close

Old Melodies ... | category: Girls | (page 4 of 11)

home

Old Melodies ...

Beat, Garage,Psychedelic... and much more in one place.

allmusic-wingsofdream.blogspot.com

Las Mosquitas - Singles 1965

Las Mosquitas - Singles 1965


"There's something international about the music of today. You can hear the blues inflection in that Liverpool sound. The Motown beat is distinctive and distinguished. There are young groups and new sounds in Germany and Australia and Japan. It's happening all over the world these days.
The music of today is happening in Argentina, too. There it's a totally new sound. This time it combines a Latin beat with Rock. This is the sound and style of Las Mosquitas, four young an attractive beatle-haired girls who sing an shake their way to fervent performances. They've affected audiences in Spain and Latin-America and other European arenas.
These four girls do it all by themselves. They have the traditional musical combination, 2 guitars, a bass guitar and drums. There is nothing timid or dainty about their approach. These talented females come upon each song with fresh and dramatic accompaniment. They engender a weird and wonderful feeling.
Few people - once they hear Las Mosquitas - fail to be moved by the vitality and warmth of their performances. They've given birth to an intense music. It's most unusual.
Somethign new is coming out of South America these days. It's not traditional Latin tempo. This time it's the sound of Las Mosquitas - four beautiful girls who sing and play a Latin-Rock rhythm that will keep the youth of the world bouncing." ~ Bubblegum Soup


Las Mosquitas - Singles 1965

Las Mosquitas - Singles 1965


WANTED : 

Las Mosquitas - Singles 1965

Les Intrigantes - Singles 1965-1968

Les Intrigantes - Singles 1965-1968



Les Intrigantes - Singles 1965-1968

Some time in the happening year of 1964, four girls from Quebec came together (Carole, Claire, Ginette and Diane) with the goal to form a band. Adpoting the moniker of Les Intrigantes they practised hard, eventually gainging a contract in Drummonville and eventually Saint-Hyacinthe under the management of one Roger Beaudet to play at youth venues. Next came a chance to record their first record in 1965, the release "Faut Savoir/Sans Toi on the Jeunesse Franco label. Both sides were written by Beaudet. This release was the first and only time the girls were featured playing their instruments on a recording. Sadly despite the quality of the recording it sank without a trace! However come Autumn they were playing at the Hotel Club YeYe. Their next release came the following year, another Beaudet composition, "Mets Chinois" and cover of Simon and Garfunkel's "Sound of Silence" (La Seul Du Soleil) - again the record failed to garner much attention, allthough the group did get the chance to film a perfomance of the song for a Tv show. 1967 proved a fruitfull year for live perfomance,including a tour with groups and artists such as Les Lutins, Les Merseys, Chantal Pary, Karo and Oliver Despax.
 Come December not one but two singles were released by the group for the masses to enjoy. The first on the A1 label was a cover of Jefferson Airplane's White Rabbit (La Justice), adapted by member Carole, while the flip was a cover of The Mamas and Papa's "Creeque Alley", translated into French as "Nous Voci" by manager, Beaudet. It similarly tells the tale of the groups unique formation! But however for some reasons unbenownest to moi, the group did not like the finished recording and the record was subsequently withdrawn from circulation. Luckily success did emerge with their other single released that month on the Jupiter label, a fantastic rendition of the Beatle's "Hello Goodbye" along with a similarly brill version of Frankie Valli and the 4 Seasons "C'mon Marianne" (Je N'aimais Pas Marianne). The popularity of the record let to more touring and another release on Jupiter, a cover of Boyce and Heart's "Goodbye Baby" with "Les Enfants De La Plage" (a version of Peggy Lee's "Til There Was You"). The reocord acheived some success too, proving especially popular on some radio stations. Sadly despite having their most successful year to date, the group had disbanded by the end of 1968. However their legacy has not been forgotten, and I can present to you the entire recorded output of these lovely pioneering ladies from the land of Quebec! Also posted below this here text is a video, lovingly made by some I assume is known to the group, featuring live footage and photographic images of the group to their biggest hit, Hello Goodbye.

Les Intrigantes - Singles 1965-1968

Thaks for this cinnamonK

CHER - 1965 & 1966

CHER - 1965 & 1966


Cher has had three careers that place her indelibly in the public consciousness, and two have been in association with her then-husband, composer/producer/singer Salvatore "Sonny" Bono (b. February 16, 1935, d. January 8, 1998). She charted major hit records in the 1960s and 1970s, working in idioms ranging from early-'60s girl group-style ballads to Jackie Deshannon folk-influenced pop to adult contemporary pop in the manner of later Dusty Springfield. She also embarked on an acting career, initially in the late '60s in association with her work as part of Sonny & Cher but later on her own, which led to a series of increasingly polished and compelling performances in Silkwood, Mask, and Moonstruck, for which she won the Academy Award for Best Actress.

