           
03. Jeśli kochasz nie mów mi o tym                                                                                        
04. Nie wierz chłopcom                                                                                                    
05. Nic nie wraca                                                                                                         
06. Co się odwlecze                                                                                                       
07. Ja się w tobie nie zakocham                                                                                           
08. Po ulicy chodzę                                                                                                       
09. Królewski zamek                                                                                                       
10. Ze mną od dziś                                                                                                        
11. Filipinki to my - LIVE                                                                                                
12. Bal Arlekina                                                                                                          
13. Charleston nastolatków                                                                                                
14. Ballada o kimś dalekim                                                                                                
15. Do widzenia profesorze                                                                                                
16. Rówieśnicy                                                                                                            
17. Wala twist                                                                                                            
18. Tłok na plaży                                                                                                         
19. Nie powtarzaj się                                                                                                     
20. Weselmy się                                                                                                           
21. Wiosna majem wróci                                                                                                    
22. Odjechali chłopcy                                                                                                     
23. Biała brzózka pośród miasta                                                                                           
24. Byli tacy jak my                                                                                                      
25. Regulaminowa piosenka                                                  



VA - The Answer To Everything Girl Answer Songs of the 60s

VA - The Answer To Everything Girl Answer Songs of the 60s



VA - The Answer To Everything Girl Answer Songs of the 60s

Review by Richie Unterberger 

An astounding number of "answer" songs have been recorded in response to big hits in the history of the recording industry, though the phenomenon is more popular at some points than at others. This CD collects no less than 28 such items from 1959-1966, most of them from the early '60s, and all but one (Bertell Dache's "Not Just Tomorrow, But Always") sung by a woman vocalist or female group. As you'd expect, virtually all of these are novelties of sorts, and virtually none of them are in the same class as the songs they're answering. Nor were many of them successful in the marketplace, though a few of them (especially Jody Miller's "Queen of the House," fired off in response to Roger Miller's "King of the Road," and Jeanne Black's "He'll Have to Stay") were actually big hits in their own right, and a few others managed to reach the lower regions of the national charts. All that considered, this is actually more listenable than many skeptics might expect. The production is usually good, the rewrites usually reasonably witty, and the performances usually enthusiastic, even if in their heart of hearts everyone involved knew it was a long shot that these things were going to be smashes. A wide range of styles are on display, from early soul and girl group to country-pop, and just a few of the performances are pretty respectable artistic products only tinged by novelty, like Gerri Granger's "Just Tell Him Jane Said Hello" (the one track on the disc that sounds like it could have been a hit and wasn't) and Esther Phillips' "When a Woman Loves a Man." Many of the big stars of the day get honored (if that's the right word) by forgotten records here, including Ray Charles, the Miracles, the Four Seasons, Dion, Bobby Vee, the Shirelles, Jim Reeves, Gene Chandler, and Sam Cooke. Even the cuts that sound like awful ideas based on their titles -- the Bobbettes' "I Don't Like It Like That" (answering Chris Kenner's "I Like It Like That") and the Teen Queens' grittily bluesy "There Is Nothing on My Mind" (answering Bobby Marchan's "There Is Something on Your Mind") -- aren't at all embarrassing to sit through. Not so, however, for the finale, Josephine's "They Took You Away -- I'm Glad, I'm Glad," the rebuff to Napoleon XIV's loony "They're Coming to Take Me Away Ha-Haa!"

VA - The Answer To Everything Girl Answer Songs of the 60s

VA - The Answer To Everything Girl Answer Songs of the 60s




 

Louise Cordet ‎– The Sweet Beat of Louise Cordet (1962-1964)





