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Orange Bicycle - Let's Take A Trip On An Orange Bicycle

Orange Bicycle - Let's Take  A Trip On An Orange Bicycle


Former foot soldiers of the UK beat boom, Rob Storm & The Whispers enthusiastically boarded psychedelia’s bendy bus in 1967 with a modish name change to Orange Bicycle, scoring a French No 1 straight off the bat with Hyacinth Threads. Notwithstanding the song’s spidery harpsichord and impressionistic air of Summer Of Love dissolution, the band’s harmony pop heritage would ultimately prove to be by far the most dominant imperative in their brief career. As much as Orange Bicycle remain a hip name to drop in collectors’ circles, in truth they had more in common with Marmalade than Pink Floyd: the novelty pop of Jenskadajka could even be Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich.
Let’s Take A Trip scoops up almost everything they ever did, with the A-sides and flips of their 10 singles comprising Disc One and their rare-as-an-uplifting-episode- of-EastEnders 1970 album plus odds, ends, waifs and strays on Disc Two. It’s pleasing but slender fare for the most part: their version of Carry That Weight/You Never Give Me Your Money has more wow and flutter on it than Kate Bush in an aviary, but their take on Sir Elt’s Take Me To The Pilot is damn near definitive. Last Cloud Home and Competition take top honours. ~ recordcollectormag.

Orange Bicycle - Let's Take A Trip On An Orange Bicycle (1967-68)
Antology


Orange Bicycle - Let's Take  A Trip On An Orange Bicycle


Orange Bicycle - Let's Take  A Trip On An Orange Bicycle

This rather lightweight vocal harmony outfit, evolved out of Robb Storme and The . Whispers. They started playing quasi-psychedelic pop music in 1967. They had a No 1 in France with their debut single Hyacinth Threads although their future singles including a cover of The Rolling Stones' Sing This All Together did not happen at home.
Their album was produced by John Peel and was largely comprised of cover versions of Elton John/Bernie Taupin material such as Take Me To The Pilot, which was also released as a single. It also included Dylan's Tonight I'll Be Staying Here With You and Denny Laine's Say You Don't Mind.
Laura's Garden can also be heard on Morgan Blue Town (LP) and Best And The Rest Of British Psychedelia (CD) compilations and it's typical of their harmony pop style.
A revitalised Morgan Bluetown label produced an album, Let's Take A Trip On... in 1988. Containing 16 tracks in all, it includes all the Columbia 'A' and 'B' sides (except the third), but none of the later Parlophone ones. Sadly there are no sleevenotes at all to suggest where the other tracks originate from.
Wilson Malone recorded a self-titled solo album as Wil Malone in 1970 for Fontana and was also in Motherlight. ~ info PSYCH-SPANIOLOS


Orange Bicycle - Let's Take  A Trip On An Orange Bicycle



Orange Bicycle - Hyacinth Threads (The Morgan Blue Town Recordings)


 Former foot soldiers of the UK beat boom, Rob Storm & The Whispers enthusiastically boarded psychedelia’s bendy bus in 1967 with a modish name change to Orange Bicycle, scoring a French No 1 straight off the bat with Hyacinth Threads. Notwithstanding the song’s spidery harpsichord and impressionistic air of Summer Of Love dissolution, the band’s harmony pop heritage would ultimately prove to be by far the most dominant imperative in their brief career. As much as Orange Bicycle remain a hip name to drop in collectors’ circles, in truth they had more in common with Marmalade than Pink Floyd: the novelty pop of Jenskadajka could even be Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich.
Let’s Take A Trip scoops up almost everything they ever did, with the A-sides and flips of their 10 singles comprising Disc One and their rare-as-an-uplifting-episode- of-EastEnders 1970 album plus odds, ends, waifs and strays on Disc Two. It’s pleasing but slender fare for the most part: their version of Carry That Weight/You Never Give Me Your Money has more wow and flutter on it than Kate Bush in an aviary, but their take on Sir Elt’s Take Me To The Pilot is damn near definitive. Last Cloud Home and Competition take top honours.

