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Peggy March ‎– Best Selection (1994)

Peggy March  ‎– Best Selection (1994)


Little Peggy March, age 15 years old, only ever had one big hit during her decade with RCA Records, but that song, "I Will Follow Him," spent three weeks at the number one spot on the charts and even topped the R&B charts for a week as well. It pretty well helped define the early girl group sound, as much as the Shangri-Las' "Leader of the Pack" or "Great Big Kiss" did at the later end of the musical genre. Her subsequent hits, "I Wish I Were a Princess" (which was featured prominently in John Waters' period romp Hairspray) and "Hello Heartache, Goodbye Love," scored much lower in the Top 40. RCA continued to record March for ten years, right into the early '70s, but she never scored an American hit of any consequence after early 1964. By contrast, in Europe, she was a popular recording artist for many years and scored several major hits, especially in Germany, where she moved in 1969.

Margaret Battavio, aka Little Peggy March, had dreamt of a singing career for most of her young life, and had been winning talent contests as a young girl. She was signed to RCA in 1962 at age 14, and made her debut that year with a cover of the song "Little Me," taken from a Sid Caesar Broadway hit, which vanished without a trace. Her second single was to ensure her place in the pop music reference books, however.

English-born girl singer Petula Clark, who'd been recording since the mid-'50s, had recently scored a hit in France with a song called "Chariot" on the Vogue label. RCA producers Hugo Peretti and Luigi Creatore ("Hugo and Luigi"), best known today for their work with Sam Cooke, found the song and got March to record the number in a new version with simpler lyrics, now known as "I Will Follow Him." Clark's recording was a slow, moody, soulful piece, with the singer seeking the depths of the song's meaning, all without the doo wop-style "did-ip, da did-ip, da did-ip" chorus. It sounded like the work of a woman. March's recording, by contrast, picked up the tempo, added a doo wop-style male chorus and a pulsing arrangement, prominent drums and chorus, and her breathy, breathless reading of the lyrics. It sounded like the work of a passionate girl, and it defined the girl group sound as much as numbers like "Johnny Angel."

March eventually released an entire album built around her sudden number one hit, including "I Wish I Were a Princess," which reached the Top 40 in 1963. The rest of the album was a pretty collection of tuneful teen pop, the world of romance as seen through the persona of a 15-year-old, including such numbers as "My Teenage Castle (Is Tumbling Down)" and "Johnny Cool." She subsequently saw modest chart success in America with the magnificent "Hello Heartache, Goodbye Love," a near-cousin of "I Will Follow Him" in beat and arrangement, which reached the Top 30 and also became a hit in England; and also with "The Impossible Happened," a funny, silly little teenage girl's romantic lament, which made the American Top 50. In early 1964, March was still reaching the lower ends of the charts with Paul Anka's "(I'm Watching) Every Move You Make," but after that, music began changing very rapidly with the advent of the British Invasion sound. She recorded 18 singles for RCA between 1964 and 1971 and several albums as well, none of which charted in any serious way in America.

As it turned out, the United States comprised only one part of the audience she was trying to reach, and listeners in Europe were far more interested in March as an American pop star than Americans were. She moved to Germany with her husband/manager, Arnie Harris, and enjoyed a career in recording, variety show performances, and television appearances. In the '80s, March returned to America, where she continues to be best known for "I Will Follow Him" and the naive early girl group sound that it represents, some 35 years after it was first released.



Peggy March  ‎– Best Selection 

Japan CD Compilation
RCA ‎– BVCP-2627

Peggy March  ‎– Best Selection (1994)

Peggy March  ‎– Best Selection (1994)

Marcie Blane - Bobby's Girl :The Complete Seville Recordings

Marcie Blane - Bobby's Girl :The Complete Seville Recordings


One minute she was schoolgirl Marcia Blank, 
the next she was Seville recording artist MARCIE BLANE,
 about to embark on a showbiz career.... 





