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Lulu - To Sir With Love (The Complete Mickie Most Recordings 1967-1969)

Lulu - To Sir With Love (The Complete Mickie Most Recordings 1967-1969)

For the majority of American listeners, Lulu's career began and ended with "To Sir with Love," the theme song to the 1967 box office hit, though she enjoyed considerably greater success in the United Kingdom, and not without reason. Lulu had a solid, spirited voice that could handle an admirable range of material, and she tended to get good songs that she made the most of with the assistance of some very talented studio help (John Paul Jones arranged much of the material on her 1969 set Lulu's Album). To Sir with Love: The Complete Mickey Most Recordings features 39 tunes recorded during Lulu's tenure with famed British producer Most, and if this consistently leans to the more commercial side of British pop of the late '60s, it's great pop with heart, soul, and no shortage of enthusiasm. On tunes like "Love Loves to Love, Love" and her cover of the Beatles' "Day Tripper," Lulu sounds very convincing belting out tough rock & roll, and she's just as confident handling soulful material with real emotional weight, such as "Morning Dew" and "To Love Somebody." And while she also gets her share of MOR pop tunes here, she handles them flawlessly, and "The Best of Both Worlds" and "A House Is Not a Home" are marvelous, heart-tugging stuff. Lulu and Most had a great ear for material, tackling numbers from the songbook of Neil Diamond, Dan Penn, Harry Nilsson, and Elton John, and even the lesser tracks (we get three versions of the less-than-thrilling "Boom Bang a Bang" -- in English, French, and Italian!) are executed with superb craft and as much feeling as the singer could muster. Lulu continued to make fine records through the 1970s and still performs today, but her early material captured her at her peak, and this thoroughly enjoyable package offers the lion's share of her excellent 1967-1969 work, digitally remastered and sounding spectacular with intelligent liner notes. Fans will love it and those who only know Lulu as the "To Sir with Love" girl will be very pleasantly surprised.

Lulu - To Sir With Love (The Complete Mickie Most Recordings 1967-1969)

Cherry Roland 1963 - 1974



Was active on the British scene in the sixties

Born

Dartford, Kent, United Kingdom
Currently
Comunitat Valenciana, Spain
Also Known As
Cherry Rowland








01 - Nobody But Me (Fontana 267304)



02 - Boys

03 -  Handy Sandy (Decca F 11579)
04 - Stay As I Am

05 - What A Guy (Decca F 11648)
06 - Just For Fun

07 - Another Night Alone (Decca D 19 729)
08 - Cry Baby Cry

09 - Wishin' And Hopin' (Telefunken SLE 14395-P)
10 - Can I Get A Witness

11 - One, Two, Three (Telefunken SLE 14 411-P)
12 - Twenty-Four Hours From Tulsa
13 - The Way You Do The Things You Do

14 - Schade fьr dich (Decca D 19 812)
15 - Was ist Gold, was ist Geld

16 - Hey, Herr Kapitдn (Columbia 1C 006-29 838)
17 - Pretty Old Lady

18 - Here Is Where The Love Is (Decca F 13491)
19 - I Can Give You Back Yourself




The Cake - More Of The Cake Please

The Cake - More Of The Cake Please


Biography by Richie Unterberger
Along with the Shirelles and the Ronettes, the Shangri-Las were among the greatest girl groups; if judged solely on the basis of attitude, they were the greatest of them all. They combined an innocent adolescent charm with more than a hint of darkness, singing about dead bikers, teenage runaways, and doomed love affairs as well as ebullient high-school crushes. These could be delivered with either infectious, handclapping harmonies or melodramatic, almost operatic recitatives that were contrived but utterly effective. Tying it all together in the studio was Shadow Morton, a mad genius of a producer who may have been second in eccentric imagination only to Phil Spector in the mid-'60s.

Originally the Shangri-Las were comprised of two pairs of sisters from Queens, NY (identical twins Marge and Mary Anne Ganser and siblings Mary and Betty Weiss). They had already recorded a couple of obscure singles when they were hired by George "Shadow" Morton to demo a song he had recently written, "Remember (Walkin' in the Sand)." The haunting ballad, with its doomy "Moonlight Sonata"-like piano riffs, wailing lead vocal, and thunderous background harmonies, seguing into an a cappella chorus backed by nothing except handclaps and seagull cries, made the Top Five in late 1964. It also began their association with Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller's Red Bird label, which would handle the group for the bulk of their career.

The quality of Morton's work with the Shangri-Las on Red Bird (with assistance from Jeff Barry and Artie Butler) was remarkable considering that he had virtually no prior experience in the music business. The group's material, so over-the-top emotionally that it sometimes bordered on camp, was lightened by the first-class production, which embroidered the tracks with punchy brass, weeping strings, and plenty of imaginative sound effects. Nowhere was this more apparent than on "Leader of the Pack," with its periodic motorcycle roars and crescendo of crashing glass. The death-rock classic became the Shangri-Las' signature tune, reaching number one.