This rather lightweight vocal harmony outfit, evolved out of Robb Storme and The . Whispers. They started playing quasi-psychedelic pop music in 1967. They had a No 1 in France with their debut single Hyacinth Threads although their future singles including a cover of The Rolling Stones' Sing This All Together did not happen at home.
Their album was produced by John Peel and was largely comprised of cover versions of Elton John/Bernie Taupin material such as Take Me To The Pilot, which was also released as a single. It also included Dylan's Tonight I'll Be Staying Here With You and Denny Laine's Say You Don't Mind.
Laura's Garden can also be heard on Morgan Blue Town (LP) and Best And The Rest Of British Psychedelia (CD) compilations and it's typical of their harmony pop style.
A revitalised Morgan Bluetown label produced an album, Let's Take A Trip On... in 1988. Containing 16 tracks in all, it includes all the Columbia 'A' and 'B' sides (except the third), but none of the later Parlophone ones. Sadly there are no sleevenotes at all to suggest where the other tracks originate from.
Wilson Malone recorded a self-titled solo album as Wil Malone in 1970 for Fontana and was also in Motherlight.

Orange Bicycle - Hyacinth Threads (The Morgan Blue Town Recordings)

Orange Bicycle - Hyacinth Threads (The Morgan Blue Town Recordings)

Orange Bicycle - Hyacinth Threads (The Morgan Blue Town Recordings)

Orange Bicycle - Hyacinth Threads (The Morgan Blue Town Recordings)

Orange Bicycle - Hyacinth Threads (The Morgan Blue Town Recordings)

Orange Bicycle - Hyacinth Threads (The Morgan Blue Town Recordings)




Ola & The Janglers - Flashback #20

Ola &  The Janglers - Flashback #20

Ola Håkansson (vocals)
Christer Idering (guitar)
Johnny Lundin (guitar)
Claes "Clabbe" af Geijerstam (guitar)
Johannes Olsson (organ)
Lennart Gudmundsson (bass)
Åke Eldsäter (bass)
Leif Johansson (drums)

Ola and the Janglers bildades 1962. Under några år i mitten och senare delen av sextiotalet hade gruppen sina stora framgångar. En av gruppens största hits, en cover på Chris Montez Let's Dance spelades flitigt inte bara i Sverige. Efter upplösningen av gruppen bildade några av medlemmarna Secret Service.

Ola and the Janglers founded in 1962. For some years in the mid and late sixties, the group had their great success. One of the group's biggest hits, a cover of Chris Montez Let's Dance was played frequently not only in Sweden. After the group disbanded, a few members formed Secret Service.

Ola & The Janglers ‎– Flashback #20 1995


01 Ola & The Janglers - Let's Dance
02 Ola & The Janglers - Hear Me
03 Ola & The Janglers - Save Me, Save Me
04 Ola & The Janglers - I Can't Wait
05 Ola & The Janglers - What I heard Today
06 Ola & The Janglers - You Don't Know Where Your Interest lies
07 Ola & The Janglers - Farewell My love
08 Ola & The Janglers - This Ring
09 Ola & The Janglers - Strolling Along
10 Ola & The Janglers - Juliet
11 Ola & The Janglers - Poetry In Motion
12 Ola & The Janglers - Alex Is The Man
13 Ola & The Janglers - Light Of Lime
14 Ola & The Janglers - Bird's Eye View Of You
15 Ola & The Janglers - Not In My Life
16 Ola & The Janglers - Thinking' Of You
17 Ola & The Janglers - No No No
18 Ola & The Janglers - Love Was on Your Mind
19 Ola & The Janglers - Stop Your Sobbing
20 Ola & The Janglers - Surprise Surprise

Ola &  The Janglers - Flashback #20


Ola &  The Janglers - Flashback #20







Orange Bicycle - Orange Bicycle (1970)

Orange Bicycle - Orange Bicycle (1970)







Orange Bicycle - Orange Bicycle (1970)


John Bachini - Bass Guitar, Vocals
Kevin Curry - Drums, Percussion
Bernie Lee - Electric Guitar, Acoustic Guitar, Guitar [Steel], Vocals
R.J. Scales - Lead Vocals
Wilson Malone - Piano, Organ, Harpsichord, Mellotron, Vocals, Arranged By



