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The Animals (French EP Box Collection) 1964-67 + Bonus + Flac + MP3


The Animals (French EP  Box Collection) 1964-67 + Bonus + Flac + MP3



The Animals (French EP  Box Collection) 1964-67 + Bonus + Flac + MP3


his may seem like a strange way to listen to a group's legacy, 42 songs on 11 CD platters in a box. It is a bit pricey, as well, but going up four songs at a time with the Animals sort of makes sense, at least as far as distilling down their most successful and interesting work. The group never quite got the hang of making successful albums; that doesn't mean that they didn't do some very good ones, including their two for EMI, but their 12" platter sales never remotely matched the popularity of their nine hit singles from 1964 through 1966. Their EPs were a different matter -- while the group strained in the studio to assemble 40 minutes of attractive listening, their songs made great four-track platters. In England, they issued five extended-play singles, while in France the group saw twice that many issued in their name, both by EMI Records and the Barclay label. The 11 discs in this box (counting the bonus CD single of "San Franciscan Nights" b/w "Good Times") make up their French EP output across three years, each song remastered in state-of-the-art, 24-bit digital audio and sounding most impressive. Starting with The Animals, containing "House of the Rising Sun," "Talkin' About You" (the official "short" edit), "Gonna Send You Back to Walker," and "Baby Let Me Take You Home," there's a good cross-section of the best work out of just about every group of recording sessions the band ever had -- they never knew how to program an album for mass appeal (especially as they couldn't include any singles on them). The EMI sides are a match in fidelity to the sound on the 24-bit Japanese remasters of the two EMI albums, but the box continues on up past that point to their brief stay with England's Decca Records and Burdon's closing out of the Animals name and eventual formation of Eric Burdon & the Animals. All of the EMI material, and even a major chunk of the Decca-recorded sides (now owned by B&C Recordings), was upgraded elsewhere by 2003, but not the MCA-owned sides such as "Hey Gyp," "When I Was Young," the mastering of which here makes the quality on Polygram's Best of Eric Burdon & the Animals, 1966-1968 sound like it's mastered off of 45s. There is one genuine obscurity, "Ain't That So," from their early psychedelic period. The artwork on the individual sleeves is also more interesting than the images on the jackets of either of their EMI LPs, at least until 1966, when the group's lineup became very fluid and Burdon became the focus of the graphics -- and one also gets a good picture of the 1967-vintage group on the bonus disc sleeve.

Tracklist

1er EP
1-1 The House Of The Rising Sun
1-2 Talkin' About You (French EP Version)
1-3 Gonna Send You Back To Walker
1-4 Baby, Let Me Take You Home
2ème EP
2-1 I'm Crying
2-2 Take It Easy
2-3 She Said Yeah
2-4 I'm In Love Again
3ème EP
3-1 Boom Boom
3-2 Club-A-Gogo
3-3 Dont Let Me Be Misunderstood
3-4 Roadrunner
4ème EP
4-1 Bring It On Home To Me
4-2 Hallelujah! I Love Her So
4-3 For Miss Caulker
4-4 Mess Around
5ème EP
5-1 We've Gotta Out Of This Place
5-2 I Cant Believe It
5-3 I Aint Got You
5-4 How Youve Changed
6ème EP
6-1 It's My Life
6-2 Believe To My Soul
6-3 I'm Going To Change The World
6-4 Let The Good Times Roll
7ème EP
7-1 Inside Looking Out
7-2 That's All I Am To You
7-3 She'll Return It
7-4 Outcast
8ème EP
8-1 Don't Bring Me Down
8-2 Cheating
8-3 What Am I Living For
8-4 I Put A Spell On You
9ème EP
9-1 See See Rider
9-2 Mama Told Me Not To Come
9-3 Help Me Girl
9-4 That Ain't Where It's At
10ème EP
10-1 Hey Gyp
10-2 In The Night
10-3 When I Was Young
10-4 Ain't That So
Bonus CD Single
11-1 San Franciscan Nights
11-2 Good Times

Enjoy

Ty To Original Sharer

"I hope for nothing, I fear nothing, I am free"

Big File (1 Gig)

