close

Old Melodies ... | category: The Crickets

home

Old Melodies ...

Beat, Garage,Psychedelic... and much more in one place.

allmusic-wingsofdream.blogspot.com

The Crickets - Well... All Right (The Crickets Collection) 1992-3

The Crickets -  Well... All Right (The Crickets Collection) 1992-3


The Crickets were a group with two careers, one that lasted less than a year-and-a-half, and another that continued for decades. Originally formed by singer and guitarist Buddy Holly, drummer Jerry Allison, and bassist Joe B. Mauldin, the Crickets went from being Holly's backing musicians to a self-contained band when they re-recorded a song that Holly had already cut under his own name to avoid violating an earlier contract. The Crickets went on to a successful run of hits with Holly -- including "Maybe Baby," "Not Fade Away," and "That'll Be the Day" -- until his death in 1959. After that, the Crickets, joined by guitarist Sonny Curtis, went on to a long run recording on their own as well as backing other artists, most notably Bobby Vee and the Everly Brothers. Their first post-Holly album, In Style with the Crickets, included the original version of Curtis' song "I Fought the Law," but by the mid-'70s, they had walked away from recording and primarily performed live, especially after the 1978 film The Buddy Holly Story revived interest in their former frontman. The Crickets came back in 1988 with T Shirt, which was produced in part by longtime fan Paul McCartney, and 2004's The Crickets & Their Buddies found them covering their classics with help from Eric Clapton, Waylon Jennings, John Prine, Graham Nash, and many more.
The "Crickets" started out as a ruse. In 1956, Buddy Holly signed a contract with Decca Records, but after two sessions in Nashville, no one was happy with the results, and Holly and Decca parted ways. After finding a more sympathetic producer in Norman Petty, Holly, Jerry Allison, and Joe B. Mauldin decamped to Petty's studio in Clovis, New Mexico, and, among other things, cut a new version of one of Holly's Decca efforts, "That'll Be the Day." Coral Records was interested in Holly's Clovis recordings, but the terms of the Decca contract meant he couldn't re-record "That'll Be the Day" under his own name, so the new version was credited to the Crickets. The Crickets' "That'll Be the Day" became a Number One hit in 1957, and for the next 15 months, there were records by the Crickets and records by Buddy Holly -- which were virtually interchangeable -- and on-stage they were billed as Buddy Holly & the Crickets. By the end of 1958, however, the references to "Buddy Holly & the Crickets" were becoming valid in the worst possible way. Holly's shifting and expanding musical interests, coupled with his move to New York and marriage to Maria Elena Santiago, and the differing relationships that the three had with Petty, who was now their manager, led to a split between Holly and his bandmates in the months immediately prior to Holly's death in a plane crash on February 3, 1959.

The result of their split was a separate existence for the Crickets. Jerry Allison became the de facto leader of the group, and they were soon a quartet, with Sonny Curtis on guitar and Earl Sinks as lead singer. In 1959, still managed and produced by Norman Petty, they recorded "Love's Made a Fool of You" backed with "Someone, Someone," which failed to chart. Their next serious assault on the charts -- a version of Curtis' "I Fought the Law" cut for Coral Records -- vanished without a trace in 1959, and their rendition of "More Than I Can Say" also failed to find an audience for them, though it did wonders for Bobby Vee (and, by extension, for Curtis as its composer). They recorded a handful of singles for Coral Records, and later signed to Liberty Records with Jerry Naylor in the lead singer spot (sometimes switching off with Curtis), in addition to recording with Buddy Holly soundalike Bobby Vee.

The group recorded for Liberty for four years, from 1961 through 1965, even doing their versions of several Beatles songs, but apart from a pair of minor hits, "My Little Girl" and "Please Don't Ever Change," were unable to generate any enthusiasm. One of Naylor's successors, David Box, died in a plane crash in 1964. They did find some lingering success in England, where they headlined shows as well as serving as a backing band for the Everly Brothers, and the group even managed to appear in two jukebox movies on either side of the Atlantic, Just for Fun (1963) in England (doing "My Little Girl" and "Teardrops Feel Like Rain") and The Girls on the Beach (1965) in America (doing "La Bamba"). By the end of the '60s, Mauldin had left music while Allison was singing lead; he and Curtis were also working as session musicians, and Curtis scored a huge success at the dawn of the '70s as the composer of "Love Is All Around," the theme song for The Mary Tyler Moore Show.

