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The Castaways - Liar, Liar (Best of the Castaways) USA






Best remembered for their garage-rock perennial "Liar Liar," the Castaways formed in 1962 around the nucleus of guitarist Roy Hensley, bassist Dick Roby and drummer Denny Craswell; originally founded simply to perform at a fraternity party, the group proved such a smashing success that it remained an ongoing concern, expanding to a quintet with the subsequent additions of lead guitarist Bob Folschow and keyboardist Jim Donna. The Castaways' lone hit, "Liar Liar" was written by Donna and released on the Soma label in 1965, reaching the number 12 slot on the U.S. charts on the strength of its inimitable echo-drenched vocals and wheezing keyboards. A series of follow-up efforts flopped, however, and despite an appearance in the 1967 film It's a Bikini World, the Castaways' career ground to a halt, although the band often performed live in the decades to follow.

The Castaways are a rock and roll band based in Minnesota that have been playing concerts, parties and weddings for years. Jim Donna (keyboards and vocals) is one of the original members of the band. It was his composition, Liar Liar that not only became a million selling song and landed in the top 10, but a song Robert credits as being influential to the sound of his then group, the Band of Joy. 

Bob Donna later joined the band on guitar and vocals with Rick Snider on drums and vocals, and Ralph Hintz on bass and vocals. In 2005 Jim Donna was inducted into the Minnesota Rock/Country Hall of Fame.

Their music has a high energy lively dance beat blended with the soul sounds of The Righteous Brothers. Their song selection runs the gamut of pop and classic rock, ballads to 50s and 60s favorites. 



One of the great one-hit wonders of the mid-'60s, the Castaways  with a catchy, garage sound best exemplified by their lone national hit, "Liar Liar." This 22-track anthology takes listeners through the band's entire history, right up to the present time, including a "Liar Liar 2000" remake. Along the way, the band goes through the customary stylistic changes (from garage to Beatles cops to soul to psychedelia) in search of that elusive second hit that most bands go through, trying new styles to fit the changing times until coming full circle back to their original sound. Great notes on the band's history and the new cuts brings a nice sense of closure to the package. 


Peter Nelson & The Castaways (NZ) - Down In The Mine (1965-1967)

Peter Nelson & The Castaways (NZ) - Down In The Mine  (1965-1967)

There are many bands called The Castaways - from the USA and the UK, etc. In the catalog of 45cat singles there are 20 of them ... Here is a rare & good band from New Zealand.



The Castaways 
    Peter Nelson (Lead Vocalist)
    Len Ormsby (Lead Guitar)
    Doug Petrie (Drums)
    Doug Henderson (Rhythm Guitar)
    Don Clarkson (Bass)
    Peter Gillette (Keyboards)

Peter Nelson and the Castaways originated from Christchurch. Peter's real name was Peter Trebilcock. They appeared on the local TV show "Teen Scene" there before basing themselves in Wellington. With this original line-up they recorded two singles "Baby Can I Take You Home"/"I'll Never Be Blue" and "Down The Road Apiece"/"I'll Go Crazy" in 1965. They were good examples of R&B from that time. Unlike other New Zealand bands of the era the Castaways chose to mine a rich vein of obscure tracks of R&B and mixed them with their own originals.

It was the next single that they were best known for. It was "Down In The Mine"/"So Don't Go". "Down In The Mine" was written by Peter Hindmarsh, who was the bass player for the Wellington band, the Premiers, in the early sixties. Around this time Doug Rowe, from Palmerston North's Saints, replaced Don Clarkson on bass in 1965.

One more single was released, "Goin' Out Of My Mind"/"Skye Boat Song", before the group left for Australia in 1966. Following the groups arrival in Australia, Peter Nelson left them to find fame as a solo artist, heading to the lucrative scene in Hong Kong. Peter was replaced by a new vocalist called Frankie Stevens, brother of Jon Stevens and they changed their name to the Castaways.

Frankie Stevens was born Francis Donald McKechnie Stevenson in Wellington, New Zealand in 1950. His mother was Maori, and his father Scottish. He has 10 brothers and sisters. One of his younger brothers is Jon Stevens, who has also had a very successful career in his own right.

