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Louise Cordet ‎– The Sweet Beat of Louise Cordet (1962-1964)





 
Louise Cordet was a phenomenon in English pop/rock for about two years, beginning when she reached number 13 on the charts with "I'm Just a Baby," released on English Decca in 1962. She was lucky enough to hit just as a new wave of British rock & rollers were coming to the fore, even though her sound was a little on the wimpy romantic side to fit in with British beat. As the daughter of a major television personality (and god-daughter of Prince Philip) with a convent school education, her origins were very different from the working class origins of most British rock & rollers, but she found an audience and held onto it, and for a time bidded fair to be Decca Records's answer to Helen Shapiro. In 1963, Cordet appeared in two movies, Just for You and Just for Fun; the latter, a follow-up to 1962's It's Trad, Dad, was particularly notable, presenting Cordet performing "Which Way the Wind Blows," which many onlookers regarded as the best music clip in the movie and the highlight of the entire film. In some ways, Cordet's career anticipated that of Marianne Faithfull, as it took her from a convent school into a world of pop stars, London night spots, and concert tours with the Beatles and Gerry & the Pacemakers. Indeed, she is said to have taught Paul McCartney a dance or two on his arrival in London, and Gerry Marsden originally wrote "Don't Let the Sun Catch You Crying" as a number for Cordet, before his group recorded it. Her final single, "Two Lovers," was a dazzling treatment of a Motown classic, drenched in heavy guitars and a great beat, and nearly as alluring as the Beatles' cover of "You've Really Got a Hold on Me." By 1965, however, Cordet had stopped recording and, ironically, became part of the cadre of hangers on surrounding Marianne Faithfull, serving as French pronunciation advisor at Faithfull's May 11, 1965 Decca Records recording session, and also doing her best in the press as a publicist for Faithfull during this period.


 British singer Louise Cordet got a U.K. Top Twenty hit in 1962 as a teenager with her first single, "I'm Just a Baby," but never made the hit parade again despite issuing a couple dozen tracks between 1962 and 1964. This exemplary compilation has all of them, including her six singles, a 1963 British EP, a couple songs from the 1963 Just for Fun soundtrack, and nine tracks (all but one sung in French) released only in France. Cordet had a mild voice that might have been more suited to straight adult pop than the pop/rock she usually recorded, and was more a late relic of the U.K. teen idol pre-Beatles pop years than she was a part of the British Invasion. Combined with the ordinary and innocuous material she was given to sing, that makes this something for British rock/early-'60s girl singer completists, as well annotated and illustrated as it is. There are some tracks of note, if more for their origins than Cordet's interpretations, particularly "Don't Let the Sun Catch You Crying," which she released (and which was a flop) in early 1964 shortly before Gerry & the Pacemakers issued their famous international hit version. Her cover of "From Me to You" from a May 1963 French EP is one of the earliest and most obscure covers of a song by the Beatles (with whom she toured that year), and like some of her other recordings, had a faint Twist rock/"yé-yé" sound. She also made an unlikely venture into Cajun-flavored pop/rock on the 1963 single "Around and Around," and "Don't Let the Sun Catch You Crying"'s flip, "Loving Baby" (written by producer and ex-Shadows drummer Tony Meehan), has some eerie tones a little reminiscent of Joe Meek's work. She was ill-equipped for harder stuff, however, and the sloppy arrangement of Mary Wells' "Two Lovers" on her final single misses some chords key to the classic original. 

 





Lulu - The Complete Recordings

Lulu - The Complete Recordings

Lulu - Shout (The Complete Decca Recordings 1964-67)
Release Date June 23, 2009 

Although Lulu's mid-'60s Decca recordings have been issued piecemeal on numerous anthologies, somehow no one executed the logical idea of putting them all together on one release until this 42-track, two-CD collection. All of her 1964-1967 sides for the label are included, serving as a comprehensive document to the first three years or so of her recording career. Particularly in the U.S. (where she really wasn't known until the 1967 chart-topper "To Sir with Love," not included here), this period has remained rather obscure, and certainly not as familiar to the general rock fan as her more commercially successful recordings of the late '60s. This is a shame, as this was undoubtedly the era -- in spite of her tender teenage years -- in which she laid down her most soulful, R&B-influenced, and raunchiest recordings by far. The 1964 British hit cover of "Shout!" is of course the most famous of these. But those who dismiss Lulu as a relative lightweight of the British Invasion might be surprised to find quite a few other first-rate combinations of soul and girl group pop here, like "Nothing Left to Do But Cry," "I'll Come Running Over," "After You," "Take Me as I Am," "Can't Hear You No More," and a rip-roaring "Heatwave." The completist nature of this project does mean you get a good number of mediocre songs that wouldn't have made the cut for a more selective single-disc Decca-era best-of. Too, some of the rarer numbers (including both sides of a German-language 45 and numerous non-LP tracks) just aren't in the same league with the more familiar tunes. But with comprehensive liner notes, this is a necessary acquisition for Lulu fans, and a pretty good one for more general British Invasion admirers.