Marcie Blane - Bobby's Girl :The Complete Seville Recordings

Marcie Blane - Bobby's Girl :The Complete Seville Recordings

Marcie Blane - Bobby's Girl :The Complete Seville Recordings

Marcie Blane - Bobby's Girl :The Complete Seville Recordings

Marcie Blane - Bobby's Girl :The Complete Seville Recordings

Marcie Blane - Bobby's Girl :The Complete Seville Recordings


Marcie Blane - Bobby's Girl :The Complete Seville Recordings

Oldies collectors can finally quit shelling out big bucks for bootleg CDs and get the real deal with Bobby's Girl: Complete Seville Recordings, a legitimate anthology of Marcie Blane's early-'60s recordings for the Seville label. The 22 cuts comprise all of her Seville singles, five long-lost demo tracks from her audition tape, and mono and stereo versions of her Top Three hit, "Bobby's Girl." "Bobby's Girl" is a classic of the teen idol era -- a teen-oriented expression of female devotion with a prominent melody and an abundance of earnest, girlish charm. Blane was practically a one-hit wonder, although she managed to score a minor hit with a follow-up release, "What's Does a Girl Do?" As that title suggests, Blane recorded a number of songs similar in theme to "Bobby's Girl" -- boy crazy, girls-are-made-for-love confections that appealed, in different ways, to male and female fantasies. In "Who's Going to Take My Daddy's Place," Blane is on the prowl for a surrogate father to scold her and take care of her, and in "Why Can't I Get a Guy" she laments being gifted with a brain but not a boy. The music is pure teen pop, similar toShelley Fabares and Annette Funicello, but Blane has more conventional singing talent than either of them. The one departure from the teen pop formula is "Ragtime Sound," a jaunty throwback to earlier musical forms similar to Annett's "Mister Piano Man." The package also includes German-language renditions of "What Does a Girl Do?" and "How Can I Tell Him" that Blane handles with confidence. The five demo tracks consist of Blane performing obviously unfamiliar (to her) songs as an electric guitar strums in the background; the performances are rough, but she shows clear promise as a singer and foreshadows the direction of her recording career with the delightfully precious song "I'm Just a Cute Little Girl." The "popcorn oldies" crowd and pop music lovers on a sugar diet are sure to enjoy this carefully compiled program of teen idol hits and rarities. ~ Greg Adams, All Music Guide

***

Ria Bartok - French EP Collection


Ria Bartok - French EP Collection



Ria Bartok - French EP Collection

Ria Bartok quit her native Germany to record a string of cover versions of international hits in neighbouring France in the 1960s, but lost out time and again to competing versions by established stars. 
She was born Marie-Louise Pleiss in Einbeck, in Germany, on 28 January 1943. 
Her father was an opera singer, who sent his daughter to Paris to finish her education. After leaving school, she took a job as a medical assistant before turning her attention to music. 
In 1963, the young blonde released her first EP, for the Ricordi label, featuring N’importe quoi, a cover of A whole lot of nothing, and Parc’que j’ai revu François, a cover of Dickey Lee’s I saw Linda yesterday, which lost out to a version by the king of French pop, Johnny Hallyday. 
Her charmingly accented delivery attracted the attention of the RCA label, where she moved for the follow up, an EP featuring the original composition Frankie. However, when it too failed, she switched to Columbia. 
Her first release on the new label was Coeur, a stab at Heart, penned by Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil, which lost out to a version by Italian star Rita Pavone. The EP is also interesting for including Sans amour, a cover of Cliff Richard’s Lucky lips, and the original composition Diggedle boeing. 
In 1964, her fourth EP featured Seule parmi les autres, a version of The Elektras’ All I want to do is run.
That year, she represented Germany in the Knokke Cup in Belgium, competing against the likes of Britain’s Elkie Brooks and the Netherlands’ Rita Hovink and Trea Dobbs.
Her next release saw her record Ce monde, a version of Umberto Bindi’s Italian hit Il mio mondo (also a hit for Britain’s Cilla Black as You’re my world). However, in France, Ria found herself in the familiar position of losing out to another version of the same song, this time by label mate Richard Anthony. 
She came closest to having a hit later that year with Et quelque chose me dit, a version of US singer Earl-Jean’s I’m into something good, which had given Herman’s Hermits a big hit.
Its relative success prompted her to release a version of the song in Spain, Algo bueno me va a pasar, and to record material for other European markets.  
In her native Germany she released two solo singles in 1964, Blue navy blue and Zu Schade dafür, a version of US singer Tracey Dey’s Ska doo dee yah, and a duet with French star Gilbert Becaud, Es ist nie zu spät, which appeared on the B-side of Becaud’s Wo ist die Liebe zu Hause 45. 
For the British market, she recorded an English version of Diggedle boeing, See if I care, and in Italy, she issued È un bugiardo the same year.
Returning her attention to France, she released arguably her three finest EPs in 1965.
First up was Tu la revois, a version of the Tokens’ Goffin and King-penned He’s in town, which Ria helped write the French lyrics for. The EP also included her take on Shirley Matthews’ Canadian million seller Big town boy, Quand reviendra le garçon que j’attends.
Sandie Shaw’s You can’t blame him was picked for an overhaul for her second EP of the year, becoming Je ne peux pas le blâmer. The release also featured Je ne veux pas qu’il me quitte, a version of UK-based US girl group Goldie and the Gingerbreads’ Can’t you hear my heartbeat and N’y touche pas, a version of little-known Becky and the Lollipops’ My boyfriend
Finally, Un baiser – her take on the Honeycombs’ That’s the way – became the lead track on her last EP of the year. For many fans, Action, a version of the song of the same name by Paul Revere and the Raiders and also included on the release, is another highlight of the release.  
Despite their quality, none of these registered with the French record-buying public and Ria left the label. 
She moved to Canada in 1966, returning to Paris only at the end of the decade. 