Frankie knew from an early age that singing was going to be his career, commencing when he sang with the school band in Upper Hutt at the age of thirteen. This was in 1962 when Wayne Mason formed his first band with classmates from Heretaunga College. Calling themselves the Southern Auroras, they consisted of Frank Stevenson, as he called himself then, on vocals, Martin Hope on lead guitar, Les Gruebner on bass, Jim McEwan on drums, and Wayne Mason on rhythm guitar. As a group they never really got going, but it was a sufficient experience to learn their musical basics. This group was the embryo band for Wayne Mason and he evolved it over the years into what would later become the Fourmyula.

Frankie's professional career began at the age of 16 when he moved to Sydney, Australia in 1966. At the same time as Frankie went to Australia, another New Zealand group was doing the same. They were Peter Nelson and the Castaways and following the groups arrival in Australia, Peter Nelson left them to find fame as a solo artist. Peter was replaced by new vocalist Frankie Stevens, and they changed their name to the Castaways.

As the Castaways they released the singles "Any Little Bit"/"Early Morning" in 1967 and "One More Fool"/"Baby What I Mean" and "Angelica"/"Love Is A Hurtin' Thing"  for EMI in Australia before returning to New Zealand in 1968. After a couple of years of touring Australia and New Zealand, he left the group to try his luck as a solo artist.

There were still two singles to be released as Peter Nelson and the Castaways. They were "Knock On Wood"/"Old Man Mose" and "At A Time Like This"/"A Little Lovin' Somethin' ", both released in 1967. As the Castaways they released the singles "Any Little Bit"/"Early Morning" in 1967 and "One More Fool"/"Baby What I Mean" and "Angelica"/"Love Is A Hurtin' Thing"  for EMI in Australia before returning to New Zealand in 1968. During their time in Australia, Len Ormsby was replaced by Reno Tehei, Doug Petrie by ex-Twilights drummer Laurie Pryor, and Peter Gillette by Lance Dixon.

Down In The Mine


Peter Nelson & The Castaways (NZ) - Down In The Mine  (1965-1967)



The Castaways ( UK) - The Tony Rivers Collection

The Castaways ( UK) - The Tony Rivers Collection


Tony Rivers and the Castaways started life as the Cutaways in Dagenham, Essex, approximately 1960. The early line-up was, Vic Larkins & Micky Johnson, gtrs, Ray Brown, bass, and Brian 'Shirt' Talbot on drums. Lead singer at one time, was Bobby Rio, (who later went on to record with Joe Meek). I became lead singer at the end of 1961, having been approached by Ray Brown, and other members of the group, who had been watching me get up to sing with a group at the Cherry Tree pub in Dagenham on a Sunday lunchtime. I’d never been in a group at that time, but I had met the lead singer whilst I was working at Butlins’ Holiday Camp in Clacton. He was on holiday with 'Terry Venables' (who one day would become the England Football manager), he told me that he sang in a group (Joe & the Teens) that played every Sunday lunchtime, at a pub in Dagenham, and when I finished the Butlins’ season, I should go and see them play, which I did. I'd get up and sing two songs, while he walked round the pub with a pint glass, collecting money for the group! Ray Brown asked me if I fancied singing with his group, ‘the Cutaways’ at the Royal Oak pub that night, I said yes, and although there were more people on stage, than in the audience, I enjoyed it enough to say yes again, when they asked if I'd like to join the group. This was probably the first real step I'd taken on the road to being a 'singer'!! I'd taken a couple of small steps during my time at Butlins’, like the occasional 'guest spot' with the Terry Young Six, who played the Rock' n 'Calypso ballroom every night. This was a very good group with some members who went on to better things later, such as, John Rostill, who, not too long after, joined the Shadows and had many hits with them, and even went on to write BIG HITS for artists like, Olivia Newton John, and a certain Elvis Presley. This was also my first meeting with Bruce Baxter, lead guitar, playing all those James Burton 'licks', and who I was to work with many times in the 70's. I also made an appearance at a dance hall in Clacton. My friend, Jock Smith and I had gone to see a group called Dave Curtis and the Tremors (a good 60's name) and I said I'd like to get up and sing with them. Now I needed a name. Tony Thompson was, and is my real name, but that didn't sound cool enough for rock'n'roll. I ended up with the name Rivers. We took this from a Decca records chart that was on the wall. No.6 was Pat Boone’s 'Moody River'. That's how I got the name. I was introduced on stage later, "All the way from London -Tony Rivers"! So now I’m in Tony Rivers and the Cutaways, playing pubs and clubs etc. Every now and then though, we'd play a lunchtime session at the Merry Fiddlers pub, pack our equipment into our van, and head off to the Granada Theatre at East Ham or Walthamstow to play between the films! I'd seen Buddy Holly with the Crickets, on both these stages, this was big stuff! Clem Cattini was always on these gigs, playing drums, with Roger LaVern on organ, us on one side of the stage, another band on the other side, Clem and Roger in the middle, half of the Tornadoes to be!! We'd all play alternately! Bizarre! It could never happen these days, but then, anything was possible. Many years later, Clem, who had now, become a top session drummer, and I, would be working together on several different things i.e. when I became a producer at CBS records in the early 70's, he was one of the CBS 'mafia', and was one of the musicians Mike Smith, head of A/R told me I had to book for the sessions. No wonder all those CBS records sounded the same! A few years after that, we recorded together again, with Cliff Richard, on ‘Devil Woman’ and other hits, and even ended up in Cliffs' band together, for a while. 

