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VA - Making Time: A Shel Talmy Production

VA - Making Time: A Shel Talmy Production



" The name Shel Talmy needs no introduction to any student of 1960s rock. In the roll-call of top producers of the era, he is foremost, an American ex-pat who almost single-handedly changed the sound of British rock'n'roll. Based upon his supervision of the early Kinks and Who alone, Talmy upped the ante and in the process forged a sonic template that would have worldwide reverberations. This is the first significant overview of this maverick's 1960s career. Talmy trained as an engineer in Hollywood, but when on holiday in the UK in 1962, boldly marched into Decca Records and announced his availability as producer. Early hits with the Bachelors and the Fortunes led to a reputation for handling the new wave of beat and mod outfits that erupted in the wake of the Beatles. He enjoyed his greatest success with the Kinks, Who and Easybeats, but could create a hit for just about anyone, from the breezy style of Chad & Jeremy or the soulful pop of Manfred Mann and Amen Corner to the acoustic-based Pentangle. Talmy s prolific schedule meant a proportion of his productions fell by the wayside, but many have subsequently become cherished items. As heard here, they range from future stars David Bowie and Lemmy (with the Rockin' Vickers) to cult faves the Untamed, Oliver Norman, First Gear and Mickey Finn, along with the acts on Talmy's own Planet Records, including pop-art avatars the Creation. Shel's girls are represented by the collectable Perpetual Langley and Goldie and the Gingerbreads, while his work with Lee Hazlewood and Roy Harper demonstrates the breadth of his abilities. Finally, along with the freakbeat classic Bald Headed Woman. Trini Lopez's witty Sinner Not A Saint (the only non-Talmy production here) is included as an example of his songwriting prowess. Making Time A Shel Talmy Production also benefits from unprecedented access to Talmy s personal vaults, which yielded master tapes for many obscurities as well as several ear-popping unissued tracks. Extensively researched and copiously illustrated, this anthology will be a significant entry in Ace's acclaimed Producer series. "

VA - Making Time: A Shel Talmy Production (2017)


VA - Making Time: A Shel Talmy Production

Mike Berry - Sounds of The Sixties

Mike Berry - Sounds of The Sixties



Mike Berry -- not to be confused with his contemporary Dave Berry -- was a pop/rock singer who gained his initial fame as part of the stable of artists produced by the legendary Joe Meek. His best known record, "Tribute to Buddy Holly" is one of the most fondly remembered singles of the pre-Beatles era in England, as well as a touching memorial to its subject, with a bravura performance by Berry. Born Michael Bourne in Northampton, England, in 1942, he was raised in London and originally started singing as a member of his church choir during the early '50s. When the skiffle boom came along in the middle of the decade, he took up playing the washboard and joined a local group christened "the Rebels". He eventually moved on to doing straight American-style rock & roll and, at the start of the '60s, was singing in a dance band called Kenny Lord & the Statesmen -- their repertory included the music of Buddy Holly and Gene Vincent, among others, whose "Peggy Sue Got Married" and "Be-Bop-A-Lula," respectively, were on a four-song demo cut by the group.
That record found its way into the hands of Joe Meek, who was struck by how closely the singer matched the tone and nuances of Holly's singing. He made contact with the group, and tried to keep singer and band together, but the other members soon fell by the wayside. In their stead, Meek recruited a London-based band called the Stormers, whose ranks included Chas Hodges on bass, Bobby Graham on the drums, and Billy Kuy and Reg Hawkins on lead and rhythm guitar, respectively -- Michael Bourne/Kenny Lord became Mike Berry and the Stormers were given the name the Outlaws, and they set about performing and recording as Mike Berry & the Outlaws, cutting a version of a song that Meek chose, called "Set Me Free." The song was duly recorded and Meek set about trying to get it released, only to have it rejected by Decca Records A&R chief Dick Rowe -- who, nonetheless, liked the singer.
Rowe prevailed upon Meek to get Berry and his band to deliver a cover version of the new Shirelles single "Will You Love Me Tomorrow." Unfortunately, Decca issued that record at the start of 1961, just as the American original finally got released in England, and Berry's version was completely swamped. It wasn't until the summer of 1961 that Berry finally had a chance to show what he could really do with a song, when he was given "Tribute to Buddy Holly," authored by Geoff Goddard. With the Outlaws emulating the sound of Holly's band the Crickets, and Berry sounding so much like Buddy Holly that the whole listening experience was downright eerie, the record was a huge hit right out of the box, and with good reason -- it was a superb record, and it had a more-than-willing public; the Texas-born Holly was revered in England far more than he was in his own country, and British teens loved the single. It made the Top 20, and sold steadily for months. It never did reach its full potential, however, owing to the interference of the BBC, which refused to play the song, citing its morbid subject matter (there were a lot of "death" songs on the radio at the time).