 
Louise Cordet was a phenomenon in English pop/rock for about two years, beginning when she reached number 13 on the charts with "I'm Just a Baby," released on English Decca in 1962. She was lucky enough to hit just as a new wave of British rock & rollers were coming to the fore, even though her sound was a little on the wimpy romantic side to fit in with British beat. As the daughter of a major television personality (and god-daughter of Prince Philip) with a convent school education, her origins were very different from the working class origins of most British rock & rollers, but she found an audience and held onto it, and for a time bidded fair to be Decca Records's answer to Helen Shapiro. In 1963, Cordet appeared in two movies, Just for You and Just for Fun; the latter, a follow-up to 1962's It's Trad, Dad, was particularly notable, presenting Cordet performing "Which Way the Wind Blows," which many onlookers regarded as the best music clip in the movie and the highlight of the entire film. In some ways, Cordet's career anticipated that of Marianne Faithfull, as it took her from a convent school into a world of pop stars, London night spots, and concert tours with the Beatles and Gerry & the Pacemakers. Indeed, she is said to have taught Paul McCartney a dance or two on his arrival in London, and Gerry Marsden originally wrote "Don't Let the Sun Catch You Crying" as a number for Cordet, before his group recorded it. Her final single, "Two Lovers," was a dazzling treatment of a Motown classic, drenched in heavy guitars and a great beat, and nearly as alluring as the Beatles' cover of "You've Really Got a Hold on Me." By 1965, however, Cordet had stopped recording and, ironically, became part of the cadre of hangers on surrounding Marianne Faithfull, serving as French pronunciation advisor at Faithfull's May 11, 1965 Decca Records recording session, and also doing her best in the press as a publicist for Faithfull during this period.


 British singer Louise Cordet got a U.K. Top Twenty hit in 1962 as a teenager with her first single, "I'm Just a Baby," but never made the hit parade again despite issuing a couple dozen tracks between 1962 and 1964. This exemplary compilation has all of them, including her six singles, a 1963 British EP, a couple songs from the 1963 Just for Fun soundtrack, and nine tracks (all but one sung in French) released only in France. Cordet had a mild voice that might have been more suited to straight adult pop than the pop/rock she usually recorded, and was more a late relic of the U.K. teen idol pre-Beatles pop years than she was a part of the British Invasion. Combined with the ordinary and innocuous material she was given to sing, that makes this something for British rock/early-'60s girl singer completists, as well annotated and illustrated as it is. There are some tracks of note, if more for their origins than Cordet's interpretations, particularly "Don't Let the Sun Catch You Crying," which she released (and which was a flop) in early 1964 shortly before Gerry & the Pacemakers issued their famous international hit version. Her cover of "From Me to You" from a May 1963 French EP is one of the earliest and most obscure covers of a song by the Beatles (with whom she toured that year), and like some of her other recordings, had a faint Twist rock/"yé-yé" sound. She also made an unlikely venture into Cajun-flavored pop/rock on the 1963 single "Around and Around," and "Don't Let the Sun Catch You Crying"'s flip, "Loving Baby" (written by producer and ex-Shadows drummer Tony Meehan), has some eerie tones a little reminiscent of Joe Meek's work. She was ill-equipped for harder stuff, however, and the sloppy arrangement of Mary Wells' "Two Lovers" on her final single misses some chords key to the classic original. 

 





Lulu - The Complete Recordings

Lulu - The Complete Recordings

Lulu - Shout (The Complete Decca Recordings 1964-67)
Release Date June 23, 2009 

Although Lulu's mid-'60s Decca recordings have been issued piecemeal on numerous anthologies, somehow no one executed the logical idea of putting them all together on one release until this 42-track, two-CD collection. All of her 1964-1967 sides for the label are included, serving as a comprehensive document to the first three years or so of her recording career. Particularly in the U.S. (where she really wasn't known until the 1967 chart-topper "To Sir with Love," not included here), this period has remained rather obscure, and certainly not as familiar to the general rock fan as her more commercially successful recordings of the late '60s. This is a shame, as this was undoubtedly the era -- in spite of her tender teenage years -- in which she laid down her most soulful, R&B-influenced, and raunchiest recordings by far. The 1964 British hit cover of "Shout!" is of course the most famous of these. But those who dismiss Lulu as a relative lightweight of the British Invasion might be surprised to find quite a few other first-rate combinations of soul and girl group pop here, like "Nothing Left to Do But Cry," "I'll Come Running Over," "After You," "Take Me as I Am," "Can't Hear You No More," and a rip-roaring "Heatwave." The completist nature of this project does mean you get a good number of mediocre songs that wouldn't have made the cut for a more selective single-disc Decca-era best-of. Too, some of the rarer numbers (including both sides of a German-language 45 and numerous non-LP tracks) just aren't in the same league with the more familiar tunes. But with comprehensive liner notes, this is a necessary acquisition for Lulu fans, and a pretty good one for more general British Invasion admirers.

Lulu - The Complete Recordings

 


Sharon - Loves You Know Who

Sharon  - Loves You Know Who



Sharon Finkelstein aka ... Sharon Tandy.