Several smaller hits followed in 1965 and 1966, many of them excellent. "Give Him a Great Big Kiss" proved they could handle more conventionally, bubbly girl group fare well; "I Can Never Go Home Anymore," a runaway tale that took their patented pathos to the extreme, would be their third and final Top Ten hit. These all show up on oldies collections, but lots of listeners remain unaware of the other fine singles in their catalog, like the moody "Out in the Streets," the dense orchestral swamp of "He Cried" (which cuts Jay & the Americans' original, "She Cried," to pieces), and another teen death tale, "Give Us Your Blessings." Some of their best songs, in fact, were B-sides; "Dressed in Black," yet another teen death drama, had a marvelously hushed and damned atmosphere, and "Paradise" was co-written by a young Harry Nilsson. Their most unusual single of all was "Past, Present and Future," which didn't feature a single sung note, presenting a somber spoken monologue and occasional spoken background chants over a classical piano track reminiscent of "Remember (Walking in the Sand)." It was too unconventional to rise above the middle of the charts, especially given that the narrative could quite possibly be construed as the recollections of an assault/rape victim.

Unlike some girl groups, the Shangri-Las were dynamic on-stage performers, choreographing their dance steps to their lyrics and wearing skin-tight leather pants and boots that were quite daring for the time. Their real lives, however, were not without elements of drama themselves. Their constant personnel changes baffle historians; sometimes they are pictured as a trio, and sometimes one of the members in the photos is clearly not one of the Weiss or Ganser sisters. Worse, the Red Bird label ran into serious organizational difficulties in the mid-'60s, and wound down its operations in 1966. The group moved to Mercury for a couple of dispirited singles, but had split by the end of the 1960s. Shadow Morton went on to an interesting, erratic career that included involvement with Janis Ian, the New York Dolls, and Mott the Hoople. Mary Anne Ganser died in 1970; the cause has been a source of mystery but it was due to either encephalitis, a barbituate overdose, or the result of a seizure. 

Even today, the Shangri-Las' history remains somewhat murky and mysterious; the original members have rarely reunited for oldies shows or talked to the press. The situation was exacerbated by frustratingly substandard reissues of their Red Bird work, which made it impossible to collect all of their fine sides without buying numerous packages, many of which boasted shockingly shoddy sound quality. Happily, the situation was rectified in the mid-'90s with excellent, comprehensive compilations of the Red Bird material in both the U.K. and U.S.

The Cake - More Of The Cake Please

320Kbps

Thanks Cor for this !

Jackie DeShannon ‎– Breakin' It Up On The Beatles Tour! (1964/2005)

Jackie DeShannon ‎– Breakin' It Up On The Beatles Tour! (1964/2005)


Contrary to what the exploitative title might have you believe, this was not recorded during a Beatles tour (though Jackie DeShannon was an opening act on their 1964 North American tour), or even a live album. Instead, it was something of a grab bag of a dozen tracks that had already been released on Liberty singles between 1962 and 1964. For all its scattered origins, however, it was a pretty good compilation of her early-'60s work, though it was neither definitive nor the very best dozen tracks she did during this period. The best stuff is extremely good, however, starting with her original versions of "Needles and Pins" and "When You Walk in the Room," both of which anticipated some of the elements that would make up folk-rock in the mid-'60s, and both of which were covered for much bigger hits by the Searchers. There's also some fine girl group-influenced pop/rock that she co-wrote with the young Randy Newman ("She Don't Understand Him Like I Do," "Hold Your Head High"), Jack Nitzsche (the very Phil Spector-esque "Should I Cry"), and Sharon Sheeley ("You Won't Forget Me"), as well as a good song Newman wrote alone, "Did He Call Today, Mama." Some of the other tracks, such as the covers of Buddy Holly's "Oh, Boy" and "He's Got the Whole World in His Hands," come off as filler in this company, but overall it's a fairly strong set by this underrated singer/songwriter. [The 2005 CD reissue on RPM adds considerable value with lengthy historical liner notes and eight bonus tracks from the same era, including a few standouts, like her folk-rocky "Needles and Pins" B-side "Till You Say You'll Be Mine," the zesty orchestrated pop/rocker "Try to Forget Him," and the girl group goodie "Breakaway." Collectors will also want this for the presence of three previously unreleased cuts among those bonus tracks, those being a pure blues-folk reading of "Mean Old Frisco" and the more routine early-'60s-styled pop numbers "Today Will Have No Night" and "Give Me a Break."]