The Animals -- The Mickie Most Years And More

The Animals -- The Mickie Most Years And More

Of all the British acts that started messing with the blues in the early '60s, the Animals always sounded the toughest and most committed to the cause. They didn't have a genius guitarist like the Yardbirds or the Bluesbreakers, and couldn't write memorable original material like the Rolling Stones, but Eric Burdon was one of the few singers in the U.K. whose guts and ferocity approached that of his influences (without sounding like he was simply copying what he'd heard), and the tough, no-nonsense attack of guitarist Hilton Valentine, bassist Chas Chandler, and drummer John Steel drove the Animals with style and power, while keyboard man Alan Price gave the band plenty of welcome melodic flair. The Animals were also one of the few bands on the scene that failed to overstay their welcome, with the original lineup breaking up by the end of 1966 (Burdon would assemble a "New Animals" in 1967, but that band ran its course by the end of the decade), and the bulk of their recorded output is collected on The Mickie Most Years and More, remarkably the first American box set devoted to the group's legacy. The set contains remastered versions of the Animals' first four American albums -- The Animals, The Animals on Tour, Animal Tracks, and Animalization -- all in original mono and including bonus tracks, while also including the group's very first release, a primitive but spirited four-track EP cut in a makeshift studio in 1963. In some ways, this package is fundamentally flawed -- the British and American versions of the Animals' LPs were very different, and a compilation containing all tracks would more accurately reflect their body of work instead of a repackaging of the U.S. albums, while the first two albums aren't even presented in their original form, with The Animals losing the admittedly less-than-stellar "Blue Feeling" and The Animals on Tour getting a new sequence and two extra tunes. However, what's here is excellent: the remastering by Adam Ayan is brilliant, preserving the full detail and power of the original tapes, and these four albums capture the Animals in peak form. David Fricke's liner notes reveal that producer Mickie Most captured most of these tunes on first take, and the first three albums are powerful, straight-ahead blues and R&B direct from the rugged side of Newcastle. Animalization was produced by Tom Wilson and boasts a richer and more ambitious sound, while Burdon began putting new focus on songwriting and new keyboard man Dave Rowberry took a more organic approach than Alan Price. It all sounds pretty great here, both in terms of music and audio, and if this isn't the final and definitive look at the Animals' run in the 1960s (especially since it doesn't include the superb 1966 album Animalism, the original band's final stand), it honors a great, underappreciated group and is must listening for anyone interested in British blues and rock.

The Animals -- The Mickie Most Years And More


Eric Burdon & The Animals ‎– See See Rider (1966)

Eric Burdon & The Animals ‎– See See Rider (1966)

One of the most important bands originating from England's R&B scene during the early '60s, the Animals were second only to the Rolling Stones in influence among R&B-based bands in the first wave of the British Invasion. The Animals had their origins in a Newcastle-based group called the Kansas City Five, whose membership included pianist Alan Price, drummer John Steel, and vocalist Eric Burdon. Price exited to join the Kontours in 1962, while Burdon went off to London. The Kontours, whose membership included Bryan "Chas" Chandler, eventually were transmuted into the Alan Price R&B Combo, with John Steel joining on drums. Burdon's return to Newcastle in early 1963 heralded his return to the lineup. The final member of the combo, guitarist Hilton Valentine, joined just in time for the recording of a self-produced EP under the band's new name, the Animals.

Eric Burdon & The Animals ‎– See See Rider (1966)


Animals (We.ve Gotta Get out of this Place) EP (1965) FR

Animals (We.ve Gotta Get out of this Place) EP (1965) FR



Animals (We.ve Gotta Get out of this Place) EP (1965) FR


The Animals ‎– We've Gotta Get Out Of This Place
Label:
Columbia ‎– ESRF 1692 Ⓜ
Series:
Présence Mondiale –
Format:
Vinyl, 7", 45 RPM, EP (Mp3) 
Country:
France
Released:
1965
Genre:
Rock
Style:
Rock & Roll, Pop Rock.

{Bonus} The Crying Shames (We Gotta get out of this place) Live Stereo.

Enjoy.



Eric Burdon & The Animals

Eric Burdon & The Animals

The Animals 

Eric Burdon & The Animals


One of the most important bands originating from England's R&B scene during the early '60s, the Animals were second only to the Rolling Stones in influence among R&B-based bands in the first wave of the British Invasion. The Animals had their origins in a Newcastle-based group called the Kansas City Five, whose membership included pianist Alan Price, drummer John Steel, and vocalist Eric Burdon. Price exited to join the Kontours in 1962, while Burdon went off to London. The Kontours, whose membership included Bryan "Chas" Chandler, eventually were transmuted into the Alan Price R&B Combo, with John Steel joining on drums. Burdon's return to Newcastle in early 1963 heralded his return to the lineup. The final member of the combo, guitarist Hilton Valentine, joined just in time for the recording of a self-produced EP under the band's new name, the Animals. That record alerted Graham Bond to the Animals; he was likely responsible for pointing impresario Giorgio Gomelsky to the group.