Sadly, she died in her home in Paris in early 1970, in a fire investigators say was caused by a cigarette. 

Ria Bartok ‎– French EP Collection
Label: Magic Records (2) ‎– 5207622
Format: 2 × CD 
Country: France
Released: 1999


Ria Bartok - French EP Collection

Shelley Fabares - Growing Up The 1962 Recordings

Shelley Fabares - Growing Up The 1962 Recordings


Shelley Fabares - Growing Up The 1962 Recordings



Shelley Fabares is one -- and maybe the best -- of a handful of young actresses/singers who emerged from the end of the 1950s through the mid-'60s, in an attempt to extend television stardom into action on the pop charts. Most didn't last, and none made the impact of their rivals, the singers who tried acting (Connie Francis, Sandy Stewart, Lulu, etc.), but Fabares did score a huge hit with "Johnny Angel."

The Band Wagon [Original Soundtrack] [CBS]Shelley Fabares was born on January 19, 1944 in California, to a family that already had a background performing (her aunt is Nanette Fabray, the actress best remembered for movies such as The Band Wagon), and she began working as a dancer and model while still a child. By the mid-'50s, she had appeared in such movies as Never Say Goodbye and Summer Love. In 1958, Fabares won the role of Mary Stone in the ABC television series The Donna Reed Show -- the show was a hit, and over the next five years, in tandem with former Mouseketeer Paul Petersen, who played her brother Jeff on the show, Fabares was one of the most visible and popular young performers on television, and the quintessential TV "daughter."
The Monkees The series was produced by Columbia Pictures Television, and the two young performers were asked to try working with the studio's label, Colpix Records. Although the demos failed to impress the label's executives, Donna Reed Show producer Tony Owen (Reed's husband) insisted that they try and make a proper record, and even financed the recording session himself with producer Stu Phillips (The Monkees, Battlestar Galactica) at the helm.
Girl HappyFabares' debut release, "Johnny Angel," reached number one on the charts in early 1962, and is regarded today as a quintessential "girl group" record. None of her subsequent records ever came close to that exalted level, but Fabares recorded for the next three years, in between acting assignments that included movies with Elvis Presley (Girl Happy, Spinout, Clambake), releasing three modestly successful singles ("Johnny Loves Me," "The Things We Did Last Summer," "Ronnie, Call Me When You Get a Chance") and a pair of albums (Shelley, The Things We Did Last Summer). To Fabares, who never conceived of a singing career for herself and wasn't entirely comfortable in that role, these recordings were all a lark, but they constituted little more than a footnote to her early career.
One Day at a Time Despite her indifference to recording, Fabares' first husband was producer Lou Adler. She didn't remain in the music business, and even her acting career had stalled at the end of the '60s. During the '70s, she resumed her career as an adult performer, appearing as a regular on series such as Forever Fornwood and One Day At A Time. She later married actor Mike Farrell (M*A*S*H) and has since emerged as a major television star again, as Craig T. Nelson's wife in the hit series Coach. She and Farrell have also been very visible as activists, raising money and the public's consciousness on behalf of numerous causes, most notably 

Shelley Fabares is one -- and maybe the best -- of a handful of young actresses/singers who emerged from the end of the 1950s through the mid-'60s, in an attempt to extend television stardom into action on the pop charts. Most didn't last, and none made the impact of their rivals, the singers who tried acting (Connie Francis, Sandy Stewart, Lulu, etc.), but Fabares did score a huge hit with "Johnny Angel."