Original Lp - 1964 Liberty
CD Compilation, Reissue Released   - 2005 PRM

Jackie DeShannon ‎– Breakin' It Up On The Beatles Tour! (1964/2005)

Barbra Streisand - People (1964)



Barbra Streisand - People  (1964)

After two less successful albums, Barbra Streisand returned to form on her fourth album, People, with a selection of songs that showed some of the imagination of her debut album. Much of the material was new. The album opened and closed with songs by Jule Styne and Bob Merrill, first "Absent Minded Me," and then the Top Ten title song that was the hit from Streisand's triumphant Broadway show, Funny Girl. Streisand introduced Cy Coleman and Carolyn Leigh's "When in Rome (I Do as the Romans Do)," a lively song that allowed her to display some of the spirit and humor that had been missing on her last two outings. And when picking from older songs, she again found obscure or atypical tunes from prominent composers or lost gems she could make her own. In the former category were Irving Berlin's "Supper Time," a blues song unlike any the composer had ever done, and "My Lord and Master," from Rodgers & Hammerstein's The King and I. In the latter was the delightful "Fine and Dandy," from the 1930 show of the same name, with music by Kay Swift. Add in some obvious choices like Jimmy Van Heusen and Sammy Cahn's "Love Is a Bore" (a companion to the previously recorded "Down with Love") and "Don't Like Goodbyes," another selection from Harold Arlen and Truman Capote's House of Flowers, from which Streisand had earlier picked "A Sleepin' Bee," and you have an album fashioned to play to the singer's strengths and musical tastes instead of trying to fit her into existing ones. That wasn't quite enough to match the quality of her debut album, but it was a definite improvement over the second and third albums. (People won Grammy Awards for Best Vocal Performance and Best Album Cover.)

Barbra Streisand - People  (1964)

Barbra Streisand - People  (1964)

She - Outta Reach (1970)

She - Outta Reach (1970)


She were one of the few all-female garage psychedelic American bands of the 1960s that played their own instruments and wrote their own material, although their official output was limited to one obscure 1970 independent single. She nonetheless had a lengthy and somewhat complicated history, beginning in the mid-'60s when guitarist and primary songwriter Nancy Ross formed a teen band (with her younger sister Sally on organ) in Sacramento, CA. Originally known as the Id, they changed their name to the Hairem and did attract some label interest. The Hairem did not officially release any material in the '60s, but five songs that they recorded did come out on the She CD compilation Wants a Piece of You in 1999. These cuts, though not as crude as the Shaggs, were nonetheless quite raw and basic, in the manner of many U.S. garage bands of the period. Indeed, they're pretty generic, or sub-generic, the chief distinction being that there were extremely few all-female groups playing such music circa 1966, especially with the raunchy attitude evident on cuts such as "Like a Snake."

The Hairem played in San Francisco and Sacramento, at both clubs and air force bases, and after several personnel changes, they had changed their name to She by the late '60s. By this point, their music was still not terribly sophisticated, but had nonetheless grown more sophisticated, with a greater emphasis on harmonies and minor-keyed, psychedelic-influenced melodies. They did record an obscure single for Kent in 1970, "Boy Little Boy"/"Outta Reach," the A-side of which was uncharacteristically soft and poppy, almost bubblegum pop. Other original material written and demoed at this time is on the Wants a Piece of You CD and shows the influence of bands like the Doors and the Jefferson Airplane, although the unschooled raunch is still present. Fact is, though, that while the performances are energetic and the vocals often salacious, the songs aren't all that clever or memorable. She disbanded in 1971, Nancy Ross and her sister Sally Ross-Moore being the only members to have stayed the course throughout the entire Hairem-She saga.

She - Outta Reach (1970)


The Liverbirds - More of The Liverbirds

The Liverbirds - More of The Liverbirds

The Liverbirds (sometimes spelled Liver Birds) were one of the more distinctive outfits in Liverpool (and anywhere else, for that matter) by virtue of the fact that they were a hard-rocking all-girl group, self-contained instrumentally and focused on rhythm & blues. They weren't too successful musically in Liverpool, but in 1963 they went to Hamburg, where they became one of the most popular acts ever to play the Star-Club. Irene Green (vocals), Sheila McGlory (guitar, vocals), Mary McGlory (bass, vocals), Pamela Birch (guitar, vocals), Valerie Gell (guitar, vocals), and Sylvia Saunders (drums) got together in early 1962 under the name the Debutones, before changing it to the more city-specific Liverbirds. Irene Green left to join Tiffany's Dimensions, while Sheila McGlory jumped to the Demoiselles and, reduced to a quartet, the Liverbirds became a major attraction at the Star-Club, cutting two LPs for the label of that name and charting a number five single in Germany with their cover of "Diddley Daddy." They were startling to look at in an era when girl singers were supposed to be pretty on-stage, four tough-looking northern girls dressed in black and playing their instruments with attitude -- they cut a savage version of Bo Diddley's "Mona" and could rip through most any rock & roll standard, but when their record company had them throw on a soft Everly Brothers-type ballad or two, it sounded more like a joke; these girls couldn't harmonize to save their lives, but they rocked their asses off. What's more, they lasted all the way to 1967, primarily playing in Germany, where several of the members settled permanently.

The Liverbirds - More of The Liverbirds

Lulu - To Sir With Love (The Complete Mickie Most Recordings 1967-1969)VA - Love Charms West Coast Hits and Rarities from California Girls and Groups (1957 - 1962)Cherry Roland 1963 - 1974The Cake - More Of The Cake PleaseJackie DeShannon ‎– Breakin' It Up On The Beatles Tour! (1964/2005)Barbra Streisand - People  (1964) Kathy Kirby ‎– Hits And Rarities And LipglossShe - Outta Reach (1970)VA - Soda Pop BabiesThe Liverbirds - More of The Liverbirds

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