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The Attack - Magic In The Air

The Attack - Magic In The Air


A band from London (1966-68) formed by lead singer Richard 'Hershey' Shirman. 

The Attack reformed in 1979 for about a year: line-up: Richard Shirman, vocals, harmonica; Micky Jones, guitar; Steve Waller, guitar; Al Maclean, bass and Glen LeFleur, drums.
The Attack - Magic In The Air


The Attack (thanks to an ever growing legion of collectors dedicated to the vibrant sound of mid- to late-'60s Swinging London) have a far larger fan base now than they ever did during their existence. Indeed their unique brand of guitar-heavy, mod-rock qualifies them as one of the finest examples of (the over used term) freakbeat. Hence over the last 15 years there has been an abundance of vinyl bootlegs and inclusions on such psychedelic/freakbeat compilations as Rubble! The founders Richard Shirman (the only original member to stay with the group throughout all of the lineup changes) and Gerry Henderson were originally in a group called the Soul System, whom, for the best part of a year, had a very unstable lineup. In early 1966, the remnants of the crumbling group were joined by Bob Hodges on organ, David John (not David John of David John & the Mood, but Davy O'List under alter ego) on guitar, and Alan Whitehead (on loan from Marmalade) on drums. They soon came to the attention of entrepreneur (gangster?) Don Arden, who then signed them to Decca and changed their name to the Attack. Their debut single released in January 1967 was an extremely anglicized cover of "Try It," an American hit for both the Standells and Ohio Express, whose versions were exemplar of the sneering garage sound. However, the Attack's powerful vocals, pop art guitar, and the underbelly of a warm Hammond created a similar atmosphere to the Small Faces (also managed by Don Arden), the Birds, and the Creation. Shortly after the single was released, Davy O'List was handpicked by Andrew Loog Oldham to join the Nice (who were to act as the backup group for newly acquired American Soul singer P.P. Arnold) and quit the group in late February. Meanwhile, Shirman, a regular visitor to the London clubs had been keeping a watchful eye on a young guitarist he had seen jamming with Jimmy Page. Shortly thereafter John Du Cann (mainstay, and songwriter) was introduced into the group. As a follow-up to "Try It," a version of "Hi-Ho Silver Lining" was then released, but Jeff Beck got the hit first in Britain in 1967. The third 45, "Created By Clive"/"Colour of My Mind," backed a foppish sub-Kinks-style number with a fairly groovy mod-psych tune penned by DuCann. Kenny Harold (bass) and Geoff Richardson (guitar) left shortly after the disappointment of "Created By Clive," leaving John as the only guitarist. Jim Avery (who later went on to the revolutionary Third World War) was drafted in on bass, with Plug (whom later went on to Welsh acid rock outfit Man) still on drums. After yet even more disappointment surrounding the "Magic in the Air" single (Decca refused its release on the grounds of it being too heavy), Plug and Jim Avery left the ranks to be replaced by Roger Deane (bass) and Keith Hodge (drums). The final single, released in early 1968, was "Neville Thumbcatch," a fruity mod-pop tune with spoken narration, like a lesser counterpart to Cream's "Pressed Rat and Warthog." Decca's deal with the Attack expired after that single, with a projected fifth 45, "Freedom for You"/"Feel Like Flying," remaining unreleased. Both sides of that single, as well as seven Attack demos recorded around that time, are included on Angel Air's CD reissue of the rare 1968 album by the Five Day Week Straw People, a studio-only outfit that was led by DuCann. There is also a compilation of the Attack's post-Decca sides entitled Final Dayze, featuring these tracks and more unreleased material (also on Angel Air). Before Decca (who wanted to keep the Attack as a pop act) parted with the group over the continued heavy nature of their newer material, the group had already entered the studio and begun work on the Roman Gods of War album. Both the artwork and a number of songs were completed, but unfortunately the label recorded over the tapes and lost the photos after they dropped the group. DuCann became the dominant creative force in the group prior to their 1968 breakup, and the likes of the unreleased "Mr. Pinnodmy's Dilemma" and "Strange House" showed the group developing a heavier rock sound, although still maintaining a sense of British mod-psych whimsy. DuCann would continue to explore a heavier direction with his subsequent group Andromeda, and joined Atomic Rooster in the '70

The Attack - Magic In The Air (Comp 1990)