The Castaways first manager was a great fellow called Benny Cooper, a former drummer with the ‘Squadronnaires’. He made sure we acted professionally and rehearsed hard (wife Joyce keeping us supplied with tea and coffee), these were good lessons to learn and stayed with me. Ask any of the Castaways! We turned 'professional' within 8 months of my joining the band, bought a van, painted out the words on the side ‘Passingham’s Pork Sausages’ and in claret and blue (of course) wrote Tony Rivers and the Castaways! Our first trip in the van was, our first 'tour of Scotland'. The trouble was, after about a couple of miles of leaving home, the boys in the back were hammering on the sides to stop. We hadn't realised that it was a sealed unit when the doors closed! No one could breathe. We had to break a tiny window in the rear door to let air in. We'd only gone up the road and Scotland seemed a long way off. We didn't even know where it was! Great days! Terry Oates became our manager around this time and got us our first ‘recording tests’ at Decca, and then EMI. 

The line-up for the recording tests was, Ray Brown, Vic Larkins, ‘Shirt’, Mickey Johnson and me on lead vocals, in other words, TR & the Cutaways. We recorded two tunes, one was, the Ricky Nelson version of 'Summertime' and the other was, 'Peter Gunn'. I found out later that Terry Oates wanted us to be an instrumental group, like the Shadows! Where would that have left me? I've never let him forget that! I think it was Terry who suggested we change our name to the Castaways, which sounded better with Tony Rivers, (not that you'd get shipwrecked up a river, would you?) It seemed to work. We must have passed the 'test' and were given a recording date in Abbey Rd Studios, and told which songs our A&R manager (John Burgess) had found for us to record, we rehearsed 'til we knew them backwards, then---- Abbey Rd!! Not that Abbey Rd studio’s in those days, had the reputation that it was to gain from the phonomenal success of ‘The Beatles’, but for us, a daunting prospect nevertheless. 


The Castaways ( UK) - The Tony Rivers Collection

The Castaways (US) - Liar, Liar (Best of the Castaways)

The Castaways (US)  - Liar, Liar (Best of the Castaways)


Best remembered for their garage-rock perennial "Liar Liar," the Castaways formed in 1962 around the nucleus of guitarist Roy Hensley, bassist Dick Roby and drummer Denny Craswell; originally founded simply to perform at a fraternity party, the group proved such a smashing success that it remained an ongoing concern, expanding to a quintet with the subsequent additions of lead guitarist Bob Folschow and keyboardist Jim Donna. The Castaways' lone hit, "Liar Liar" was written by Donna and released on the Soma label in 1965, reaching the number 12 slot on the U.S. charts on the strength of its inimitable echo-drenched vocals and wheezing keyboards. A series of follow-up efforts flopped, however, and despite an appearance in the 1967 film It's a Bikini World, the Castaways' career ground to a halt, although the band often performed live in the decades to follow.

The Castaways are a rock and roll band based in Minnesota that have been playing concerts, parties and weddings for years. Jim Donna (keyboards and vocals) is one of the original members of the band. It was his composition, Liar Liar that not only became a million selling song and landed in the top 10, but a song Robert credits as being influential to the sound of his then group, the Band of Joy. 