Too Much Monday MorningAllison and Curtis were the core of the group in the early '70s, mostly working as a touring act rather than a recording outfit, though new records did appear on various labels, including Mercury and MCA. In the wake of the revival of interest in Holly's music at the end of the '70s, thanks in part to the 1978 movie The Buddy Holly Story, the Crickets re-formed on a steady basis, with Joe B. Mauldin returning to the lineup after more than a decade out of music. In 1986, Curtis left the fold to re-establish himself as a solo performer, and was replaced by Gordon Payne on vocals. In 1988, they recorded the single "T-Shirt," produced by noted fan Paul McCartney, which became a minor hit and led to the release of an LP of the same name from Epic Records. The British label Carlton Records issued Too Much Monday Morning in 1996, which included guest vocals from Texas country-folk artist Nanci Griffith. In 2004, the Crickets released The Crickets & their Buddies, in which they re-recorded a number of their Holly-era hits with notable guest stars, among them Eric Clapton, John Prine, Rodney Crowell, Graham Nash, Bobby Vee, and Waylon Jennings (whose contribution was recorded shortly before his death). After the death of Joe B. Mauldin in 2015 and the advancing age of the other Crickets, the band faded away from both recording and live work, but a steady flow of archival reissues and the group's induction into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 2012 kept their music and memory alive. In 2018, the British Not Now label issued The Crickets Story, which collected the group's complete recordings from 1957 to 1962

The Crickets -  Well... All Right (The Crickets Collection) 1992-3



Bobby Vee & The Crickets - Bobby Vee Meets The Crickets (1962)

Bobby Vee & The Crickets - Bobby Vee Meets The Crickets (1962)


Launching his career as a fill-in for the recently deceased Buddy Holly, Bobby Vee scored several pop hits during the early '60s, that notorious period of popular music sandwiched between the birth of rock & roll and the rise of the British Invasion. Though a few of his singles -- "Rubber Ball," for one -- were as innocuous as anything else from the era, Vee had a knack for infectious Brill Building pop, thanks to his ebullient voice as well as the cadre of songwriters standing behind him.

Born in Fargo, North Dakota in 1943, Robert Thomas Velline was still in his teens when he formed his first combo, the Shadows, with his brother Bill and their friend Bob Korum. The trio were playing around the area when their big break came, at the expense of one of Bobby's musical idols; the Winter Dance Party package tour, with Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens, and the Big Bopper were on their way to Fargo when their plane went down in Iowa, killing all three. The Shadows were scheduled to play the date instead of Holly, and several months later, producer Tommy "Snuff" Garrett supervised their first recording session and the release of the single "Suzie Baby" on Soma Records. Liberty/RCA picked up the single later in the year, and though it just barely scraped the pop charts, the label kept plugging with Vee as a solo act, recording him on Adam Faith's "What Do You Want?," which also failed to move.

With the collective might of the Brill Building behind him, though, Vee was guaranteed to make it; his third single, "Devil or Angel," hit the Top Ten in mid-1960, followed by "Rubber Ball" later that year. One year later, Vee's biggest hit, "Take Good Care of My Baby," spent three weeks at number one, followed by the number two "Run to Him." His fame appeared to wane after the 1962 Top Ten single "The Night Has a Thousand Eyes," due in large part to the success of the Beatles and other English acts. Vee appeared in several movies (Just for Fun, Play It Cool) and briefly tried to cash in on the British phenomenon -- with the disappointing Bobby Vee Sings the New Sound from England! -- but also recorded songs by his early influences, including Buddy Holly and the Crickets. Vee continued to chart throughout the '60s, and even hit the Top Ten again in 1967 with "Come Back When You Grow Up," but after a brief attempt at more serious recordings, he hit the rock & roll oldies circuit. He died in 2016 at the age of 73.



Bobby Vee Meets The Crickets is a cross-over rock and roll album that brings singer Bobby Vee together with the Crickets. It was Vee's 6th album and The Crickets' second release following the departure and subsequent death of their front man, Buddy Holly. The album contains new versions of three songs written by or recorded by Holly—Peggy Sue, Bo Diddley, and Well...All Right—and a host of cover versions of 1950s rock'n'roll songs by artists like Little Richard and Chuck Berry. Originally released as an LP record on July 14, 1962, the album was re-released on CD in 1991, with bonus tracks not featured on the original album.