Lulu - The Complete Recordings

 


Sharon - Loves You Know Who

Sharon  - Loves You Know Who



Sharon Finkelstein aka ... Sharon Tandy.

Sharon  - Loves You Know Who

If there was any justice in the world, Johannesburg-born Sharon Tandy (born Sharon Finkelstein) would have been up there with Dionne Warwick and Dusty Springfield in the 60s.
Unquestionably, she had the voice for it, and her choice of songs was pretty much impeccable. Her South African debut LP, Sharon - Loves You-Know-Who, showcased her strong, intuitive delivery on Cliff Richard and Elvis Presley covers.
Sharon honed her vocals on the South African club circuit before hooking up with lover (later husband) Frank Fenter of Atlantic Records and playing a couple of dates with his proteges, UK beat band The Couriers.
She moved to London in 1964 to seek fame and fortune.
Between 1964 and 1969 Sharon flirted with melodramatic, Sandie Shaw-like Brit pop, freakbeat and psychedelic rock with Southampton pop art beat combo Les Fleur de Lys, recording superb numbers such as Stay With Me and You’ve Gotta Believe It.
sharontandy_lpShe appeared on Thank Your Lucky Stars, Beat Club and Top Of The Pops, and her fiery version of Hold On (1967) became her signature tune – with her breathless rasp going head-to-head with searing Yardbirds-like guitars.
Signed to Stax in 1966 she cut earthy Southern soul with Booker T & The MGs and Isaac Hayes, becoming the first European-based artist to record in East McLemore Studios. She also appeared as an opening act on the 1967 Stax/Volt Tour of Europe.
On her return to England she teamed with Les Fleur de Lys again, but by 1970 she was back in South Africa.
  She recorded a single for Polydor in 1967 credited to "Debrah Aire" featuring more pop styled tracks, but this also flopped. However, the combination of lack of commercial success and the breakdown of her relationship with Fenter led to her return to South Africa in 1970.



http://www.rockboar.com/persons/435/Psychedelic-rock/Sharon-Tandy


Sharon - Loves You Know Who (With The Astronauts)
 Rare first album ...







Les Gam's - EP Collection

Les Gam's - EP Collection


Les Gam's

Les Gam's étaient un groupe vocal féminin de rock français, populaire au début des années 1960, mais dont la carrière fut éphémère.

Biographie
Le groupe se compose de Graziella, Annie, Michèle et Suzy, toutes anciennes choristes de Gilbert Bécaud. C'est en prenant la première lettre de leurs prénoms qu'elles trouvent leur nom d'artiste.

Les Gam's figurent parmi le plateau proposé par le magazine Salut les Copains lors d'un concert gratuit donné le 22 juin 1963 à Paris, place de la Nation, devant 150 000 jeunes spectateurs. Elles furent également choristes pour Claude François.

La chanteuse soliste Annie Markan entame une carrière solo en 1965 en enregistrant la version française d'un succès américain de Len Barry 1,2,3. Elle est ensuite attachée de presse chez Polygram.

Discographie
Supers 45 tours 
Cheveux fous et lèvres roses / Comme ils s'aimaient / Bon vent, ma jolie / Adieu bye bye, Vogue, 1962
Il a le truc / Ne dis pas du mal de mon amour / Oui les filles / Rendez-vous jeudi, Mercury, 1963
C'est bien fait pour toi / Je ne pourrai jamais l'oublier / Attention accident / Tiens-le, Mercury, 1963
La soirée est finie / De quoi sont faits les garçons ? / Toi l'ami / Beau garçon, Mercury, 1963
Oh ! wow wow wee / L'été reviendra / My boy lollipop / L'anneau de feu, Mercury, 1964
Une petite larme m'a trahie / Impatiente (d'etre seule pour pleurer) / Rien n'est trop beau / Toujours un coin qui me rappelle (Les Gam's avec Annie Markan), 1964