Sharon  - Loves You Know Who

If there was any justice in the world, Johannesburg-born Sharon Tandy (born Sharon Finkelstein) would have been up there with Dionne Warwick and Dusty Springfield in the 60s.
Unquestionably, she had the voice for it, and her choice of songs was pretty much impeccable. Her South African debut LP, Sharon - Loves You-Know-Who, showcased her strong, intuitive delivery on Cliff Richard and Elvis Presley covers.
Sharon honed her vocals on the South African club circuit before hooking up with lover (later husband) Frank Fenter of Atlantic Records and playing a couple of dates with his proteges, UK beat band The Couriers.
She moved to London in 1964 to seek fame and fortune.
Between 1964 and 1969 Sharon flirted with melodramatic, Sandie Shaw-like Brit pop, freakbeat and psychedelic rock with Southampton pop art beat combo Les Fleur de Lys, recording superb numbers such as Stay With Me and You’ve Gotta Believe It.
sharontandy_lpShe appeared on Thank Your Lucky Stars, Beat Club and Top Of The Pops, and her fiery version of Hold On (1967) became her signature tune – with her breathless rasp going head-to-head with searing Yardbirds-like guitars.
Signed to Stax in 1966 she cut earthy Southern soul with Booker T & The MGs and Isaac Hayes, becoming the first European-based artist to record in East McLemore Studios. She also appeared as an opening act on the 1967 Stax/Volt Tour of Europe.
On her return to England she teamed with Les Fleur de Lys again, but by 1970 she was back in South Africa.
  She recorded a single for Polydor in 1967 credited to "Debrah Aire" featuring more pop styled tracks, but this also flopped. However, the combination of lack of commercial success and the breakdown of her relationship with Fenter led to her return to South Africa in 1970.



http://www.rockboar.com/persons/435/Psychedelic-rock/Sharon-Tandy


Sharon - Loves You Know Who (With The Astronauts)
 Rare first album ...







Les Gam's - EP Collection

Les Gam's - EP Collection


Les Gam's

Les Gam's étaient un groupe vocal féminin de rock français, populaire au début des années 1960, mais dont la carrière fut éphémère.

Biographie
Le groupe se compose de Graziella, Annie, Michèle et Suzy, toutes anciennes choristes de Gilbert Bécaud. C'est en prenant la première lettre de leurs prénoms qu'elles trouvent leur nom d'artiste.

Les Gam's figurent parmi le plateau proposé par le magazine Salut les Copains lors d'un concert gratuit donné le 22 juin 1963 à Paris, place de la Nation, devant 150 000 jeunes spectateurs. Elles furent également choristes pour Claude François.

La chanteuse soliste Annie Markan entame une carrière solo en 1965 en enregistrant la version française d'un succès américain de Len Barry 1,2,3. Elle est ensuite attachée de presse chez Polygram.

Discographie
Supers 45 tours 
Cheveux fous et lèvres roses / Comme ils s'aimaient / Bon vent, ma jolie / Adieu bye bye, Vogue, 1962
Il a le truc / Ne dis pas du mal de mon amour / Oui les filles / Rendez-vous jeudi, Mercury, 1963
C'est bien fait pour toi / Je ne pourrai jamais l'oublier / Attention accident / Tiens-le, Mercury, 1963
La soirée est finie / De quoi sont faits les garçons ? / Toi l'ami / Beau garçon, Mercury, 1963
Oh ! wow wow wee / L'été reviendra / My boy lollipop / L'anneau de feu, Mercury, 1964
Une petite larme m'a trahie / Impatiente (d'etre seule pour pleurer) / Rien n'est trop beau / Toujours un coin qui me rappelle (Les Gam's avec Annie Markan), 1964


Les Gam's - EP Collection

Les Gam's - EP Collection

Les Gam's - EP Collection

Les Gam's - EP Collection




V.A.- Dream Babes

V.A.-  Dream Babes

Vol.1 - Am I Dreaming
The British girl group sound was a different animal than the American article: there was an equal emphasis on production craft, but there was a higher proportion of pop to soul, and a Europop influence in many of the melodies and arrangements. This 24-track compilation gathers rare non-hit singles from 1962 to 1970, and none of the singers will be familiar to U.S. listeners (indeed, most or all of them will be unfamiliar to British ones as well). It's decent but light girl group (or girl group-influenced) '60s pop that could often use more grit; some of it's fairly strong, but there are no melodies or performances that announce "classic" in neon lights. If you're a sucker for the girl group sound, it's an acceptable addition to the library, with some standouts, like Samantha Jones' "Don't Come Any Closer" (covered to greater effect in French by Françoise Hardy), Alma Cogan's "Snakes and Snails," and Carole Deene's goofy "Some People," with a train whistle bleating away in the background.