The British psych-pop outfit known as Orange Bicycle evolved from a Beat group, Robb Storme & the Whispers, also known as the Robb Storme Group. They had recorded a handful of harmony pop singles for Pye, Piccadilly, Decca, and Columbia Records during the early '60s, but with little success. In 1966, the Robb Storme Group covered the Beach Boys' "Here Today." It was arranged by the band's own multi-talented keyboardist/producer Wilson Malone and produced by Morgan Music's co-owner Monty Babson at Morgan Studios in the Willesdon area of London. With psychedelic music at its zenith, the group decided to change its name change and, in 1967, re-emerged as Orange Bicycle. Over the next few years, they released a half-dozen singles; their first single -- "Hyacinth Threads" -- remains the band's best-known track, appearing on numerous compilations. In late August/early September 1968, Orange Bicycle -- wearing matching black and orange suits -- performed at the Isle of Wight music festival, reportedly covering songs by Love and the Rolling Stones. In 1970, already somewhat past its prime, Orange Bicycle recorded its only album, The Orange Bicycle. It was comprised largely of covers, including Elton John's "Take Me to the Pilot," Bob Dylan's "Tonight I'll Be Staying Here With You," and Denny Laine's "Say You Don't Mind." A few tracks were produced by John Peel. Psychedelic pop music, however, was on the wane, or transmogrifying into heavier prog or hard rock, so the group decided to call it a day, breaking up in 1971. Wilson Malone's self-titled solo album (as Wil Malone) for Fontana was released that same year. Meanwhile, drummer Kevin Currie joined Supertramp, then Burlesque, before becoming a session drummer. Malone went on to form the heavy psych-prog trio Bobak Jons Malone with celebrated engineer/producer Andy Jons and guitarist producer Mike Bobak. They recorded one album, Motherlight. Malone also collaborated with bassist John Bachini on singer/songwriter Robert MacLeod's 1976 solo album Between the Poppy and the Snow. That same year, they covered the Beatles' "You Never Give Me Your Money" for All This and World War II. Malone then went on to become a top producer/arranger on his own, working with many successful groups and solo artists. His string arrangement for the Verve's "Bittersweet Symphony" (which appropriated the symphonic arrangement from the Rolling Stones' "The Last Time") caused a ruckus that resulted in Andrew Loog Oldham suing the Verve for songwriting royalties. In 1988, the Morgan Bluetown label issued an Orange Bicycle compilation, Let's Take a Trip On..., which contained all of the band's Columbia singles but no Parlophone-era recordings. Edsel later reissued all of Orange Bicycle's recordings -- 33 tracks total -- on a double CD in 2001.

1. Lady Samantha (03:34)
2. Country Comforts (03:15)
3. The Sweet Thing Is (02:17)
4. Make It Rain (04:07)
5. Say You Don't Mind (02:57)
6. Hallelujah Moon (03:28)
7. Jelly On The Bread (03:52)
8. Take Me To The Pilot (03:04)
9. Come To Tomorrow Morning (04:12)
10. Back (03:37)
11. Tonight I'll Be Staying Here With You (04:32)
12. Hyacinth Threads (Bonus Track) (02:55)
13. Amy Peate (Bonus Track) (02:09)
14. Laura's Garden (Bonus Track) (03:16)
15. Lavender Girl (Bonus Track) (02:21)
16. Jenskadajaka (Bonus Track) (03:33)
17. Sing This Song All Together (Bonus Track) (02:41)
18. Trip On An Orange Bicycle (Bonus Track) (03:36)

A somewhat late-in-the-day attempt at psychedelic pop, this album does have a few advantages, mostly in the way it's executed -- for starters, it isn't as wimpy as a lot of U.K. psychedelic pop was during this period; Orange Bicycle plays hard and generates a fairly hard sound, despite their pop orientation, the wattage turned up fairly high and the vocals pretty intense. The album is top-heavy with outside songwriting, Elton John, Bob Dylan, and Denny Laine all playing prominent roles as composers, with Laine giving the group perhaps their best moment with his "Say You Don't Mind", where they even sound a little bit like the original (Roy Wood-era) Electric Light Orchestra. Still, they're neither fish nor fowl, too heavy to pass for pop but not intense enough to be taken too seriously -- the material is a little too off-kilter to have worked at the time, or to be of anything much more than historical interest today.