The Attack - Magic In The Air

They were an incredibly hot property at the time, especially in the local London clubs, yet even with two future Nice stars, an Atomic Rooster-to-be, and a member of Marmalade in their various ranks, the Attack failed to breach the British chart. Long gone but far from forgotten, the mods-cum-psychedelic rockers finally get their due with this sumptuous compilation. Amazingly, between the time the Attack first entered the studio in 1966 and their final recordings together in 1968, they shifted their lineup four times. Thankfully, the sleeve notes provide some assistance untangling their convulsive history, with the aid of an interview with frontman Richard Shirman, who also annotates all 16 of the tracks within. The Attack released only four singles during their all-too-brief lifespan, and both sides of all their 45s are included here, joined by a pair of numbers recorded during a BBC radio session and a clutch of unreleased studio recordings. As the songs are not presented chronologically, About Time! has a rather mishmash feel, bouncing willy-nilly around the years and lineups. It's worth pointing out then that the quirky story-song "Neville Thumbcatch" was recorded eight months before Cream's equally eccentric "Pressed Rat and Warthog" hit the shops! The Attack's assault on the scene came from a variety of musical directions that included splashy mod, shiny pop, hefty blues, assaultive rock, and aggressive psychedelia. And perhaps this was a small part of their problem — every time one turned around, the band had a new look and another sound. Still, the talent within their ranks was phenomenal, and with their keen ear for covers, a splendid sense of melody, and their own talents with a pen, the Attack should have won the day. They didn't back then, but the war's not quite over yet. 

Toby Twirl - Toby Twirl (1968- 70)

Toby Twirl - Toby Twirl  (1968- 70)


English band from Newcastle, England, founded in 1968 until 1971 when the group was disbanded. The band was named after a 1950's children's book character who happened to be a pig. 

Toby Twirl - Toby Twirl  (1968- 70)

Toby Twirl emerged from the mid 60s club scene in Newcastle-upon-Tyne in the North East of England, and were originally called 'The Shades of Blue'. They were signed to Decca Records by Wayne Bickerton, and released three singles: "Back In Time", "Toffee Apple Sunday" and "Movin' In". Although critically acclaimed in later years, none of the singles charted due to lack of major radio play. The group concentrated on live work during the late 60s and early 70s and were a top draw around the North of England. The line up was Dave 'Holly' Holland (vocals), Barrie Sewell (keyboards), Stuart Somerville (bass), Nick Thorburn (guitar) and John Reed (drums). Stuart was replaced by Dave Robson after he was tragically drowned in Tynemouth and Holly was replaced by Steve Pickering.

Mega Dodo is proud to announce the release of a full-length album of unreleased recordings the band made in the late 60s. Several reels of tape were recently discovered by the band's drummer, John Reed, which have been carefully transferred to a digital medium and professionally mastered.

Toby Twirl - Toby Twirl  (1968- 70)




Toby Twirl was a late 60's UK pop/psych band. Best known for their original classic, Romeo and Juliet, they released several catchy harmony singles, all compiled here.

Toby Twirl - Toby Twirl  (1968- 70)

Originally from Newcastle, England, Toby Twirl was founded in 1968 and recorded three classic, and now highly collectable, singles for Decca in the late 1960s. This long overdue debut album mixes original songs with a selection of carefully curated hits of the day. The recordings were discovered by the band's drummer, John Reed, in a dusty box of reel-to-reel tapes in his attic. The band made several demo and showcase recordings at various studios in the late '60s, but they were thought lost forever. Reed's chance discovery uncovered a veritable goldmine of late '60s recordings by both line-ups of the band. Part 1 of the CD features vocalist Dave 'Holly' Holland, while part 2 features vocalist Steve Pickering.




The Talismens - The Talismen's style

The Talismens - The Talismen's style

The Talismens - The Talismen's style


Trevor Cook drums
Clive Devine bass guitar, vocals
Steve Outhwaite guitar, vocals
George Rainsford guitar, vocals
Alan "Digger" Dike guitar, vocals (joined in 1965)
Laurie Jeffs guitar, vocals (joined in 1966)


The Talismen won top spot in the first Midland Beat magazine popularity poll that was held in 1964. The poll was meant to highlight the most popular performing groups in the West Midlands so a high placing would benefit a band considerably in terms of publicity and the extra bookings that would result from it. Funnily enough though, The Talismen were not from Birmingham but were based in Cheltenham - quite some distance south of the Midlands area!


The Talismens - The Talismen's style


The Creation ‎– Action Painting

The Creation ‎– Action Painting



The band's history began in 1963 with a group called the Blue Jacks in Cheshunt, Hertfordshire, to the north of London. The band had just gotten a new lead singer, Kenny Pickett (who'd previously driven the van for Neil Christian & the Crusaders), and with the addition of a new lead guitarist, Eddie Phillips, they changed their name to the Mark Four. The latter band got signed to Mercury Records' British division in 1964 but the resulting two singles failed to sell. Even as British audiences were finding their work quite resistible, however, German audiences were greeting their performances at the Big Ben Club in Wilhelmshaven with rousing enthusiasm. It was during their extended residence in Germany that the band chanced to cross paths with a local band called the Roadrunners, who had attracted amazing local club attendance with their use of guitar feedback in their songs. Eddie Phillips made note of the effect and started working out how he might assimilate it into his playing.