Berry would seem to have been on his way, but such was not the case. His next two singles never charted, and a year later it almost seemed as though he was back at square one. Even more to the point, as 1962 wore into 1963, a new sound started emerged in England, coming out of Liverpool. After two missed, Berry charted a second hit, "Don't You Think It's Time," in late 1962, which made the British Top Ten at what later proved to the tail-end of the pre-Beatles era in British pop music. He followed this up with another Top 40 appearance in the spring of 1963, with the song "My Little Baby." During this same period, he was booked onto a package tour with the Beatles, and proved he could share a bill with the prime practitioners of the new Merseybeat sound. He also became one of the earliest performers to be managed by Robert Stigwood, who was working for Meek, and took over his bookings and, for a time, his recording sessions. This proved to be fortuitous, as Meek always had too much on his tray, and never had enough good songs to supply to the artists he was managing, or enough time to devote to each of their recordings and careers. But the changes in music, and the growing dominance of groups over solo singers ultimately overpowered Stigwood's best efforts on his behalf, or the varied sides that Berry tried to put before the British public from 1963 onward. By that time, the Outlaws -- whose ranks had come to include a promising young guitarist named Ritchie Blackmore -- had moved on to other activities, the members folded into other Meek-managed bands (including the Tornados) or doing session work. By the middle of the decade, Berry was consigned to ever-smaller gigs and recordings. He turned to acting in the '70s, though he never entirely gave up music, and by the end of the decade had found something of a niche as a nostalgia/oldies performer, still doing basic rock & roll. He returned to the U.K. Top Ten in 1980 with the single "The Sunshine of Your Smile," and got a second crack at the charts with "If I Could Only Make You Care" and "Memories." His renewed commercial success even led Berry to re-record "Tribute to Buddy Holly" in a more personalized rendition two decades after the fact. Since the '80s, he has divided his time between acting (including the series Are You Being Served in its last four seasons) and music. In 2006, he released About Time Too, an album cut with the surviving members of the Crickets in Nashville.

Mike Berry - Sounds of The Sixties

David Garrick - The Pye Anthology (2002)

David Garrick - The Pye Anthology (2002)


Of all the aspiring pop stars to come out of England in the 1960s, David Garrick had the most unlikely background. Unlike the members of the Beatles, Gerry & the Pacemakers, et. al, who were all fans of rock & roll as kids, Garrick grew up in an environment steeped in classical music. Born Philip Darryl Core (some sources list his birth name as Darrell Philip Corré) on September 12, 1945 in Liverpool, he came from a home in which Mozart and Beethoven were vital musical figures, and occupied the center of his attention to music -- rather than Bill Haley, Chuck Berry, or Elvis Presley, Mario Lanza loomed large on his boyhood radar screen. From an early age he was also singing in church choirs. He took formal voice training starting at age 14, and was singing with the Birkenhead Opera Company by 16. And from there it was off to La Scala on a grant to study with Lanza's one-time teacher. This was in the early '60s, and still not out of his teens, he had worn himself ragged between the voice training and the work to pay his expenses, and so he headed back to Liverpool.

It was then, while trying to figure out his next move -- whether to keep at the classical training or pursue something else -- that he began spending time at the Cavern Club. It was with the encouragement of DJ (and future author) Bob Wooller that he began making contact with various rock & roll bands who, by the mid-'60s, were working around the city. One night, he was persuaded to stand up at the Cavern and give an impromptu performance of an aria from Pagliacci, and was amazed to hear the applause that followed -- and amused to be dubbed "The Opera Singer" by the youthful patrons. Even so, he didn't consider seriously pursuing a singing career until he was approached at another club by a man who turned out to be Robert Wace, the manager of the Kinks. An audition was arranged before John Schoeder, the head of A&R for Pye Records' Piccadilly imprint, and within a week he was in London cutting his first record, and a recording contract -- which had to be signed by his parents, because of his age -- was forthcoming. A change of name seemed appropriate as well, and it was reportedly Wace's chance sighting of the sign for the Garrick Theatre that led them to the last name, whilst "David" scanned better than either Philip or Darryl.