ROY ORBISON - ARTIST Of The WEEK


  Although he shared the same rockabilly roots as Carl Perkins, Johnny Cash, and Elvis Presley, Roy Orbison went on to pioneer an entirely different brand of country/pop-based rock & roll in the early '60s. What he lacked in charisma and photogenic looks, Orbison made up for in spades with his quavering operatic voice and melodramatic narratives of unrequited love and yearning. In the process, he established rock & roll archetypes of the underdog and the hopelessly romantic loser. These were not only amplified by peers such as Del Shannon and Gene Pitney, but also influenced future generations of roots rockers such as Bruce Springsteen and Chris Isaak, as well as modern country stars the Mavericks.

Orbison made his first widely distributed recordings for Sun Records in 1956. Roy was a capable rockabilly singer, and had a small national hit with his first Sun single, "Ooby Dooby." But even then, he was far more comfortable as a ballad singer than as a hepped-up rockabilly jive cat. Other Sun singles met with no success, and by the late '50s he was concentrating primarily on building a career as a songwriter, his biggest early success being "Claudette" (recorded by the Everly Brothers).

After a brief, unsuccessful stint with RCA, Orbison finally found his voice with Monument Records, scoring a number-two hit in 1960 with "Only the Lonely." This established the Roy Orbison persona for good: a brooding rockaballad of failed love with a sweet, haunting melody, enhanced by his Caruso-like vocal trills at the song's emotional climax. These and his subsequent Monument hits also boasted innovative, quasi-symphonic production, with Roy's voice and guitar backed by surging strings, ominous drum rolls, and heavenly choirs of backup vocalists.

Between 1960 and 1965, Orbison would have 15 Top 40 hits for Monument, including such nail-biting mini-dramas as "Running Scared," "Crying," "In Dreams," and "It's Over." Not just a singer of tear-jerking ballads, he was also capable of effecting a tough, bluesy swagger on "Dream Baby," "Candy Man," and "Mean Woman Blues." In fact, his biggest and best hit was also his hardest-rocking: "Oh, Pretty Woman" soared to number one in late 1964, at the peak of the British Invasion.

It seemed at that time that Roy was well-equipped to survive the British onslaught of the mid-'60s. He had even toured with the Beatles in Britain in 1963, and John Lennon has admitted to trying to emulate Orbison when writing the Beatles' first British chart-topper, "Please Please Me." But Orbison's fortunes declined rapidly after he left Monument for MGM in 1965. It would be easy to say that the major label couldn't replicate the unique production values of the classic Monument singles, but that's only part of the story. Roy, after all, was still writing most of his material, and his early MGM records were produced in a style that closely approximated the Monument era. The harder truth to face was that his songs were starting to sound like lesser variations of themselves, and that contemporary trends in rock and soul were making him sound outdated.

Orbison, like many early rock greats, could always depend on large overseas audiences to pay the bills. The two decades between the mid-'60s and mid-'80s were undeniably tough ones for him, though, both personally and professionally. A late-'60s stab at acting failed miserably. In 1966, his wife died in a motorcycle accident; a couple of years later, his house burned down, two of his sons perishing in the flames. Periodic comeback attempts with desultory albums in the 1970s came to naught.

Mystery Girl
Orbison's return to the public eye came about through unexpected circumstances. In the mid-'80s, David Lynch's Blue Velvet film prominently featured "In Dreams" on its soundtrack. That led to the singer making an entire album of re-recordings of hits, with T-Bone Burnett acting as producer. The record was no substitute for the originals, but it did help restore him to prominence within the industry. Shortly afterward, he joined George Harrison, Bob Dylan, Tom Petty, and Jeff Lynne in the Traveling Wilburys. Their successful album set the stage for Orbison's best album in over 20 years, Mystery Girl, which emulated the sound of his classic '60s work without sounding hackneyed. By the time it reached the charts in early 1989, however, Orbison was dead, claimed by a heart attack in December 1988.


