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Jerry Cole - A Go Go Guitars (60s) (2008)

Jerry Cole - A Go Go Guitars (60s) (2008)


Jerry Cole - A Go Go Guitars (60s) (2008)

01 - Jerry Cole - Curfew
02 - Jerry Cole - Teenage Fair
03 - Jerry Cole - Ventures Venture
04 - Jerry Cole - 12 A Go Go
05 - Jerry Cole - Hip Hugger
06 - Jerry Cole - Really Got It Bad
07 - Jerry Cole - The Tower Of London
08 - Jerry Cole - Boss Hair
09 - Jerry Cole - George Played
10 - Jerry Cole - Sloppin'

Lora said:

The Marsadees - The Marsadees (1967 1997 USA)

The Marsadees - The Marsadees (1967 1997 USA)



The Marsadees - The Marsadees (1967 1997 USA)

The Marsadees - The Marsadees (1967 1997 USA)

The Marsadees were one of the most popular and versatile bands to emerge from South Carolina in the late '60s. This collection is a compilation of the Marsadees' favorites from the Justice Records Label.

The Marsadees: Dennis Steele, Bobby Areheart, Larkin Corley (guitar); 
Stack Harmon (bass); Larry Ingram (drums).

The band pushes hard on these studio renditions of numbers (especially Dennis Steele's lead playing on "Pipeline") that they obviously played as part of their stage sets. Their vocals are fairly non-descript, and instrumentally, apart from Stack Harmon's animated and melodic bass playing, and Larry Ingram's drumming (which, alas, is muted on these source tapes), there's not a lot to distinguish them from hundreds of other bands from this period - except for a savage, frantic and tense version of "Wipeout," which must've been their big finish on-stage. An interesting document of its time and place, but not essential. ~ Bruce Eder


The Crickets - Well... All Right (The Crickets Collection) 1992-3

The Crickets -  Well... All Right (The Crickets Collection) 1992-3


The Crickets were a group with two careers, one that lasted less than a year-and-a-half, and another that continued for decades. Originally formed by singer and guitarist Buddy Holly, drummer Jerry Allison, and bassist Joe B. Mauldin, the Crickets went from being Holly's backing musicians to a self-contained band when they re-recorded a song that Holly had already cut under his own name to avoid violating an earlier contract. The Crickets went on to a successful run of hits with Holly -- including "Maybe Baby," "Not Fade Away," and "That'll Be the Day" -- until his death in 1959. After that, the Crickets, joined by guitarist Sonny Curtis, went on to a long run recording on their own as well as backing other artists, most notably Bobby Vee and the Everly Brothers. Their first post-Holly album, In Style with the Crickets, included the original version of Curtis' song "I Fought the Law," but by the mid-'70s, they had walked away from recording and primarily performed live, especially after the 1978 film The Buddy Holly Story revived interest in their former frontman. The Crickets came back in 1988 with T Shirt, which was produced in part by longtime fan Paul McCartney, and 2004's The Crickets & Their Buddies found them covering their classics with help from Eric Clapton, Waylon Jennings, John Prine, Graham Nash, and many more.
The "Crickets" started out as a ruse. In 1956, Buddy Holly signed a contract with Decca Records, but after two sessions in Nashville, no one was happy with the results, and Holly and Decca parted ways. After finding a more sympathetic producer in Norman Petty, Holly, Jerry Allison, and Joe B. Mauldin decamped to Petty's studio in Clovis, New Mexico, and, among other things, cut a new version of one of Holly's Decca efforts, "That'll Be the Day." Coral Records was interested in Holly's Clovis recordings, but the terms of the Decca contract meant he couldn't re-record "That'll Be the Day" under his own name, so the new version was credited to the Crickets. The Crickets' "That'll Be the Day" became a Number One hit in 1957, and for the next 15 months, there were records by the Crickets and records by Buddy Holly -- which were virtually interchangeable -- and on-stage they were billed as Buddy Holly & the Crickets. By the end of 1958, however, the references to "Buddy Holly & the Crickets" were becoming valid in the worst possible way. Holly's shifting and expanding musical interests, coupled with his move to New York and marriage to Maria Elena Santiago, and the differing relationships that the three had with Petty, who was now their manager, led to a split between Holly and his bandmates in the months immediately prior to Holly's death in a plane crash on February 3, 1959.