It was then that matters got more complicated, as his debut single, "Go," didn't chart, despite some good reviews in the music papers. A second single, "One Little Smile," was pegged as a hit on Juke Box Jury but also failed to sell in sufficient numbers to chart. After much deliberation about the potentially make-or-break third single, Garrick and his managers agreed upon "Lady Jane," a new, Elizabethan-flavored song from Mick Jagger and Keith Richards. with an arrangement by Alan Tew, it was very much of its time, an ornate pop/rock record that reached number 20. Garrick was still generating lots of attention, more than a singer with one moderately successful single might have, mostly thanks to his classic good looks and the image that he cultivated. With Wace's encouragement, and help from costume designer Kay Ambrose, with whom he was living in London at the time, he took on the look of an 18th century dandy, something akin to Patrick MacNee's "John Steed" look from the Avengers' color episodes (or John Pertwee's image from his Dr. Who episodes) of the period.

Garrick was also prevailed upon to tour, and the prospect of performing live as a pop singer terrified him, as he still had little confidence in his ability in this area. He jumped into the deep end, a music showcase at the Marquee Club in London, on a bill that included David Bowie (working as David Jones), with Pye Records star Long John Baldry as host -- and "Lady Jane" went over like a storm in front of the audience. He was then sent on tour, booked with Gene Pitney and the Troggs, and backed by the Creation and the Iveys (later better known as Badfinger), both bands whose members he had known in Liverpool. Meanwhile, a fourth single, "Dear Mrs. Applebee," made it to number 22 on the U.K. charts and topped the sales listings in Germany and Holland.

Although Garrick's popularity in continental Europe remained strong throughout the remainder of the '60s, in England his sales began to drop in 1967. His contract with Pye ended in 1969, three years after it began, and he was subsequently signed to Columbia Records and released a further half-dozen singles, and by the start of the '70s, he was working on the cabaret circuit. This kind of move was usually a last resort for fading rock acts, but in Garrick's case it was preferable to some aspects of his earlier career. As a cabaret artist, he had the freedom to add operatic and art-song repertory that audiences in rock & roll venues would not have stood for -- as a result, he became more the David Garrick that he wanted to be. During the mid-'70s, he finally took a temporary break from performing that ended up lasting 15 years, until the end of the '80s, when he cut his first new album since the start of the '70s. A spate of CD reissues saw his four singles -- especially "Lady Jane" -- re-compiled many times over the ensuing decades, as well as the release of a double-CD anthology from Castle Records. Garrick's absence from music, coupled with his startling good looks and unusual repertory, has turned him into one of the more enigmatic figures to emerge from British pop music in the mid-'60s, somewhat akin to Scott Walker, if not as celebrated.

David Garrick - The Pye Anthology (2002)

1. (MF) *****
2.(GD) *****

I Meteors - I Meteors & Beatlesmania (1964;1965)

I Meteors - I Meteors & Beatlesmania (1964;1965)


Il gruppo nasce alla fine degli anni '50 dalla diaspora dei Golden Rock Boys di Andrea Mingardi quando Ivo Faccioli (in arte Baby Evans) cantante e bassista, decide di fondare un gruppo orientato sul rock classico e sulle novità musicali che giungono dagli USA e dall'Inghilterra. La band, oltre a Faccioli, comprende Umberto Pizzi, Sergio Nicoli, Stefano Salviati e William della Corinna. Nel 1961, vanno in tour con Gene Vincent e ne vengono pesantemente influenzati. La formazione subisce alcuni cambiamenti ed entra in organico il cantante Enzo Cifiello (Ray Silver). Pubblicano per una piccola etichetta (Alfa Record) alcuni singoli.

I Meteors durante un film con Morandi
Nel 1963 entra a far parte del gruppo il chitarrista Jimmy Villotti. A quel punto la formazione consta di Jimmy Villotti (chitarra solista), Baby Evans (basso e canto), Ray Silver (cantante solista), Vittorio Volpe (batteria), Piero Gherardi (sax e flauto traverso) in arte Piero Dani.