Bob Donna later joined the band on guitar and vocals with Rick Snider on drums and vocals, and Ralph Hintz on bass and vocals. In 2005 Jim Donna was inducted into the Minnesota Rock/Country Hall of Fame.

Their music has a high energy lively dance beat blended with the soul sounds of The Righteous Brothers. Their song selection runs the gamut of pop and classic rock, ballads to 50s and 60s favorites. 

 www.thecastawaysrock.com


The Castaways - Liar, Liar (Best of the Castaways) (1999)


1. Liar, Liar  
2. Sam  
3. Goodbye Babe  
4. A Man's Gotta Be A Man  
5. She's A Girl In Love  
6. Why Should This Happen To Me  
7. Lead Me On  
8. Everytime  
9. Watching The Time Go By  
10. Work Song  
11. (I) Feel So Fine  
12. Hit The Road Jack  
13. Walking In Different Circles  
14. Just On High  
15. Lavender Popcorn  
16. What Kind Of Face  
17. Words On Fire  
18. Bad Hair Day  
19. Lucille  
20. That Was Then, This Is Now  
21. The Music That I'm Making  
22. Liar, Liar 2000 

The Castaways (US)  - Liar, Liar (Best of the Castaways)


Review by Cub Koda 
One of the great one-hit wonders of the mid-'60s, the Castaways were a Minneapolis group with a catchy, garage sound best exemplified by their lone national hit, "Liar Liar." This 22-track anthology takes listeners through the band's entire history, right up to the present time, including a "Liar Liar 2000" remake. Along the way, the band goes through the customary stylistic changes (from garage to Beatles cops to soul to psychedelia) in search of that elusive second hit that most bands go through, trying new styles to fit the changing times until coming full circle back to their original sound. Great notes on the band's history and the new cuts brings a nice sense of closure to the package. 
 

The Castaways - Any Little Bit - Singles (1967-1968) (2017 NZ-Australia)

The Castaways - Any Little Bit - Singles (1967-1968) (2017 NZ-Australia)


The Castaways - Any Little Bit - Singles (1967-1968) (2017 NZ-Australia)

There are many bands called The Castaways - from the USA and the UK, etc. In the catalog of 45cat singles there are 20 of them ... Here is a rare & good band from New Zealand.
The Castaways (NZ-Australia)
Line-Up:
    Peter Nelson (Lead Vocalist)
    Len Ormsby (Lead Guitar)
    Doug Petrie (Drums)
    Doug Henderson (Rhythm Guitar)
    Don Clarkson (Bass)
    Peter Gillette (Keyboards)
Peter Nelson and the Castaways originated from Christchurch. Peter's real name was Peter Trebilcock. They appeared on the local TV show "Teen Scene" there before basing themselves in Wellington. With this original line-up they recorded two singles "Baby Can I Take You Home"/"I'll Never Be Blue" and "Down The Road Apiece"/"I'll Go Crazy" in 1965. They were good examples of R&B from that time. Unlike other New Zealand bands of the era the Castaways chose to mine a rich vein of obscure tracks of R&B and mixed them with their own originals.
It was the next single that they were best known for. It was "Down In The Mine"/"So Don't Go". "Down In The Mine" was written by Peter Hindmarsh, who was the bass player for the Wellington band, the Premiers, in the early sixties. Around this time Doug Rowe, from Palmerston North's Saints, replaced Don Clarkson on bass in 1965.
One more single was released, "Goin' Out Of My Mind"/"Skye Boat Song", before the group left for Australia in 1966. Following the groups arrival in Australia, Peter Nelson left them to find fame as a solo artist, heading to the lucrative scene in Hong Kong. Peter was replaced by a new vocalist called Frankie Stevens, brother of Jon Stevens and they changed their name to the Castaways.
Frankie Stevens was born Francis Donald McKechnie Stevenson in Wellington, New Zealand in 1950. His mother was Maori, and his father Scottish. He has 10 brothers and sisters. One of his younger brothers is Jon Stevens, who has also had a very successful career in his own right.
Frankie knew from an early age that singing was going to be his career, commencing when he sang with the school band in Upper Hutt at the age of thirteen. This was in 1962 when Wayne Mason formed his first band with classmates from Heretaunga College. Calling themselves the Southern Auroras, they consisted of Frank Stevenson, as he called himself then, on vocals, Martin Hope on lead guitar, Les Gruebner on bass, Jim McEwan on drums, and Wayne Mason on rhythm guitar. As a group they never really got going, but it was a sufficient experience to learn their musical basics. This group was the embryo band for Wayne Mason and he evolved it over the years into what would later become the Fourmyula.
Frankie's professional career began at the age of 16 when he moved to Sydney, Australia in 1966. At the same time as Frankie went to Australia, another New Zealand group was doing the same. They were Peter Nelson and the Castaways and following the groups arrival in Australia, Peter Nelson left them to find fame as a solo artist. Peter was replaced by new vocalist Frankie Stevens, and they changed their name to the Castaways.
As the Castaways they released the singles "Any Little Bit"/"Early Morning" in 1967 and "One More Fool"/"Baby What I Mean" and "Angelica"/"Love Is A Hurtin' Thing"  for EMI in Australia before returning to New Zealand in 1968. After a couple of years of touring Australia and New Zealand, he left the group to try his luck as a solo artist.
There were still two singles to be released as Peter Nelson and the Castaways. They were "Knock On Wood"/"Old Man Mose" and "At A Time Like This"/"A Little Lovin' Somethin' ", both released in 1967. As the Castaways they released the singles "Any Little Bit"/"Early Morning" in 1967 and "One More Fool"/"Baby What I Mean" and "Angelica"/"Love Is A Hurtin' Thing"  for EMI in Australia before returning to New Zealand in 1968. During their time in Australia, Len Ormsby was replaced by Reno Tehei, Doug Petrie by ex-Twilights drummer Laurie Pryor, and Peter Gillette by Lance Dixon.