 ROY ORBISON - ARTIST Of The WEEK




Donny & Marie Osmond - The Best Of

Donny & Marie Osmond - The Best Of



Marie Osmond 

As part of a family act that came to be virtually synonymous with wholesome entertainment, Marie Osmond enjoyed a lengthy career switching between several different areas of show business. Born Olive Marie Osmond in Ogden, UT, in 1959, she was raised in a strict Mormon family along with her eight brothers. She made her first TV appearance at the age of three, when her oldest brothers performed on The Andy Williams Show as the Osmonds.
After spending the '60s as variety-show fixtures, the Osmonds shot to pop stardom in 1970, and before long the group's management encouraged Marie to try her hand at recording as well. She made several concert appearances with her brothers (though she was never officially a member of the Osmonds), and in 1973 she cut her first single, the country tune "Paper Roses." The song was a gold-selling smash, going to number one on the country charts (the first time a female artist's debut single had ever done so) and into the Top Five on the pop charts. Her accompanying album of the same name also topped the country charts, and Osmond followed it with two more albums for MGM and several more singles, none of which matched its success.
In 1976, she and brother Donny began hosting their own weekly variety show, Donny & Marie, which ran until 1979. In the meantime, she also began to pursue acting; she famously turned down the lead role in Grease because she didn't approve of the script's moral content but found limited success in a series of TV movies and later did voice-over work for several children's cartoons. In the mid-'80s, she returned to country music and signed with Curb, scoring a number one hit right out of the box with the Dan Seals duet "Meet Me in Montana." Her solo follow-up, "There's No Stopping Your Heart," also topped the country charts, and she landed two more big hits in 1986 with the Top Five solo track "Read My Lips" and the number one Paul Davis duet "You're Still New to Me." None of her subsequent singles breached the country Top Ten, though 1987's "I Only Wanted You" came close, and she charted for the final time in 1990 with "Like a Hurricane."

Osmond spent much of the '90s in touring musicals and returned to television in 1998 as co-host of the daytime talk show Donny & Marie, which ran for two seasons. In the early 2000s, Osmond made prominent appearances on the reality television shows Celebrity Duets (as a judge) and Dancing with the Stars. In 2007 she released the seasonal Magic Of Christmas, her first studio album in almost 20 years. It was followed in 2010 by I Can Do This, a collection of spirituals and hymns. Osmond has also written several self-help books, including one dealing with her own bout of postpartum depression.

Donny Osmond


Donny Osmond has been in show business from an age when most children are still becoming accustomed to getting on the school bus in the morning, and in a career that's spanned six decades, he's made a name for himself in nearly every field of contemporary entertainment, most notably music, but also theater, film, radio, and television, and shown that it's possible to grow and mature as a performer while holding on to the wholesome, family-friendly reputation that's always been part of his public persona.
Donald Clark Osmond was born on December 9, 1957; he was the seventh of nine children born to George and Olive Osmond, a devout Mormon couple from Ogden, Utah. George Osmond earned his living selling real estate and insurance, but he loved to sing, and when his sons developed an enthusiasm for music, he helped them form a barbershop quartet. The vocal group began performing regularly in Utah, and they landed an audition to appear on The Lawrence Welk Show. Welk turned the Osmond Brothers down, but while they were in California, George took the boys to Disneyland, and they began harmonizing with a strolling barbershop quartet during their visit. the Osmond Brothers were good enough to attract the attention of park management, and later Walt Disney himself, and were chosen to perform on a television special, Disneyland After Dark, in 1962. That appearance led to a regular spot on The Andy Williams Show, beginning later that same year. In 1963, Donny joined his older brothers Alan, Wayne, Merrill, and Jay in the singing group, and they were regulars on the Williams show until 1969; they were also frequent guests on Jerry Lewis' comedy-variety hour, which ran from 1967 to 1969.
As the Osmond Brothers grew older and the face of popular music continued to change, the boys wanted their act to have a more contemporary appeal, and they retooled themselves as a polished pop/rock combo, with the brothers playing instruments as well as singing. Mike Curb signed the group, now called the Osmonds, to MGM Records, and they went to Muscle Shoals, Alabama to record with producer Rick Hall, whose credits ran the gamut from Wilson Pickett and Etta James to Tommy Row and Paul Anka. Hall's first single with the Osmonds, 1971's "One Bad Apple," became a number one hit, and it was the first in a long string of chart successes for the group. the Osmonds appeared regularly in teen magazines such as 16 and Tiger Beat, thanks to the appeal of their well-crafted records and dynamic live shows, and Donny was often singled out as teen heart-throb material for his well-scrubbed good looks. MGM wasted no time in capitalizing on this, and Donny's first solo single, "Sweet and Innocent," was released in 1971. It rose to number seven on the Billboard pop charts, and the follow-up, "Go Away, Little Girl," went all the way to number one. Donny continued to enjoy solo hits, as well as performing and recording with the Osmonds, who became more ambitious in the recording studio, dipping their toes into harder rock on 1972's Crazy Horses, and crafting a spiritually oriented concept album with 1973's The Plan. In 1973, the lone Osmond sister, Marie, made her recoding debut, scoring a hit single with a cover of "Paper Roses." By the mid-'70s, the Osmonds' popularity was beginning to fade in the notoriously fickle world of teen pop, but in 1976, Donny and his sister Marie became the hosts of a weekly television variety show, with the other Osmond siblings making frequent appearances over the course of the show's run. Donny & Marie was a hit in the ratings, and in 1978, Donny & Marie even starred in a movie, Goin' Coconuts, but viewership began to decline during the third year, and in 1979, midway through its fourth season, the series went off the air.
In the '80s, Donny's career hit a dry spell, particularly after a Broadway revival of George M. Cohen's Little Johnny Jones, with Osmond in the lead, closed after a single performance in 1982. Osmond set out to once again reshape his image into something sleeker and hipper, and he made cameo appearances in Jeff Beck's 1985 music video for "Ambitious," as well as Luis Cardenas' 1986 clip for "Runaway." In 1989, Donny recorded a new album after Peter Gabriel, who met Osmond at a charity event, offered him use of his Real World recording studio in Bath, England. The new album, simply titled Donny Osmond, was a solid, dance-friendly contemporary pop recording, but Osmond's management and record label feared his bubblegum history might work against the album, and they struck upon a novel promotional gimmick. The album's first single, "Soldier of Love," was released to radio as a new song from a "mystery artist," and it gained airplay as listeners wondered whom the singer might be. The gambit worked -- "Soldier of Love" became a major hit, and the album followed it into the upper reaches of the charts.

