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Anette – What About Me Let's Jump The Broomstick (1964)


Danish 60's - 70's singer. Anette started performing as a singer in the late 50's. 
 Her real name was Bente Karlsen. She was hired by Henning Blegvads Orkester as a substitute for their singer called Anette. She therefore adopted the stage name Anette and released one single as Anette Kay. Due to legal issues she had to shorten it to Anette. Was later married to Henning Blegvad and changed her stage name to Anette Blegvad in 1971. After divorcing Henning Blegvad she later married again and is now named Bente Hesselberg.





The Shangri-Las - Leaders Of The Pack (1964-66) 2005

The Shangri-Las - Leaders Of The Pack (1964-66) 2005

The Shangri-Las - Leaders Of The Pack (1964-66) 2005

Front cover Red Bird ‎– RB 20-101 1965

By the time that their sole long-player Shangri-Las-'65 hit the streets, the Queens, NY-based girl group had already made a sizable dent in the pop charts with the death rock anthem "Leader of the Pack," the equally angst-riddled teenage musical soap opera "Remember (Walkin' in the Sand)," and the no-nonsense "Give Him a Great Big Kiss." The latter being forever branded with the sassy spoken "When I say I'm in love, you best believe I'm in love L-U-V!" introduction. The Shangri-Las consisted of two sets of siblings: twins Marge Ganser and Mary Anne Ganser as well as Mary Weiss and Elizabeth Weiss. It was under the guidance and influence of producer Shadow Morton that the young ladies gained access to the legendary Brill Building hitmakers Jeff Barry and Ellie Greenwich. They supply nearly half of the dozen sides on this album. Primary among them are the catchy minor-chord "Out in the Streets" and -- perhaps trying to evoke the impact of "Leader of the Pack" -- the partially narrated "Give Us Your Blessing." Morton's unmistakable production values can be heard here at their most constructive. They capture the richness of a Phil Spector recording with a "theater of the mind" sonic realism, courtesy of Morton's affinity for sound effects. From the Kirshner/Nevins stable of talent came the soon-to-be Monkees composers Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart. Before their connection with the pre-fabs, they offered the upbeat standout "Dum Dum Ditty" to the Shangri-Las. Other deep cut classics include the Motown-influenced rocker "Right Now and Not Later" and the funky James Brown groove that permeates the Morton-penned "Sophisticated Boom Boom."

The Shangri-Las - Leaders Of The Pack (1964-66) 2005

The Shangri-Las - Leaders Of The Pack (1964-66) 2005


The Shangri-Las - Leaders Of The Pack (1964-66) 2005

The Shangri-Las - Leaders Of The Pack (1964-66) 2005

The Shangri-Las - Leaders Of The Pack (1964-66) 2005

The Shangri-Las - Leaders Of The Pack (1964-66) 2005

The Shangri-Las - Leaders Of The Pack (1964-66) 2005



Looking for high quality ... :

You Can't Sit Down

Good Night, My Love, Pleasant Dreams





P.P. Arnold - The Best Of

P.P. Arnold -  The Best Of


A soul vocalist who came from a family of gospel singers, Pat (P.P.) Arnold began singing as a four-year-old. She got her start backing Bobby Day before being invited to join the Ikettes, backing Ike and Tina Turner. Arnold toured with them in the '60s, including one stint with the Rolling Stones. Mick Jagger persuaded her to remain in London, and she later recorded for the Immediate label (then run by the Stones' manager Andrew Loog Oldham). Loog Oldham, Jagger, and Mike Hurst produced Arnold's debut LP, The First Lady of Immediate, in 1967, which included the single "The First Cut Is the Deepest," which was written by Cat Stevens and later popularized by Rod Stewart.

Arnold also had moderate success with the singles "The Time Has Come," "(If You Think) You're Groovy," and "Angel in the Morning" in the late '60s, though they were hits in England and Europe rather than America. Arnold was part of the cast for the play Catch My Soul in 1969, and subsequently acted in the television shows Fame and Knots Landing, plus Andrew Lloyd Webber's Starlight Express. Arnold re-entered the music world in the mid-'80s. She sang lead on a Boy George song for the film Electric Dreams in 1984 while on 10 Records. She worked with Dexter Wansel and Loose Ends on the single "A Little Pain," which she recorded as Pat Arnold. She then had another English hit with the single "Burn It Up" on the Rhythm King label. The Beatmasters later produced her song "Dynamite."