V.A.-  Dream Babes

V.A.-  Dream Babes


 Vol.2 - Reflections

British girl singers did not comprise the healthiest subgenre of 1960s rock. And since this 22-track compilation of female-sung British pop/rock from 1962-1971 does not include any big names except for Cilla Black (represented by her 1968 B-side "Work Is a Four Letter Word") and Helen Shapiro (with her self-penned 1964 B-side "He Knows How to Love Me"), you might not ready yourself for a stunning experience. It isn't brilliant, but actually it's a pretty fair and fun collection of obscurities. Some other names might be faintly remembered (in the U.K., not the U.S.), such as Samantha Jones and Elkie Brooks, but for the most part these are no-names, working in a vein combining British Invasion sounds with American girl-group/soul-influenced production. Some of the more memorable outings include Jones' wispy "Somebody Else's Baby," Guillivers People's solid adaptation of Jackie DeShannon's "Splendour in the Grass," Linda Laine & the Sinners' wistful and folky "Don't Do It Baby," and Carol Elvin's "Don't Leave Me," which sounds instantly suitable for a British mid-'60s film soundtrack. As a change of pace there's also the folk-pop of the Levee Breakers' 1965 single "Babe I'm Leaving You," featuring the voice of Beverley, who would become a noted part of the 1970s folk-rock scene as part of a duo with her 

V.A.-  Dream Babes

V.A.-  Dream Babes


Vol.3 - Backcomb'n'Beat

The third installment of this series devoted to British '60s girl group-like sounds is, like the genre itself, not a match for the best American girl group music. But like its predecessors, it's a fairly good compilation, if more notable for inventive orchestral pop production than for the talents of the singers. Julie Driscoll, represented by the early single "I Know You Love Me Not" (which sounds a little like an experimental Dusty Springfield), is the only fairly well-known name on this 22-track disc, though Twinkle had some success in Britain, and Glenda Collins and Samantha Jones have their enthusiasts. There are some real solid, ingratiating pop/rock cuts here, though, like the McKinleys' quite gutsy "Sweet and Tender Romance"; Dany Chandelle & the Ladybirds' "Lying Awake," a pretty reasonable facsimile of Phil Spector's Ronettes/Crystals arrangements; the Chantelles' exuberant "Gonna Get Burned"; Sylvan's odd "We Don't Belong," with its clattering descending melody and suicide allusions; the breathy sides by Samantha Juste, the future wife of Mickey Dolenz; the swirling torch pop of Cloda Rogers' "Lonely Room"; and the Drifters-influenced arrangement of Jan Panter's "Yours Sincerely." A real surprise contributor, if an indirect one, is Donovan, who co-wrote and played guitar on the McKinleys' 1965 pop-folk outing "Give Him My Love," a number he never recorded himself. Overall it's an above-average comp with good variety, not just of interest to die-hard specialists.

V.A.-  Dream Babes

V.A.-  Dream Babes


Vol.4 - Go Girl

Although volume four of RPM's Dream Babes series of 1960s British girl group sides gets further into obscure flops than its predecessors, there's barely any drop in the quality, which remains good, though hardly great. And as with most of the rest of the songs on this series, the production's better than the singers or the material. That's not to say there aren't some pretty good cuts on this 22-song anthology, some of them explicitly derivative of the American girl group sound (like the Chantelles' cracking "I Want That Boy," a cover of an obscure U.S. single by Sadina), others taking a pop-soul approach, others mixing in some British beat music. Some of these performers are famous, but not for their music: two sides of a 1967 Twiggy single are here, as are a couple of 1968 tracks by Linda Thorson (who played Tara King on The Avengers). Highlights include the Orchids' stomping, pining adolescent girl group "Mr. Scrooge" (produced and co-written by Who/Kinks producer Shel Talmy); the Chantelles' credible emulation of slickly lush American pop-soul on "I Think of You"; and the British Invasion-cum-Everly Brothers harmonies of the McKinley Sisters' pounding "When He Comes Along" (by Geoff Stephens, author of "The Crying Game"). Plenty of other names well-known to British Invasion fans were involved in some of these sides in some capacity, like John Carter and Ken Lewis (who wrote the McKinleys' nice ballad "That Lonely Feeling"); session guitar ace Big Jim Sullivan, who plays tone pedal guitar on that track, as he had on Dave Berry's "The Crying Game"; Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber, who wrote Ross Hannaman's Marianne Faithfull-like 1967 single "Down Through Summer"; producer Mike Leander, who wrote the Breakaways' gloomy ballad "Sacred Love"; and Kenny Lynch, who wrote the Linda Thorson sides. Released for the first time here is Jacki Bond's 1967 recording of "Reviewing the Situation," cut a couple of years prior to Sandie Shaw's release of the same tune on her 1969 album of the same name.