Tony Rivers & The Castaways - Birth Of Harmonies

Tony Rivers & The Castaways - Birth Of Harmonies


Tony Rivers and the Castaways started life as the Cutaways in Dagenham, Essex, approximately 1960. The early line-up was, Vic Larkins & Micky Johnson, gtrs, Ray Brown, bass, and Brian 'Shirt' Talbot on drums. Lead singer at one time, was Bobby Rio, (who later went on to record with Joe Meek). I became lead singer at the end of 1961, having been approached by Ray Brown, and other members of the group, who had been watching me get up to sing with a group at the Cherry Tree pub in Dagenham on a Sunday lunchtime. I’d never been in a group at that time, but I had met the lead singer whilst I was working at Butlins’ Holiday Camp in Clacton. He was on holiday with 'Terry Venables' (who one day would become the England Football manager), he told me that he sang in a group (Joe & the Teens) that played every Sunday lunchtime, at a pub in Dagenham, and when I finished the Butlins’ season, I should go and see them play, which I did. I'd get up and sing two songs, while he walked round the pub with a pint glass, collecting money for the group! Ray Brown asked me if I fancied singing with his group, ‘the Cutaways’ at the Royal Oak pub that night, I said yes, and although there were more people on stage, than in the audience, I enjoyed it enough to say yes again, when they asked if I'd like to join the group. This was probably the first real step I'd taken on the road to being a 'singer'!! I'd taken a couple of small steps during my time at Butlins’, like the occasional 'guest spot' with the Terry Young Six, who played the Rock' n 'Calypso ballroom every night. This was a very good group with some members who went on to better things later, such as, John Rostill, who, not too long after, joined the Shadows and had many hits with them, and even went on to write BIG HITS for artists like, Olivia Newton John, and a certain Elvis Presley. This was also my first meeting with Bruce Baxter, lead guitar, playing all those James Burton 'licks', and who I was to work with many times in the 70's. I also made an appearance at a dance hall in Clacton. My friend, Jock Smith and I had gone to see a group called Dave Curtis and the Tremors (a good 60's name) and I said I'd like to get up and sing with them. Now I needed a name. Tony Thompson was, and is my real name, but that didn't sound cool enough for rock'n'roll. I ended up with the name Rivers. We took this from a Decca records chart that was on the wall. No.6 was Pat Boone’s 'Moody River'. That's how I got the name. I was introduced on stage later, "All the way from London -Tony Rivers"! So now I’m in Tony Rivers and the Cutaways, playing pubs and clubs etc. Every now and then though, we'd play a lunchtime session at the Merry Fiddlers pub, pack our equipment into our van, and head off to the Granada Theatre at East Ham or Walthamstow to play between the films! I'd seen Buddy Holly with the Crickets, on both these stages, this was big stuff! Clem Cattini was always on these gigs, playing drums, with Roger LaVern on organ, us on one side of the stage, another band on the other side, Clem and Roger in the middle, half of the Tornadoes to be!! We'd all play alternately! Bizarre! It could never happen these days, but then, anything was possible. Many years later, Clem, who had now, become a top session drummer, and I, would be working together on several different things i.e. when I became a producer at CBS records in the early 70's, he was one of the CBS 'mafia', and was one of the musicians Mike Smith, head of A/R told me I had to book for the sessions. No wonder all those CBS records sounded the same! A few years after that, we recorded together again, with Cliff Richard, on ‘Devil Woman’ and other hits, and even ended up in Cliffs' band together, for a while. 