Cherilyn Sarkisian was born in California in 1946; she was 17 when she first met Salvatore "Sonny" Bono, a songwriter and protégé of producer Phil Spector. Sonny brought her to Spector, who used her as a backup singer and produced one single by her, a novelty Beatles tribute record called "Ringo I Love You" issued under the name Bonnie Jo Mason. It disappeared without a trace, but the couple were undaunted -- they emerged as a duo, initially called Caesar & Cleo, later that year, and cut "The Letter," "Do You Wanna Dance," and "Love Is Strange."

Caesar & Cleo didn't trouble the chart compilers with any degree of success, but late in 1964, Cher (then known as Cherilyn) was signed to Liberty Records' Imperial imprint, and Sonny came along as producer. A Spector-ish version of "Dream Baby" managed to get airplay in Los Angeles, becoming a local hit, and they suspected they were onto something. That same month, Sonny & Cher, as they were now known, signed to Reprise Records and released their first single, "Baby Don't Go." The song became a major local hit in Los Angeles, after which the duo jumped from Reprise to the Atco label, a division of Atlantic Records. In April 1965 their first single, "Just You" was released and rose to number 20 on the charts. The duo was on its way, and Cher also had Imperial Records after her for a second single. The couple had seen the Byrds pioneer commercial folk-rock with Bob Dylan's "Mr. Tambourine Man," and had witnessed them performing another Dylan number, "All I Really Want to Do" at a club in Los Angeles. The group intended to issue their own recording of "All I Really Want to Do," but Cher, with Sonny producing, beat them to the punch with her own recording of the song.

She pursued a dual career for the next two years, cutting solo recordings under Sonny's guidance that regularly charted, and duets with her husband for Atco. A month after "All I Really Want to Do," they released "I Got You Babe," which was one of the biggest-selling and most beloved pop/rock hits of the mid-'60s, and the couple's signature tune across two eras of success. Cher's solo career ended up slightly overshadowed by her work with Sonny & Cher, but at the time she was fully competitive on her own terms -- her first LP reached the Billboard Top 20 and was on the albums charts for six months. "Bang Bang (My Baby Shot Me Down)" was another hit, a million-seller that made number three in America and England, and she made the Top Ten once more with her 1967 single "You Better Sit Down Kids." The latter song, written by Sonny (and which was also a hit for Glen Campbell), dealt with divorce, an unusual subject for a 1960s pop record, and was one of a series of releases on which Cher's music broached difficult areas -- others were "I Feel Something's in the Air," which dealt with unwanted pregnancy, and "Mama (When My Dollies Have Babies)."

Cher's solo career at Imperial, which had created some political problems for the couple at Atlantic, ended with the lapsing of her contract in 1967, and she moved to Atlantic. Ironically, it was this move that contributed to the unhappy reversal of the couple's fortunes at the end of the decade.

By the end of the 1960s, Sonny & Cher were no longer selling records. A series of commercial missteps, coupled with a change in public taste, had sharply curtailed their sales, and a pair of movies (Good Times, Chastity) had lost millions. Additionally, they were no longer recording for Atlantic -- though they were still under contract to them -- owing to the label's decision to take Cher's solo recordings out of Sonny's hands and assign a new producer to her.

Coupled with the presentation of a bill from the Internal Revenue Service for $200,000 in back taxes, these events left the couple in dire financial straits at the end of the 1960s. They were forced to play club dates, opening for artists like Pat Boone, and it was there that their second career, and a second career for Cher, took shape. A new contract with Decca Records in 1971, coupled with a chance at a summer replacement gig on the CBS television network, brought them a second chance at success.

The tryout on television was a success, as the couple proved to be as funny as they were musically diverse. It took a little longer to find a new formula for Cher's music -- her initial single on Decca's Kapp label, "Classified 1A," was a failure; a serious song dealing with a girl's feelings for a boyfriend killed in Vietnam; it was topical in all the wrong ways to become a pop chart success. Producer Snuff Garrett was recruited to work with her, and he found a series of songs that were perfect for Cher's maturing talent.

