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Mosvichi (группа Москвичи) - Live in "Vremena Goda" hall (USSR)

Mosvichi (группа Москвичи) - Live in

Talking about rock 'n' roll Moscow, one cannot but recall the beat-group "Moskvichi", which was born in the house number 6 on Universitetsky Prospect, in the apartment where the Shapovalov brothers lived: Victor, Vladimir and Valery...


Members :

Mosvichi (группа Москвичи) - Live in



Viktor SHapovalov - drums
Vladimir SHapovalov - rhythm guitar
Valerij SHapovalov - solo guitar
Aleksej Cejtlin - bass guitars

Auto-translate article "VALEROCK: ТИПО МОЯ «ЖИЗНЬ В ИСКУССТВЕ».



"  It became impossible to rehearse with drums at home and we had to find a base. As a result, the club * "Krasnaya Roza" at the Moscow textile factory, which is on the street. Timur Frunze, became the base of our group, which we called "Moskvichi". Since 1965, we began to rehearse there, and for this we played free dances for the factory workers on holidays. The group consisted of us, three brothers Shapovalovs (Victor (drums), Valery (solo guitar) and Vladimir (rhythm guitar)), and Vladik played on the electric organ. After he left, we decided to play without organ at all.

Mosvichi (группа Москвичи) - Live in

* "Red Rose" club

In our group, sometimes different individual singers sang, but still we gravitated towards instrumental music ...
I recently visited the Central Park of Culture and Leisure. Gorky and stood for a little while at the two-storey building of the ** Vremena Goda cafe. Today everything looks like after the atomic bombing, but earlier, in the late 60s, this was the only place in Moscow where a beat group played every day. And this was our group “Moskvichi"

Mosvichi (группа Москвичи) - Live in

** "Seasons" hall




Mosvichi (группа Москвичи) - Live in


 

Electron - Surf 1965-1970 Russia (ex USSR)

Electron - Surf 1965-1970  Russia (ex USSR)


In 1963, the Yunost radio station introduced the audience to a young pop group - the Electron quartet. “We decided to call our ensemble that way,” wrote the lider  of “Electron” Valery Prikazchikov, “not only because it is based on power tools. Electron "to some extent expresses these aspirations of ours."  "Electron" was  be  one of the most popular pop group, successfully performing in many cities of the country with solo programs and with famous pop artists. True, its composition has changed over the years, hence the other name - "New Electron". Its artistic director is still Valery Prikazchikov (electric guitar), the rest of the participants - V. Gerkulenko (organ), V. Pankratov (drums), V. Zaikin (bass guitar). The main thing in the repertoire of the "New Electron" is pop and dance...

Electron - Surf 1965-1970  Russia (ex USSR)

Electron - Surf 1965-1970  Russia (ex USSR)

1. Vernis' 
2. Melodiya iz k/f "Bum" 
3. Solnechnye chasy 
4. Veselye turisty 
5. Chetyre orbity 
6. Vechernie teni 
7. Melodiya iz k/f "Sherburgskie zontiki" 
8. Posmotri 
9. Dom voshodyaschego solntsa 
10. Novyj tanets 
11. Kolybel'naya Svetlane 
12. Vatussi 
13. Grezy 
14. Shagi v nochi 
15. Bystree zvuka 
16. Ten' tvoey ulybki 
17. Solnechnyj zaychik 
18. Vechnoe dvizhenie 

Electron - Surf 1965-1970  Russia (ex USSR)

Dežo Ursiny ‎– Pevniny A Vrchy






Dezider Ursiny also known as Dežo Ursiny (Slovak pronunciation: [ˈdeʒo ˈuɾsini]; 4 October 1947 – 2 May 1995) was a Slovak rock musician and a television and film screenwriter and director. He is considered one of the most important personalities of Slovak rock music and one of the most talented and unique Slovak popular music composers. He belongs to a wide group of legends of Czechoslovak Big Beat.[1] Dežo Ursiny was a member of big beat bands The Beatmen, The Soulmen in the 1960s and since the mid-1970s, until his death he pursued a solo-career, composing sophisticated artistic and critically highly praised music, which varied slightly from one album to another and is sometimes hard to define, can be described as jazz rock, or more widely – progressive rock. He composed music to several films, including the popular musical "Neberte nám princeznú" and also shot several documentary movies during his lifetime.