Les Gam's - EP Collection

Les Gam's - EP Collection

Les Gam's - EP Collection

Les Gam's - EP Collection




V.A.- Dream Babes

V.A.-  Dream Babes

Vol.1 - Am I Dreaming
The British girl group sound was a different animal than the American article: there was an equal emphasis on production craft, but there was a higher proportion of pop to soul, and a Europop influence in many of the melodies and arrangements. This 24-track compilation gathers rare non-hit singles from 1962 to 1970, and none of the singers will be familiar to U.S. listeners (indeed, most or all of them will be unfamiliar to British ones as well). It's decent but light girl group (or girl group-influenced) '60s pop that could often use more grit; some of it's fairly strong, but there are no melodies or performances that announce "classic" in neon lights. If you're a sucker for the girl group sound, it's an acceptable addition to the library, with some standouts, like Samantha Jones' "Don't Come Any Closer" (covered to greater effect in French by Françoise Hardy), Alma Cogan's "Snakes and Snails," and Carole Deene's goofy "Some People," with a train whistle bleating away in the background.

V.A.-  Dream Babes

V.A.-  Dream Babes


 Vol.2 - Reflections

British girl singers did not comprise the healthiest subgenre of 1960s rock. And since this 22-track compilation of female-sung British pop/rock from 1962-1971 does not include any big names except for Cilla Black (represented by her 1968 B-side "Work Is a Four Letter Word") and Helen Shapiro (with her self-penned 1964 B-side "He Knows How to Love Me"), you might not ready yourself for a stunning experience. It isn't brilliant, but actually it's a pretty fair and fun collection of obscurities. Some other names might be faintly remembered (in the U.K., not the U.S.), such as Samantha Jones and Elkie Brooks, but for the most part these are no-names, working in a vein combining British Invasion sounds with American girl-group/soul-influenced production. Some of the more memorable outings include Jones' wispy "Somebody Else's Baby," Guillivers People's solid adaptation of Jackie DeShannon's "Splendour in the Grass," Linda Laine & the Sinners' wistful and folky "Don't Do It Baby," and Carol Elvin's "Don't Leave Me," which sounds instantly suitable for a British mid-'60s film soundtrack. As a change of pace there's also the folk-pop of the Levee Breakers' 1965 single "Babe I'm Leaving You," featuring the voice of Beverley, who would become a noted part of the 1970s folk-rock scene as part of a duo with her 

V.A.-  Dream Babes

V.A.-  Dream Babes


Vol.3 - Backcomb'n'Beat

The third installment of this series devoted to British '60s girl group-like sounds is, like the genre itself, not a match for the best American girl group music. But like its predecessors, it's a fairly good compilation, if more notable for inventive orchestral pop production than for the talents of the singers. Julie Driscoll, represented by the early single "I Know You Love Me Not" (which sounds a little like an experimental Dusty Springfield), is the only fairly well-known name on this 22-track disc, though Twinkle had some success in Britain, and Glenda Collins and Samantha Jones have their enthusiasts. There are some real solid, ingratiating pop/rock cuts here, though, like the McKinleys' quite gutsy "Sweet and Tender Romance"; Dany Chandelle & the Ladybirds' "Lying Awake," a pretty reasonable facsimile of Phil Spector's Ronettes/Crystals arrangements; the Chantelles' exuberant "Gonna Get Burned"; Sylvan's odd "We Don't Belong," with its clattering descending melody and suicide allusions; the breathy sides by Samantha Juste, the future wife of Mickey Dolenz; the swirling torch pop of Cloda Rogers' "Lonely Room"; and the Drifters-influenced arrangement of Jan Panter's "Yours Sincerely." A real surprise contributor, if an indirect one, is Donovan, who co-wrote and played guitar on the McKinleys' 1965 pop-folk outing "Give Him My Love," a number he never recorded himself. Overall it's an above-average comp with good variety, not just of interest to die-hard specialists.