The Castaways first manager was a great fellow called Benny Cooper, a former drummer with the ‘Squadronnaires’. He made sure we acted professionally and rehearsed hard (wife Joyce keeping us supplied with tea and coffee), these were good lessons to learn and stayed with me. Ask any of the Castaways! We turned 'professional' within 8 months of my joining the band, bought a van, painted out the words on the side ‘Passingham’s Pork Sausages’ and in claret and blue (of course) wrote Tony Rivers and the Castaways! Our first trip in the van was, our first 'tour of Scotland'. The trouble was, after about a couple of miles of leaving home, the boys in the back were hammering on the sides to stop. We hadn't realised that it was a sealed unit when the doors closed! No one could breathe. We had to break a tiny window in the rear door to let air in. We'd only gone up the road and Scotland seemed a long way off. We didn't even know where it was! Great days! Terry Oates became our manager around this time and got us our first ‘recording tests’ at Decca, and then EMI. 

The line-up for the recording tests was, Ray Brown, Vic Larkins, ‘Shirt’, Mickey Johnson and me on lead vocals, in other words, TR & the Cutaways. We recorded two tunes, one was, the Ricky Nelson version of 'Summertime' and the other was, 'Peter Gunn'. I found out later that Terry Oates wanted us to be an instrumental group, like the Shadows! Where would that have left me? I've never let him forget that! I think it was Terry who suggested we change our name to the Castaways, which sounded better with Tony Rivers, (not that you'd get shipwrecked up a river, would you?) It seemed to work. We must have passed the 'test' and were given a recording date in Abbey Rd Studios, and told which songs our A&R manager (John Burgess) had found for us to record, we rehearsed 'til we knew them backwards, then---- Abbey Rd!! Not that Abbey Rd studio’s in those days, had the reputation that it was to gain from the phonomenal success of ‘The Beatles’, but for us, a daunting prospect nevertheless. 

****


http://www.craftweb.org/web/tony/cast_disc.html

In 1968 the band disbanded and Rivers formed Harmony Grass with former band mates. Their single "Move in a Little Closer" reached No. 24 on the UK Singles Chart in January 1969. They released one album, This Is Us, on RCA, and gave concerts in the UK (including at London's Marquee Club).[5] Rivers left to go solo in 1970.

Tony Rivers & The Castaways - Birth Of Harmonies  (Compilation1998)

Tony Rivers & The Castaways - Birth Of Harmonies

Tony Rivers & The Castaways - Birth Of Harmonies

Tony Rivers & The Castaways - Birth Of Harmonies

Tony Rivers & The Castaways - Birth Of Harmonies

Tony Rivers & The Castaways - Birth Of Harmonies

Tony Rivers & The Castaways - Birth Of Harmonies




The Castaways - Liar, Liar (Best of the Castaways) USAPeter Nelson & The Castaways (NZ) - Down In The Mine  (1965-1967)The Castaways ( UK) - The Tony Rivers Collection The Castaways (US)  - Liar, Liar (Best of the Castaways)The Castaways - Any Little Bit - Singles (1967-1968) (2017 NZ-Australia)Tony Rivers & The Castaways - Birth Of Harmonies

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