The result of their split was a separate existence for the Crickets. Jerry Allison became the de facto leader of the group, and they were soon a quartet, with Sonny Curtis on guitar and Earl Sinks as lead singer. In 1959, still managed and produced by Norman Petty, they recorded "Love's Made a Fool of You" backed with "Someone, Someone," which failed to chart. Their next serious assault on the charts -- a version of Curtis' "I Fought the Law" cut for Coral Records -- vanished without a trace in 1959, and their rendition of "More Than I Can Say" also failed to find an audience for them, though it did wonders for Bobby Vee (and, by extension, for Curtis as its composer). They recorded a handful of singles for Coral Records, and later signed to Liberty Records with Jerry Naylor in the lead singer spot (sometimes switching off with Curtis), in addition to recording with Buddy Holly soundalike Bobby Vee.

The group recorded for Liberty for four years, from 1961 through 1965, even doing their versions of several Beatles songs, but apart from a pair of minor hits, "My Little Girl" and "Please Don't Ever Change," were unable to generate any enthusiasm. One of Naylor's successors, David Box, died in a plane crash in 1964. They did find some lingering success in England, where they headlined shows as well as serving as a backing band for the Everly Brothers, and the group even managed to appear in two jukebox movies on either side of the Atlantic, Just for Fun (1963) in England (doing "My Little Girl" and "Teardrops Feel Like Rain") and The Girls on the Beach (1965) in America (doing "La Bamba"). By the end of the '60s, Mauldin had left music while Allison was singing lead; he and Curtis were also working as session musicians, and Curtis scored a huge success at the dawn of the '70s as the composer of "Love Is All Around," the theme song for The Mary Tyler Moore Show.

Too Much Monday MorningAllison and Curtis were the core of the group in the early '70s, mostly working as a touring act rather than a recording outfit, though new records did appear on various labels, including Mercury and MCA. In the wake of the revival of interest in Holly's music at the end of the '70s, thanks in part to the 1978 movie The Buddy Holly Story, the Crickets re-formed on a steady basis, with Joe B. Mauldin returning to the lineup after more than a decade out of music. In 1986, Curtis left the fold to re-establish himself as a solo performer, and was replaced by Gordon Payne on vocals. In 1988, they recorded the single "T-Shirt," produced by noted fan Paul McCartney, which became a minor hit and led to the release of an LP of the same name from Epic Records. The British label Carlton Records issued Too Much Monday Morning in 1996, which included guest vocals from Texas country-folk artist Nanci Griffith. In 2004, the Crickets released The Crickets & their Buddies, in which they re-recorded a number of their Holly-era hits with notable guest stars, among them Eric Clapton, John Prine, Rodney Crowell, Graham Nash, Bobby Vee, and Waylon Jennings (whose contribution was recorded shortly before his death). After the death of Joe B. Mauldin in 2015 and the advancing age of the other Crickets, the band faded away from both recording and live work, but a steady flow of archival reissues and the group's induction into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 2012 kept their music and memory alive. In 2018, the British Not Now label issued The Crickets Story, which collected the group's complete recordings from 1957 to 1962

The Crickets -  Well... All Right (The Crickets Collection) 1992-3



Bobby Vee & The Crickets - Bobby Vee Meets The Crickets (1962)

Bobby Vee & The Crickets - Bobby Vee Meets The Crickets (1962)


Launching his career as a fill-in for the recently deceased Buddy Holly, Bobby Vee scored several pop hits during the early '60s, that notorious period of popular music sandwiched between the birth of rock & roll and the rise of the British Invasion. Though a few of his singles -- "Rubber Ball," for one -- were as innocuous as anything else from the era, Vee had a knack for infectious Brill Building pop, thanks to his ebullient voice as well as the cadre of songwriters standing behind him.

Born in Fargo, North Dakota in 1943, Robert Thomas Velline was still in his teens when he formed his first combo, the Shadows, with his brother Bill and their friend Bob Korum. The trio were playing around the area when their big break came, at the expense of one of Bobby's musical idols; the Winter Dance Party package tour, with Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens, and the Big Bopper were on their way to Fargo when their plane went down in Iowa, killing all three. The Shadows were scheduled to play the date instead of Holly, and several months later, producer Tommy "Snuff" Garrett supervised their first recording session and the release of the single "Suzie Baby" on Soma Records. Liberty/RCA picked up the single later in the year, and though it just barely scraped the pop charts, the label kept plugging with Vee as a solo act, recording him on Adam Faith's "What Do You Want?," which also failed to move.