"Gypsies, Tramps and Thieves," a conscious attempt to emulate Springfield's "Son of a Preacher Man" (which also recalled Cher's own "Bang Bang") was released late in 1971 and became a number one hit and a million-seller. To some listeners, "Gypsies, Tramps and Thieves" was the epitome of schlocky pop/rock, but the song's subject matter, unusual tempo changes, and an incredibly memorable chorus-hook became a vehicle for a transcendent performance by the singer, marking Cher's maturation as an artist (the B-side, "I Hate to Sleep Alone," written by Peggy Clinger of the Clinger Sisters, curiously enough, managed to recall Sonny's Spector-influenced productions from the Imperial years). A follow-up album, featuring her covers of contemporary hits such as "Fire and Rain," sold well also, and her next single, "The Way of Love," a revival of a mid-'60s Kathy Kirby hit, solidified the image of a new, more confident and powerful Cher. And the debut of the couple's regular network variety series on CBS in January 1972 brought them back to the center of American and international popular culture in a more mature, wittier guise, and one that concentrated much more on Cher as a personality.

Her 1960s music ran the gamut from Spector-style miniature teen pop symphonies to covers of contemporary adult pop ("It's Not Unusual") and folk-rock. Her voice wasn't very rich or powerful, but it was expressive and surrounded by Sonny's radiant Spector creations, and she could put over an almost inappropriately cheerful sounding version of "The Bells of Rhymney" or "Blowin' in the Wind." By contrast, her early-'70s material, solo or with Sonny, had a more adult point of view and personality. "Gypsies, Tramps and Thieves" and the later number one solo hits "Half-Breed" and "Dark Lady" were dramatic, highly intense performances, almost as much "acted" as sung, and very different from her 1960s output.

In 1974, it was revealed that the couple's marriage was coming to an end. Ironically, Cher came out of this split more secure than her husband, despite his having guided her career for a decade and having all of the real training in the entertainment business. She embarked on an acting career, even as she continued to make headlines for her romantic exploits, including an affair with (and two marriages to) Gregg Allman. She became a far better actress than she was a singer, first revealed in Mike Nichols' Silkwood (1983) and then in Peter Bogdanovich's Mask (1985) and George Miller's The Witches of Eastwick (1987). Her acting peers caught on to the worth of her work in time for an Academy Award for Best Actress for her performance in Norman Jewison's 1987 romantic comedy Moonstruck.

Living Proof Since the mid-'70s, Cher has been known more for her acting than for her music, although she has continued to record for numerous labels, including Columbia, and in 1998 scored an international chart-topping smash with the club-friendly single "Believe." The year 2001 brought Living Proof, the equally dance-oriented follow-up to the transformative Believe, and by 2005 she had completed the three-year, high-grossing Farewell Tour ahead of a lucrative Las Vegas residency of equal length. In 2010 she starred in the musical Burlesque, and "You Haven't Seen the Last of Me" from the movie's soundtrack went on to win a Golden Globe Award. In September 2013 Cher released a new studio set, Closer to the Truth, the results of further sessions with assistance from Mark Taylor, the British songwriter/producer who had been a regular collaborator since Believe. Cher's appearance in the 2018 musical film Mama Mia! Here We Go Again inspired her to record an album of ABBA cover songs called Dancing Queen later that year. Dancing Queen appeared in September, 2018.

 All I Really Want To Do - 1965

CHER - 1965 & 1966

01. All I Really Want To Do
02. I Go To Sleep
03. Needles And Pins
04. Don't Think Twice, It's All Right
05. He Thinks I Still Care
06. Dream Baby
07. The Bells Of Rhymney
08. Girl Don't Come
09. See See Blues (C.C. Rider)
10. Come And Stay With Me
11. Cry Myself To Sleep
12. Blowin' In The Wind

CHER - 1965 & 1966


The Sonny Side Of Cher - 1966

CHER - 1965 & 1966

01. Bang Bang (My Baby Shot Me Down)
02. A Young Girl (Une Enfante)
03. Where Do You Go
04. Our Day Will Come
05. Elusive Butterfly
06. Like A Rolling Stone
07. Ol' Man River
08. Come To Your Window
09. The Girl From Ipanema
10. It's Not Unusual
11. Time
12. Milord

CHER - 1965 & 1966

The Pussycats - You Can't Stop Loving Me ‎(7", EP) 1966

The Pussycats - You Can't Stop Loving Me ‎(7

No information about these lovely ladies ... Except for excerpts from WIKipedia that they performed a song written for Shangri Las and the post on blog (https://cult45.wordpress.com/2013/03/19/the-pussycats-i-want-your-love/) with the same desire to find information...
All 4 Pussycats recordings also came out as an EP (Portugal) through CBS in ’66 .As always, would love to know more about these elusive ladies and their recordings.