The Mark Four got a second crack at recording success with Decca Records, which resulted in a single of "Hurt Me (If You Will)" b/w "I'm Leaving." It also failed to sell, but it did establish the beginning of a new sound; on that record, Phillips introduced his own approach to guitar feedback. It was all a little too wild for Decca, which stuck the song on the B-side, but it was a beginning of sorts. It also coincided with an ending, as the band's rhythm guitarist, Mick Thompson, and their bassist, John Dalton -- soon to join the Kinks, replacing Peter Quaife -- quit. The Mark Four finished their history with a temporary lineup and one last single in early 1966. During the weeks that followed, Pickett and Phillips, along with drummer Jack Jones, held the group together and began rethinking their precise image and direction -- for a brief time, future superstar bassist Herbie Flowers even sat in with them. By the spring of that year, the group had evolved into the Creation, with ex-Merseybeats bassist Bob Garner filling out the lineup, and they had also signed with an ambitious young Australian-born manager -- then closely associated with Brian Epstein -- named Robert Stigwood.

The Creation burst on the British pop/rock scene that June with "Making Time," a single that seemed to have everything going for it -- a killer beat after a brief (but catchy) stop-and-go intro, a great chorus, and a flashy, slashy, crunchy lead guitar part by Eddie Phillips that intersected very neatly with and expanded upon the kind of sound that the Who were carrying high onto the charts at the time. The parallel was no accident, as that single was produced by Shel Talmy, who'd also worked on all of those early Who sides. In an eerie and inexplicable portent of their future, however, "Making Time" soared to number five in Germany but peaked at an anemic number 49 in England, this at a time when they were getting amazing press for their stage performances, which included paintings being lit afire and, in anticipation of what Jimmy Page would one day be doing with the Yardbirds, among others, Phillips began playing his electric guitar with a violin bow.

The group finally saw some slightly significant chart action at home in the fall of 1966 with "Painter Man," a cheerfully trippy pop anthem -- with a feedback-oozing guitar break -- that made the Top 40; predictably, the same record hit number one in Germany. The B-side, "Biff Bang Pow," opened with a "My Generation" guitar riff and jumped into a pop/rock idiom with a psychedelic edge that could have earned it airplay on its own.

By the start of 1967, however, the Creation had hit a crisis point, as Kenny Pickett quit over creative differences and frustration at the need to continue touring in Europe, where their audience was seemingly rooted. He was eventually replaced by Kim Gardner, late of the group the Birds. Their sound at that point was still intact -- Phillips was still there on guitar, which was a huge part of what they were about musically and sonically. At this point, with whatever momentum they'd built up in jeopardy, the group took a totally unexpected turn into blue-eyed soul with "If I Stay Too Long," which was a good enough showcase for Gardner (supported by some reverb-soaked backing vocals and an organ) but offered little from Phillips except some emphatically played chords; it was as though the Who, having established themselves on the charts and the radio with "My Generation" and "Anyway Anyhow Anywhere," had suddenly issued their version of "Please, Please, Please" as a 45 rpm -- it confused people who knew the Creation, and was mostly ignored by established fans. Much more like their established sound were "Can I Join Your Band," which somehow only got issued in France, and the U.K. single's B-side, "Nightmares."

We Are Paintermen They were still struggling for a commercial foothold in England, despite being one of the most widely touted live acts of the time, when the group's German label decided it was time to release a Creation LP. We Are Paintermen ended up being better than anyone could have anticipated, highlighted by the previous hit plus a surprisingly good, crunchy, at times almost Byrds-like rendition of "Like a Rolling Stone," and a version of "Hey Joe" that had the temerity to take Jimi Hendrix's slow tempo and treat its jagged guitar line even more harshly. There was also a rousing rendition of "Cool Jerk" for anyone who cared, though a lot else of what was there was either off-point or represented the earlier lineup. One more single, "Life Is Just Beginning" b/w "Through My Eyes," showed up in the fall of 1967 -- the A-side was a rousing psychedelic showcase, with elements of Indian raga and a catchy, chant-like main body, plus jagged guitar and a string orchestra with the cellos sawing away in the best "King Midas in Reverse" manner. "Through My Eyes" was no throwaway, either, with a lean, crunchy guitar, beautiful choruses, and a great central tune, with three-minutes-and-change of spacy sensibilities ending in a feedback crescendo.
Evidently, Eddie Phillips felt that the single was as good a showcase as he would ever get, and in October of 1967 he quit. His departure was followed by Kim Gardner's decision to exit the group for a team-up with Ron Wood, Jon Lord, and Twink in what became known as Santa Barbara Machinehead. The Creation was kept "alive" into the spring of 1968 when their U.K. label, Polydor, released a single of "How Does It Feel" b/w "Tom Tom" on both sides of the Atlantic, with the U.S. version tarted up with all sorts of dubbed-on psychedelic effects. They were both good sides but never charted, and that might've been the end of the group, but for the sudden re-emergence of Kenny Pickett, who got Gardner and Jones back together to form the core of a new Creation. That band went through a couple of lineup changes, played around Europe for a bit with Ron Wood as a member, and then dissolved, and somewhere in the midst of all of those lineup changes a new album was started and abandoned (and forgotten for 36 years). Oddly enough, the "new" group at its best didn't sound bad, or all that much different from the classic lineup, although they lacked Phillips' knack for brushing up right against the edge of chaos with his guitar breaks.