History
Ursiny was born and raised in Bratislava. He attended electrotechnical high school where he made his first musical contacts. He started playing guitar at the age 11, and in the early 1960s he is known to play in the amateur bands Fontána and Jolana. At the end of 1964 he joined The Beatmen as a lead guitarist and singer, and the following year they gained nationwide success in Czechoslovakia. The group played Beatles-like music and wrote critically praised songs, of which 4 were released on two singles. Ursiny, being only 17, wrote their best song, "Let's Make A Summer". However, their success didn't last long and the band didn't manage to build themselves a stable position on the scene and after their breakup they soon disappeared from people's memories. In 1966 the band decided to emigrate to West Germany in search for wider success, limited by the unfriendly political regime, but Ursiny refused to leave his homeland. The band, with a replacement for him soon broke up because of disappointment from the lack of success in the west.




In 1967 Ursiny started studying film and television dramaturgy at the Musical Arts College in Bratislava and from mid-1967 to mid-1968 he was a founding member of The Soulmen, the group that was proclaimed the best at the 1st Czechoslovak Beat Festival in Prague in December 1967. They played Cream-like music and released 4 songs on an EP in the early 1968. In late 1968 he founded The New Soulmen who however disbanded soon thereafter, and didn't release any songs. After the 1968 occupation of Czechoslovakia the situation much worsened for musicians, and it was more difficult to perform and release as freely as before. The normalization removed English from the band names and song lyrics and the song themes were undergoing very strong censorship.

In 1970 he founds the band Provisorium after meeting his lifelong mate, keyboardist Jaro Filip. The band existed shortly in two line-ups, and played only two shows during their existence but managed to arrange a recording deal, before they finally broke up. Ursiny and Filip recorded an album with Czech musicians Vladimír Kulhánek (bass) and Jaroslav Erno Šedivý (drums) from the band Flamengo, whom they first met three days before recording. The album "Dežo Ursiny & Provisorium", with all lyrics in English, was released to a miracle in 1973. It consisted of four songs, with side long track "Christmas Time". Full of jazzy melodies it is now considered a classic and one of the best Slovak albums ever recorded (as would later be probably every Ursiny's album), but at the time of its release it remained practically unnoticed by the public.

In the same year Ursiny finished his studies and later started working at the Koliba film studios in Bratislava. He escaped military service by fleeing to a psychiatric hospital and in 1974 he met another his lifetime friend, poet Ivan Štrpka, who would remain his almost sole lyricist for the rest of the time. He changes his opinion that only English is the language of rock and all his later recordings will have Slovak lyrics. He considered the lyrics so important that all his albums after his first Slovak one would read "Dežo Ursiny/Ivan Štrpka" as artists on their covers. In 1975 they both start working on the musical trilogy "Gondwana – Laurasia – Pangea", which was later abandoned, and the material was reworked and used differently up to a certain level. The 18-minute-long song "Ostrov" (Island), from his first Slovak album "Pevnina detstva", is a remnant from the original material, named originally "Tristanov ostrov" (Tristan's Island). The album was recorded in late 1977 and released in 1978, and again didn't gain practically any success, partly because it was not at all promoted by the media and the publishing industry, because of various problems with censorship. However the album is also a classic now for the fans of the Czechoslovak progressive scene, and musically it is very much treasured, "Ostrov" is a jazz rock masterpiece, and Štrpka's lyrics are praised as well.