V.A.-  Dream Babes

V.A.-  Dream Babes


Vol.4 - Go Girl

Although volume four of RPM's Dream Babes series of 1960s British girl group sides gets further into obscure flops than its predecessors, there's barely any drop in the quality, which remains good, though hardly great. And as with most of the rest of the songs on this series, the production's better than the singers or the material. That's not to say there aren't some pretty good cuts on this 22-song anthology, some of them explicitly derivative of the American girl group sound (like the Chantelles' cracking "I Want That Boy," a cover of an obscure U.S. single by Sadina), others taking a pop-soul approach, others mixing in some British beat music. Some of these performers are famous, but not for their music: two sides of a 1967 Twiggy single are here, as are a couple of 1968 tracks by Linda Thorson (who played Tara King on The Avengers). Highlights include the Orchids' stomping, pining adolescent girl group "Mr. Scrooge" (produced and co-written by Who/Kinks producer Shel Talmy); the Chantelles' credible emulation of slickly lush American pop-soul on "I Think of You"; and the British Invasion-cum-Everly Brothers harmonies of the McKinley Sisters' pounding "When He Comes Along" (by Geoff Stephens, author of "The Crying Game"). Plenty of other names well-known to British Invasion fans were involved in some of these sides in some capacity, like John Carter and Ken Lewis (who wrote the McKinleys' nice ballad "That Lonely Feeling"); session guitar ace Big Jim Sullivan, who plays tone pedal guitar on that track, as he had on Dave Berry's "The Crying Game"; Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber, who wrote Ross Hannaman's Marianne Faithfull-like 1967 single "Down Through Summer"; producer Mike Leander, who wrote the Breakaways' gloomy ballad "Sacred Love"; and Kenny Lynch, who wrote the Linda Thorson sides. Released for the first time here is Jacki Bond's 1967 recording of "Reviewing the Situation," cut a couple of years prior to Sandie Shaw's release of the same tune on her 1969 album of the same name.

V.A.-  Dream Babes

V.A.-  Dream Babes


 Vol.5 - Folk Rock and Faithful

The word "folk-rock" seems to mean something different to everyone, and many fans might find Dream Babes, Vol. 5: Folk Rock and Faithfull, a compilation of 22 woman-sung 1965-1969 tracks to be more accurately pegged as "folk-rock-influenced pop/rock" than "folk-rock." Even if it's more featherweight than the Byrds (or for that matter the Mamas & the Papas), it's a pretty interesting and fun collection of rarities, most of them sung by British femmes and produced in the U.K. (though a couple of Australians sneak in, as does Jackie DeShannon's "Don't Turn Your Back on Me," recorded by the Californian in England). There's nothing here by Marianne Faithfull, despite the sly use of her name in the title. But the wispier and folkier tracks here certainly bear her influence, including those by Nico (her London-recorded cover of Gordon Lightfoot's "I'm Not Saying"), Vashti (represented by her rare 1966 single "Train Song"/"Love Song"), Gay Singleton's "In My Time of Sorrow" (a DeShannon-Jimmy Page composition also recorded by Faithfull, though Singleton's version is good too), Greta Ann's melodramatic "Sadness Hides the Sun," Gillian Hills's "Tomorrow Is Another Day" (the actress' only English-language release), and Trisha's 1965 single "The Darkness of My Night" (a Donovan composition that Donovan apparently never recorded himself, though it's not so hot). Some of these records opt for a far more elaborately arranged approach, though, with the Caravelles' 1967 single "Hey Mama You've Been on My Mind" sounding rather like Eric Andersen as sung by a girl group and produced by Phil Spector, and Gemini's "Sunshine River" (from Australia) pouring on the Byrds-y electric guitars. While some of these cuts are dull, there are other cool items as well, like "Bring It to Me" by Vashti pals Jennifer Lewis and Angela Strange; Judi Smith's gorgeous "Leaves That Come Tumbling Down," another Jackie DeShannon-Jimmy Page co-write; Australian Maggie Hammond's strong cover of "High Flying Bird," even if she does change the key lyric "I'm rooted like a tree" to the less effective "I'm tired as can be"; and Caroline Carter's "The Ballad of Possibilities (Come Along)," another obscure Jackie DeShannon song. The more traditional face of folk music even surfaces with Leonore Drewery's "Rue," probably better known under the title Pentangle used for the same tune, "Let No Man Steal Your Thyme." The folk-rock concept gets stretched pretty far to include Angelina's "Wishing My Life Away," which seems more influenced by Buddy Holly and Joe Meek. But if that's what it takes to get worthwhile rarities like those issued, why not?

V.A.-  Dream Babes

V.A.-  Dream Babes


Vol.6 - Sassy and Stonefree

Where previous volumes of the worthy Dream Babes series focused on woman-sung British pop/rock of a slightly earlier (mid-'60s) vintage, Sassy and Stonefree: Dream Babes, Vol. 6 has a somewhat later timespan, featuring 22 recordings from 1966-1972 (three of them previously unreleased). Accordingly, there are more soul, heavy rock, and singer/songwriter influences to be heard, though it's still identifiably Brit-pop-based for the most part. Even if you think you know your '60s Brit-pop, you might not be well acquainted with many of the names here; it takes quite some digging to assemble a compilation of this sort in which the most famous names are Clodagh Rodgers (whose "Come Back and Shake Me," included here, made number three in the U.K. in 1969), Samantha Jones, and Lesley Duncan. It's shorter on highlights than other installments in the series, and not the kind of thing that would have given Dusty Springfield and Lulu much to worry about. There's some stuff to enjoy in what's a pretty pop-soul-oriented set, particularly on the production end. But there are no true standouts as far as the songs are concerned, and while the singers are okay, none are especially commanding (and some of the material would have probably been done better by the American artists the producers and vocalists sometimes seemed to be trying to emulate). Generally it's tastefully perky and upbeat, never more so than on Sandra Bryant's "Girl with Money," which is a little reminiscent of the kind of uptempo songs Neil Diamond wrote in his early solo career.