The Animals [Compilation]Gomelsky booked the band into his Crawdaddy Club in London, and they were subsequently signed by Mickie Most, an independent producer who secured a contract with EMI's Columbia imprint. A studio session in February 1964 yielded their Columbia debut single, "Baby Let Me Take You Home" (adapted from "Baby Let Me Follow You Down"), which rose to number 21 on the British charts. For years, it was rumored incorrectly that the Animals got their next single, "House of the Rising Sun," from Bob Dylan's first album, but it has been revealed that, like "Baby Let Me Take You Home," the song came to them courtesy of Josh White. In any event, the song -- given a new guitar riff by Valentine and a soulful organ accompaniment devised by Price -- shot to the top of the U.K. and U.S. charts early that summer. This success led to a follow-up session that summer, yielding their first long-playing record, The Animals. Their third single, "I'm Crying," rose to number eight on the British charts. The group compiled an enviable record of Top Ten successes, including "Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood" and "We've Gotta Get Out of This Place," along with a second album, Animal Tracks.
In May of 1965, immediately after recording "We've Gotta Get Out of This Place," Alan Price left the band, citing fear of flying as the reason; subsequent biographies of the band have indicated that the reasons were less psychological. When "House of the Rising Sun" was recorded, using what was essentially a group arrangement, the management persuaded the band to put one person's name down as arranger. Price came up the lucky one, supposedly with the intention that the money from the arranger credit would be divided later on. The money was never divided, however, and as soon as it began rolling in, Price suddenly developed his fear of flying and exited the band. Others cite the increasing contentiousness between Burdon and Price over leadership of the group as the latter's reason for leaving. In any case, a replacement was recruited in the person of Dave Rowberry.

Animalisms In the meantime, the group was growing increasingly unhappy with the material they were being given to record by manager Mickie Most. Not only were the majority of these songs much too commercial for their taste, but they represented a false image of the band, even if many were successful. "It's My Life," a number seven British hit and a similar smash in America, caused the Animals to terminate their association with Most and with EMI Records. They moved over to Decca/London Records and came up with a more forceful, powerful sound on their first album for the new label, Animalisms. The lineup shifts continued, however: Steel exited in 1966, after recording Animalisms, and was replaced by Barry Jenkins, formerly of the Nashville Teens. Chandler left in mid-1966 after recording "Don't Bring Me Down," and Valentine remained until the end of 1966, but essentially "Don't Bring Me Down" marked the end of the original Animals.
Eric Is HereBurdon re-formed the group under the aegis of Eric Burdon and the New Animals, with Jenkins on drums, John Weider on guitar and violin, Danny McCulloch on bass, and Vic Briggs on guitar. He remained officially a solo act for a time, releasing a collection of material called Eric Is Here in 1967. As soon as the contract with English Decca was up, Burdon signed with MGM directly for worldwide distribution, and the new lineup made their debut in mid-1967. Eric Burdon and the New Animals embraced psychedelica to the hilt amid the full bloom of the Summer of Love. By the end of 1968, Briggs and McCulloch had departed, to be replaced by Burdon's old friend, keyboard player/vocalist Zoot Money, and his longtime stablemate, guitarist Andy Summers, while Weider switched to bass. Finally, in 1969, Burdon pulled the plug on what was left of the Animals. He hooked up with a Los Angeles-based group called War, and started a subsequent solo career.
Before We Were So Rudely Interrupted The original Animals reunited in 1976 for a superb album called Before We Were So Rudely Interrupted, which picked up right where Animalisms had left off a decade earlier and which was well-received critically but failed to capture the public's attention. In 1983, a somewhat longer-lasting reunion came about between the original members, augmented with the presence of Zoot Money on keyboards. The resulting album, Ark, consisting of entirely new material, was well received by critics and charted surprisingly high, and a world tour followed. By the end of the year and the heavy touring schedule, however, it was clear that this reunion was not going to be a lasting event. The quintet split up again, having finally let the other shoe drop on their careers and history, and walked away with some financial rewards, along with memories of two generations of rock fans cheering their every note.



Eric Burdon & The Animals

As the lead singer of the Animals, Eric Burdon was one of the British Invasion's most distinctive vocalists, with a searingly powerful blues-rock voice. When the first lineup of the group fell apart in 1966, Burdon kept the Animals' name going with various players for a few years. Usually billed as Eric Burdon & the Animals, the group was essentially Burdon's vehicle, which he used to purvey a far more psychedelic and less R&B-oriented vision. Occasionally he came up with a good second-division psychedelic hit, like "Sky Pilot"; more often, the music was indulgent, dating it almost immediately. Burdon's real triumphs as a solo artist came at the beginning of the '70s, when he hooked up with a bunch of L.A. journeyman soul/funksters who became his backing band, War. Recording three albums' worth of material in the year or two that they were together, the Burdon/War records could ramble on interminably, and would have benefited from a lot of editing. But they contained some spacy funkadelia of real quality, especially their number three hit single "Spill the Wine," which was almost recorded as an afterthought in the midst of sessions dominated by exploratory jams. Eric Burdon & War were already big stars on record and stage when Burdon, for reasons unclear to almost everyone, quit the band in 1971. War defied expectations and became even bigger when left to their own devices; Burdon, after recording an album with veteran bluesman Jimmy Witherspoon, cut a series of generally desultory solo albums. He recorded off and on after that, at times with the Animals, but has never come close to reaching the heights of his work with the early Animals and War. Burdon was always a riveting live performer, though, and he continued to tour with various incarnations of the Animals and as a solo act, branching out as a painter and author as well, and working in the studio when it suited him.