L'ingresso del chitarrista Jimmy Villotti impone una sterzata allo stile del gruppo che comincia ad eseguire il repertorio del Beat inglese. Nel 1964 partecipano al Festival degli sconosciuti di Ariccia con "Insieme a voi", e cominciano ad incidere per la RCA Italiana. Nello stesso anno partecipano al film "In ginocchio da te" con Gianni Morandi, eseguendo "Insieme a voi" (mascherati) ed accompagnando Morandi (di cui diventano il gruppo d'accompagnamento nelle serate).

Successivamente, i Meteors si esibiscono al Piper di Roma insieme ai Rokes. Incidono anche un album con una serie di cover e qualche pezzo originale. Nel 1965 incidono il secondo album, Beatlesmania, tutto di cover dei Fab Four.

Da allora in poi la stella dei Meteors comincia ad eclissarsi, proseguono l'attività con continui cambi di formazione (e l'ingresso di Sergio Nicoli, organo, Ciro Scognamiglio, basso, e Gilberto Faggioli, chitarra) e pubblicano l'ultimo singolo nel 1966, per la Polydor.

Jimmy Villotti continuerà la propria carriera con alterno successo, fondando un gruppo rock, I Baci, poi i Tritons ed infine come chitarrista di Paolo Conte.

Successivamente entrò nei Meteors Daniele Guidazzi (organo, chitarra solista) da Ravenna, (poi "Le cose dell'altro mondo " con Francesco Marsella "Checco" dei giganti S.Remo 1969, Arrangiatore Miura Records, Ricordi, e varie collaborations con artisti italiani e stranieri, tra cui Zucchero, Alice (1980) e svariati altri, oggi compositore e produttore di musical e colonne sonore).

Nei Meteors ha militato, nel loro ultimo periodo, anche un giovanissimo Dodi Battaglia, come bassista, (suonando con Daniele Guidazzi apprese i primi rudimenti della chitarra e divenne il grande chitarrista di oggi Il suo primo assolo di chitarra fu quello di "Fortuna" 



Il gruppo spalla di Gianni Morandi per un tratto degli anni '60. Il nome scelto non era certo beneaugurante di una lunga carriera. Si sono cimentati nella traduzione di molti brani classici dei Beatles in un LP dedicato al gruppo inglese dal titolo Beatlesmania. La formazione del gruppo di Bologna era composta da Ivo Faccioli (sax), Gilberto Faggioli (chitarra), Marco "Jimmy" Villotti (chitarra) poi noto collaboratore di molti musicisti, Ciro Scognamiglio (basso) e Vittorio Volpe (batteria), in altre formazioni anche Enzo Cifiello (voce) noto anche come Ray Silver. Nel gruppo emiliano ha transitato anche Dodi Battaglia, anche lui bolognese, poi chitarrista storico dei Pooh. Ha suonato il basso nel gruppo Ivan & i Meteors, gruppo apripista nel concerto bolognese di Jimi Hendrix (1968). Discografia: Abrakadabra / Nunca (Alfa NP332 - 1961), Angustia / Lucilla (Alfa NP333 - 1961), Marcia turca / Avanti indrè (Alfa NP334 - 1962), Eulalia Torricelli Twist / Movimento Twist (Alfa NP351 - 1962), Dove sei / Il tuo sorriso (Alfa NP361 - 1962), Amico / Non finirò d'amarti (Alfa NP 417 - 1963), Vita difficile / Hey, Paola! (Alfa NP419 - 1963), Insieme a voi / Se mi trovassi con te (ARC N 4051 - 1965), Vi sembra giusto (di Gianco e Pieretti, una canzone "di protesta") / Incontri al sol (Polydor nh 421204 - 1966). LP: I Meteors (RCA pml 103821 - 1964), Beatlesmania (ARC sa 1 - 1965).