That might've been the end, once and for all, of the group's history, but for four excellent (and very early) sides, probably demos by the Pickett/Phillips lineup, with Herbie Flowers sitting in on bass -- including a fine soul side, "Mercy, Mercy, Mercy," and a killer rendition of "Bonie Maronie," kitted out in a manner not that different from "Hey Joe" or "Biff Bam Boom" -- that turned up in Germany in 1968. This time, however, the group was really gone, the members going their separate ways -- Phillips into soul singer P.P. Arnold's band, among other activities; Gardner became part of Ashton, Gardner & Dyke ("Resurrection Shuffle") and Tony Kaye's group Badger; Dalton and Thompson tried reuniting under the name Passtime, and Kenny Pickett, after enjoying some success as a songwriter and performing in a variety of contexts, returned to being a roadie, this time for Led Zeppelin and other bands; and he eventually re-formed the Creation in the first half of the '90s.

How Does It Feel to Feel? His reactivation of the Creation was a response to a long series of events belatedly recognizing the band. In the early '80s, Eva Records of France released an LP that combined the singles by the Mark Four and some of the key sides of the Creation, while England's Edsel Records released How Does It Feel to Feel?, the definitive LP collection of the Creation. The group gained a reputation as one of the great lost missing links of '60s rock, sort of England's answer to Moby Grape in terms of massive talent unaccountably caught in a dead-end. The latter-day group enjoyed three years of success before Pickett's death from a heart attack in 1996 ended their history. Since then, Demon Records in England has issued a slightly fuller, better mastered compilation (Our Music Is Red -- With Purple Flashes), and Retroactive Records released two CDs of their work, complete with outtakes, alternate mixes, and television performances, all amazing for a band that couldn't get a proper LP recorded in their own time. In 2017, the Numero Group released Action Painting, a double-album that included new stereo mixes of most of their records, and Edsel made a bid to top that with a four-CD set called Creation Theory, which gathered up later-period recordings in addition to their classic sides.




The Creation ‎– Action Painting

The Creation ‎– Action Painting 2017


Of all the bands that almost made it in the swingin' '60s, the Creation are one of the most storied and most anthologized. Thanks to a small number of classic singles, especially the brilliant "Making Time," their incendiary stage show, and their guitarist Eddie Phillips' use of a violin bow to conjure otherworldly sounds out of his guitar, the art-pop freakbeat group is often seen as the quintessential lost band of the era. The Numero Group's double-disc set Action Painting is the latest effort to make sure the Creation's music is given the attention it deserves. From the exhaustive booklet to the pristine remastering done by the group's original producer, Shel Talmy, it's the best-looking and best-sounding set yet. It gathers up all their singles, tracks that never saw the light of day at the time but were later issued on compilations, a handful of songs cut by the band in its pre-Creation Mark Four incarnation, a small number of backing tracks, and, most interestingly for Creation obsessives, 15 new stereo mixes done by the collection's producer Alec Palao and approved by Talmy. Hearing the songs yet again, it's clear that given a break here or there, or if they had managed to keep a stable lineup together, the Creation really could have been as big as the Small Faces or the Who. Songs like "Making Time," "Try and Stop Me," and "Biff, Bang, Pow" have the powerful crunch of the latter and the swaggering attitude of the former. Add in Phillips' startling guitar work, Kenny Pickett's powerfully soulful vocals, and the punchy overall sound and you've got some timeless stuff. Even when the band reconfigured and lost Pickett's vocals, the other guys stepped up to fill the void, and later songs like "How Does It Feel to Feel" and "Life Is Just Beginning" have all the energy and power of the best music coming out of the U.K. at the time. All their best songs are here, interspersed with the R&B covers and novelties bands had to do to survive the '60s. Even at their dorkiest though, when covering "Cool Jerk" or singing about dancing girls on "The Girls Are Naked," the Creation always had that special something that made everything they did sound alive and important. In the years since the band split up, smart labels have made sure to keep the Creation's work available with varying degrees of quality. The Numero Group have done their usual top-notch job, and Action Painting is the best Creation collection yet. The remastering is clear and strong, the booklet is a great read, and the stereo mixes on the second record are an interesting diversion, opening up the sound a little and giving the guitars more room to breathe. The band is a classic just-missed story, detailed in painstaking fashion in the booklet, but as Action Painting shows, the Creation's music lives on as some of the most exciting, most impressive sounds of the '60s.