My Secret LifeBurdon continued on this journeyman path until well into the new millennium, recording such solid albums as 2004's My Secret Life and 2006's Soul of a Man. In 2012, he experienced an unexpected comeback when Bruce Springsteen made him a cornerstone of his keynote speech at South by Southwest. Burdon joined Springsteen on-stage and was soon in demand. First, he recorded an EP with the Ohio-based garage rockers the Greenhornes, and then he devoted himself to the full-length 'Til Your River Runs Dry, which received a high-profile launch in January 2013.
------------------------------
FROM JANCY

1. Live at the Club Gogo

Eric Burdon & The Animals


Eric Burdon & The Animals

2&3. EMI Comlete ANIMALS

Eric Burdon & The Animals

Eric Burdon & The Animals

Eric Burdon & The Animals

4. The 1965-1966 Sessions DECCA

Eric Burdon & The Animals

Eric Burdon & The Animals

5. Animalism plus

Eric Burdon & The Animals

Eric Burdon & The Animals
6 Winds Of  Change

Eric Burdon & The Animals

Eric Burdon & The Animals


7 The Twain Shall Meet

Eric Burdon & The Animals

Eric Burdon & The Animals


8 Love Is

Eric Burdon & The Animals

Eric Burdon & The Animals

9.Eric Burdon

Eric Burdon & The Animals

Eric Burdon & The Animals

10.The BBC Files 1965-1968

Eric Burdon & The Animals

Eric Burdon & The Animals

11 London 67 & Stockholm 68 Live

Eric Burdon & The Animals

Eric Burdon & The Animals




----------------------------

The Animals - Animalism   STEREO  (US-1966)  Plus

Eric Burdon & The Animals


01-All Night Long
02-Shake
03-The Other Side Of This Life
04-Rock Me Baby
05-Lucille
06-Smoke Stack Lightning
07-Hey Gyp
08-Hit The Road, Jack
09-Outcast
10-Louisana Blues
11-That's All I Am To You
12-Going Down Slow

And the "Bonus Hits"
13-Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood
14-Blue Feeling
15-Jailhouse Rock
16-Gonna Send You Back To Walker
17-Heartbreak Hotel
18-Work Song
19-A Girld Named Sandoz
20-Ain't That So
21-Greatfully Dead
22-Monterey
23-When I Was Young
24-San Franciscan Nights

-------------------------------

***

Eric Burdon And The Animals - Roadrunners! (1966 - 1968)

Eric Burdon And The Animals - Roadrunners! (1966 - 1968)

A 19-track collection of otherwise unavailable live performances from 1966-1968, taken from shows in Melbourne, Stockholm, London, and the '67 Monterey Pop Festival, as well as radio and television broadcasts. Most of this dates from the psychedelic version of the band, which will disappoint those who are primarily interested in the group's rock/R&B prime. It's quite a good relic, though, with rough and ready execution by both Burdon and the band, and some unusual R&B and psychedelic material alongside the versions of hits like "Inside Looking Out," "Monterey," "San Franciscan Nights," and "When I Was Young." Sound ranges from fair to very good.


Eric Burdon And The Animals - Roadrunners! (1966 - 1968)

Eric Burdon And The Animals - Roadrunners! (1966 - 1968)

Eric Burdon And The Animals - Roadrunners! (1966 - 1968)

Eric Burdon And The Animals - Roadrunners! (1966 - 1968)

The Animals (French EP  Box Collection) 1964-67 + Bonus + Flac + MP3The Animals -- The Mickie Most Years And More Eric Burdon & The Animals ‎– See See Rider (1966)The Animals - The Complete French CD EP 1964-1967Animals (Inside Looking Out) EP (1966) FRAnimals (Don't Bring Me Down) EP (1966)Animals (We.ve Gotta Get out of this Place) EP (1965) FRAnimals (Bring it on Home to me) EP (1965) (FR)Eric Burdon & The Animals Eric Burdon And The Animals - Roadrunners! (1966 - 1968)

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