V.A.-  Dream Babes


V.A.-  Dream Babes


Vol.7 - Beat Chic

By the time of this 2007 release, the Dream Babes series had developed into a surprisingly extensive one, testifying to the existence of much more female-sung 1960s British pop/rock than even most British rock experts realized. Like any genre series that digs up a seemingly endless mountain of obscurities, it's more impressive for its quantity than its quality. Still, like its predecessors, Beat Chic: Dream Babes, Vol. 7 offers a wide assortment of material from the '60s (from 1962-1967 in this CD's case), drawing from the girl group, soul-pop, and pop/rock styles, only occasionally taking in influences from the guitar-oriented British Invasion sound. Certainly the 22 tracks aren't safe choices; Billie Davis and Goldie & the Gingerbreads are the only artists who will be fairly recognizable to collectors, and even those acts aren't exactly automatically familiar ones to most vintage rock fans. Fans of the mainstream mid-'60s British pop/rock sound will enjoy this material for the production values it typifies, but there's really not much in the way of gripping performances or songs. Some of the more notable items include Polly Perkins' energetic novelty "You Too Can Be a Beatle"; Goldie & the Gingerbreads' rather disappointingly mild "Can't You Hear My Heartbeat," which Herman's Hermits nabbed the hit with in the U.S.; and Dani Sheridan's quite good interpretation of "Guess I'm Dumb," co-written by Brian Wilson and originally recorded by Glen Campbell in the U.S. Honeybus fans will also want to note the inclusion of three previously unreleased Christine Holmes tracks co-written by Pete Dello and Ray Cane, the best of which ("Here Comes My Baby") is a competent American girl group-like effort with Beatlesque touches.

V.A.-  Dream Babes

V.A.-  Dream Babes


Vol.8 - Stockingtop Pop

In the mid-'60s through early '70s, the British pop music industry was a well-oiled machine, cranking out bright, tuneful melodies at a feverish pace, and RPM's eighth CD collection of rare U.K. pop singles from female vocalists demonstrates just how deep the well goes on this stuff. With the exception of Tina Charles' brassy but over the top cover of Melanie's "Bo Bo's Party" and the subtle but defiant "I Don't Ever Want to Be Kicked by You" by the Stockingtops, the mood on these tunes is upbeat and the craft is polished and professional, with the production slick and the arrangements full-bodied, suggesting the British equivalent of classic Brill Building pop with a characteristic dollop of music hall theatrics. Many of these singers supplemented their paychecks as solo acts by doing backing vocals on sessions by other artists (or by doing commercials -- a promotional recording for Bush audio equipment leads off this disc), and there's a certain uniformity to the performing styles of these artists. But a few of the tracks do stand out, such as the high-gloss soul stylings of Maxine Nightingale, the aggressively chirpy harmonies of the Cameos, the very American leanings of the Chanters, and the sweet, breathy confidence of the Paper Dolls. And even the lesser selections are fine examples of studiocraft at its height, from the days when the bigger the studio orchestra and the more audacious the arrangement, the better. While some might find a certain kitsch value in this stuff, Stockingtop Pop is good enough to be appreciated without irony, and Michael Robson's liner notes offer plenty of background data on these forgotten songbirds.