I Meteors - I Meteors & Beatlesmania (1964;1965)

I Meteors - I Meteors & Beatlesmania (1964;1965)


I Meteors - I Meteors & Beatlesmania (1964;1965)

I Meteors - I Meteors & Beatlesmania (1964;1965)


Bergen White - For Women Only (1970)

Bergen White - For Women Only (1970)


Although best known for a long and successful career as a Nashville arranger, Bergen White also recorded one of the Holy Grails of soft pop: 1970's lush, melancholy For Women Only, a minor classic of its genre. According to Steve Stanley's comprehensive liner notes published in Rev-Ola's 2004 reissue of For Women Only, White was born in Miami, OK, in 1939, the son of a Baptist minister who regularly moved his family from city to city throughout the southern half of the U.S. The Whites finally settled in Nashville when Bergen was 14; there he befriended fellow music fans Bobby Russell and Buzz Cason, with whom he later recorded a single credited to the Todds. After college, White taught math and science for two years before Russell persuaded him to resume their musical collaboration, this time as staff vocalists with Bill Beasley's sound-alike label Hit Records, an imprint infamous for cutting carbon-copy knockoffs of chart hits that were commonly sold in supermarkets and priced to move. Hit not only offered White an opportunity to hone his vocal skills, but he was also allowed to compose original material for release via the B-sides of the label's singles.
In time, White was taken under the wing of Nashville producer Bill Justis and offered the chance to begin arranging recording sessions. He also joined the Justis-sponsored hot rod group Ronny & the Daytonas as a vocalist -- best known for their pop smash "G.T.O.," the band's ranks later included White's old schoolmate Buzz Cason as well. With a growing number of session dates now under his belt, in 1967 White signed to Monument to record his first solo single, "If It's Not Asking Too Much" -- an exquisitely melancholy slice of string-sweetened pop, the record earned little commercial attention, and its creator resumed his work behind the scenes. In 1969 he agreed to record a full-length LP for Shelby Singleton's SSS label, enlisting the assistance of noted session guitarist and engineer Wayne Moss, owner of Nashville's legendary Cinderella Studio. The resulting For Women Only appeared the following year -- an ornate and elegant work of richly detailed harmony pop, both the album and its lead single, "It's Over Now," failed to chart. After issuing a gospel-influenced non-LP single titled "Spread the Word," SSS terminated White's contract.

Even as his recording career faltered, however, White's session career was reaching critical mass -- his work on Tony Joe White's 1969 Top Ten hit "Polk Salad Annie" brought him to the attention of no less than Elvis Presley, who wanted Bergen to arrange a version of the song for him to perform in his Las Vegas show. He went on to arrange several Presley sessions in the years to follow, on occasion contributing backing vocals as a substitute Jordanaire -- White's résumé would later include country luminaries such as Dolly Parton, Ronnie Milsap, the Statler Brothers, the Oak Ridge Boys, Alabama, Garth Brooks, Faith Hill, and Tim McGraw. In the meantime, in 1975 he signed to the Private Stock label, issuing a cover of the Del Vikings classic "Come Go with Me," soon followed by the David Gates-penned "Have You Taken a Good Look Lately." White's third effort for the label, a rendition of the Gene Chandler perennial "Duke of Earl," began to accrue some commercial momentum, but touring behind the single would have forced him to turn down some studio projects -- when he balked at hitting the road, Private Stock cut its promotional funding, and for all intents and purposes his pop career was over. In 1980 White did release a gospel LP, Praise the Lord -- in 1998, he also resurfaced with a seasonal effort credited to the Bergen White Christmas Singers.

Bergen White - For Women Only (1970)
Bergen White - For Women Only (1970)

Bergen White was a member of Ronny & the Daytonas during the Nashville-based hot rod group's last days, when the band was shifting away from Beach Boys-styled hot rod and surf tunes and developing its "softer" side after finding some success with a ballad hit, "Sandy." In 1969, when the group finally did break up, White remained in the Nashville area, where he recorded his first album, For Women Only, which was released on producer and mini-mogul Shelby Singleton's SSS-International label. White wrote or co-wrote several of the tracks himself ("Now" was co-written with Bob Tubert, who wrote several hits for Eddy Arnold, Sonny James, Roy Clark, and others), but many of the highlights are his soft pop renditions of material penned by other notable composers. "She Is Today" is a faster-paced, more upbeat version of the Barry Mann & Cynthia Weil song that had previously been recorded by the Vogues, who were also on SSS at the time. White covers the Lettermen's harmony pop arrangement of Little Anthony & the Imperials' "Hurt So Bad" (a Top 20 hit from September 1969) and Townes Van Zandt's gorgeous "Second Lover's Song." There are a couple of David Gates tunes too, the sublime "Gone Again" and "Look at Me," which appeared on Bread's debut album that same year. Incidentally, during this same time, White provided vocals (along with Daytonas' group leader Buzz Cason and Bobby Russell) and string arrangements for several so-called "supermarket" knockoff records that were released by the budget sound-alike Hit Records label. One of these recordings was the Bergen White-Russell-penned Beach Boys knockoff "We Built a 409," credited to "the Roamers" (aka Ronny & the Daytonas). Singleton was listed as the producer on these records. White continues to have a thriving career as an arranger/producer in Nashville.