The Pussycats - You Can't Stop Loving Me ‎(7



Sylvie Vartan - Sylvie a Nashville (1964)

Sylvie Vartan  - Sylvie a Nashville (1964)

"Sylvie a Nashville" was Vartan's third RCA Victor album -- and her strongest up to that point in her career. (It was, by way of comparison, her equivalent of Rick Nelson's third LP, "Ricky Sings Again," in that here she, like her equally underrated American contemporary, seemed to have arrived at the top of her early pop form.) The original 12-track LP included Sylvie's wonderful signature song, "La plus belle pour aller dancer," as well as her great country cover "Si je chante"/"My Whole World is Falling Down." This Culture Factory restoration adds 16 additional tracks, with such treats as "Sha la la," "L'homme en noir" (a different perspective on Roy Orbison's "Oh, Pretty Woman"), and other recordings that fill out the program. What makes this particular edition so much fun is the care that was taken to capture the look of the 1960s album itself, from the faithfully reproduced gatefold-sleeve cover art to the grooved surface of the CD itself.  The other four Sylvie Vartan LP replications in the Culture Factory's "Les Annees RCA, Vol. 1" series are also worth exploring and owning, but, if it comes down to a choice, "Sylvie a Nashville" is truly the must-have." 

Sylvie Vartan  - Sylvie a Nashville (1964)


Marianne Faithfull ‎– Loveinamist by Marianne Faithfull ‎ (1967)

Marianne Faithfull ‎– Loveinamist by Marianne Faithfull ‎ (1967)

Marianne Faithfull ‎– Love In A Mist

Faithfull's final album of the 1960s (she would do one more single, in 1969) was a confused, patchy effort that seemed indicative of musical directionless. There was overblown, orchestrated straight pop (the cover of the Beatles' "Yesterday"), numbers where she seemed to be attempting to be a British Edith Piaf of sorts, and covers of contemporary folk-rock tunes by Donovan and Tim Hardin. Also, a couple of the better songs ("This Little Bird" and "Counting") had long been available on singles, from 1965 and 1966, respectively. This would have been categorized as "eclectic" rather than "directionless" if the material had been better, the arrangements more inspired, and the singing more commanding, but that wasn't the case on any of those counts. There are still some enjoyable bits, like the cover of "Young Girl Blues," and particularly the version of Jackie DeShannon's moody "With You in Mind." At the time, it was likely seen as something to fill in the gaps in the absence of better material. No one suspected, probably, that Faithfull would be diverted by other professional activities and personal calamities, and really wouldn't return to high visibility as a recording artist for a dozen years. The 1988 CD reissue on London U.K. has a couple of worthwhile bonus tracks in previously unreleased covers of Tim Hardin's "Hang Onto a Dream" and the Kinks' "Rosie, Rosie" (titled "Rosy Won't You Please Come Home" when it appeared on the Kinks' Face to Face album), both of which were recorded in September 1966.

Marianne Faithfull ‎– Loveinamist by Marianne Faithfull ‎ (1967)

VA - Swinging Mademoiselles

VA - Swinging Mademoiselles
Swinging Mademoiselles 2005

VA - Swinging Mademoiselles


In his liner notes to Silva America's compilation of female-sung French pop songs of the 1960s, Swinging Mademoiselles: Groovy French Sounds from the 60s, Peter Compton, writing of the "yé-yé" movement that responded to American and British pop of the era, writes that "Sylvie Vartan, Françoise Hardy, Sheila, and France Gall were the biggest stars of the genre...." None of those singers appear on this collection, which instead features 18 selections by 14 lesser-known names. They are, however, uniformly winning, whether they are attempting to rock out, as Jacqueline Taieb does on the album-opening "7 Heures du Matin," when she approximates the stutter of Roger Daltrey and the nonsense syllables of Little Richard, or settling for catchy pop, as Christine Pilzer does on the 1920s-style "Cafe Creme." Rock tends to take a back seat to projections of personality and feminine verve on these tracks, notably Elizabeth's cocky and kooky "Je Suis Sublime," which recounts a sort of "My Favorite Things" list of what she considers life's joys, all of which add up to make her the sublime person she is. But there are some light rockers, such as Clothilde's "Et Moi, et Toi, et Soie" and Liz Brady's tongue-twisting "Palladium (The Hip)." The British influence is overt in two songs brought across the English Channel, "Je Suis la Tigresse," Delphine Desyeux's take on Lulu's U.K. hit "I'm a Tiger," and "Plus Tard," Katy David's French translation of "Call Me," originally recorded by Petula Clark, herself a mainstay of the French charts. But the overall enjoyment provided by the collection is somewhat dampened by the lack of real stars, as well as by the sometimes iffy sound quality. Oddly for what appears to be a legitimate licensing project, the tracks seem to have been mastered from old records, and pops and crackles are audible on several of them.

