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Royal Guitar Ensemble - Golden Guitar (1967)

Royal Guitar Ensemble - Golden Guitar (1967)


Royal Guitar Ensemble - Golden Guitar (1967)

Japanese studio project with good arrangements, play and sound.
It was recorded using the Channel 20 Sound, a new process which realises in superbly lifelike stereo all the potential splendour of each instrument, was specially developed in the Tokyo studios of E.M.I.'s associates, Toshiba Musical Industries. Recordings are made in a new studio designed exclusively for high quality recording; a multiplicity of solo microphones captures every subtlety of tone-colour from each instrument, and a specially developed control console blends, mixes and amplifies each microphone's contribution with delicacy, precision and engineering brilliance that characterise Japan's present-day technological achivement. 





Takeshi Terauchi & The Bunnys - Let's Go Classics (1967 Japan)

Takeshi Terauchi & The Bunnys - Let's Go Classics (1967 Japan)

Takeshi Terauchi & The Bunnys - Let's Go Classics (1967 Japan)

Takeshi Terauchi (born January 17, 1939 in Tsuchiura, Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan), also known as Terry, is a Japanese instrumental rock guitarist. His preferred guitar is a black Mosrite with a white pickguard. His guitar sound is characterized by frenetic picking, heavy use of tremolo picking and frequent use of his guitar's vibrato arm. Terauchi started his career playing rhythm guitar for a country and Western act "Jimmie Tokita and The Mountain Playboys", which had bassist Chosuke Ikariya. In 1962 he formed his first group, The Blue Jeans. However, in 1966 he left the group and formed The Bunnys with whom he played. In May 1967, he also established his own company named "Teraon".He left the Bunnys in 1968. 
He reformed the Blue Jeans in 1969 and the band has been active until today.
Album 'Let's Go Classics' is fuzzy instrumental covers for classical themes - Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, Ketelbey, Rimsky-Korsakov, Chopin, Khatchaturian, Schubert, Brahms, Bizet, Ivanovici & Puccini.


VA - THE SURF COASTERS (JAPAN) 2 CD




VA - THE SURF COASTERS (JAPAN) 2 CD
The band's became known due to their stint on the talent show television program, Ebisu-Onsen (which was very similar in concept to the American program, Star Search), on which the winning band would receive a recording contract.

The Surf Coasters had much success on the show, which lead to a loyal fan following. They succeeded to make it into the final round of the competition, where they finished in second place; however, they still received a record deal, which lead to the release of their debut CD, Surf Panic '95, which, despite being an instrumental album, sold well. The band also played that year with surf music legend and "King of the Surf Guitar", Dick Dale, who was on his first tour of Japan. Reportedly, after the tour Dale referred to Naka as the "Prince of the Surf Guitar."

Since then, the band has released upwards of twenty records, for the Columbia, Victor and BMG record labels, and have become number one, Japan-wide, for instrumental bands. Their sound has varied since 1995, including dancehall, acoustic arrangements, blues, ethereal, and heavy metal. Naka has also gone on to record, with and without the rest of the band, on other musical projects, including soundtracks for film and video games.

Though not officially broken up, the band played its last shows together in November 2005. Naka has been performing with an assortment of bands, including Ryouchi Endo and The Southern All Stars. Kurita has been playing bass with his band Chill.

01. Tsunami Struck
02. The Clash
03. Fly Up
04. Shark Attack
05. Intruder
06. Bike Men
07. Dolphins (Live On TV)
08. Chasing Shadows
09. Waste Land
10. Typhoon Swell
11. Rampage
12. Death Rage 2000
13. Sea Knows
14. Bitter Sweet Samba
15. Tally-Ho
16. Astral Circle
17. Free Fall
18. Start Inaction
19. Last Train
20. Satisfy
21. Linda
22. Wild Cherry
23. Guts (Live)
24. Beach Monster (Live)
25. Rock Dance (Live)
26. Misirlou (Live)

CD 2

01. Misirlou
02. Shark man
03. The clash
04. Ultra Q's theme
05. Beach monster
06. Wave weapon
07. Chasing shadows (Live)
08. Tsunami struck
09. Vamos por ahi
10. Intruder
11. Bombora
12. Black hole
13. Big tunder
14. Adventures in paradox
15. Hawaiian daylight
16. Cyclone
17. Baja
18. Jack the ripper
19. Riding high
20. Happy easter!
21. Black sand beach
22. Surf express
23. Jaws break
24. Fly up (Live)
25. Misirlou

The Mops - Psychedelic Sounds in Japan (1968)

The Mops - Psychedelic Sounds in Japan (1968)