P.P. Arnold -  The Best Of




Skeeter Davis - Skeeter Sings Standards (1965)

Skeeter Davis - Skeeter Sings Standards (1965)


Skeeter Davis never received much critical attention, but in the '50s and '60s, she recorded some of the most accessible crossover country music, occasionally skirting rock & roll. Born Mary Penick, Davis took her last name after forming a duo with Betty Jack Davis, the Davis Sisters. Their 1953 single "I Forgot More Than You'll Ever Know" was a big country hit; its B-side, the remarkable "Rock-a-Bye Boogie," foreshadowed rockabilly. That same year, however, the duo's career was cut short by a tragic car accident in which Betty Jack was killed and Skeeter was severely injured. Skeeter did attempt to revive the Davis Sisters with Betty Jack's sister but was soon working as a solo artist.

In the early '60s, Davis followed the heels of Brenda Lee and Patsy Cline to become one of the first big-selling female country crossover acts, although her pop success was pretty short-lived. The weepy ballad "The End of the World," though, was a massive hit, reaching number two in 1963. "I Can't Stay Mad at You," a Top Ten hit the same year, was downright rock & roll; penned by Gerry Goffin and Carole King, it sounded like (and was) an authentic Brill Building girl group-styled classic. Goffin and King also wrote another successful girl group knockoff for her, "Let Me Get Close to You," although such efforts were the exception rather than the rule. Usually she sang sentimental, country-oriented tunes with enough pop hooks to catch the ears of a wider audience, such as "I Will."

Davis concentrated on the country market after the early '60s, although she never seemed too comfortable limiting herself to the Nashville crowd. She recorded a Buddy Holly tribute album in 1967, when Holly wasn't a hot ticket with either the country or the rock audience. But she certainly didn't reject country conventions either: She performed on the Grand Ole Opry and recorded duets with Bobby Bare, Porter Wagoner, and George Hamilton IV.
Skeeter Davis - Skeeter Sings Standards (1965)



Doris Day - Love Him (1963) / Latin For Lovers (1964) /

Doris Day - Love Him (1963) / Latin For Lovers (1964) /

Doris Day - Love Him (1963) / Latin For Lovers (1964) /


Except for a single release of the title song from her film Move Over, Darling, Doris Day stayed away from the record racks for most of 1963, possibly dissatisfied with Columbia Records' efforts to record and promote her with outdated concept albums of old standards at the same time that she was the reigning queen of Hollywood. But in the winter of 1963-1964, she returned with her first new LP in more than a year, Love Him!, and it represented a whole new approach. The producer was her 21-year-old son, Terry Melcher, and he attempted to bring his mother's musical style up to date by banishing the silly concepts and carefully choosing contemporary material he thought would suit her. He got Brill Building pop songwriters Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil to pen the title song, a bolero in which a woman gives another woman advice on the man she has lost to her. And the rest of the material dated either from the last few years or had recently been revived. Thus, for example, "Since I Fell for You" might be a 1948 copyright, but it had been a hit for Lenny Welch in 1963. There were also songs associated with Elvis Presley and appropriations from the country and R&B charts. Melcher seemed to want to demonstrate that Day could sing a broader range of material than Columbia had been giving her, and she responded by throwing herself into performances of songs that had greater depth than those she usually sang. The approach didn't always work, but Day sounded much more engaged than she had on previous albums. The disc made the charts, but sales were difficult to estimate; in Billboard it just missed the Top 100, while in Cash Box it climbed into the Top 40, a significant commercial comeback.

Doris Day - Love Him (1963) / Latin For Lovers (1964) /


In the wake of the Stan Getz albums Jazz Samba (1962) and especially Getz/Gilberto (1964), Brazilian bossa nova was all the rage with the jazz-pop set of the early and mid-'60s, and many pop singers took the opportunity to record albums full of songs by Antonio Carlos Jobim. Doris Day might not come to mind immediately as someone well-suited to the lightly rhythmic style, but she had always had a feel for mid-tempo material that provided a showcase for her warm, rich voice. Still, you might have thought of her as a bit lightweight for the easygoing, yet intricate Brazilian sound. But by her early forties, the eternally ingenuous singer finally was showing signs of maturity. She had taken a distinctly different tack on Love Him!, the 1964 album produced by her son, Terry Melcher, and here she sang the lyrics like a grown-up woman, her voice even betraying an attractive huskiness here and there. As a former band singer, she knew how to work with the beat, and so the rhythms didn't throw her at all. The result was a surprisingly satisfying change of pace for her. Unfortunately, rather than marking a new beginning in her recording career, it happened to come at the end. Latin for Lovers was the last new Doris Day album to be recorded (though it was released ahead of Doris Day's Sentimental Journey, which was actually recorded a couple of months earlier); all that followed were a few singles in 1966-1967 and a "lost" 1967 LP session, The Love Album, which languished unreleased in the Columbia vaults until Melcher found it in 