The Creation ‎– Action Painting

The Creation ‎– Action Painting

The Creation ‎– Action Painting

The Creation ‎– Action Painting

The Creation ‎– Action Painting

The Creation ‎– Action Painting

The Creation ‎– Action Painting

The Creation ‎– Action Painting

The Creation ‎– Action Painting

The Creation ‎– Action Painting


The Creation ‎– Action Painting


The Eyes- Blink (1966)

The Eyes- Blink (1966)

Barry Allchin - bass guitar (1964-67), Brian Cocoran - drums (1964-67), Phil Heatley - guitar (1964-67), Chris Lovegrove - lead guitar (1964-67), Terry Nolder - vocals (1964-67), Steve Valentine - rhythm guitar (1967)

In 1965 and 1966, the Eyes released a clutch of singles that stand up to the Who's work from the same era in their blend of extremely innovative guitar feedback/distortion and anthemic mod songwriting. "When the Night Falls," "The Immediate Pleasure," "I'm Rowed Out," "You're Too Much," and the dry "My Generation" satire "My Degeneration" are revered highly by British Invasion collectors. The bursts of electronic mayhem were quite advanced for the time, though like the Who they had hooks and harmonies to counterpoint the madness. They weren't as memorable as the Who and didn't approach commercial success. After a much softer fourth single and an ill-conceived album of Rolling Stones covers (recorded under the name the Pupils), the group disbanded. 

The Eyes- Blink (1966)


Includes both sides of their four singles, plus a couple of cuts from their LP of Rolling Stones covers. There's a big distance between the good and bad cuts on this compilation, although the best four or five tracks are good indeed.

***

The Smoke - It´s Smoke Time (1967)

The Smoke - It´s Smoke Time (1967)

The Smoke - It´s Smoke Time (1967)

Mike Rowley: Vocals, Guitar
Geoeffrey Gill: Drums, Guitar
John "Zeke" Lund: Guitar, Bass
Malcolm Luker: Guitar, Keyboards, Sitar

The Smoke - It´s Smoke Time (1967)



More than any other band, the Smoke epitomized the groove of Swinging London -- which was especially ironic when one considers that, at the height of their success, they sold more records in Europe than England. Their sound fell somewhere between mod and the Beatles -- their instrumental attack was somewhat Who/Small Faces-like, yet they delighted in cheerful vocals and infectious harmonies and melodies. Only slightly popular on their home turf, and unknown in the U.S., their biggest success was in Germany (oddly enough, for such a British-sounding group). The band hailed from York, where bassist Zeke Lund and lead guitarist Mal Luker began playing together in a band called Tony Adams & the Viceroys, whose lineup eventually came to include drummer Geoff Gill. Though the band was successful locally, enjoying a decent fan base with a solid, basic rock & roll sound, built on early-'60s songs, Lund, Luker, and Gill could hear the changes going on around them in music, with the rise of Merseybeat and the blues, R&B, and soul-based music coming out of London. They eventually decided to strike out on their own, playing a more ambitious repertory. They linked up late in 1964 with singer Mick Rowley and rhythm guitarist Phil Peacock, refugees from a band called the Moonshots. The resulting band, the Shots, played a hard brand of R&B, similar to what the Small Faces were doing -- they were taken on as clients by Jack Segal and Alan Brush, a pair of London-based agents (Segal had the know-how, Brush the financing), who fronted them money for rehearsals and equipment, and got them signed up with independent producer and music publisher Monty Babson, who cut four sides with the group, two of which were issued as a single under license to EMI-Columbia. It was at just about that time that events began breaking against the band -- they lost Phil Peacock, who wasn't comfortable with the more complex sounds the rest of the band were interested in generating, and they lost their financing. They gamely decided to carry on as a quartet, the single-guitar configuration lending itself to an edgier sound, and sought new backing.

That was how they ended up in a bizarre management situation, when they were offered a seeming rescue by a pair of twin London-based entrepreneurs, Ron and Reg Kray. Renowned today the world over as notorious gangsters, the Kray brothers have been immortalized in books, including Profession of Violence and Reg's own autobiography Born Fighter, and one feature film (The Krays), and were even memorably satirized in one Monty Python sketch ("The Piranha Brothers"). They were among the top crime kingpins in London at the time, and among their other enterprises, they had an interest in a few clubs, and thought at one point that a more direct participation in the entertainment business might prove lucrative. (And yes, it sounds funny to read it, or even to write it, but that is exactly how Morris Levy, an American gangster and club owner, came to go into the record and publishing business in New York, and ended up founding Roulette Records). Thus, they signed the group and became the Shots' managers, but were never able to do anything with them in terms of bookings -- strong-arming clubs for "protection" money was more their specialty than lining up engagements. The band decided to abandon the contract, and when they were served with an injunction, they were left unable to perform.