V.A.-  Dream Babes

V.A.-  Dream Babes





Many THANKS to Cor 

Mary Wells - Looking Back 1961-1964

Mary Wells - Looking Back  1961-1964


Time and legions of other soul superstars have obscured the fact that for a brief moment, Mary Wells was Motown's biggest star. She came to the attention of Berry Gordy as a 17-year-old, hawking a song she'd written for Jackie Wilson; that song, "Bye Bye Baby," became her first Motown hit in 1961. The full-throated approach of that single was quickly toned down in favor of a pop-soul sound. Few other soul singers managed to be as shy and sexy at the same time as Wells (Barbara Lewis is the only other that springs to mind), and the soft-voiced singer found a perfect match with the emerging Motown production team, especially Smokey Robinson. Robinson wrote and produced her biggest Motown hits; "Two Lovers," "You Beat Me to the Punch," and "The One Who Really Loves You" all made the Top Ten in the early '60s, and "My Guy" hit the number one spot in mid-1964, at the very height of Beatlemania.
Mary turned 21 years old as "My Guy" was rising to the top of the charts, and left Motown almost immediately afterward for a reported advance of several hundred thousand dollars from 20th Century Fox. The circumstances remain cloudy years later, but Wells and her husband-manager felt Motown wasn't coming through with enough money for their new superstar; she was also lured by the prospect of movie roles through 20th Century Fox (which never materialized). It's been rumored that Wells was being groomed for the sort of plans that were subsequently lavished upon Diana Ross; more nefariously, it's also been rumored that Motown quietly discouraged radio stations from playing Wells' subsequent releases. What is certain is that Wells never remotely approached the success of her Motown years, entering the pop Top 40 only once (although she had some R&B hits). Motown, for their part, took care throughout the rest of the '60s not to lose their big stars to larger labels.
Wells' departure from Motown was so dramatic and unsuccessful that it has tended to overshadow the quality of her later work, which has almost always been dismissed as trivial by critics. True, it didn't match the quality of her Motown recordings -- Smokey Robinson could not be replaced. But her '60s singles for 20th Century Fox (whom she ended up leaving after only a year), Atco, and Jubilee were solid pop-soul on which her vocal talents remained undiminished. She wrote and produced a lot of her late-'60s and early-'70s sessions with her second husband, guitarist Cecil Womack (brother of Bobby), and these found her exploring a somewhat earthier groove than her more widely known pop efforts. She had trouble landing recording deals in the '70s and '80s.



Mary Wells - Looking Back  1961-1964
1961-1964 includes 11 previously unreleased tracks
Personnel: 
Mary Wells (vocals); 
The Andantes, The Love-Tones (background vocals).

Mary Wells - Looking Back  1961-1964


This two-CD, 43-track box set is the most comprehensive retrospective of Motown's biggest female star before Diana Ross. Although her first hit, "Bye Bye Baby," presented Wells as a blues belter, she quickly settled into a sly and sassy groove. Subsequent hits like "You Beat Me to the Punch," "Two Lovers," and "My Guy" (all included here) made the most of her shy, seductive voice by teaming her with some great songs and production by Smokey Robinson. Although many of these tunes were relegated to B-sides, album tracks, or even the can (11 were previously unreleased), the material -- written by Motown stalwarts like Berry Gordy, Holland-Dozier-Holland, and Mickey Stevenson when Smokey was unavailable -- is not far below the hits in quality. This is as much a testimony to Motown's overflow of prolific talent as Wells', but doesn't detract from the consistency of this set, which includes her duets with Marvin Gaye (as well as a previously unreleased duet with Smokey Robinson). Includes a comprehensive essay in the photo-packed booklet, although the mysterious absence of the excellent "Was It Worth It" is a notable loss.

Rita Chao - The Singles Collecton

Rita Chao -  The Singles Collecton
 

Rita Chao, aka "Seow Mei-Mei", the A-G0-Go Queen of the 60s. Recorded her first EP with The Quests that included one of her greatest hits during that period, "Shake, Shake, Shake" or "Yeow, Yeow, Yeow" in Mandarin. Like Sakura, she sang in Mandarin, English and Japanese. Most of her recordings were accompanied by The Quests. "Sixteen Candles" was one of her most popular English songs.

Rita Chao -  The Singles Collecton


Rita Chao, best known to her Mandarin-speaking fans as …Ling Yun, Ling Ying or Seow Mei-Mei, depending on the source of information you’d prefer to rely on…), was born in Singapore, most probably during the mid '40s of the last century, probably in 1946.
According to some reports, her family originated from the city of Hangzhou (杭州), which is located in the Zhejiang Province in Eastern China, not so far from Shanghai (上海).
Her interest in music developed at school, and when she was 15 she started singing and performing on stage. Her grandmother, Zhao Yongchun a former amateur Peking Opera singer, encouraged her to leave school and at that time she embarked on short tours through Vietnam and North Borneo (Malaysia) along with small acting companies.
Since then, Zhao Yongchun, determined to make her beloved granddaughter famous, became her manager and successfully arranged for her to perform in some of the most famous nightclubs in Singapore. In those days, Rita also used to perform at the now defunct New World Amusement Park along with Sakura, and they both lived in Jalan Besar.
In 1966 Rita was signed by Columbia / EMI and released her very first 7" EP, the subject of this post. On this record, she was paired with the top guitar band from Singapore, The Quests, and it was instant stardom.
During her career Rita Chao recorded many great Mandarin covers of popular English songs and she was part of the pioneers who launched the Rock Movement in Singapore. Along with Sakura (with whom she joined forces on many recordings during the late '60s) they were both known as 'A Go-Go Queens of the Sixties".