VA - Swinging Mademoiselles


Swinging Mademoiselles 2006

VA - Swinging Mademoiselles


Although, as its title suggests, Swinging Mademoiselles Deux is the follow-up to the earlier collection Swinging Mademoiselles: Groovy French Sounds from the 60s, it is actually a better album than its predecessor. Once again, the contents have been assembled from French pop records featuring female singers that roughly correspond to the era of Swinging London, say, 1966, hence the title. These are the equivalents to the contemporaneous British hits of Marianne Faithfull, Cilla Black, and Petula Clark. In fact, the exact French equivalent to Petula Clark is...Petula Clark herself, who was just as big a star in France singing in French as she was in Britain and America singing in English. Here, she takes on a French adaptation of the hit "Needles and Pins" with an entirely different lyric, called "La Nuit N'en Finit Plus." Her inclusion on the album points to its superiority over its predecessor. While some of the biggest stars of what was called the yé-yé movement in French pop are still missing, many of the singers here are better known than the ones on the first disc. As the subtitle puts it, the album contains "More groovy French pop from the 60s including Brigitte Bardot, Petula Clark, Jacqueline Taïeb [who actually was on the first album] and Zouzou." Bardot's selection, "Ecoute le Temps," the theme from the TV show Saint-Tropez...Vole, actually bears a 1971 copyright, but no matter. This is still music that sounds like the mid-'60s, shortly after the Beatles arrived and before psychedelia set in, an eclectic, fun time when songs had harpsichord solos (Maryene's "Cette Fille N'est Rien Pour Lui") or borrowed the sound of the Kinks' "You Really Got Me" (Pussy Cat's "Acune Fille au Monde [Power of Love]"). In France as well as England and the U.S., it was a silly, entertaining interlude in pop, captured again on this album. (A disclaimer inside the CD booklet explains the occasionally uneven sound quality as "due to unavailability of certain master recordings," resulting in the use of old records instead.)

VA - Swinging Mademoiselles

Dinah Lee - The Viking Recordings 1964-1967

Dinah Lee - The Viking Recordings 1964-1967

Dinah Lee is the stage name of New Zealand-born singer, Diane Marie Jacobs (born 19 August 1946), who performed 1960s pop and then adult contemporary music. Her debut single from early 1964, "Don't You Know Yockomo?", achieved No. 1 chart success in New Zealand and, across the Tasman Sea, in Brisbane and Melbourne. It was followed in September by her cover of Jackie Wilson's, "Reet Petite", which also reached No. 1 in New Zealand and peaked at No. 6 in Melbourne. The Australian release was a double A-sided single with "Do the Blue Beat". On her early singles she was backed by fellow New Zealanders, Max Merrit & His Meteors. Lee appeared regularly on both New Zealand and Australian television variety programs, including Sing, Sing, Sing and Bandstand. She toured supporting Johnny O'Keefe, Ray Columbus & the Invaders and P.J. Proby. According to Australian rock music journalist, Ed Nimmervoll, in the 1960s, "Lee was the most successful female singer of in [sic] both her New Zealand homeland and Australia ... on stage and on record Dinah had all the adventure and exuberance for the time the boys had"


Dinah Lee - The Viking Recordings 1964-1967




Sylvie Vartan - Sylvie (1962)

Sylvie Vartan - Sylvie (1962)


Sylvie Vartan is an iconic, award-winning Bulgarian-French singer and actress whose signature singles "La Plus Belle Pour Aller Danser," "Si Je Chante," "Zoom Zoom Zoom," and "Irresistiblement" are considered not only classics of French pop, but also European classics. She established her stardom as a yé-yé idol who transformed herself into a superstar show-woman during the '70s. She is considered a French national treasure known simply as "Sylvie" and renowned for her elaborately staged concerts, sequined costumes, adventurous choreography, and no-nonsense professionalism.

Vartan was born Sylvie Georges Vartanian in Iskretz, Bulgaria during WWII, seven years after her brother Eddie. Her parents were originally from Georgia and worked for the French embassy. After Bulgaria was invaded by the Soviets in September 1944 -- a month after her birth -- the Vartan's house was confiscated, prompting the family to relocate to Bulgaria's capitol and largest city, Sofia. Due to changing circumstances in the country, they decided to leave and emigrated to Paris, France, arriving in December 1952 after a three-day train ride. They were shocked at the abundance of food, gifts, and other products readily available for purchase. Georges Vartan procured work as a night porter and the family stayed in a hotel for several years, cramped in a single room. The children, who could not speak a word of French, found it difficult to adapt. Nevertheless, through sheer hard work, Sylvie managed to pass her entry exam to the Lycée Victor Hugo.