In 1979 another album, "Nové mapy ticha" was released, which introduced shorter songs and some more accessible lyrics (which was, however, even more apparent on several subsequent albums). The backing band was named Burčiak (Federweisser) and with this group Ursiny released also another album "Modrý vrch", which is considered to be his best by the most of his fans and the critics. By this time he had written music to various films, including popular television musical "Neberte nám princeznú" (Don't take the princess away from us), with its songs performed by singers Marika Gombitová, Miroslav Žbirka and Marie Rottrová. Songs from this musical are for sure most remembered by the people from all the music ever written by Ursiny.

In 1983 the album "4/4" was released with the band named Prognóza (Prognosis), and in 1984 "Bez počasia", with band again named Provisorium (the name had then remained on the rest of Ursiny's albums ~ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De%C5%BEo_Ursiny











 

Czerwono Czarni i Katarzyna Gartner - Msza beatowa, Pan przyjacielem moim (1968)

Czerwono Czarni i Katarzyna Gartner - Msza beatowa, Pan przyjacielem moim (1968)


The Polish rock scene dates from 1959, when the short-lived Rhythm and Blues band debuted.Rhythm and Blues soon disbanded, but most of its members on the same day formed the Czerwono-Czarni group.Czerwono-Czarni was founded by Franciszek Walicki on 22 June 1960 in Gdańsk, first performed on 23 July that year, and operated until 1976.They were the first band to record a rock-n-roll (at the time called "big beat" in Poland, which was more politically acceptable than the term "rock-n-roll", which was seen as subversive by the communist authorities)[9] record in Poland, in 1961, in Warsaw, in the concert hall of the National Polish Philharmonic, which at night served as a recording studio. The 1961 release was the group's first.

Original members included Zbigniew Garsen (Zbigniew Wilk), Marek Tarnowski, Mirosław Wójcik - saksofon tenorowy, Andrzej Jordan and Michaj Burano.This changed shortly afterwards, and notable artists who performed in the group included W. Bernolak (Polanie), Seweryn Krajewski (Czerwone Gitary), Zbigniew Podgajny (Niebiesko-Czarni), Zbigniew Bizoń, Przemysław Gwoździowski, Piotr Puławski (Polanie), Ryszard Poznakowski, Henryk Zomerski, Tadeusz Mróz, Ryszard Gromek, Helena Majdaniec, Katarzyna Sobczyk, Karin Stanek, Wojciech Gąssowski, Toni Keczer, Maciej Kossowski.Over 70 artists worked with the group during its 16-year history.
The group received numerous awards in the National Festival of Polish Song in Opole and Sopot Festival.[1] On 13 April 1967 they performed as an opening act for the Rolling Stones in Warsaw. Czerwono-Czarni performed at their 50th anniversary concert in 2010

Katarzyna Gärtner - Polish composer, pianist and arranger. ( February 22, 1942 in Myślenice, Poland)



Czerwono Czarni i Katarzyna Gartner - Msza beatowa, Pan przyjacielem moim (1968)

Czerwono Czarni i Katarzyna Gartner - Msza beatowa, Pan przyjacielem moim (1968)

Czerwono Czarni i Katarzyna Gartner - Msza beatowa, Pan przyjacielem moim (1968)

Czerwono Czarni i Katarzyna Gartner - Msza beatowa, Pan przyjacielem moim (1968)

Czerwono Czarni i Katarzyna Gartner - Msza beatowa, Pan przyjacielem moim (1968)

VA - Warszawski Rock and Roll lat 60

Mosvichi (группа Москвичи) - Live in "Vremena Goda" hall (USSR)Electron - Surf 1965-1970  Russia (ex USSR)Dežo Ursiny ‎– Pevniny A VrchyDežo Ursiny ‎– Pevniny A Vrchy 2 (Rarity)Czerwono Czarni i Katarzyna Gartner - Msza beatowa, Pan przyjacielem moim (1968) VA - Warszawski Rock and Roll lat 60

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