The Band Wagon [Original Soundtrack] [CBS]Shelley Fabares was born on January 19, 1944 in California, to a family that already had a background performing (her aunt is Nanette Fabray, the actress best remembered for movies such as The Band Wagon), and she began working as a dancer and model while still a child. By the mid-'50s, she had appeared in such movies as Never Say Goodbye and Summer Love. In 1958, Fabares won the role of Mary Stone in the ABC television series The Donna Reed Show -- the show was a hit, and over the next five years, in tandem with former Mouseketeer Paul Petersen, who played her brother Jeff on the show, Fabares was one of the most visible and popular young performers on television, and the quintessential TV "daughter."
The Monkees The series was produced by Columbia Pictures Television, and the two young performers were asked to try working with the studio's label, Colpix Records. Although the demos failed to impress the label's executives, Donna Reed Show producer Tony Owen (Reed's husband) insisted that they try and make a proper record, and even financed the recording session himself with producer Stu Phillips (The Monkees, Battlestar Galactica) at the helm.
Girl HappyFabares' debut release, "Johnny Angel," reached number one on the charts in early 1962, and is regarded today as a quintessential "girl group" record. None of her subsequent records ever came close to that exalted level, but Fabares recorded for the next three years, in between acting assignments that included movies with Elvis Presley (Girl Happy, Spinout, Clambake), releasing three modestly successful singles ("Johnny Loves Me," "The Things We Did Last Summer," "Ronnie, Call Me When You Get a Chance") and a pair of albums (Shelley, The Things We Did Last Summer). To Fabares, who never conceived of a singing career for herself and wasn't entirely comfortable in that role, these recordings were all a lark, but they constituted little more than a footnote to her early career.
One Day at a Time Despite her indifference to recording, Fabares' first husband was producer Lou Adler. She didn't remain in the music business, and even her acting career had stalled at the end of the '60s. During the '70s, she resumed her career as an adult performer, appearing as a regular on series such as Forever Fornwood and One Day At A Time. She later married actor Mike Farrell (M*A*S*H) and has since emerged as a major television star again, as Craig T. Nelson's wife in the hit series Coach. She and Farrell have also been very visible as activists, raising money and the public's consciousness on behalf of numerous causes, most notably 


The Things We Did Last Summer 1962

Shelley Fabares - Growing Up The 1962 Recordings


Shelley! 1962

Shelley Fabares - Growing Up The 1962 Recordings

Growing Up The 1962 Recordings 2014
http://www.jasmine-records.co.uk/acatalog/jascd-908.html

Shelley Fabares - Growing Up The 1962 Recordings

Katja Holländer - Hallo Katja (1966)

Katja Holländer - Hallo Katja (1966)


American-born singer Katja Holländer signed to the Polydor label in her family’s German homeland in 1966, where she cut a number of go-go-tastic tunes with some of the country’s top songwriters. 
She was born Melody Hollaender on 20 March 1944 in Hollywood, California, in the United States. Her father was composer Friedrich Hollaender, who is best known for having penned Marlene Dietrich’s Falling in love again/Ich bin von Kopf bis Fuß auf Liebe eingestellt. 
Melody came to Europe in the 1950s, and in 1966 she landed a contract with the Polydor label in Germany. 
At that time, the country was smitten with Nancy Sinatra. Her These boots are made for walkin’ had just spent six weeks at the top of the charts, and a German version of the song, performed by fellow US singer Eileen, had also proved a hit. 
Polydor bosses decided that their new signing – who had been renamed Katja Holländer – would be the perfect front for a Teutonic take on this sound. 
Katja was teamed with top lyricist and producer Kurt Feltz and composer Werner Scharfenberger, the pair behind many big hits by the likes of Gitte, Mina and Connie Francis. 
The first single to be released from this collaboration was the first-rate Er heißt Peter, with Wenn ich deinen Namen hör, a version of the Jackie De Shannon-penned Come and stay with me (a hit in the UK for Marianne Faithfull), on the reverse. 
Perhaps surprisingly, the 45 failed to sell. 
What is more unexpected is that the label pushed ahead with its plans for Katja to cut an album.
The resultant LP, Hallo, Katja, is remarkably good. Full of catchy tunes and tongue-in-cheek lyrics, it is now much sought after by fans of the genre. However, despite promotional appearances on German TV, it didn’t attract much attention from record buyers at the time. 
The following year, Katja switched to the smaller Populär label for one final German release, Weine nicht um einen Boy, issued under the alternative spelling of Katja Hollaender. When it went the way of her previous releases, no further material was issued. 