Rita Chao, who was wildly popular in Singapore, Malaysia and Hong Kong in the 1960s , has passed away in July last year. She was 64.


1. Rita Chao&The Surfers- Time Is Tight
2. Rita Chao&The Surfers - My Lost Dream
3. Rita Chao - I'm Into Something Good
4. Rita Chao - Sixteen Candles
5. Rita Chao - Wooly Bully
6. Rita Chao - Jilted
7. Rita Chao - Pretty Flamingo
8. Rita Chao - Hanky Panky
9. Rita Chao - Proud Mary
10. Rita Chao - Diamond
11. Rita Chao - Cu Cu Cu Choo
12. Rita Chao - Obladi -  Oblada
13. Rita Chao - Gonna Be Alright
14. Rita Chao - Tears
15. Rita Chao - Shake, Shake, Shake
16. Rita Chao - Let True Love Begin
17. Rita Chao - Frankie
18. Rita Chao - Watasiwa
19. Rita Chao - Only Friends
20. Rita Chao - How To Catch A Girl
21. Rita Chao - Love Is Me Love Is You
22. Rita Chao - The Boy Next Door
23. Rita Chao - Happy Happy Birthday
24. Rita Chao - I Know
25. Rita Chao - As Tears Go By
26. Rita Chao - He's Untrue


Suzi Quatro / My Heart and Soul (I Need You Home for Christmas) 2020





Suzi Quatro / My Heart and Soul (I Need You Home for Christmas) 2020

4 December Suzi Quatro — known in music history as the first “breakout” female bass player to become a bona fide “rock star” with a string of international hits in the 1970s — released a powerful new holiday song, “My Heart and Soul (I need You Home for Christmas).”

Explained Suzi Quatro of the song’s process in a statement:

“So, lockdown had just begun. My son was in the studio working on ideas every day for our next album, a perfect opportunity as neither of us was ‘on the road’. I was sitting on the patio, relaxing, and heard this absolutely beautiful track coming out of the open studio door. It was a bass line, with a sparse guitar chord, and drums. It was immediate for me. I ran into the studio (mask on of course), and told my son to set up a microphone, and without thinking, without writing anything down, I sang the first 4 lines of the song exactly as they ended up. That`s when you know you have a great song … and we do. Merry Xmas everyone!


1 My Heart and Soul (I Need You Home for Christmas) Radio Edit
2 My Heart and Soul (I Need You Home for Christmas) Full Version




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The Pleasure Seekers - What A Way To Die (1964-1968)





The Detroit garage band the Pleasure Seekers originally comprised sisters Suzi, Patti, and Arlene Quatro, the daughters of jazz musician Art Quatro. The group started while the siblings were all still in their teens. They quickly transcended novelty status by writing their own material and playing their own instruments, and made their debut in 1966 with the local hit "Never Thought You'd Leave Me," released on the Hideout label (the recording arm of the local teen club where Suzi reportedly worked as a counter clerk). A year later they jumped to Mercury for "Light of Love." Eldest sister Arlene soon exited the Pleasure Seekers to begin a family -- among her children was actress Sherilyn Fenn, best known for her work in the TV cult series Twin Peaks -- and was replaced by another Quatro sister, Nancy. Throughout the remainder of the decade the band toured relentlessly, even appearing at a USO showcase at the peak of the Vietnam War, but mainstream success continued to elude them. Around 1969, the Pleasure Seekers rechristened themselves Cradle, a move which also heralded a harder-edged sound; by the early '70s, however, the trio disbanded, with Suzi going on to fame as a solo performer (as well as co-starring on the hit sitcom Happy Days as the legendary Leather Tuscadero) while Patti joined the California band Fanny. In 2016, Sundazed released a collection of their classic recordings, What a Way to Die.