Bergen White - For Women Only (1970)

Bergen White - For Women Only (1970)

Thanks a lot to Cor




Bread and Beer Band - Bread and Beer Band (1969)



In early 1969, Elton John  (then known by his given name Reg Dwight)  and friends formed a band known as The Bread And Beer band :




Bernie Calvert - bass
Caleb Quaye - guitar
Reg Dwight (Elton John) - piano
Roger Pope - drums
Lennox - percussion
Rolfo - percussion


The group recorded a single and an album in Feb. 1969, which was produced by Chris Thomas at the legendary EMI Studios at Abbey Road. The single was released in the UK only, in Feb. of '69. The album was planned for June of 1969, but cancelled, and the band put out on their own label in a handmade sleeve.


" Way back in the sixties, before there was an Empty Sky or even an Elton John, pianist Reginald Dwight was enlisted by aspiring producer Tony King to join what the latter envisioned as a studio band along the lines of the great Motown sections of the past. It wasn't to be a touring, full-time outfit, but a recording group and studio back-up unit that could be revised and shifted to fit the needs of each individual project that was undertaken. King, who produced the group along with veteran Chris Thomas (Procol Harum, Jethro Tull), also enlisted Hollies bassist Bernie Calvert, a pair of Jamaican conga and cowbell men and present-day Elton John Band members Roger Pope (drums) and Caleb Quaye (guitar). The group was dubbed the Bread and Beer Band, and with good reason.

"We used to go down to the pub in the afternoon, have a few beers and go back to the studio in the evening. Then we'd turn down all the lights at Abbey Road and get all moody," recalled Tony King. "The Beatles had been using lots of colored lights while they were recording - we thought it was terribly avant-garde - so we used to steal them and use them during our sessions."

King, who now serves as general manager for Elton John's and manager John Reid's Rocket Records, describes the group's first recorded effort as a satirical 12-bar blues treatment of the theme to the "Dick Barden Show," [should be "Dick Barton Show"] the BBC's rough equivalent to our own Dick Tracy. It was released as a single. "We got some nice reviews and people said it was interesting in an adventurous sort of way." It didn't sell.
Nevertheless, Bread and Beer were sufficiently motivated to record an album, a concept sort of thing that featured reworked arrangements of popular songs of the day with a few standards tossed in. Among the songs that Reginald and company tampered with were Sam the Sham's Wooly Bully, Donovan's Mellow Yellow and even a humorous arrangement of the Zorba The Greek movie theme. Fortunately or unfortunately, it was never released."

According to King, the tapes are now the property of John Reid and only one disc, an acetate presented to Elton on his last birthday, is in existence. "When I played it for Elton on his birthday," said King, "I thought It would be God-awful. We were surprised to find that it was half-decent. I think that if it were lousy, we'd all own up to it, because it's only between us anyway. But everybody who played on it still likes it." There is no way, however, that the album will ever be released. "




Valuable studio recordings of “Beared and Bear Band”, which had been registered in 69, before Elton John debuted as a singer-songwriter! At this point in time he is still playing the cover of the hit pops of the time without thorough vocals and playing the piano, but this recording is a valuable excavated sound source that has been stored without being officially released. It is a collector’s item that has attracted attention as a 60’s rare sound source that can be said to be the origin of Elton John!




Soul Inc. - Volume 1

Soul Inc. - Volume 1
Louisville, Kentucky garage rock band active in the mid- to late-1960s whose name was coined by bassist/vocalist Jimmie Orten. Their first single, "Don't You Go", appeared in 1965.