Among hardcore 1960s rock collectors who have an interested in Japanese bands of the period, the Mops are one of the biggest acts in the genre, even if that genre is barely known to English-speaking listeners due to some linguistic barriers, and its general obscurity outside of Japan. Their 1968 album Psychedelic Sounds in Japan is certainly the Mops LP that's gained the widest international exposure, as it's the one with the most garage-psychedelic style and has rewarded the efforts of avid collectors around the world. In fact, the Mops were even marketed as "the first psychedelic band in Japan" in their homeland, though as psychedelia goes, it's pretty raw, verging on garage-punk at times. In truth, it's more attractive for the crazed energy of the performances -- and the odd juxtaposition of the earnestness of the singing and playing with the unhinged bent of the arrangements -- than for the originality of the music. It's distinguished from other sounds of its sort, perhaps, by the manic fervor of youngsters discovering British and American psychedelia without quite having the vocabulary (musical and otherwise) to execute it with nearly as much polish as their inspirations. On the Japanese-language songs in particular, this leads to some melodic angles, anguished vocals, and rudimentary fuzz guitar blasts that can sound fairly exotic to Western ears, though they're not exactly catchy. The English-sung tunes comprising more than half the album are mostly covers of foreign hits (the zany self-identifying anthem "I Am Just a Mops" being an exception), and while there's a charge to be gotten by hearing them tackle classics by the Animals and Jefferson Airplane with naive zeal, they're not exactly stunning interpretations, let alone close to being on the level of the originals. They also make an ambitious foray into raga-rock with "Kienai Omoi," complete with sitar. As a whole, the record's an interesting if flawed relic of a time when Japanese rock was just finding its feet, with a clumsy yet endearingly passionate force. [The 2010 British CD reissue on RPM (with English-language historical liner notes) marks the first time it's been licensed outside Japan, and includes two bonus tracks from their 1968 non-LP single "Omae No Subete O"/"Atsuku Narenai," both of which find them getting into dissociative distorted-guitar-fueled sounds far freakier than anything on the album. Note that this reissue does not include one of the tracks from the original LP, "Blind Bird," which has never been made available for any reissue of the album due to its controversial lyrics.]

The Mops - Psychedelic Sounds in Japan (1968)


The Mops - Psychedelic Sounds in Japan (1968)

The Mops - Psychedelic Sounds in Japan (1968)


Among hardcore 1960s rock collectors who have an interested in Japanese bands of the period, the Mops are one of the biggest acts in the genre, even if that genre is barely known to English-speaking listeners due to some linguistic barriers, and its general obscurity outside of Japan. Their 1968 album Psychedelic Sounds in Japan is certainly the Mops LP that's gained the widest international exposure, as it's the one with the most garage-psychedelic style and has rewarded the efforts of avid collectors around the world. In fact, the Mops were even marketed as "the first psychedelic band in Japan" in their homeland, though as psychedelia goes, it's pretty raw, verging on garage-punk at times. In truth, it's more attractive for the crazed energy of the performances -- and the odd juxtaposition of the earnestness of the singing and playing with the unhinged bent of the arrangements -- than for the originality of the music. It's distinguished from other sounds of its sort, perhaps, by the manic fervor of youngsters discovering British and American psychedelia without quite having the vocabulary (musical and otherwise) to execute it with nearly as much polish as their inspirations. On the Japanese-language songs in particular, this leads to some melodic angles, anguished vocals, and rudimentary fuzz guitar blasts that can sound fairly exotic to Western ears, though they're not exactly catchy. The English-sung tunes comprising more than half the album are mostly covers of foreign hits (the zany self-identifying anthem "I Am Just a Mops" being an exception), and while there's a charge to be gotten by hearing them tackle classics by the Animals and Jefferson Airplane with naive zeal, they're not exactly stunning interpretations, let alone close to being on the level of the originals. They also make an ambitious foray into raga-rock with "Kienai Omoi," complete with sitar. As a whole, the record's an interesting if flawed relic of a time when Japanese rock was just finding its feet, with a clumsy yet endearingly passionate force. [The 2010 British CD reissue on RPM (with English-language historical liner notes) marks the first time it's been licensed outside Japan, and includes two bonus tracks from their 1968 non-LP single "Omae No Subete O"/"Atsuku Narenai," both of which find them getting into dissociative distorted-guitar-fueled sounds far freakier than anything on the album. Note that this reissue does not include one of the tracks from the original LP, "Blind Bird," which has never been made available for any reissue of the album due to its controversial lyrics.]

The Mops - Psychedelic Sounds in Japan (1968)


EAST - EAST (1972) Japan

Mp3 256\70 Mb
*******
This band of Japanese exiles released just one album, which first appeared in 1972 and makes its long-overdue CD debut here. A melodic and musicianly set featuring Japanese instruments such as the shakuhachi, koto and taisho-goto alongside the traditional trappings of Western rock and roll, it's a hugely enjoyable collection that will appeal to all fans of Easterntinged psychedelia.
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East - East (remastered 1972 Album)
1.Beautiful Morning 2.Me 3.Geese On The Road 4.She 5.Lumberer Moses 6.Deaf Eyed Julie 7.Black Hearted Woman 8.Call Back The Wind 9.Jar1 0.Everywhere 11.Shin-Sorllan
*****
LINK (restored)