With the collective might of the Brill Building behind him, though, Vee was guaranteed to make it; his third single, "Devil or Angel," hit the Top Ten in mid-1960, followed by "Rubber Ball" later that year. One year later, Vee's biggest hit, "Take Good Care of My Baby," spent three weeks at number one, followed by the number two "Run to Him." His fame appeared to wane after the 1962 Top Ten single "The Night Has a Thousand Eyes," due in large part to the success of the Beatles and other English acts. Vee appeared in several movies (Just for Fun, Play It Cool) and briefly tried to cash in on the British phenomenon -- with the disappointing Bobby Vee Sings the New Sound from England! -- but also recorded songs by his early influences, including Buddy Holly and the Crickets. Vee continued to chart throughout the '60s, and even hit the Top Ten again in 1967 with "Come Back When You Grow Up," but after a brief attempt at more serious recordings, he hit the rock & roll oldies circuit. He died in 2016 at the age of 73.



Bobby Vee Meets The Crickets is a cross-over rock and roll album that brings singer Bobby Vee together with the Crickets. It was Vee's 6th album and The Crickets' second release following the departure and subsequent death of their front man, Buddy Holly. The album contains new versions of three songs written by or recorded by Holly—Peggy Sue, Bo Diddley, and Well...All Right—and a host of cover versions of 1950s rock'n'roll songs by artists like Little Richard and Chuck Berry. Originally released as an LP record on July 14, 1962, the album was re-released on CD in 1991, with bonus tracks not featured on the original album.


Bobby Vee & The Crickets - Bobby Vee Meets The Crickets (1991)

Bobby Vee & The Crickets - Bobby Vee Meets The Crickets (1962)

The reissue of this enjoyable album includes ten bonus tracks, including alternate takes, unreleased songs


Like Weird ! (1961 - 1964 singles) - The Centuries (aka Tommy Falcone & The Centuries)

Like Weird ! (1961 - 1964 singles) - The Centuries (aka Tommy Falcone & The Centuries)

The Centuries [N.Y.C.]  »  aka Tommy Falcone & The Centuries & aka The Shoestring   


"The common link is Tommy Falcone (producer, composer and guitar player).
The Tommy Falcone & The Centuries single will, based on the cat#, be circa 1960.
The group name was then shortened to The Centuries.
Some years later The Centuries single "Jack 23" (released on Cleopatra Records) was reissued on 20th Century Fox as by The Shoestring and renamed "Shoop-De-Hoop-Twine" (publishing credit on 20th Century Fox re-issue to Cleopatra Pub Co)."


"From a basement in New Jersey, Tommy Falcone remade  himself into a "Phil Spector"... From 1962 to 1970, he founded and ran Cleopatra Records, discovered and mentored young Garden State talent, wrote songs and produced wild studio effects, and quit his day job to promote it all himself. Trained as an accordionist, Falcone had a whirlwind imagination and an omnivorous approach to genre, expressed through acts like the Centuries, the Tabbys, Johnny Silvio, the Inmates, Bernadette Carroll, the Hallmarks, Vickie & the Van Dykes, the Shandillons, Eugene Viscione, the Shoestring, and more. Cleopatra became a time-capsule of every 1960s pop style imaginable—garage rock, psychedelia, surf, girl groups, soul, novelties, exotica, even a crooner—a kaleidoscope of sound in search of the ever-elusive hit record"


"Tommy Falcone was active in New York City throughout the sixties, foremost as a music arranger and producer. Well, active is maybe an overstatement since only a handful of recordings surfaced. On the other hand, some of those, like Like Weird, are unearthly remarkable. Like Weird did not stir much commercial commotion when it was released in the summer of 1961 and it did not get much help from Billboard either that listed it as with “moderate sales potential”.

Other projects that occupied Tommy Falcone included diverse and experimental recordings as The Shoestring’s Candy Andy (bubblegum pop about a child molester), The Cracker Rapper’s first recording (doo wop), Polynesian Paradise as The Centuries (check out the B-side instrumental, Outer Limits), New Jersey garage band The Inmates and the spaced out single Heavenly with Bernadette Carroll.

For some reason, but not very surprising, Tommy Falcone’s musical career did not take off. He seems to have made a part of his living as a teacher at Red Bank School of Music. Just before he died by a heart attack back stage aged only 40 years (circa 1968), he was reported to stack records at a record store. An occupation as good as anyone."



The Centuries

Like Weird ! (1961 - 1964 singles) - The Centuries (aka Tommy Falcone & The Centuries)

The most resonant room in the Newark Public Library in 1958 was the locker room where Gary Swangin practiced his singing. Swangin, a high school student who worked part time at the checkout desk, would often sneak away during breaks to hone his technique and work on an original song, “The Promise of Love”—until he got caught. 