As luck would have it, however, they still had a publishing and recording contract with Babson and access to his studio, and so they took advantage of their ban on performing by writing and making records. Indeed, thanks to the fact that they were barred from performing as a band, the Shots probably had more free time to write and record than any working group in England (even the Beatles were touring in those days, though not for much longer). It was during this period that they also decided to change their name, dropping the Shots -- no one remembered the Moonshots by this time, anyway -- in favor of the Smoke. One of the songs they came up with was "My Friend Jack," a mod-flavored psychedelic number authored by Rowley and Gill. With its march beat and mix of shimmering and crunchy reverb-laden guitar, it was a catchy, striking, aggressively trippy work -- in America, it would've been called psychedelic punk -- that now seems like the most delightfully subversive piece of freakbeat, somewhere midway between the Who's power-chord-drenched teen anthems and the trippy cheerfulness of, say, "Dr. Robert" by the Beatles. Its drug references were so potent that the song had to be rewritten before EMI would touch it; released in February of 1967 -- a period in which "Penny Lane" and "Strawberry Fields Forever" were as challenging or ambitious as the label wanted to be -- the single only made it to number 45 before being banned by the BBC, limiting it to three weeks on the U.K. charts. In Europe, however, the record soared; the group were also fortunate enough to appear on an installment of the German television show Beat Club, alongside Jimi Hendrix, the Who, and Cliff Bennett & the Rebel Rousers. "My Friend Jack" ended up riding the German pop charts to the top, and earned the Smoke a place on a tour with the Small Faces and the Beach Boys.

It's Smoke Time They were now stars, although not in the place they'd expected to be. The single charted high in Switzerland, France, and Austria as well, and suddenly there was demand for a Smoke LP in Germany. They delivered this in the form of It's Smoke Time, comprised of the best of the year-old tracks recorded for Babson in the spring, summer, and fall of 1966. The band actually relocated to Germany, while continuing to release records in England -- their recording contract was sold to Chris Blackwell in late 1967, and he soon took over their management as well; they were free of their obligations to the Krays by then (who had, in any case, been distracted by a gang war and a prosecution). They cut some fine psychedelia and crossed paths with the members of Traffic in the studio during this period. The end came out of a degree of weariness, after five years of work and perhaps the sincere belief that they'd already enjoyed most of the fruits of their brief pop stardom -- they declined to obey a Blackwell summons to return to England for a recording session, and that marked the effective end of their history, at least as a classic British beat/freakbeat outfit. Mick Rowley remained in Germany, where, as the voice and frontman for the band, he had a natural following. Luker, Gill, and Lund did finally return home and went to work for Babson's Morgan Studios, working in various bands within Babson's orbit, including Blue Mink, Orange Bicycle, and Fickle Pickle. A latter-day version of the Smoke -- principally organized around Zeke Lund -- surfaced in a distinctly '70s mode early in the ensuing decade but made no great impression on anyone. Meanwhile, "My Friend Jack" lingered in the memory of music mavens for its cheerful brand of psychedelic punk, and even It's Smoke Time -- an incredible obscurity outside of Germany -- enjoyed a reputation as one of the most cheerful records ever made. By the mid-'90s there were reissues of the single and the LP on CD, and in 2002 a comprehensive double CD of the complete work of the '60s and '70s versions of the band was available.

The Smoke - It´s Smoke Time (1967)

01. My Friend Jack 03:07
02. Waterfall 02:44
03. You Can't Catch Me 03:20
04. High In A Room 03:03
05. Wake Up Cherylina 02:22
06. Don't Lead Me On (Reno, Brown) 02:20
07. We Can Take It 02:47
08. If The Weather's Sunny 02:56
09. I Wanna Make It With You 03:13
10. It's Getting Closer 02:36
11. It's Just Your Way Of Lovin' 02:28
12. I Would If I Could But I Can't 02:16
Bonus Tracks:
13. Have Some More Tea (Ridley) 02:16
14. Victor Henry's Cool Book 02:31
15. Sidney Gill 03:35
16. It Could Be Wonderful (Miller) 02:21
17. Keep A Hold Of What You've Got (Maldon) 02:09
18. She's A Liar (Maldon) 02:24
19. I Am Only Dreaming (The Smoke) 02:00
20. Universal Vagrant (Feldman, Goldstein, Gottehrer, Farrel) 02:54
21. Dreams Of Dreams (Chapman, Vaughan, Williams) 02:31
22. My Birth (Francis) 02:42
23. Jack Is Back (Berckerman) 03:19
24. That's What I Want (Malone) 02:26
25. Playing With Magic (Malone) 03:07
26. My Friend Jack (alternat take)


The Smoke - tracks 1-16, 23-26
The Shots - tracks 17,18
Chords Five - tracks 19,20
Smoke - tracks 21-22


Besides "My Friend Jack," other highlights of the Smoke's only album (all but one of whose tracks were group originals) include the beautiful mid-tempo ballad "Waterfall" and the bee-humming guitars and lilting backup vocals on "You Can't Catch Me." This Repertoire reissue of the original LP adds 14 additional cuts, including non-LP singles, a single issued in 1965 by the Shots (an earlier version of the group), a single puzzlingly issued under the alias the Chords Five, and an interesting alternate take of "My Friend Jack." A lot of these tracks pale in comparison to the 12 from the original album, but "Have Some More Tea" is a great Who-ish number, and "Sydney Gill" is a good stab at a more progressive mood. [Originally released in 1967.]