Osmond released another contemporary pop album, Eyes Don't Lie, in 1990 which, while not as successful as its immediate predecessor, fared well on the charts. In 1992, Osmond returned to the musical stage, starring as Joseph in the Toronto production of Andrew Lloyd Webber's Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat; the show was a critical and popular success, with Osmond racking up over 2,000 performances between 1992 and 1997, and in 1999, when Webber created a film version of the musical for television broadcast and home video release, Osmond once again played Joseph in a cast that also included Richard Attenborough and Joan Collins. In 1998, Osmond provided the singing voice of Shang in the Disney animated feature Mulan, and in the fall of the same year, he and his sister Marie returned to television, starring in a daytime talk show that ran until the spring of 2000. Donny also returned to the recording studio to cut a holiday-themed album, Christmas at Home, and in 1999, published an autobiography, Life Is Just What You Make It, in which he openly discussed the ups and downs of his career, the burden of his public image, and his struggle with panic disorder.

In 2001, Osmond released This Is the Moment, an album dominated by songs from Broadway shows, and followed it in 2002 with Somewhere in Time, a collection of love songs which featured a new version of "Puppy Love" (a hit for Donny in 1972), and "No One Has to Be Alone," which Osmond recorded for the animated feature The Land Before Time IX: Journey to Big Water. In 2002, Osmond became the new host of the long-running television game show Pyramid, and in 2004, he returned to pop music with the album What I Meant to Say, his first collection dominated by original material since Eyes Don't Lie; it included the single "Breeze on By," which rose to the Top Ten of the British pop charts. In 2006, Osmond appeared as Gaston in the Broadway production of Disney's Beauty and the Beast, earning enthusiastic reviews, and in 2007, he became a guest commentator on Entertainment Tonight, just in time to cover his sister Marie's stint on the fifth season of Dancing With The Stars, in which she finished in third place. Marie's run on Dancing with the Stars prompted her and Donny to begin performing together again, and in 2008, they launched a revue at the Flamingo Hotel in Las Vegas, while Donny made a surprise return to the big screen in the Martin Lawrence comedy College Road Trip. In the fall of 2009, Donny took his own turn on Dancing with the Stars, and won the grand prize; he followed that up with an eclectic new album, 2010's The Entertainer, which included new interpretations of his earlier hits and pop standards, as well as a handful of new tunes. In 2010, Donny became the host of a syndicated radio show, The Donny Osmond Show, described as "a lifestyle-oriented music radio show," which was broadcast in both the United States and the United Kingdom. And in 2011, Donny & Marie reunited in the recording studio for their first album together since 1978, simply titled Donny & Marie.