When coworker Salvatore Girgenti heard it echoing off the tile and steel, he was so taken that he suggested they play together. With Girgenti on rhythm guitar, they recruited the D’Amato brothers, Charles, who played drums standing up, and Peter on lead guitar. 

D’Amato’s neighbor Francis Corragio brought virtuosity to their nascent band, at first playing an amplified upright bass. Corragio had started playing at eleven years old, and by the time of the Centuries he was taking lessons from members of the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra and New York Philharmonic. 

The library would prove crucial in another way. Swangin checked people’s books and bags as they exited the building, bringing him into contact with a wide range of folks—including Cleopatra Records’ Tommy Falcone. 

By 1960, Swangin’s education at Rutgers University was taking priority and his musical ambitions were expanding.He went on to Columbia University and performed in the Greenwich Village folk scene with a far-ahead-of-its-time fusion of modern lyricism with African rhythms. 

With Swangin gone, the band took a sharp turn into new waters rough with surf—losing lyrics but compensating with invention and melody. The Centuries transformed into an instrumental rock group inspired by the space race and Polynesia, becoming Falcone’s very own version of the Ventures with whom to explore the then-burgeoning sounds of surf rock and exotica. 


The Centuries has been played on NTS in shows including The Numero Group, featured first on 26 July 2018. Songs played include Like Weird and Beach Umbrella World. 


Founded in 2003 as an archival record label by Tom Lunt, Rob Sevier, and Ken Shipley, Numero has evolved into a multi-format media company, devoted to dragging brilliant recordings, films, and photography out of unwarranted obscurity. 


"We’re on a dirty, labor-intensive mission... and it’s urgent as all hell. Time kills off precious bits of passed-over sound, story, and ephemera every day, just as fast as we can haul this sprawling archive of under-heard recordings—along with the musicians, writers, and entrepreneurs who created them—out of exile."

Like Weird ! - 1961 - 1964 singles

Like Weird ! (1961 - 1964 singles) - The Centuries (aka Tommy Falcone & The Centuries)





( Whacky) Surf Songs A Go Go! 60's (2 CD Set)


( Whacky) Surf Songs A Go Go! 60's (2 CD Set)



( Whacky) Surf Songs A Go Go! 60's (2 CD Set)

Tracklist

CD 1

01/ Flintstones & Beach Boys-Surfin' USA (aka Surfin Craze) - US, CA
02/ Baylanders - Surfer's Rule - US, CA
03/ Buddies - Wanda On Her Honda - US, CA
04/ Chris Montez & Kathy Young - Shoot That Curl - US, CA
05/ Country Boys - The Okie Surfer - US, CA
06/ Devons - Honda Bike - US, CA
07/ Dovells - Dragster On The Prowl - US, PA
08/ Fabulous Quiet Five - Red Hot Scrambler Go - UK
09/ Frank Sinatra Jr. - Dance Baby Dance - US, NJ
10/ Gary Lewis & Playboys - Malibu Run - US, CA
11/ Gremlins - California Sounds - US, VA
12/ Hesitations - Surfin' School - US, MI
13/ Hot Rodders - Spirit Of America - US, ?
14/ Impacts - Lindae - US, IN
15/ Jay Epae - Surfin in Waikiki - NZ
16/ King Family - Be true to your school - US, ?
17/ Majority - Shut 'em down in London town - UK
18/ Rachel & Revolvers - The Revo-Lution - US, CA
19/ Revells - School is a Gas - US, CA
20/ Squiddly Diddly's - Squiddly  - US, CA
21/ Squiddly Diddly's – Surfin’ Song - US, CA
22/ Surfaris - Go go go for Louie's - US, CA
23/ Vettes - Happy Hodaddy - US, CA
24/ Viscounts V - Cherry Red Vette - US, MN
25/ Zip - Codes - Run Little Mustang - US, CA

( Whacky) Surf Songs A Go Go! 60's (2 CD Set)

( Whacky) Surf Songs A Go Go! 60's (2 CD Set)