Jasmin-T ‎– Some Other Guy (1969)

Jasmin-T ‎– Some Other Guy (1969)

Both Barry Womersley & George Eccles had been in Rhythm & Blues Incorporated from Southport, Eccles went on to join The Clayton Squares before forming Jasmine-T who played through to the mid 70's. Lightbulb & Big Al were in The Bootles.

George Eccles - Lead Guitar
Brent 'Lightbulb' Pickthall - Bass guitar
'Big Al' Alan Menzies- Drums


Jasmin-T ‎– Some Other Guy (1969)

Jasmin-T ‎– Some Other Guy (1969)


The Defenders - Looking At You 1963-1968

The Defenders - Looking At You 1963-1968

The Defenders - Looking At You 1963-1968


Founder:
Jens Henrik Dahl - Lead guitar, Rhythm guitar
Hans Klitgaard Larsen - Bass Guitar (in band: 1961 - 1963)
Peder Jelsbak - Lead guitar (in band: 1961 - Dec, 1963)
Ken Gudman - Drums (in band: 1961 - Dec, 1963; 1964 - 1967)
Flemming Knud Sørensen - Guitar, Vocals (in band: 1961 - Oct, 1967)
Members:
Rudolph Alexander Hanius Hansen - Bass Guitar (in band: 1963 -)
Jørgen Stig (in band: 1967 - 1968)
Benny Qvotrup - Drums (in band: Dec, 1963 - 1964)

Defenders were a beatgroup forned in Østerbro in Copenhagen in 1961 with the following mem- bers: Flemming Knud Sørensen, Peder Jelsbak, Jens Henrik Dahl, Hans Klitgaard Larsen , Ken Gudman.

 In 1962-63 they played locally, in places like Restaurant Cap Horn and Place Pigalle, inspired by Cliff Richards and The Shadows, and also 50`s rock, influenced by Flemming Sørensens love for Elvis Presley. Their first performance was in Restaurant Cap Horn where the the group got more work. In the summer of 1963 Defenders had a regular jog playing at Place Pigalle at Bakken.

Defenders reached the status as Denmarks most popular band in the years 1964-65. Defenders played a combination of r & and softer beat presented in a good spirited way. They performed nurmerous times on Danish and Swedish television. They also performed as a backingband for Gunilla Thom. Their greatest hit was the groups own composition, a sort of rock-cavalcade with lovingly ironic parodies of Stones, Hitmakers, Elvis and Defenders.

Defenders made their debut with new psychedelic style in Falkoner Centret in September 1967. In October Sørensen left and formed his own band Page One. Lead vocals were now sung by R. Hansen. Defenders kept on as a trio, and added Indian instruments to their sound, which can be heard at their only release as a trio. Defenders were finished as a band none the less, and called it quits in april 1968.


Albums:

Defenders (1965)
Looking at You (1966)

Singles & EPs:

Don't Show Me Away (1964)
Mashed Potatoes (1965)
Walking The Dog (1965)
That´s My Baby (1965)
Wolly Bully (1965)
Sitting All Alone (1966)
Rolly Polly (1966)
Dear Mrs. Applebee (1966)
Der Er Lys I Lygten (1966)
Jeg Har Aldrig Fået Noget (1966)
I Can't Believe What You Say (1967) 

The Defenders - Looking At You 1963-1968 2 CD

The Defenders - Looking At You 1963-1968






The Mickey Finn - Garden of My Mind The Complete Recordings 1964-1967

The Mickey Finn - Garden of My Mind The Complete Recordings 1964-1967

Members: Alan Mark (2), Bernard Jory, Danny Peyronel, Mickey Waller

The Mickey Finn traveled in the same circles as The Rolling Stones and The Pretty Things, but despite some very close calls, the band never hit the big time.  Garden of My Mind: The Complete Recordings collects The Mickey Finn’s 1964-1967 Blue Beat, Oriole, Columbia, Polydor and Direction singles along with previously unreleased demo recordings to paint a full portrait of the cult-favorite band.

The story of The Mickey Finn began in the U.K. circa 1962 when guitarist Mickey Waller joined with drummer Richard Brand in The Strangers.  By 1963, Waller and Brand had teamed with bassist John Burkett, vocalist Alan Mark and keyboardist John “Fluff Cooke” as Mickey Finn and The Blue Men.  Under this moniker, the group released a trio of singles, all included here: “Tom Hark” b/w “Please Love Me” on Blue Beat, and “Pills” b/w “Hush Your Mouth” and “Reelin’ and A’ Rockin'” b/w “I Still Want You” on Oriole.  These singles established the band’s “bluebeat” sound and featured choice contributions from friend Jimmy Page – not on guitar, but on harmonica!  Page also joined the band for some onstage gigs.