Sylvie [1962] In 1960, the Vartans moved into an apartment. Sylvie entered the Hélène Boucher Lycée for Girls. Her mother advised her to specialize in foreign languages, at which she seemed gifted. That advice would serve her well in the future. Around this time, she began to take an interest in rock & roll (Bill Haley and Elvis Presley) and jazz -- her bother had become a professional trumpeter). That same year, Eddie gave up his legal studies to become first an artistic director for RCA France, and then a record producer. Almost immediately he persuaded his sister to sing a duet with Frankie Jordan on "Panne d’essence," released as the flipside to one of his singles. Unexpectedly, the B-side became the hit and Vartan, uncredited on the sleeve, received her first opportunity to sing on television. She as well-received by the press, who dubbed her "la collégienne du twist" ("the twisting schoolgirl"). By the fall of 1961 she had signed her own deal with Decca and, that December, issued her debut EP whose hit track was "Quand Le Film Est Triste," a cover of Sue Thompson's "Sad Movies (Make Me Cry)." The label rushed out her version of Ray Charles' "What'd I Say" and put her on-stage at the L'Olympia that same month as the opening act for Vince Taylor. In July of 1962 she toured the country with Gilbert Bécaud and did her second concert at L'Olympia with Johnny Hallyday. In autumn she released her version of "The Loco-Motion" and her first LP, simply titled Sylvie and followed it shortly thereafter with the single "Tous Mes Copains." Vartan also had her first adult part in a movie playing a singer in the film Un Clair de Lune à Maubeuge. In 1963, Paul Anka offered her the song "I'm Watching You," which became her first international hit in Japan and Korea, resulting in the smash LP, Twiste et Chante. She rounded out the year with four TV specials and became the doyenne of teen magazines. Of the 32 tracks she released between 1962 and 1963, six landed in the European Top 20. Late in 1963, Vartan toured France with Johnny Hallyday and starred with him in the movie D'où Viens-Tu, Johnny? Shortly thereafter, they traveled to Nashville, to record with the Jordanaires, resulting in the album À Nashville. The pair was engaged in 1964, just before Hallyday went to perform his compulsory military service, and Vartan released her self-titled album, which is considered her entry into the yé-yé universe. Its single, "La Plus Belle Pour Aller Danser," became her most recognizable hit. Eddie Vartan hired two English songwriting session musicians, Tommy Brown on drums and Mick Jones (later of Foreigner) on guitar. All went to record in New York City, where they penned Sylvie's hit "Cette Lettre-Là." The track marked her first variety TV show performance on the Ed Sullivan Show as a promo for her full-length Gift Wrapped from Paris.
Vartan and Hallyday married in 1965 and gave birth to a son in August of 1966. Though she took a couple of months off, during 1966-1967 she recorded and released more hits, all of which were delivered in television variety show appearances, including "Dis Moi, Que Tu M'aimes" (where she was accompanied by a group of male dancers) and "Le Jour Qui Vient" in early 1968; both hit number one in France, as did "2'35 de Bonheur" and "Comme Un Garçon." These tracks all registered chart success in Italy, Belgium, Japan, and Korea as well. In April, Vartan sustained serious injuries from an automobile accident, but she recovered quickly and was back in the studio and on television, as well as at the L'Olympia by December. The following year, Vartan delivered nine Saturday night appearances on Italy's national television station, which aided her single "Zum Zum Zum" in becoming a hit. She toured the globe in the aftermath and returned to Italy for more shows, including a television special. Her sophisticated, proto-Las Vegas stage show gained press notice across Europe for her numerous costume changes and dance routines. In 1970, she was involved in a second serious car accident, this time with Hallyday. He was unharmed, but Vartan was seriously injured. Extensive plastic surgery on her face was required. She convalesced in New York, where she met Jojo Smith, Barbra Streisand's choreographer, who masterminded her future American-style review shows. Nonetheless, by year's end she was back. She performed at L'Olympia and did a tour of Japan the following spring where she was warmly received for recording three songs in Japanese. She returned to the cinema, acting in director Harry Kumel's Malpertuis by; the film also featured Orson Welles in its cast.