Katja now lives back in California, where she manages her father’s musical legacy.

http://www.readysteadygirls.eu/#/katja-hollander/4532558106  

Katja Holländer - Hallo Katja (1966)

Katja Holländer - Hallo Katja (1966)

Birtha - Can't Stop The Madness

Birtha - Can't Stop The Madness




Birtha was one of the leading female rock bands performing during the 
early 1970's.  The band consisted of four women:

 Shele Pinizzotto ( guitar), 
Rosemary Butler (bass), 
Sherry Hagler (keyboards)
 and Liver Favela (drums)

All four members of the group performed lead vocals and 
harmonies.
Liver was the last member to join Birtha in 1968.   The group immediately 
started playing the club circuit  and toured from  California to Alaska.  From 
1968 to 1971 Birtha worked to tighten and refine their rock sound and in 
1971 they started writing  their own material.   Most of the material was 
written by Birtha, but there were a few songs  which were written in 
partnership with other parties including,  Mark Wickman and Gabriel 
Mckler.  

Birtha signed a record contract with Dunhill Records in 1972 and recorded 
their first album, "Birtha" with record producer Gabriel Mckler and 
Engineers,  David Hassinger and Val Caray.    After the release of their first 
album, Birtha began playing rock concerts and clubs  throughout the U.S., 
Canada and Europe.    While taking breaks in their home town,  Los 
Angeles, they would often play The Whiskey and The Troubadour and 
frequently played a club in Glendale, CA called The Sopwith Camel (great 
club).  
 In 1973 Birtha recorded their second album, "Can't Stop The Madness" with producer and engineer Christopher Huston.  

Birtha - Can't Stop The Madness


The band was on the road for more than 250 days a year and played with groups like, Fleetwood Mac, Alice Cooper, Poco, Black Oak Arkansas, 
Cheech and Chong, The Kinks, B.B. King, Three Dog Night, James Gang and many more.  

The band broke up in 1975 and all the members went their seperate ways.  


Birtha - Can't Stop The Madness  1973

Birtha - Can't Stop The Madness

Birtha - Can't Stop The Madness

Nancy Sinatra - Country, My Way (1967)

Nancy Sinatra - Country, My Way (1967)


Growing up as the child of one of the greatest icons in American music can't be easy, but Nancy Sinatra managed to create a sound and style for herself fully separate from that of her (very) famous father, and her sexy but strong-willed persona has endured with nearly the same strength as the image of the Chairman of the Board.

Nancy Sinatra was born in the Summer of 1940, while her father, Frank Sinatra, was singing with the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra; as the daughter of show business royalty, Nancy grew up in the spotlight, and made her first appearance on television with her father in 1957. It wasn't long before Nancy developed aspirations of her own as a performer -- she had studied music, dancing, and voice through much of her youth -- and in 1960 she made her debut as a professional performer on a television special hosted by her father and featuring guest star Elvis Presley, then fresh out of the Army. After appearing in a number of movies and guest starring on episodic television, Nancy was eager to break into music, and she signed a deal with her father's record label, Reprise. However, her first hit single, 1966's "These Boots Are Made for Walkin'," made it clear she had the talent and moxie to make it without her father's help. Sounding both sexy and defiant, and belting out a definitive tough-chick lyric over a brassy arrangement by Bill Strange (and with the cream of L.A.'s session players behind her), "These Boots Are Made for Walkin'" was an immediate and unstoppable hit, and took the "tuff girl" posturing of the Shangri-Las and the Ronettes to a whole new level.

A number of hits followed, including "How Does That Grab You," "Sugar Town," and the theme song to the James Bond picture You Only Live Twice. Nancy also teamed up with her father for the single "Somethin' Stupid," which raced to the top of the charts in 1967. Most of Nancy's hits were produced by Lee Hazlewood, who went on to become a cult hero on his own and recorded a number of memorable duets with her, including "Sand," "Summer Wine," and the one-of-a-kind epic "Some Velvet Morning." Nancy reinforced her "bad girl" persona in 1966 with co-starring role opposite Peter Fonda in The Wild Angels, the Roger Corman film that helped kick off the biker flick cycle of the 1960s and early '70s; she also teamed up with Elvis Presley in the 1968 movie Speedway.