As 1964 ended, John Burkett departed the group and was replaced by Mick Stannard.  Columbia signed Porgy and Bess showstopper “It Ain’t Necessarily So.”  (Ironically, the character who sings that song in the original musical-folk opera is named Sporting Life!)  The recording is included here along with “God Bless the Child,” as both tracks later saw release on Talmy’s Orbit label.  Two more demos from this period, “Stagger Lee” and “Poverty,” debut on this collection.

the group with its newly-stripped down moniker of Mickey Finn for one single produced by Shel Talmy, “The Sporting Life” b/w “Night Comes Down.”  Both sides were co-written by Talmy, and it’s a possibility that Jimmy Page played guitar on these sessions per Alan Mark in the liner notes.  Talmy recorded other tracks with the band that didn’t see release at the time, including a version of George and Ira Gershwin and DuBose Heyward’s
As The Mickey Finn, the band released its next 45 on Polydor in 1966: a cover of Billy Stewart’s “I Do Love You” b/w Pam Sawyer and Lori Burton’s ballad “If I Had You Baby.”  Mick Stannard was next to leave the group, and he was replaced first by Rod Clark and then by Bernie Jory.  Demos from this transitional period are included here, as is The Mickey Finn’s next (and final) single, for CBS’ Direction label in 1967.  The original song “Garden of My Mind,” written by Finn, Mark and Jory, was backed on 45 by “Time to Start Loving You,” credited to all five members.  Richard Gottehrer (“My Boyfriend’s Back,” “I Want Candy”) produced this single, which should have established the band as a top-flight purveyor of freakbeat/psychedelia.


The Mickey Finn continued to perform and tour through 1968 before its members called it a day, but RPM’s new release shows the group as a potent might-have-been with a small if strong legacy of great music.  Garden of My Mind: The Complete Recordings presents these recordings in non-chronological sequence.  It has been remastered by Simon Murphy and features liner notes by Brian Neavyn based on his interviews with the band members for Ugly Things magazine.

01. Pills (single A-side,1964) (Ellas McDaniel) - 2:33
02. I Still Want You (single B-side,1964) (Mickey Waller, Alan Mark) - 2:26
03. Garden Of My Mind (single A-side,1967) (Mickey Waller, Alan Mark, Bernard Jory) - 2:29
04. Night  Comes Down (single B-side,1965) (Shel Talmy, Jon Mark) - 2:09
05. Hush Your Mouth (single B-side,1964) (Jimmy Reed) - 2:35
06. Time To Start Loving You (single B-side,1967) (Mickey Waller, Alan Mark, Bernard Jory, Richard Brand, Fluff Cooke) - 2:38
07. Ain't Necessarily So (Ira Gershwin, George Gershwin, DuBose Heyward) - 3:17
08. If I Had You Baby (single B-side,1966) (Lori Burton, Pam Sawyer) - 1:48
09. The Sporting Life (single A-side,1965) (Chris Radmall, Shel Talmy) - 2:29
10. Because I Love You (I Do Love You) (single A-side,1966) (Billy Stewart) - 2:06
11. Reelin' & A'Rockin' (single A-side,1964) (Chuck Berry) - 2:20
12. Stagger Lee (Lloyd Price, Harold Logan) - 2:25
13. Poverty (Dave Clark, Pearl Woods) - 3:17
14. Miss Jane (Bernard Jory) - 2:57
15. God Bless The Child (Billie Holiday, Arthur Herzog) - 2:30
16. Tom Hark (single A-side,1964) (Rupert Bopape) - 2:17
17. Please Love Me (single B-side,1964) (Alan Hawkshaw) - 2:17


Garden Of My Mind:  The Complete Recordings 1964-1967 is the collection album by The Mickey Finn, was released on November 20, 2015 by RPM, featuring Jimmy Page (Guitar), includes the best known single "Garden Of My Mind" and "I Do Love You" and more!.

The Mickey Finn - Garden of My Mind The Complete Recordings 1964-1967


Personnel:
- Alan Mark - vocals
- Mickey Finn (Michael Finn Waller) - guitar
- John Burkett - bass
- Richard Brand - drums
- John "Fluff" Cooke - keyboards
- Mick Stannard - bass
- Rod Clark - bass
- Bernie Joy - bass
+
- Jimmy Page - harmonica (01,05)


The Mickey Finn - Garden of My Mind The Complete Recordings 1964-1967

The Attack - Magic In The AirToby Twirl - Toby Twirl  (1968- 70)The Talismens - The Talismen's styleThe Creation ‎– Action PaintingThe Eyes- Blink (1966)The Smoke - It´s Smoke Time (1967)The Smoke - My Friend Jack  (2000)Jasmin-T ‎– Some Other Guy (1969)The Defenders - Looking At You 1963-1968The Mickey Finn - Garden of My Mind The Complete Recordings 1964-1967

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