V.A.-  Dream Babes

V.A.-  Dream Babes


 Vol.5 - Folk Rock and Faithful

The word "folk-rock" seems to mean something different to everyone, and many fans might find Dream Babes, Vol. 5: Folk Rock and Faithfull, a compilation of 22 woman-sung 1965-1969 tracks to be more accurately pegged as "folk-rock-influenced pop/rock" than "folk-rock." Even if it's more featherweight than the Byrds (or for that matter the Mamas & the Papas), it's a pretty interesting and fun collection of rarities, most of them sung by British femmes and produced in the U.K. (though a couple of Australians sneak in, as does Jackie DeShannon's "Don't Turn Your Back on Me," recorded by the Californian in England). There's nothing here by Marianne Faithfull, despite the sly use of her name in the title. But the wispier and folkier tracks here certainly bear her influence, including those by Nico (her London-recorded cover of Gordon Lightfoot's "I'm Not Saying"), Vashti (represented by her rare 1966 single "Train Song"/"Love Song"), Gay Singleton's "In My Time of Sorrow" (a DeShannon-Jimmy Page composition also recorded by Faithfull, though Singleton's version is good too), Greta Ann's melodramatic "Sadness Hides the Sun," Gillian Hills's "Tomorrow Is Another Day" (the actress' only English-language release), and Trisha's 1965 single "The Darkness of My Night" (a Donovan composition that Donovan apparently never recorded himself, though it's not so hot). Some of these records opt for a far more elaborately arranged approach, though, with the Caravelles' 1967 single "Hey Mama You've Been on My Mind" sounding rather like Eric Andersen as sung by a girl group and produced by Phil Spector, and Gemini's "Sunshine River" (from Australia) pouring on the Byrds-y electric guitars. While some of these cuts are dull, there are other cool items as well, like "Bring It to Me" by Vashti pals Jennifer Lewis and Angela Strange; Judi Smith's gorgeous "Leaves That Come Tumbling Down," another Jackie DeShannon-Jimmy Page co-write; Australian Maggie Hammond's strong cover of "High Flying Bird," even if she does change the key lyric "I'm rooted like a tree" to the less effective "I'm tired as can be"; and Caroline Carter's "The Ballad of Possibilities (Come Along)," another obscure Jackie DeShannon song. The more traditional face of folk music even surfaces with Leonore Drewery's "Rue," probably better known under the title Pentangle used for the same tune, "Let No Man Steal Your Thyme." The folk-rock concept gets stretched pretty far to include Angelina's "Wishing My Life Away," which seems more influenced by Buddy Holly and Joe Meek. But if that's what it takes to get worthwhile rarities like those issued, why not?

V.A.-  Dream Babes

V.A.-  Dream Babes


Vol.6 - Sassy and Stonefree

Where previous volumes of the worthy Dream Babes series focused on woman-sung British pop/rock of a slightly earlier (mid-'60s) vintage, Sassy and Stonefree: Dream Babes, Vol. 6 has a somewhat later timespan, featuring 22 recordings from 1966-1972 (three of them previously unreleased). Accordingly, there are more soul, heavy rock, and singer/songwriter influences to be heard, though it's still identifiably Brit-pop-based for the most part. Even if you think you know your '60s Brit-pop, you might not be well acquainted with many of the names here; it takes quite some digging to assemble a compilation of this sort in which the most famous names are Clodagh Rodgers (whose "Come Back and Shake Me," included here, made number three in the U.K. in 1969), Samantha Jones, and Lesley Duncan. It's shorter on highlights than other installments in the series, and not the kind of thing that would have given Dusty Springfield and Lulu much to worry about. There's some stuff to enjoy in what's a pretty pop-soul-oriented set, particularly on the production end. But there are no true standouts as far as the songs are concerned, and while the singers are okay, none are especially commanding (and some of the material would have probably been done better by the American artists the producers and vocalists sometimes seemed to be trying to emulate). Generally it's tastefully perky and upbeat, never more so than on Sandra Bryant's "Girl with Money," which is a little reminiscent of the kind of uptempo songs Neil Diamond wrote in his early solo career.