One More TimeNancy continued to record into the early '70s, but in 1970 she married dancer Hugh Lambert (a brief marriage to British singer and actor Tommy Sands ended in 1965), and she devoted most of her time to her new life as a wife and mother, as well as working with a number of charitable causes. In 1985, she published the book Frank Sinatra: My Father, and became increasingly active in looking after her family's affairs; she published a second book on Frank Sinatra in 1998 and currently oversees the Sinatra Family website. In 1995, Nancy returned to the recording studio with a country-flavored album called One More Time, and she helped publicize it by posing for a photo spread in Playboy magazine. Nancy launched a concert tour in support of the album, and in 2003 teamed up with Hazlewood to record a new album together, Nancy & Lee 3, which sadly was not released in the United States. However, Nancy soon returned to the recording studio at the urging of longtime fan Morrissey, and in the fall of 2004 she released a new disc simply entitled Nancy Sinatra, an ambitious set which included contributions from members of U2, Pulp, Calexico, Sonic Youth, Jon Spencer Blues Explosion, and other contemporary rock performers.
The album's release was followed by more live work from Nancy, including a memorable appearance at Little Steven's International Underground Garage Rock Festival 2004, in which she performed songs from her new album as well as "These Boots Are Made for Walkin" backed by an all-star band (including a horn section) and flanked by dozens of frugging go-go dancers.

Nancy Sinatra - Country, My Way (1967)

Nancy Sinatra - Country, My Way (1967)

Nancy Sinatra - Country, My Way (1967)

Nancy Sinatra trades her go-go boots for cowboy boots on Country, My Way, a pop-country platter featuring Sinatra's interpretations of country hits. "Jackson," a cover of the Johnny Cash and June Carter hit that she performs as a duet with producer Lee Hazlewood, was released as a single and made the pop Top 20. Every pop vocalist from Ed Ames to Margaret Whiting cut an album of country songs, but Hazlewood had an ear for country music and brought in real Nashville session players for authenticity. Hazlewood's style was half country to begin with, so the album isn't much of a stretch for Sinatra. Many of the songs come from the pop end of the country field: Skeeter Davis' "End of the World" nearly topped the pop chart, and it seems as though practically everyone recorded Don Gibson's "Oh Lonesome Me" in the '60s. Hazlewood contributed only one song, "By the Way (I Still Love You)," but his presence is felt strongly throughout. The Sundazed reissue adds three country-flavored cuts from Reprise singles as bonus tracks.

Jackie Trent - Where Are You Now ( The Pye Anthology)

Jackie Trent - Where Are You Now ( The Pye Anthology)


A British singer/songwriter of the '60s whose voice was far better suited for reaching the back row of Broadway auditoriums than soul or rock, Jackie Trent (born Yvonne Burgess in 1940; she changed her name to Jackie Trent at the age of 14) nonetheless operated on the fringe of the U.K. pop scene in the manner of other femme belters like Cilla Black, though her efforts were usually even more middle of the road. Her one big triumph was her number one British single in mid-1965, "Where Are You Now (My Love)"; that would be her only Top 20 entry. If she can often sound like Petula Clark crossed with Shirley Bassey, there's a good reason for that; she shared Clark's producer, Tony Hatch, who would become her songwriting partner and husband. Trent and Hatch, in fact, penned several of Clark's hits, though (with the exception of "Where Are You Now") the composers weren't nearly as successful when applying their songwriting/production talents to Jackie's discs. Trent recorded quite prolifically for Pye in the '60s (including some duets with husband Tony), but it's as a songwriter that she'll primarily be remembered.

Jackie Trent - Where Are You Now ( The Pye Anthology)

Jackie Trent - Where Are You Now ( The Pye Anthology)

Jackie Trent - Where Are You Now ( The Pye Anthology)

****

Jackie Trent – Where Are You Now (1965) EP

Jackie Trent - Where Are You Now ( The Pye Anthology)

Jackie Trent - Where Are You Now ( The Pye Anthology)

Jackie Trent's best work was done in partnership with Tony Hatch who was to become her husband, but her singing career began much earlier. She began singing professionally during the late 1950s and, although she was a popular singer at the small venues she played, she remained fairly unknown nationally. Her first recordings were with Oriole, which is now a label noted for being a little more adventurous with its signings than some of the better known ones. However, her work remained in relative obscurity until she auditioned at Pye for Hatch. The couple obviously liked each other's company because they soon began working together on a number of musical projects.