Bobby Vee & The Crickets - Bobby Vee Meets The Crickets (1991)

Bobby Vee & The Crickets - Bobby Vee Meets The Crickets (1962)

The reissue of this enjoyable album includes ten bonus tracks, including alternate takes, unreleased songs


The Crickets - A Collection (1965)

The Crickets - A Collection (1965)


The Crickets - A Collection (Liberty LBY 1258)

The Crickets - A Collection (1965)


01 - La Bamba
02 - All Over You
03 - Everybody's Got A Little Problem
04 - I Think I've Caught The Blues
05 - We Gotta Get Together
06 - Playboy
07 - Lonely Avenue
08 - My Little Girl
09 - Teardrops Fall Like Rain
10 - Right Or Wrong
11 - You Can't Be In Between
12 - Don't Try To Change Me
13 - Lost And Alone
14 - I'm Not A Bad Guy

US American band, which started in the 1950s with members: Buddy Holly (real name: Charles Hardin Holley) (vocals/guitar), Jerry Allison (drums), Niki Sullivan (guitar) and Joe Mauldin (bass). Member Niki Sullivan left in 1958 and Buddy Holly died in 1959. Afterwards the band was kept alive by Jerry Allison, who still recorded and toured with various line-ups, including some with the early sixties personnel.



Bobby Vee - Bobby Vee With The...

Bobby Vee - Bobby Vee With The...

Bobby Vee With The...

Bobby Vee & The Strangers - Look At Me Girl (1966)

The Strangers studio group behind Bobby Vee on several recordings. 

Bobby Vee - Bobby Vee With The...


Bobby Vee & The Crickets - Bobby Vee Meets The Crickets

Bobby Vee - Bobby Vee With The...

Bobby Vee & The Shadows - The Early Rockin' Years (1995)

Bobby Vee - Bobby Vee With The...


Bobby Vee & The Ventures - Bobby Vee Meets The Ventures

Bobby Vee - Bobby Vee With The...

Buddy Holly & The Crickets - The ''Chirping'' Crickets (1957)

Buddy Holly & The Crickets - The ''Chirping'' Crickets (1957)

The debut album by the Crickets and the only one featuring Buddy Holly released during his lifetime, The "Chirping" Crickets contains the group's number one single "That'll Be the Day" and its Top Ten hit "Oh, Boy!." Other Crickets classics include "Not Fade Away," "Maybe Baby," and "I'm Looking for Someone to Love." The rest of the 12 tracks are not up to the standard set by those five, but those five are among the best rock & roll songs of the 1950s or ever, making this one of the most significant album debuts in rock & roll history, ranking with Elvis Presley and Meet the Beatles.

Buddy Holly & The Crickets - The ''Chirping'' Crickets (1957)

The Crickets - In Style WIth The Crickets (1960)

The Crickets - In Style WIth The Crickets (1960)
The sole album done by the Crickets without Buddy Holly and prior to their move to Liberty Records is superior to most of what they did for Liberty, and it's certainly closer in sound to Buddy Holly's late-1950s discs. It's not the same as hearing Buddy Holly: he's a singer/songwriter/guitarist that cannot be replaced. It is, nevertheless, good Tex-Mex rock, particularly on the tunes where Sonny Curtis had a hand in the songwriting. By far the most significant cut is the original version of "I Fought the Law," an arrangement pretty close to that of Bobby Fuller's classic 1966 hit version, but not as full and punchy, particularly in the backup vocals. This LP was definitely influential on the Bobby Fuller Four, as they covered no less than three of the songs: "I Fought the Law," Sonny Curtis' "Baby, My Heart," and "Love's Made a Fool of You," which made the Top 30 in the U.K. The other cuts are not as strong (particularly the covers of "Great Balls of Fire" and "Rockin' Pneumonia and the Boogie Woogie Flu"), but they're still honest and true -- something that can't be said of a lot of famous groups that have decided to keep on recording when the star of the show becomes unavailable. The sweet ballad "More Than I Can Say" would become a #2 hit for Leo Sayer in 1980. The German CD reissue on MCA adds six bonus cuts from non-LP singles and outtakes, which are definitely worth having and were otherwise only available on the German compilation Rare Items, 1959-60. These include the original version of "Someone, Someone," taken to #2 in the U.K. by Brian Poole and the Tremeloes in 1964, and "Don'Cha Know," covered by the Searchers.

The Crickets - In Style WIth The Crickets (1960)


The Crickets -  Well... All Right (The Crickets Collection) 1992-3Bobby Vee & The Crickets - Bobby Vee Meets The Crickets (1962)The Crickets - A Collection (1965)Bobby Vee - Bobby Vee With The...Buddy Holly & The Crickets - The ''Chirping'' Crickets (1957)The Crickets - In Style WIth The Crickets (1960)The Crickets - Crickets FileThe Crickets - Still In StyleThe Crickets - The Liberty Years, EMI Legends Of Rock N' Roll Series The Crickets ‎– Please Don't Ever Change 1961-1962

Report "Old Melodies ..."

Are you sure you want to report this post for ?

Cancel
×