CD 2

Tracklist

01/ Mr. Gasser & Weirdos - You Ain't Nothing But a Honda - US, CA
02/ Beach Boys - [We'll keep riding] (acetate) - US, CA
03/ Buddies - Mean Little Monza - US, CA
04/ Conventionals - No, No, No, They Gotta Go - US, ?
05/ Danny Coughlan - Beach Boy - CAN
06/ Digger Revell & Denvermen - My Little Rockers Turned Surfie - OZ
07/ Embers - I'm Goin' Surfin' - US, TX
08/ Flintstones - Wayouts - US, CA
09/ Frankie & Teentones - Told You Little Baby - US, MI
10/ Gary Usher & Usherettes - Three Surfer Boys - US, CA
11/ H.H., Los - Surfside Six - MX
12/ Hesitations - Wild Little Willie - US, MK
13/ Hurrican Serenaders - Surf City - D
14/ J. Frank Wilson - Black Car X - US, TX
15/ Jimmy Hannan - Beach Ball - OZ
16/ Larry Bright - Surfin' Queen - US, CA
17/ Pierre & Slopers - Let's go skiing - US, ?
18/ Rally Packs - Move Out, Little Mustang - US, CA
19/ Rivieras - Let's go to Hawai - US, IN
20/ Squiddly Diddly's  - Jetsons - US, CA
21/ Squiddly Diddly's  - Space Crazy - US, CA
22/ Tino & Revlons - Little G.T.O - US, MI / NY
23/ Vettes - 484 Drag Car (Little Ford Ragtop) - US, CA
24/ Zip - Codes - Fancy Filly From Detroit City - US, CA
25/ Brian Lord & Midnighters - The Big Surfer - US, CA

Enjoy

Another Great Compilation By Original Sharer

"I hope for nothing, I fear nothing, I am free"

The Original Surfaris - Bombora

The Original Surfaris - Bombora


Originally slated to be released in 1963, this album was withdrawn due to litigation over the use of The Surfaris name, and retrieved from the vaults in the mid-'90s. A fair but unexceptional instrumental surf collection; the best cuts (most notably the title track) have appeared on compilations.


Those of us who've hanged 10 in our dreams know "Wipeout" by the Surfaris. These, however, are the Original Surfaris, some kids from the Fullerton area of Orange County who arrived at their name not via the Beach Boys' "Surfin' Safari," but via the Safaris' doo-wop hit "Image of a Girl." Such romantic notions can't deter drummer Mike Biondi from unleashing a maniacal drum solo that squeezes as many rim shots into 12 bars as the other Surfaris' Ron Wilson unloads in an entire chorus. Wild and woolly though the Original Surfaris may be (Larry Weed's ripping leads are precise and deadly) they also know their way around a ballad; "Surf Angel" is as wonderfully mushy as anything by Rosie & the Originals. --Jud Cost

Quite possibly the greatest surf album you've never heard, this 1963 session was only the stuff of legend until purloined by Sundazed. Screaming guitars, screaming sax, & screaming groupies vie for the stereo microphones in this Tony Hilder production that'll become the prize of your surf collection should you buy it, which you most certainly should, indeed. We ain't lyin'. Sundazed. 1995.


BOMBORA! was recorded and scheduled for release in 1963, but was unissued due to legal problems. This is the album's first release. Quite possibly the greatest surf album you've never heard, this 1963 session was only the stuff of legend until purloined by Sundazed. Screaming guitars, screaming sax, & screaming groupies vie for the stereo microphones in this Tony Hilder production that'll become the prize of your surf collection should you buy it, which you most certainly should, indeed. We ain't lyin'. Sundazed. 1995. Includes liner notes by Robert J. Dalley. This is part of Sundazed records' Yesterdazed Series. Personnel: Larry Weed (guitar); Doug Weisman (saxophone); Al Valdez (piano); Mike Biondi (drums). Liner Note Author: Robert J. Dalley. The Original Surfaris: Larry Weed, Chuck Vehle (guitar), Doug Wiseman (saxophone), Al Valdez (piano), Jim Tran (bass), Mike Biondi (drums). Compilation producer: Bob Irwin. Dirty Linen (4-5/96, p.55) - "...a great `lost' album that ended up being shelved in a vault in 1963. You'll hear `driving, twin-guitar, tuff-sax wallop' as you cruise through the ultimate surf soundtracks..."

The Original Surfaris - Bombora


Dickie Loader & The Blue Jeans - My Babe/Exclusviely Yours 1963Jerry Cole - A Go Go Guitars (60s) (2008)The Marsadees - The Marsadees (1967 1997 USA)The Crickets -  Well... All Right (The Crickets Collection) 1992-3Bobby Vee & The Crickets - Bobby Vee Meets The Crickets (1962)Like Weird ! (1961 - 1964 singles) - The Centuries (aka Tommy Falcone & The Centuries)VA - Waikiki Surf Battle (Live)( Whacky) Surf Songs A Go Go! 60's (2 CD Set)VA - Surf's Comin' The Original Surfaris - Bombora

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