With her American-style stage show -- complete with a large chorus of backing singers -- at L’Olympia in December of 1972, she offered audiences more rock-based material, but did cover Jacques Brel's "Ne Me Quitte Pas" and "Mon Père," the last offered as a tribute to her father, who died in 1970. In 1973, she cut her first duet with her husband. The single "J’ai un Problème" quickly attained gold certification. The pair toured that summer before Vartan undertook another Japanese tour, which resulted in an acclaimed, best-selling double-live album. From March to May of 1975, she appeared on Italian TV in the eight-episode series Punto e Basta and followed it with a summer tour with Jean-Jacques Debout that culminated in a concert with Hallyday in Narbonne. In October she planned a series of performances at the Palais de Congrès in Paris, a larger venue than she was used to in France; she hired the American choreographer Walter Painter to coach her army of dancers. The most vampish of French singers in elaborate costumes triumphed in those concerts and shows, and resulted in an ensuing tour. Following these activities, Vartan took a sabbatical to the U.S. with her son. She returned to the Palais de Congrès for a new show in 1977, Qu’est-ce Qui Fait Pleurer Les Blondes?, after her 1976 album of the same name. Her concerts added more dazzling touches to her singing.

Je Chante pour Swanee Albums released during the '70s -- including Je Chante Pour Swanee, Shang Shang A Lang, Fantaisie, and I Don't Want the Night to End, all charted in Europe and Japan.
De Choses et d'Autres In 1980, Hallyday and Vartan divorced after 15 years of marriage. In 1981, she opened a performance school in Paris, and followed it the next year with two more schools in Japan. She also released the acclaimed, best-selling full-length De Choses et D’Autres. 1981 was also the year she met her future husband, producer Tony Scotti, who would later become one-half of Scotti Brothers Records. In November, backed by the American dancer and singer, Gene Kelly, she performed at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas. This ultimate test for the "yéyé girl next door" ended in a standing ovation. While her live shows on either side of the Atlantic or Pacific were always sold-out events, her record sales were lackluster: 1984's Made in the USA and Virage in 1985 both sold poorly in comparison to earlier efforts, resulting in her leaving RCA after a quarter-century. Vartan married Scotti in 1984. After a four-year break she returned with 1989's Confidanses. The first two singles, "C’est Fatal" and "Il Pleut Sur London" both scored on the charts, but "Quand Tu Es Là," a re-visioned 1965 hit arranged by Etienne Daho, hit the top three. She also took part in the recording of the benefit album Urgence: 27 Artistes Pour La Recherche Contre Le Sida to assist AIDS victims.
Vent d'Ouest At the end of 1990, Vartan returned to Bulgaria for the first time since she was eight and gave a concert. In 1991, encouraged by her husband and aided by Daho, she gave a concert tour of her earlier hits entitled "Je Vous Salue Paris." While its reception at home was lukewarm, it was well-received in Japan and Italy. In 1992 she issued the album Vent d’Ouest, arranged by Claude Gaudette. While it gained exceptionally positive critical notice, it sold only modestly. She spent 1993 acting in various films before returning to issue the unplugged set Sessions Acoustiques in late 1994. Her show at the following year's Casino de Paris supported the date as she banished the high-rent glitz and excess of earlier tours and instead presented the show as a more intimate affair -- to great critical notice -- though not all costume changes were forsaken. In the fall of 1996, she issued Toutes Les Femmes Ont un Secret, with tunes by a who's-who of hit songwriters including Luc Plamondon, Richard Cocciante, Jean-Louis Murat, Marc Morgan, and Yves Simon. The critical and fan acceptance of this mature sound was universal. In November, she sang at L’Olympia, the legendary site of her yéyé years. Vartan wore the same Yves Saint-Laurent dress she'd worn for her début on its stage. She sang only hits, including those of the '60s, beginning with "La Plus Belle Pour Aller Danser."