The first fruit of the new collaboration was 'Where Are You Now My Love' which they co-wrote, and which gave Jackie Trent her first and only #1. She had only two further minor hits in the UK, although her popularity and that of Tony Hatch was probably greater in Australia which was a country they frequently visited together.


Although they wrote several more well known songs together they were turned into hits for other singers - in particular Petula Clark. Since then their best known work is probably the composition of the theme tune for the Australian soap 'Neighbours'.

1 Where are you now
2 On the other side of the tracks
3 How Soon
4 Don't stand in my way



Jackie Trent - Where Are You Now ( The Pye Anthology)

The British singer-songwriter died in hospital in Menorca on Saturday (March 21) after a long illness
The 74-year-old's family say she passed away  on Saturday morning with her family beside her...

RIP

Kathy Kirby ‎– Sings 16 Hits From Stars And Garters (1963) Lp and Secret Love (1964) Ep

Kathy Kirby ‎– Sings 16 Hits From Stars And Garters (1963) Lp and Secret Love (1964) Ep


Kathy Kirby was born Kathleen O'Rourke in Ilford, Essex on the East London borders on October 20, 1940. She was dubbed "The Golden Girl of Pop" in the mid-'60s, although her fall from fame into obscurity was almost instantaneous, as the international singing star who had appeared at the Royal Variety Performance and was Britain's entrant to the Eurovision Song Contest, earning millions, was declared bankrupt and found her life in ruins, sleeping in a shop doorway. She was a child prodigy, winning her first talent contest at the age of just three. She had an operatic singing voice and was a member of the school choir, looking forward to a potential career in opera and she was recruited as the featured singer for Bert Ambrose & His Orchestra, one of Britain's leading wartime big bands. The link with Ambrose remained long after she had departed to sing with other bandleaders, and then as a solo singer, signing a contract with Decca Records. It was the medium of television that gave her her big break, when she appeared in 1962 as a guest on the The Arthur Haynes Show and The Morecambe and Wise Show but it was the TV series, Stars & Garters, a variety show based in a traditional British pub setting, that made her a star. Appearing as a sort of Marilyn Monroe figure, blonde and youthful, she appealed to both teenagers and their fathers, and wore a glossy lipstick which earned her the nickname of "Wetlips." Kirby was a regular on the show throughout 1963 and 1964 and was undoubtedly billed as the star, releasing an album featuring songs that had been sung on the program called 16 Hits from Stars and Garters which just failed to reach the Top Ten early in 1964. 1963 was her peak year, just as teenagers were turning to the sounds of Merseybeat, she was voted the Top British Female Singer in the New Musical Express Poll and had several hit singles, beginning with a vocal version of the Shadows former instrumental number one hit "Dance On," followed by two bouncy cover versions of Top Ten singles, "Secret Love" and "Let Me Go Lover." Further TV appearances followed including Ready Steady Go, Thank Your Lucky Stars, and Sunday Night at the London Palladium. In 1965 she was chosen to represent Great Britain in the Eurovision Song Contest, singing "I Belong," which came in second. Although she also appeared that year at the Royal Command Variety Performance and even had her own BBC TV series, Kathy Kirby Sings, the hits had dried up by 1965. Kirby was completely swamped by the tide of Merseybeat and other new British pop music that dominated the mid-'60s. By 1967, she had left Decca for Columbia, but none of the singles, albums, or EPs released on that label were hits. Just as she was negotiating a change of direction and a role in the movies in 1971, her longterm friend and mentor Bert Ambrose died and the slow descent to bankruptcy and obscurity began. Having finally got her life back on track during the 1980s, she has lived at her home in Kensington, West London, effectively retired from show business but with the occasional TV appearance and even less frequent recording

Kathy Kirby - Secret Love (1964) 

Kathy Kirby ‎– Sings 16 Hits From Stars And Garters (1963) Lp and Secret Love (1964) Ep

Kathy Kirby ‎– Sings 16 Hits From Stars And Garters (1963)

Kathy Kirby ‎– Sings 16 Hits From Stars And Garters (1963) Lp and Secret Love (1964) Ep




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