In 1968, several members formed the short-lived splinter group Elysian Field while original guitarist Wayne Young kept the band's name onstage with a cast of new members.


Soul Inc. - Volume 1

Louisville, Kentucky garage rock band active in the mid- to late-1960s whose name was coined by bassist/vocalist Jimmie Orten. Their first single, "Don't You Go", appeared in 1965. In 1968, several members formed the short-lived splinter group Elysian Field while original guitarist Wayne Young kept the band's name onstage with a cast of new members.
”The Louisville, Kentucky band which released 7 great 45s between 1966-1969 which just ring out with great fuzz guitar, Hammond Organ, Mellotrons, and hard-driving vocals. 20 tracks including unreleased material and a great Psychedelic sampler track from their later incarnation The Elysian Field. They take a tour named ”Caravan of stars tour” with The Byrds, We Five, Paul Revere & The Raiders and Bo Diddley.”
”Soul. Inc, although displaying a magnitude of soul influences, diverged into practically every other mid-60s genre. Their name was not entirely apt! The 20 featured tracks trace the Louisville band’s musical journey from 1965 until ’69 via a number of 45s released on local labels, alternate takes and previously unreleased songs. “Stronger Than Dirt” (later covered by fellow garage bands the Daybreakers and Us Four) is a fuzz laden tune, with a soul tinged verse, a wild solo, pounding drums and a comical lyric, apparently inspired by an Ajax advert from the TV. Danceable 60s garage punk just doesn’t come any better! A few months later when the Byrds startled every young band with “Eight Miles High” Soul Inc’s reaction was to write “60 Miles High” on which they nearly managed to achieve the psychedelic zest of the Byrds. “UFO” which is so influenced by Dylan that it might as well be fellow imitators Mouse & The Traps, is another excellent example of garage band parody. The magnificent moog segment is uncannily like the whacky sounds on the Osmond’s hit “Crazy Horses”. Soul Inc an influence on the Osmonds? Maybe! Finally, the later proto-punk number “I Hate You” blends hard rock fret abuse with nihilistic singing. By the end of the decade the soul influence had completely gone.”


***

Soul Inc. ‎– Volume 2


Soul Inc. ‎– Volume 2


Gear Fab Records continues its Souls Inc. story with the release of Volume 2. Originally a singles band from Kentucky, Soul Inc. was formed in 1965 when guitarist Wayne Young and drummer Marvin Maxwell secured a place on Dick Clark's Caravan of Stars tour prior to even forming a band. The two hired some musicians and backed up the likes of Lou Christi, Reparata & the Delrons, and others. On the second Dick Clark tour, Soul Inc. opened as a stand-alone band and quickly became a favorite of many of the top acts of the day, including Paul Revere & the Raiders. Over the following months, Soul Inc. built a reputation for themselves and began recording singles. The band recorded songs for the Rondo, Star Records, Boss and Counterpart labels, and became one of the most popular acts in Kentucky. Volume 1 of the Soul Inc. story collected 20 of the band's singles recorded between 1965 and 1969. Volume 2 now continues that story with an additional 16 tracks that were not on Volume 1, and features one song from the next incarnation of the band (known as the Elysian Field, not to be confused with the dream-pop band or the black-metal band named Elysian Fields). The music ranged from Beatles-influenced pop, garage rock, and surf-styled instrumentals to Motown soul and psychedelic rock. Throughout their entire career the band was constantly experimenting and progressing as the times changed. Soul Inc. split in 1969, with three members forming the Elysian Field while Wayne Young kept the Soul Inc. moniker and continued the band for a short time with various lineups. Sadly, by the end of 1969, Soul Inc. was no more. In 1999, Young reunited with the original band members and recorded a new Soul Inc. album. The sound quality on this CD is for the most part excellent, and is taken from master tapes where possible. With the release of this second compilation of Soul Inc.'s singles, the band's musical history has finally been completely documented

Soul Inc. ‎– Volume 2

Tracks:
1.Connection
2.Nothing But a Dream
3.Midnight Hour
4.Hanging Out My Tears
5.Laryngitis
6.Don't You Go
7.Love Me When I'm Down
8.When I Stopped Dreaming
9.Alligator
10.Soul Jam
11.Hanging Out My Tears - (alternate version)
12.Stronger Than Dirt - (original 45 version)
13.Midnight Hour - (alternate version)
14.Satisfied
15.Ready, Willing and Able
16.Get Right With Your Man - (original 45 version)
17.Mother Hate - (with Elysian Fields)

 SOUL INC were one of the biggest bands in Louisville during the 60's and released 7 singles between '65-'69. They recorded much more that was recently discovered in the studio archives. Great PSYCHEDELIC music that shows the band transition from mid- to late 60's when they became 'Elysian Field'. Includes 3 tracks under the name ELYSIAN FIELD.