Doris Day - Love Him (1963) / Latin For Lovers (1964) /



Célia Vilela - 2 in 1

Célia Vilela - 2 in 1


Cylia Villela started discogrbfica career in 1955 and recorded some 78 RPM discs aty become part of the first gerazgo the Brazilian Rock around 1960. In that year he recorded his two big hits: "Talk on the phone," versgo Fred George for "Pillow Talk" (Peper and James), and "Love Train" Likewise, it versgo Fred George for "One Way Ticket To The Blues" (H. Hunter / J. Keller), both in the same lanzadas 78 RPM record by GERD, and inclundas the first LP Cylia, "And Viva Youth !!!" lanzado in 1961. The second LP Cylia Villela, "F-15 Space" was only  in 1964. Had the TV show " Cylia, Msica and Youth "on TV Continental Rio de Janeiro, alym of" In Rock Wheel "by Rbdio Globe, having transferred to after aa Rbdio Guanabara. Married musician Carlos Becker, former member of The Angels group and its irmgo, Sergio Becker. He abandoned his career before the Young Guard burst and from entgo became reclusive, and vehemently refused to give his testimony on Histuria the Brazilian Rock to Albert Pavgo in 1987, despite several attempts to contact the musician singer. He died in 2005 in Petrupolis.Petrupolis.

Petula Clark - En Vogue (Beat En Francais)

Petula Clark - En Vogue (Beat En Francais)


This is a long-overdue double-CD volume, assembling 50 of Petula Clark's rock & roll sides cut for France's Vogue Records during the years 1959-1967. 

Petula Clark - En Vogue (Beat En Francais)

Petula Clark - En Vogue (Beat En Francais)

Petula Clark - En Vogue (Beat En Francais)


Some of the music, such as "Partir, Il Nous Faut" (aka "Nobody I Know") skew very close to MOR pop, but most of it is unimpeachable in its origins and intent, and enough of it is familiar to English-speaking audiences ("Bye Bye Mon Amour" being a translation of "Hello Mary Lou" and "Viens Avec Moi" being "I Know a Place," etc.). Some of the French versions of Clark's English-language hits, such as "Si Tu Prenais la Temps" (aka "A Sign of the Times") are interesting to hear for the differences in their arrangements, which expose different instruments from their familiar recorded versions. Additionally, she does amazingly well with Ray Davies' "A Well Respected Man" (aka "Un Jeune Homme Bien"), a song for which one wouldn't expect Clark to have excessive affinity, and "Tu Perds Ton Temps" (aka the Beatles' "Please Please Me"). There are also numerous tracks unique to the French pop marketplace that are decent early-'60s-style pop/rock, obviously influenced by such artists as Neil Sedaka and the slick Brill Building sound, plus some adaptations of familiar melodies ("Enfant Do" being "Cotton Fields" in French garb) -- and there's at least one jewel of a composition here, "L'Amour Que Tu M'As Donne," that ought to have been translated into English, plus one previously unissued track, "Donne Moi," that's got a harder electric sound than most of Clark's music. The sound is excellent and the annotation by Mick Patrick and Richard Harries is exceptionally thorough.

Petula Clark - En Vogue (Beat En Francais)

Sylvie Vartan - Gift Wrapped from Paris  (1965)Françoise Hardy ‎– In ItalianFrançoise Hardy ‎– In English & En Anglais Anette – What About Me  Let's Jump The Broomstick (1964)The Shangri-Las - Leaders Of The Pack (1964-66) 2005P.P. Arnold -  The Best OfSkeeter Davis - Skeeter Sings Standards (1965)Doris Day - Love Him (1963) / Latin For Lovers (1964) /Célia Vilela - 2 in 1 Petula Clark - En Vogue (Beat En Francais)

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