Sensible As a mother to a pair of daughters as well as a Bulgarian child named Darina, Vartan took more time off to devote to parenthood. She issued two children's' albums in 1997 and 1998, and didn't give a damn what the public thought of them. But she had something for them, as well. Vartan cut Sensible for Philips, which was released that October. Material came from the many veterans she'd worked with in the past as well as new collaborators who included Michel Jouveaux, Jay Alanski, and the duo of Marc Lavoine/Aboulker. Her son David Hallyday also penned material for the album. In November, French president Jacques Chirac presented her with the prestigious Légion D'Honneur for her lifetime achievements and contributions to French culture. Vartan returned to touring in 1999 with a concert filled with classic songs from the great chanson era of the 1930s and '40s, as well as her own hits. Not one to shy away from glamour, Vartan hired Jean-Paul Gaultier to design her costumes and Painter for the choreography. The pomp and circumstance resulted in the best-selling Tour de Siecle live album. Vartan didn't release another album until she was 60, in 2004. She published her autobiography, Entre Ombre et Lumière and released Sylvie, written in collaboration with a loyal band of songwriters including Didier Barbelivien, Michel Mallory, and David Hallyday. It was a showcase for the classic Vartan at her pop diva best. Besides featuring contributions from her faithful partners, she included songs from up-and-coming stars including Daran and Florent Marchet. A double-length greatest-hits set followed, as did a box set of seven live albums. She supported all of them with two weeks of shows at Palais des Congrès, and an extensive tour of Geneva, Brussels, and Tokyo. The fashion industry got in on the act, too: Musée Galliera paid its own tribute by organizing an exhibition of Vartan's original stage costumes. The exhibition ran from October of 2004 to February of 2005 and featured 80 stage costumes and personal outfits from the singer's wardrobe, from her "yé-yé" period to the present. In 2006, she received the Ordre National du Mérite Award presented by the French minister of Culture and Communications, Renaud Donnedieu de Vabres. He hailed her as "one of the most prestigious ambassadresses of French chanson and French chic" and a "woman with a big heart who has used her international fame to spearhead her campaign against poverty and misery in the world...." In fact, throughout her career, the singer remained deeply attached to her homeland. In 1992, she set up the Sylvie Vartan Association for Bulgaria, providing valuable aid to children in need via donations and the provision of medical equipment for pediatric hospitals.
Nouvelle Vague In 2007, Vartan released Nouvelle Vague, a covers set featuring her own versions of '60s classics by the Rolling Stones ("Ruby Tuesday") the Beatles ("Drive My Car"), sister yé-yé artist Françoise Hardy ("Le Temps de L'Amour"), and French adaptations of Leonard Cohen's "Suzanne" and Bob Dylan's "Blowin’ in the Wind." All the songs were set to simple, basic arrangements that emphasized the rich timbre of Vartan's voice. She also campaigned to free five Bulgarian nurses who'd been imprisoned and sentenced to death in Libya eight years earlier. Relentlessly pursuing a series of petitions, appeals to the French president, and appearances in the media, Vartan played a high-profile role in the campaign that had been organized by Lawyers Sans Frontiers. The nurses were released and returned home to Bulgaria in July 2007.
Soleil Bleu After a long international tour, Vartan returned to work on a new album entitled Soleil Bleu. Upon the advice of Daho, she met with Keren Ann and the singer Doriand; they wrote two songs for her in "J’fais La Moue" and "Je Me Détacherai," and produced her album, released by RCA at the end of 2010. All the young faces of French chanson were invited to take part writing for and playing on the album. The title song was written and interpreted in a duet with Julien Doré; Vartan and Arthur H duetted on a cover of Benjamin Biolay's "La Vanité." She also sang tailor-made lyrics by Daho, La Grande Sophie, Frédéric Botton, and son David. To celebrate the release of Soleil Bleu, Vartan did a one-off performance at the Théâtre du Châtelet in Paris in December. Many hits were on the program, but also newer songs, including duets with Doré and Arthur H, who joined her on-stage. She then embarked on a sold-out tour to present her new songs live across Europe.
Sylvie in NashvilleVartan issued a 50th anniversary live album entitled Live a La Salle Pleyel: The 50th Anniversary Concert in 2011 before taking a breather. In 2013, she returned to a Nashville studio to celebrate the 50th anniversary of her Music City album. Sylvie in Nashville included songs by Bob Seger, Kristian Bush, and Roy Orbison, as well as some custom-penned originals. To her surprise, the album charted at home and across Europe. In 2015, BMG/Sony Legacy issued Une Vie en Musique, a special edition retrospective that included tracks from her catalog associated with Sofia, Bulgaria, Paris, and Los Angeles.

Sylvie Vartan - Sylvie (1962)


Las Mosquitas - Singles 1965Les Intrigantes - Singles 1965-1968CHER - 1965 & 1966The Pussycats - You Can't Stop Loving Me ‎(7", EP) 1966Sylvie Vartan  - Sylvie a Nashville (1964)Marianne Faithfull ‎– Loveinamist by Marianne Faithfull ‎ (1967)VA - Swinging MademoisellesVA - Swinging Mademoiselle Dinah Lee - The Viking Recordings 1964-1967Sylvie Vartan - Sylvie (1962)

Report "Old Melodies ..."

Are you sure you want to report this post for ?

Cancel
×