Donny & Marie Osmond - The Best Of

20th Century Masters - The Millennium Collection: The Best of Donny & Marie Osmond collects a dozen of the brother and sister duo's best-known and definitive performances, including "Leaving It All Up to You," "It Takes Two," "Deep Purple," and "Paper Roses." Though some of the songs the duo tackles venture into rock and disco influences, for the most part their work stayed in the '70s AM pop style that Donny's teenage solo career began with, and is epitomized by songs like "One of These Days" and their version of "Let It Be." Though their sound never quite hit the transcendent highs of the Carpenters' work, at its best Donny & Marie's output had a smooth, airy agreeable quality that has made it date surprisingly well. Not many Osmond retrospectives focus just on Donny & Marie's work, so 20th Century Masters - The Millennium Collection: The Best of Donny & Marie Osmond fills that gap competently.




Ola &The Janglers - Surprise Surprise (1965)

Ola &The Janglers - Surprise Surprise (1965)




Ola & the Janglers were a garage rock and beat group, founded in Stockholm, Sweden in1962. Its lead member was Ola Håkansson.
Among the hits they scored in their native country are "No, No, No" (1965), "Love Was on Your Mind", "Poetry in Motion", "Alex Is the Man" (1966), "I'm Thinking Of You" (1965), "Strolling Along", and "Runaway" (1968). The group's 1969 hit "Let's Dance", a cover of the Chris Montez song, reached #92 on the Billboard Hot 100.

Ola &The Janglers - Surprise Surprise (1965)

Ola Håkansson, vocal
Christer Idering, guitar. Replaced by Claes af Geijerstam 1965
Johannes Olsson, keyboards (organ)
Lennart Wallin, bass. Replaced by Åke Eldsäter 1966
Leif Johansson, drums

Всё началось в начале 60-х. Малоизвестный молодой исполнитель Ola Håkansson в 1963 году присоединяется к группе The Janglers, как их солист. Ola сразу же занял там лидирующие позиции, так как вскоре название этого коллектива звучало как Ola & The Janglers. Помимо Ola, в группу входили ещё четверо участников, среди которых можно отметить известного шведского музыканта Claes Af Geijerstam (он и являлся автором большинства песен Ola & The Janglers) и Leif Johansson, который впоследствии также попал в группу Secret Service. Творчество Ola & The Janglers было довольно популярным как в самой Швеции, так и за её пределами. Начав репертуар с кавер-версий композиций The Kinks и Rolling Stones, у себя на родине группа записала более 20 синглов. А их песня “Let’s Dance” в мае 1969 года даже удостоилась попасть в American Billboard Top 100. Ola & The Janglers засветились и в роли кинозвёзд: в 1967 году появились два фильма с участием музыкантов: Drra på - Kul grej på väg till Götet и более известный Ola & Julia, где Ola Håkansson даже исполнил главную роль. Саундтрек к Ola & Julia был написан Claes Af Geijerstam, и включал в себя песню Juliet (Julia на шведском), вышедшую также на сингле. Активность Ola & The Janglers стала угасать с началом 70-х. Последние же сингл и альбом группы вышли в 1976-м году с большим отрывом в пять лет от предшествующих релизов. Альбом 1965 года.

01-Surprise, Surprise 
02-Stop Your Sobbing 
03-We Got A Good Thing Going 
04-Land Of 1000 Dances 
05-Love Was On Your Mind 
06-No No No 
07-It`s Allright 
08-Thinkin` Of You 
09-I Remember When I Loved Her 
10-Satisfaction 
11-This Sporting Life 
12-Leave Me Be







Orange Bicycle - Let's Take  A Trip On An Orange BicycleOrange Bicycle - Hyacinth Threads (The Morgan Blue Town Recordings)Ola &  The Janglers - Flashback #20Orange Bicycle - Orange Bicycle (1970) ROY ORBISON - ARTIST Of The WEEKDonny & Marie Osmond - The Best OfOla &The Janglers - Surprise Surprise (1965)

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