V.A.-  Dream Babes


V.A.-  Dream Babes


Vol.7 - Beat Chic

By the time of this 2007 release, the Dream Babes series had developed into a surprisingly extensive one, testifying to the existence of much more female-sung 1960s British pop/rock than even most British rock experts realized. Like any genre series that digs up a seemingly endless mountain of obscurities, it's more impressive for its quantity than its quality. Still, like its predecessors, Beat Chic: Dream Babes, Vol. 7 offers a wide assortment of material from the '60s (from 1962-1967 in this CD's case), drawing from the girl group, soul-pop, and pop/rock styles, only occasionally taking in influences from the guitar-oriented British Invasion sound. Certainly the 22 tracks aren't safe choices; Billie Davis and Goldie & the Gingerbreads are the only artists who will be fairly recognizable to collectors, and even those acts aren't exactly automatically familiar ones to most vintage rock fans. Fans of the mainstream mid-'60s British pop/rock sound will enjoy this material for the production values it typifies, but there's really not much in the way of gripping performances or songs. Some of the more notable items include Polly Perkins' energetic novelty "You Too Can Be a Beatle"; Goldie & the Gingerbreads' rather disappointingly mild "Can't You Hear My Heartbeat," which Herman's Hermits nabbed the hit with in the U.S.; and Dani Sheridan's quite good interpretation of "Guess I'm Dumb," co-written by Brian Wilson and originally recorded by Glen Campbell in the U.S. Honeybus fans will also want to note the inclusion of three previously unreleased Christine Holmes tracks co-written by Pete Dello and Ray Cane, the best of which ("Here Comes My Baby") is a competent American girl group-like effort with Beatlesque touches.

V.A.-  Dream Babes

V.A.-  Dream Babes


Vol.8 - Stockingtop Pop

In the mid-'60s through early '70s, the British pop music industry was a well-oiled machine, cranking out bright, tuneful melodies at a feverish pace, and RPM's eighth CD collection of rare U.K. pop singles from female vocalists demonstrates just how deep the well goes on this stuff. With the exception of Tina Charles' brassy but over the top cover of Melanie's "Bo Bo's Party" and the subtle but defiant "I Don't Ever Want to Be Kicked by You" by the Stockingtops, the mood on these tunes is upbeat and the craft is polished and professional, with the production slick and the arrangements full-bodied, suggesting the British equivalent of classic Brill Building pop with a characteristic dollop of music hall theatrics. Many of these singers supplemented their paychecks as solo acts by doing backing vocals on sessions by other artists (or by doing commercials -- a promotional recording for Bush audio equipment leads off this disc), and there's a certain uniformity to the performing styles of these artists. But a few of the tracks do stand out, such as the high-gloss soul stylings of Maxine Nightingale, the aggressively chirpy harmonies of the Cameos, the very American leanings of the Chanters, and the sweet, breathy confidence of the Paper Dolls. And even the lesser selections are fine examples of studiocraft at its height, from the days when the bigger the studio orchestra and the more audacious the arrangement, the better. While some might find a certain kitsch value in this stuff, Stockingtop Pop is good enough to be appreciated without irony, and Michael Robson's liner notes offer plenty of background data on these forgotten songbirds.

V.A.-  Dream Babes

V.A.-  Dream Babes





Many THANKS to Cor 
VA - Swinging Mademoiselles (Plus)Filipinki – Nie Ma Go (1968)Filioinki -  Nagrania Radiowe Z Lat 1963-1972 [Z Archiwum Polskiego Radia]VA - The Answer To Everything Girl Answer Songs of the 60s Louise Cordet ‎– The Sweet Beat of Louise Cordet (1962-1964)VA - Girls With Guitars  Sharon  - Loves You Know Who  Les Gam's - EP CollectionV.A.-  Dream Babes

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