Label:Sundazed Music 

Released: 2016

What A Way To Die (1964-1968):
 
Bass Vocals – Suzi Quatro (tracks: 2,7,9,10,11,12)
Drums – Darline Arnone, Nan Ball (tracks: 3,6), Nancy Rogers
Guitar – Pami Benford
Guitar, Vocals – Patti Quatro (tracks: 2,7,9,11,12)
Keyboards – Diane Baker (tracks: 3,6)
Keyboards, Vocals – Arlene Quatro (tracks: 2,11,12)
Percussion – Nancy Quatro (tracks: 11)
Vocals – Marylou Ball (tracks: 3,6)



Years before Rolling Stone ran their first think piece about "Women in Rock," the Go-Go's had their first practice, or Fanny had to explain for the first time that they really played their own instruments, the Pleasure Seekers were a combo out of Detroit who proved the gals could rock just as hard as the guys. Led by future glam rock icon Suzi Quatro on bass and her sister Patti Quatro on lead guitar (with fellow siblings Arlene Quatro and Nancy Quatro joining the lineup at different times), the Pleasure Seekers were a tough, versatile band with chops, personality, and attitude to spare. The Pleasure Seekers never scored a hit record, and while they toured relentlessly, their novelty as an all-female rock band was a blessing and a curse, attracting an audience that often didn't take them seriously. But the sides they left behind leave no question that they had the goods, and What a Way to Die is a thoroughly enjoyable 11-song collection that preserves the Pleasure Seekers' finest moments. The title track has long been a favorite among garage rock collectors, and it's one of the wildest and funniest sides of the era, in which a young woman compares her boyfriend to a bottle of beer -- and finds the boyfriend a lot less satisfying. While there are other garage-centric tracks like "Never Thought You'd Leave Me" and "Gotta Get Away," the Pleasure Seekers also cut some potent blue-eyed soul, especially "Good Kind of Hurt" and "Locked in Your Love." And the latter-day live recordings on side two saw they were evolving into a smart, heavier outfit that fit right in at the Grande Ballroom, Detroit's home venue for the MC5, SRC, and the Stooges. While What a Way to Die only runs 38 minutes, it does include all the material the band released in its lifetime, along with some potent outtakes and live material, and the liner notes from Mike and Anja Stax tell the band's story in concise but well-detailed fashion. You don't have to be a garage rock junkie or obsessed with female-fronted bands to dig this collection -- just about anyone who goes for '60s-era rock & roll should find something here to like.




Patsy Ann Noble - Hits & Rarities


Patsy Ann Noble enjoyed performing careers in Australia and England before turning to acting in the late '60s. She was born into a family of performers in Australia: her father Buster Noble was a popular comic, singer and dancer while her mother, the former Helen de Paul, was a choreographer and stage producer. As a child, she appeared in various productions of her parents, and became a performer in her own right on a popular radio program in 1950. Noble studied singing and dancing, and was qualified to teach ballet at the age of 14. She subsequently became the lead singer and featured dancer in her parents' production of a revue called International Follies. Noble's television debut followed in 1960, and was signed as regular performer on Bandstand, a weekly Australian musical showcase. A recording contract with the Australian division of HMV Records -- a unit of the EMI group -- led to the release of her first single, "I Love You So Much It Hurts," in late 1960. "Good Looking Boy," released a year later, charted in both Sydney and Melbourne (Australia didn't have an established national record chart in those days), and led to the release of Noble's first album, Just For You, which was given the first Logie Award ever granted for Best Female Singer. Her success as a singer didn't distract Noble from her acting, and she appeared in serious theatrical productions during this period.


Having gone about as far as music could take her in Australia, Noble headed for England in 1963, and started at the top when she ended up making her BBC debut alongside the Beatles; Noble and the band ended up making several televised appearances together, and she seemed poised for a major singing career, issuing a fine girl group-type record in 1963 with "Don't You Ever Change Your Mind" b/w "Sour Grapes." She was a regular panelist on Juke Box Jury and also appeared in the jukebox musical Just for Fun, and got a singing spot in one episode of Secret Agent/Danger Man. Somehow, the success never came to Noble as a singer, despite appearances at the London Palladium and the Paris Olympia Theater, and by 1966 she'd begun to emphasize her acting once again, though she continued to record sides for Polydor until late in the decade. It was as Trisha Noble, with her hair dyed blonde, that she enjoyed considerably more success, both in England and America, on television series such as Executive Suite and Strike Force, and in feature films, including Star Wars Episode 1: The Phantom Menace  





Louise Cordet ‎– The Sweet Beat of Louise Cordet (1962-1964)VA - Girls With Guitars  Sharon  - Loves You Know Who  Les Gam's - EP CollectionV.A.-  Dream Babes Mary Wells - Looking Back  1961-1964Rita Chao -  The Singles Collecton Suzi Quatro / My Heart and Soul (I Need You Home for Christmas) 2020Patsy Ann Noble - Hits & Rarities

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