Thanks a lot Dave for this share...



The Jesters - Cadillac Men (The Sun Masters) - 1966

The Jesters - Cadillac Men (The Sun Masters) - 1966


It might come as a surprise that a full-length CD credited to the mid-'60s Memphis band the Jesters even exists, since their total released output while they were active was limited to just one single. Ace researcher Alec Palao has done his usual impeccable job of digging through the vaults, however, to come up with this 18-track retrospective, featuring both sides of their 1966 Sun single "Cadillac Man"/"My Babe"; four tracks that came out on a 1989 various-artists box set compilation; seven previously unreleased cuts, including an alternate version of "Cadillac Man"; a Sun recording on which the Jesters backed Jimmy Day; and four tracks by the Escapades, the band singer Tommy Minga fronted after leaving the Jesters in late 1965. Though "Cadillac Man" is interesting as a kind of mid-'50s Chuck Berry sound-alike item, the band's truer personality seems to come through in the recordings not released at the time. In those, they sound a little like a crazed '60s garage band (if that's not a redundant description) that owes far more to '50s rock & roll, rockabilly, and R&B than the usual such group -- not as if they've digested those influences primarily via British Invasion bands, but more like they've studied the original '50s performers themselves. Bo Diddley and Chuck Berry might be the most audible of those influences, but certainly you can hear some Carl Perkins (whose "Boppin' the Blues" they cover), as well as some raw frat rock and Chicago blues. To be honest, the songwriting is more OK than brilliant, and the musicianship a little unpolished even by garage band standards, but it certainly makes for an interesting deviation from the usual garage rock excavation. The Escapades' tracks are almost slick by comparison and far more in the standard garage-pop mold (complete with sullen lyrics and swirling organ), but they're hardly gratuitous inclusions, as "I Tell No Lies" is well above average for that style; in fact, it's the best song on the compilation.

The Jesters - Cadillac Men (The Sun Masters) - 1966



Jon & Robin - The Soul Of A Boy And Girl (1967 2017 USA)

Jon & Robin - The Soul Of A Boy And Girl (1967 2017 USA)


Jon & Robin - The Soul Of A Boy And Girl (1967 2017 USA)

Jon & Robin - The Soul Of A Boy And Girl (1967 2017 USA)

Jon & Robin - The Soul Of A Boy And Girl (1967 2017 USA)

Jon & Robin - real names: Jon Abdnor, Javonne Braga. Mid-1960s duo who recorded for Dallas-based Abnak Records (founded by the namesake father of Jon Abdnor). Jon Abdnor (who also doubled as a company point man) released several regional hit singles in 1963-64 but didn't really hit it big nationally until hs father suggested he get a duet partner. 
Abdnor was paired with singer Robin Beavers, but she quit before the recording sessions were to begin. She was replaced with Javonne Braga, who took on "Robin" as her stage name. The pair hit the Top 20 with "Do It Again A Little Bit Slower" in the spring of 1967. After a spate of follow-up singles that barely made the Billboard Hot 100 (but were regional best-sellers in Texas and the Southwest), the duo released solo singles before breaking up for good in 1969. Braga married Five Americans drummer Jimmy Wright in 1970 while Jon, defeated by various legal and personal issues, quit the music business.


VA - Making Time: A Shel Talmy ProductionMike Berry - Sounds of The SixtiesDavid Garrick - The Pye Anthology (2002)I Meteors - I Meteors & Beatlesmania (1964;1965)Bergen White - For Women Only (1970)Bread and Beer Band - Bread and Beer Band (1969)Soul Inc. - Volume 1Soul Inc. ‎– Volume 2The Jesters - Cadillac Men (The Sun Masters) - 1966Jon & Robin - The Soul Of A Boy And Girl (1967 2017 USA)

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