The Jacks-Vacant World (1968) Japan

Mp3 320\87Mb
**************
" ...This record is amazing. I discovered it from a former co-worker who played it once, years ago. Then I tried forever to track it down until finally I found the correct band "Jacks". I'm not going to be able to do this record justice with my review but I have to do one since there isn't one already. It's 1968 Japanese music. No english words. It's got a strong mixture of both Japanese and Western 60's rock vibe. There's alot of usage of some sort of bell type instrument. A very lovely soft sound. The music swings from being really beautiful and soft ..very very soft, to some sort of acid-rock/surf-rock/jazz swing type sound. I really can't explain it. It's top notch quality stuff though. The guy has got a great soft voice but occasionally when they go into a more wild section of a song, he breaks out with this great yelling. It's not yelling like stupid punk rock yelling. It's yelling like god help me I'm sad and dying yelling. It's very sophisticated and arty sounding. I don't know much about the old Japanese 1960s scene but I find it really surprising that this came of out Japan in 1968. It's brilliant. The atmosphere on this record is just amazing. Sort of like how you'd imagine the calm before a storm, in the warm but cooling windy air. Almost like you're floating, and occasionally all hell starts to break loose, and then it's back to this calmness. It's great. Seriously, the only way in my mind to ever be able to describe the bulk of this record is to take a Japanese man singing the Beatles' "Yer Blues" in japanese, and cross it with the Radiohead song "No Surprises" which is very simular in calmness and with that bell type sound. It's just this incredible, other-worldy sound that the Jacks have. It's the best stuff I've ever heard and I don't know how to explain it. If you check it out you won't be sorry. Good luck finding a copy though ... " (By Gonzo (USA) )
**************
01 Marianne02 Stop The Clock03 Vacant World04 Is The Broken Mirror05 Gloomy Flower06 Love Generation07 Barn - Manji08 Where_09 Love10 500 Miles From The Sky
************

Long time search for :
V.A.-G.S. I Love You-Japanese Garage Bands ,
The Spiders- Let's Go Spiders!!,
The Mops-Psychadelic Sounds In Japan

For help - ALL THANKs !!!

The Jaguars - The Jaguars (196?) Japan

Mp3 256\111Mb
************

What are the Group Sounds?

In June 1966, the Beatles visited Japan to perform a series of concerts at Tokyo's legendary Budokan Hall. Their visit created such national excitement among teenagers that almost overnight there was a dramatic shift in the way young musicians formed groups, played their instruments and thought about fashion and style.
This new wave of 1960s Japanese rock groups was called Group Sounds—or GS for short. (Japanese Group Sounds)
Lineup:
Yukio Miya
Shin Okamoto
Hisayuki Okitsu
Yasuji Sato
Kiochi Miyazaki
Mikio Morida
Takeshi Hamano
They were one of most famous GS; many Japanese remember their debut song "Want You See Again(Kimi ni Aitai)". They sung some moody hit songs and wrote cool punk ballads like "My Dawn" (on HOT NIPS). On the other hand, they were compared to Dave, Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich. (In Japanese they were called as Dave Dee group for short!). Jaguars covered "Zabadak", "Legend of Xanadu".This Japanese cover version of Xanadu was a #20 hit. Actually, it was the flip side of another moody song. The lead singer Sin Okamoto attracted teen girls with his good looks and singing with whip like Dave Dee. Also they covered the fab "Tobacco Road" which is on the "Big Lizard Stomp" compilation, which was a psychedelic version, much like the Blues Magoos, "Blue Feeling" (Slitherama), "See See Rider" (Banzai Freak Beat).
They appeared in their own movie "Jaguars Tekizen Jyouriku" in '68, a cool comedy which was influenced by the Beatles' "Help!". But soon after, the leader/drummer Miya quit the band due to a conflict with the other members. He wrote their early original "Beat Train". He formed a new group called New Jaguars and released a few singles, but they weren't successful. In their later years, the GS boom had peaked, so they recorded moody popular songs and after some personnel changes, they disbanded in '71. (Another Group Sounds )
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The Jaguars - First Album
1 Mademoiselle Blues 2 Zabadak 3 Dancing Lonely Night 4 Lady Jane 5 Tabbaco Road 6 Poor John 7 I Wanna See You 8 Dancing Baby 9 My Girl 10 Young Tomorrow 11 Lonely Girl 12 New Orleans 13 Hanky Panky 14 There's Always Daybreak 15 See See Rider 16 Mustang Sally 17 Beat Train 18 Seaside Bound 19 Blue Chateau 20 Two from North Japan 21 Sunny Boy
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Royal Guitar Ensemble - Golden Guitar (1967) Takeshi Terauchi & The Bunnys - Let's Go Classics (1967 Japan)Takeshi Terauchi- Summer Pops At Waikiki (1975)VA - THE SURF COASTERS (JAPAN) 2 CDThe Mops - Psychedelic Sounds in Japan (1968)The Mops - Psychedelic Sounds in Japan (1968)EAST -  EAST (1972) JapanThe Jacks-Vacant World (1968) JapanThe Jaguars - The Jaguars (196?)   Japan

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